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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at five. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's �*pretending' to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland set to be relaxed next week. face coverings will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. mps back a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by four billion pounds — charities say it will have
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a devastating impact for the world's poor. everybody understands why the permit needed to get a lot of money to the pandemic. the pandemic has affected countries all over the world. and, the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera — and is reported to be thriving. two days after england's euros final defeat, the row over the online racist abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings says the home secretary priti patel "stoked the fire" by refusing to criticise fans who booed the england team for taking the knee after she previously described it as "gesture politics".
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ms patel has condemned the racist abuse players have faced online following the match, and the government has defended her — saying she fully understood the issues of racism having been a victim of "appalling online abuse" herself. and later today the prime minister will meet social media companies and reiterate the urgent need for action against online abuse. nesta mcgregor reports. politicians, footballers — professions where a career can be defined whether you go to the right or to the left. and rashford has missed! two professions now at the centre of a racism dispute. i know that the whole house willjoin me in condemning the sickening racist abuse directed last night at our heroic england football team on social media. soon after, england defender tyrone mings, who featured at euro 2020, refused the home secretary's support. on twitter he responded to her,
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claiming she had failed to back the squad's the anti—racism message in taking a knee. mings said the minister had stoked the fire ahead of the tournament by calling taking the knee "gesture politics", and now she was pretending to be disgusted. ms patel has yet to comment further. although taking a knee has been contentious, for some the argument that politics and sport should remain separate seems contradictory. the people that run this country are coming out and saying. booing a gesture that the players are taking — they're not condemning that. so how can you not condemn that but then come out and say it's about the social media? sort your own house out first. sort your own house out first and then you can start talking about other people and other organisations. you can't say one thing and not do the other. it just screams hypocrisy. social media companies continue
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to say they are doing everything they can to combat online abuse, although the sheer numbers using it globally makes it a tough task. the government meanwhile says it will start fining social media platforms if they fail to act. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups. that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. england's current squad has been described as the most diverse ever. players socially aware, amplified voices for those in the stands. captain harry kane saying those who abuse its members are not welcomed at games. this mural of marcus rashford here in south manchester was defaced hours after his penalty miss on sunday, but since then hundreds of people have turned up
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to post good luck messages of thanks and support. last night, the manchester united striker tweeted he can apologise for missing a spot kick but won't apologise for the colour of his skin. the mural is currently being restored, but restoring the confidence of the young england players affected by this could take much longer. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. and our correspondent nesta mcgregor joins me now from withington. at joins me now from withington. that mural of marcl it's at that mural of marcus rashard. it's quite busy there is an? what's happening evening?— happening evening? reader, that mirror has now— happening evening? reader, that mirror has now been _ happening evening? reader, that mirror has now been 100% - happening evening? reader, that mirror has now been 100% fully l mirror has now been 100% fully restored. like you say, very very busy. i've been here since mid day and this has been the scene all day. hundreds and hundreds of people showing up to show their support. remember this mirror was defaced hours after marcus rashard missed that penalty kick during england's euro 2020 loss to italy. since then
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it's been restored and as well as the restoration we have thousands of messages. things like love not hate, plenty of love hearts and some people have gone all poetic. this one says is notjust winning that makes us winners there is more important stuff like insuring kids get school dinners all about marcus rashard social enterprises that remember he successfully campaigned to have free meals provided to primary school kids was up so he is really important to this area. his mum werejust up really important to this area. his mum were just up the road. it's really important to this area. his mum werejust up the road. it's not just people locally, people have come as far as london, birmingham and ireland. ispoke come as far as london, birmingham and ireland. i spoke to one mum who said i want my son to know how people should be treated. maw; people should be treated. many thanks. i'm nowjoined by amir khan, who is a coach at fletcher moss fc, marcus rashford's grassroots club.
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good afternoon. i so much for joining us. you must be watching that sort of outpouring of support and affection for marcus rashford with a full heart.— with a full heart. yes, i'm 'ust overwhelmed i with a full heart. yes, i'm 'ust overwhelmed with i with a full heart. yes, i'm 'ust overwhelmed with just i with a full heart. yes, i'm just overwhelmed with just the - with a full heart. yes, i'm justl overwhelmed with just the love with a full heart. yes, i'm just - overwhelmed with just the love they are showing towards marcus. it's something that's always been there. and you know it usually as people of manchester we can be a little bit with a outpouring but it's clear to everyone that racism has no place was them and anyone who has these thoughts is not welcome here. to echo harry cain, we don't want you. so how much do you have to talk about these issues to the young people who are at your club now? unfortunately, more and more. we had incidents in the past where plenty of grassroots levels some people seem to think they go to the lowest places in the may comments on some
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of our players have come over to me and spoken to me about it and we should be talking about football, talking about what's important to us but instead i'm out having to have conversations about racism. even now with what's happening i'm having conversations with my own child and also with my team members as well about this is just a very small minority but it shouldn't affect what you want to do, should let it affect your confidence in any way shape orform. it'sjust affect your confidence in any way shape or form. it's just so sad for me having to have these conversations rather than conversations rather than conversations of football. i5 conversations rather than conversations of football. is it more prevalent _ conversations of football. is it more prevalent than - conversations of football. is it more prevalent than it - conversations of football. is it more prevalent than it was before, do you think he comes up more than it used to because of social media? i think it does. and i think social media has a part to play. at the moment where sometimes sections of reality and what people perceive to be true and fuelled by social media companies it's that window to the world where i think it is becoming more and more prevalent for eight minority and individuals who can spout whatever they want to do.
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unfortunately, it is becoming more and more. using all the time now. it's unacceptable but you still see it. and how do you deal with it then with your players if you hear something that's been said or if you hear something on a team that you are playing against? fix, hear something on a team that you are playing against?— are playing against? a very simple philosorahy. _ are playing against? a very simple philosophy, identify _ are playing against? a very simple philosophy, identify and _ are playing against? a very simple philosophy, identify and isolate. . philosophy, identify and isolate. you identify the problem find out exactly what's been said or who set it and then you i that individual. i will go to the referee and said excuse me, that person hasjust made a comment, deal with that i won't let it go. with the referee deals with it which i do nine times out of a comment, deal with that i won't let it go. with the referee deals with it which i do nine times out. my with it which i do nine times out. my boys are there to play football. the players i have are there to play football they're not there to listen to any races abused in any way shape orform, i will take my players to any races abused in any way shape or form, i will take my players of the pitch if i have to.— or form, i will take my players of the pitch if i have to. where is he cominu the pitch if i have to. where is he coming from. _ the pitch if i have to. where is he coming from, where _ the pitch if i have to. where is he coming from, where these - the pitch if i have to. where is he i coming from, where these attitudes coming from, where these attitudes coming from? it coming from, where these attitudes coming from?— coming from, where these attitudes coming from? it sounds like you step on it immediately. _ coming from? it sounds like you step on it immediately. i— coming from? it sounds like you step on it immediately. i think— on it immediately. i think unfortunately as much as we are a multicultural society i think it's handed down by feelings of old of
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the 1980s the eight 1980s it seems to rear its ugly head every now and again. i'm nota to rear its ugly head every now and again. i'm not a political person but i do think there is in top government have a lot to say. it's not doing that well known that what's being said in certain areas was up i think we need to have a o—tolerance approach in zero tolerance from everybody. we can't give everybodyjust tolerance from everybody. we can't give everybody just a tolerance from everybody. we can't give everybodyjust a snippet is a well they didn't really mean that, you've just got to stop and start at the top completelyjust stop. you the top completely 'ust stop. you didn't the top completely 'ust stop. you awn-t actually — the top completelyjust stop. you didn't actually coach marcus rashford but can you feel his legacy still? , , ., rashford but can you feel his legacy still? , , still? yes, you can. marcus was a ounuer still? yes, you can. marcus was a younger child _ still? yes, you can. marcus was a younger child when _ still? yes, you can. marcus was a younger child when i _ still? yes, you can. marcus was a younger child when i was - still? yes, you can. marcus was a younger child when i was around | still? yes, you can. marcus was a i younger child when i was around so i didn't get the opportunity to coach them but i will say is looking at what we have the marcus metal ones of the future. it's some really talented individuals and the likes of marcus rashford will inspire them because when you hear the stories
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and hear what's being said somebody who is still a young man who's done so much outside the game, free school meals, his achievements on the field as well. he is in inspiration and by us talking to young players and talking is a look, this is what you can achieve and stand in the face of racism, be somebody who stood up and said no, it's unacceptable and you can do the same. let him be the inspirational person for you. and realise that you can achieve anything despite all the naysayers. can achieve anything despite all the na sa ers. , ., talk to you. the government has survived a conservative backbench revolt over aid cuts which saw former prime minister theresa may warn that some of the world's poorest will die as a result of the slashed spending. mps were voting on whether to back the government's reduction in aid funding to 0.5% of gross national income — which the prime minister has argued is "temporary" but "necessary" and a new test which critics have warned could mean spending never returns
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to the target of 0.7% — a commitment made in the conservative manifesto. in the last hour the result was announced in the house of commons. the ayes to the right, 333. the noes to the left, 298. the ayes have it, the ayes have it! unlock. mr speaker, i recognise the passion and conviction with which many members spoke today in favour of the 0.7% target. members who voted before and against the government... to be that as a salient point. whilst not every member failed to vote for the governments compromised the substantive matter of whether we remain committed to the 7.7 target notjust remain committed to the 7.7 target not just alba for
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remain committed to the 7.7 target notjust alba for decades to come is clearly a point of significant unity in this house. today's vote is made that commitment more secure for the long term while helping the government to fix problem of public finances and continue to deliver for oui’ our constituents today. i can speak now to danny sriskandarajah, ceo of oxfam uk. good afternoon. you've already commented on the outcome of this vote and talked about it as a disaster for the worlds poorest people. disaster for the worlds poorest eo - le. , , disaster for the worlds poorest --eole. , , , , disaster for the worlds poorest --eole. , ,, ., ., disaster for the worlds poorest n-eole. , ,, ., ., people. just spell out what you think that's _ people. just spell out what you think that's the _ people. just spell out what you think that's the case. _ people. just spell out what you think that's the case. the - think that's the case. the combination of the covid—i9 pandemic increasing conflict around the world and breakdown associated with climate change means there are more people in need of humanitarian assistance today around the world and that has been at any point since the second world war. and we are seeing a huge reversal in the gains the world had seen on poverty reduction. and sojust the world had seen on poverty reduction. and so just at this very
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moment our country is reneging on the promise that we made to the poorest people and cutting back with holding aid just when it's needed the most. it holding aid 'ust when it's needed the most. . , . holding aid 'ust when it's needed the most. ., , ., , ., the most. it was a promise that was made in different _ the most. it was a promise that was made in different times. _ the most. it was a promise that was made in different times. that - the most. it was a promise that was made in different times. that is - made in different times. that is essentially the governments argument. i essentially the governments argument-— essentially the governments aruument. ~' ~ . , , ., argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but _ argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but it _ argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but it really _ argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but it really aptly - argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but it really aptly a - argument. i think the archbishop of canterbury but it really aptly a few. canterbury but it really aptly a few months ago when he said that promises should be kept at the worst of time notjust promises should be kept at the worst of time not just at the best of times. the reality of the pandemic is that those who are poor who are living through other crises, their lives have gotten really much worse in many parts of the world that oxfam works in. and so this is exactly the wrong moment to be cutting back. we are seeing an 80% cutting back. we are seeing an 80% cut in clean water and sanitation services around the world. doing that in the middle of a global health pandemicjust doesn't make sense. we are talking about in aid cut that's .4% of government spending for this year. but that
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amount is about the same that the 25 poorest countries are spending on their combined health budgets at this moment. when health interventions are so critical. it's the timing of this decision and the scale of it compared to the scale of other interventions the government is making that is really devastating.— is making that is really devastating. is making that is really devastatina. ., ., is making that is really devastatina. ., m ., , ., ., ., devastating. you make a strong moral arr ument devastating. you make a strong moral argument for— devastating. you make a strong moral argument for it _ devastating. you make a strong moral argument for it but _ devastating. you make a strong moral argument for it but then _ devastating. you make a strong moral argument for it but then ministers - argument for it but then ministers would say, what about the economic argument and the money that's needed for the nhs, schools and policing given the vast spending that has had to be done because of the pandemic? first of all let me be clear, there is a huge need for government intervention on public services here to prevent a dramatic rise in poverty here in the uk. but we are talking about i% of government spending. it's the only major government department budget that's been cut. we are the only g7 country thatis been cut. we are the only g7 country that is reducing our aid at this
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moment. and so we are talking about cuts that are going to be really painful that colleagues in my work across a development sector are being told with weeks notice that they have to cut back on contracts for millions of pounds worth of spending on family planning services, education, immunisation programmes, clean water programs. it's a really bad way to do public policy above everything else. these are long—term investments at the british people have been supporting on clean water, education, family planning. and to turn the tap off at this moment and in this dramatic fashion is counterproductive and it doesn't give us as taxpayers good value for money. fine doesn't give us as taxpayers good value for money.— value for money. one report, the government _ value for money. one report, the government has _ value for money. one report, the government has said _ value for money. one report, the government has said is _ value for money. one report, the - government has said is compromising because this is a temporary measure, cutting the budget back to .5%. fire cutting the budget back to .5%. are ou cutting the budget back to .5%. site: you reassured by cutting the budget back to .5%. 2.2 you reassured by the?
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cutting the budget back to .5%. 22 you reassured by the? know. our analysis suggests that the measures the government says introduced, the text if you will will only have been met once in the last 20 years. this may well have been called a road map but it's a road map with lots of checkpoints, lots of detours. that might mean it will take years for aid to be back at the levels we are expecting in the world was expecting. it comes back to the timing, just at the moment will be seen this great reversal in poverty in a rise in hunger. the poorest people in the world can't afford to wait for those checks, for the budget numbers to climb back up. thank you very much. doctors' leaders have criticised the government's decision to relax covid restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". it comes as groups representing bus, coach, and rail companies have said that face coverings will not be made compulsory for passengers in england when the rules
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are lifted in six days' time. the government is advising people to wear masks if services are busy. our health correspondent jim reed reports. the law may be changing in england, but how will the public respond? from next week, masks and social distancing will no longer be enforced. instead, it will be up to individuals and businesses to make their own decisions. i think the way he's done it is great and i think lifting it completely, i think, should go slowly. i think it's quite scary. it might be too soon. the vaccines are definitely working, they've done theirjob, _ it's stopping the deaths - which was the main concern, so i don't see it as a big problem. with covid infections rising, the language from government has become more cautious. ministers are stressing that life should not return to normal straightaway. it's about learning to live with the virus,
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to strike a balance, but also accepting that the restrictions themselves have health consequences as well as economic consequences, so whichever way the government goes on this, there are consequences. the government's scientific advisers think that even with vaccinations, this latest wave of the virus could lead to between 1,000 and 2,000 hospital admissions a day. that would be half the level seen injanuary, but the doctors' union is warning there could still be an impact on the nhs. we know the infection rate has gone down in the older population, so why not use that scientific evidence, spend a few more weeks vaccinating the younger population properly, double vaccinating them, and at that time, if you remove these restrictions, you will not see the same impact of increases of infection and hospitalisation. in scotland, the first minister has been setting out whether some restrictions can be relaxed next week. in wales, lockdown rules will be reviewed tomorrow and in northern ireland, some covid measures will be
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eased on july 26th. in england, new guidance has also been published for the 3.5 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable. that group have been advised to visit supermarkets at quieter times of the day and continue to limit other close contacts if possible. if the government were just to say, ok, we recognise that on public transport, where some people have no choice but to go because they don't own a car, and if we put ourselves in the shoes of somebody who has to use public transport to go for chemo or dialysis, it absolutely makes sense that they have confidence that people will be wearing face coverings. the government says that delaying lifting restrictions in england would carry more risk as the weather gets colder and children return after the summer holidays. this is, though, a difficult moment in the pandemic and no—one can really be sure what will happen to infections over the next few months. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures
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for the uk. there have been a further 36,600 cases recorded in the past 2a hours. 50 people have died — that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. taking a look at the vaccination data. nearly 46 million people in the uk have received a first dose of a covid vaccine. nearly 35 million people have had both doses. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has announced that the country will move to its lowest level of covid restrictions from next week. limits on the number of people who can meet — both inside and outside — will be relaxed, as will social distancing rules. but she told msps that some legal measures — such as face coverings — will remain in place for some time. so we will continue to ease restrictions. we're not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. let me turn then to the detail of our decisions. from monday 19th ofjuly,
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all parts of scotland not currently there will move to level zero — however, this move will be made with certain modifications applied consistently across the country to ensure that we're not easing up faster than is sensible given the current situation that we face. full details of the changes are on our website, but i will highlight some key pointsjust now. in level zero, up to eight people from up to four households can meet indoors at home, compared to six people from three households in levels one and two. up to ten people from up to four households can meet in a public indoor space such as a pub or restaurant, and up to 15 people from up to 15 households can meet outdoors — whether in a private garden or public space. children under 12 already do not count towards the total number of people, and from monday they will not count towards the total number of households either. in level zero, up to 200 people can attend weddings and funerals.
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soft play centres can open, as they could at level one but not at level two, and for hospitality businesses, at level zero, unlike in level two, there's no requirement for customers to pre—book a two—hour slot to go to a pub or restaurant. however, customers will still be required to provide contact details to help test and protect, and they will still be required to wear face coverings — except when seated. there will still be limits on the size of events and stadium attendances, but these will increase outdoors to 2,000 seated and 1,000 standing and indoors to 400. as of now, as like now, organisers will be able to apply to stage larger events. let me turn now to the modifications to our indicative plans. firstly, hospitality venues in level zero in all parts of scotland will require to close at midnight. this is a change to what we had previously indicated for level zero, that venues would follow local licensing rules.
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this reflects the fact that indoor hospitality, despite the sector's sterling efforts — and i want to pay tribute to those — does remain a relatively risky environment, particularly later at night when people might be less likely to follow rules. a midnight closing time represents progress from level one and level two, but it will still help to mitigate some of that additional risk. i can now speak to linda bauld, professor of public health at the university of edinburgh. lots of detail they are from the first minister. d0 lots of detail they are from the first minister.— lots of detail they are from the first minister. do you think she's not it first minister. do you think she's got it about _ first minister. do you think she's got it about right? _ first minister. do you think she's got it about right? certainly - first minister. do you think she's got it about right? certainly a . first minister. do you think she's i got it about right? certainly a more cautious approach was just listening to her again cautious approach was just listening to heragain and cautious approach was just listening to her again and i did listen later this evening there's a lot of detail, a lot of numbers like so many stages in this pandemic i think people are going to need to get to grips with exactly what's happening for different types of events. but i think the key point to emphasise is that moving to level zero, it's not
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freedom day. there are a number of medications that will still remain in place. i think the key distinction from the uk approach are as you been covering there, the requirement for a face covering some of the fact that people will still be encouraged to work from home and employers are being told quite clearly people can do that they should continue to do that. also the continued emphasis on checking in when you access venues, test and protect. and also the physical distance inc. which will remain in some particular settings. these are distinctions that i wouldn't say are huge distinctions but there is less of an emphasis on personal responsibility, what we're hearing from the scottish government for them and more of an emphasis on government having a framework around what people can and cannot do. so given that cases are rising which approach are you most comfortable with? i approach are you most comfortable with? .., , approach are you most comfortable with? .. , ., approach are you most comfortable with? , ., ., ., with? i can see that none of the uk governments _ with? i can see that none of the uk governments are _ with? i can see that none of the uk governments are getting _ with? i can see that none of the uk governments are getting this - with? i can see that none of the uk. governments are getting this exactly right. there are still big questions
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i think about the testing trays, test and protect system even in scotla nd test and protect system even in scotland has come under criticism in recent days. there's also questions about the fact that we are not providing support for long covid that we should be across uk and not include scotland. a purely public health perspective i think you be hard pressed by anybody in my field who felt discarding face covering it making it mandatory at the current time when you still got around a third of the adult population who have yet had a second dose and people who have yet had a second dose and people are extremely clinically vulnerable very concerned about the ship. i think scotland's decision in that regards for a wee bit longer is certainly something i welcome. , , ~ bit longer is certainly something i welcome. , ,, ., welcome. just thinking about facemask. — welcome. just thinking about facemask. a _ welcome. just thinking about facemask, a lot _ welcome. just thinking about facemask, a lot of _ welcome. just thinking about facemask, a lot of criticism l welcome. just thinking about | facemask, a lot of criticism of welcome. just thinking about - facemask, a lot of criticism of the governments policy in england has been about not requiring facemask wearing in public transport. or in settings where people have no choice whether to use public transport are not so they can't get somewhere by car. how important is wearing a
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facemask, what sort of proof texting doesn't really give people? i facemask, what sort of proof texting doesn't really give people?— doesn't really give people? i think we are holding _ doesn't really give people? i think we are holding this _ doesn't really give people? i think we are holding this up _ doesn't really give people? i think we are holding this up as - doesn't really give people? i think we are holding this up as an - doesn't really give people? i think i we are holding this up as an example but there are others whether narrative is definitely around individual choice in our collective response was a face coverings generally, the virus is airborne, i think if you are wearing a well fitted, and i do emphasise face covering with several layers of fabric, not the gaps on the outside, fits well around the nose, it certainly does provide a reasonable level of protection in terms of protecting other people. in a modest level of protection in terms of yourself. it's eight mitigation and i think when we add to the vaccination will make a difference. the other criticism of what we heard from downing street yesterday were around the timing. i think the shifting, i suspect we will hear this from wales tomorrow giving things a wee bit more time to deliver more second doses seems to have been the tone from the devolved governments. this relatively modest
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but important distinctions certainly over the last eight or nine months as we've moved between phases. we have to leave it there. thank you so much. a man who murdered two children in the 1980s is set to be freed from prison, after a review. the parole board decision to release him had been challenged by the government. colin pitchfork, who's his early 60s, was jailed for life in 1988 after raping and strangling 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds explained what's happened today. well, the grounds for his releases that the case is being considered by the parole board and that he is safe to release. that is the main decision the parole board took, but what has happened today is that a challenge to that decision, which came from thejustice secretary, robert buckland, has been rejected by a seniorjudge. now, when pitchfork�*s release
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was announced or became public, robert buckland, thejustice secretary, was very concerned. there was a lot of media coverage and concern for the families of the two girls who died in the 1980s. he appealed against the decision, saying it was procedurally unfair or irrational. now a judge has decided today that this is a case of considerable seriousness, complexity and notoriety, in his words, terrible consequences of brutal rapes and murders of two innocent girls will forever darken the lives of the families concerned, but he said he was satisfied the decision to release this man was justified. now, thejustice secretary has responded or the ministry ofjustice has responded in the last hour or so saying that the department is disappointed with this outcome, that its sympathies are with the families of lynda mann and dawn ashworth and also
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that it is changing the law to ensure child murderers face life in prison without possibility of parole as the default sentence. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. not a bad day out there today with lots of sunny spells. there are a few showers around, but nowhere near as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. into the evening hours, you can see very pleasant temperatures, high teens, low 20s and in some places clear skies. one or two showers may linger into the evening, particularly across central parts of the uk, but for most of us it is going to be a dry evening and night. clear skies across western and central areas, a bit more cloud from aberdeenshire along the north sea coast to east anglia and the south—east. tomorrow, a fine day. a lot of us wake up to clear blue skies. probably a bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon but, on the whole, it is a fine day and temperatures widely into the low or even mid 20s, so it really is going to feel quite warm tomorrow. the outlook, if you like warm
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weather it is a good one for you. it is going to turn increasingly warm and the weekend is looking promising. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines — england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland are set to be relaxed next week. face coverings will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. mps back a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid
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budget by £4 billion. charities say it will have a devastating impact for the world's poor. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good evening. uefa has opened displinary proceedings against the football association following the euro 2020 final between england and italy at wembley on sunday. there are four charges against the fa, including "disturbance caused by its supporters during the national anthem", as well as a pitch invasion, throwing of objects and lighting of a firework. meanwhile, seperately, a uefa ethics and disiplinary inspector has been appointed to conduct an investigation into the events involving supporters inside and around the stadium. the punishments for the offences could include fines and possibly having to play behind closed doors
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in future uefa matches. there are more details on that developing story on the website. meanwhile, greater manchester police have launched an investigation after racist graffiti was sprayed over marcus rashford's mural. the england and manchester united player said he had been on the verge of tears when he saw that members of the public had covered the graffiti with positive messages and hearts. the artwork in manchester was defaced after the final. it has been re—sprayed by the graffiti artist, and notes and drawings have been attached to the wall. rashford wrote on social media... "the communities that always wrapped their arms around me continue to hold me up." rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka also received racist abuse online after they missed penalties in the final at the weekend. one father travelled all the way from birmingham with his sons to show them the positive messages. i wanted to remind them that despite what they've
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heard or what they may have seen, the players on the pitch that day, in particular the black players, are all very much still heroes, they're all still kings. and i wanted to actually show them that not everybody thinks like that, and by coming here and seeing other people who are standing against the vile, visceral treatment that some of the players have received is actually really heart—warming and fills me with hope. three england players have been selected for the euros team of the tournament — raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. sterling scored three times during the competition, while maguire and walker helped england's defence only concede two goals in the whole tournament. the team also includes five players from champions italy. the line—up was chosen by uefa's team of 16 technical observers. england have a huge task ahead of them in the cricket. they need 332 to win the third odi against pakistan after the visitors delivered an impressive innings. they just lost an early wicket in
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reply. that would malan was just caught with an early ball. babar azam making a superb 158 at edgbaston. after saqib mamood took the early wicket of fakhar zaman, england struggled to get the second, matt parkinson finally bowling imam ul haq for 56. his replacement, mohamed rizwan, went for 7h. there was a late batting collapse, with bryson carse getting five wickets. babar with 158. pakistan finished on 331—9 after 50 overs. and england are currently 43—1. ben stokes' side already have a 2—0 lead. alun wynjones could be returning to the british and irish lions squad despite being ruled out after he dislocated his shoulder just a few weeks ago. it's said to have not been as bad as expected and is healing. connor murray captains the team against south africa a tomorrow. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on the 24th ofjuly. head coach warren gatland will decide ifjones will rejoin the squad shortly.
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let's update you on the tour de france, and defending champion tadej pogacar remains in the yellow jersey with five stages to go. today was classed as a medium—mountain stage, with two very challenging days in the pyrenees tomorrow and thursday. all the main contenders finished together, so pogacar�*s five—minute, 18—second lead is intact. austria's patrick konrad broke away with 23 miles to go and managed to hold off an eight—man chasing group to win the stage, his first grand tour victory. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. thank you very much, jane. as we've been hearing, the government is to go ahead with its cut to the overseas aid budget after it saw off a tory revolt in the commons this afternoon. mps voted by a majority of 35 to lower the uk's contribution
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to 0.5% of national income. i'm joined now by melissa leach, director of the institute of development studies. good afternoon. i wonder if you could put this into some sort of context for us. because the uk was a leader in terms of giving money in terms of foreign aid. where does this leave it now?— terms of foreign aid. where does this leave it now? absolutely. well, this leave it now? absolutely. well, this is incredibly _ this leave it now? absolutely. well, this is incredibly disappointing - this is incredibly disappointing news because this reduction now means more than £4 billion wiped off the a budget forjust this year alone and that is going to have a devastating long—term impact, the decision that we had today that that is not going to be reversed for millions of the poorest people in the world. the uk is actually this year the only g7 country cutting. we have been a leader but the us, france and germany are increasing eight this year in the context of a global pandemic and ominously important challenges like climate
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change. an ironic this is the year of all years to the uk should continue to be a leader. we are hosting the big the climate change conference and we are tackling a pandemic is the wrong time to be cementing in place those cuts. france and germany will be increasing their aid spending from a lower base than the uk.— lower base than the uk. germany actually won't- — lower base than the uk. germany actually won't. germany - lower base than the uk. germany actually won't. germany was - lower base than the uk. germany i actually won't. germany was already above 0.7 and will be increasing from there. france is increasing from there. france is increasing from eight lower base, but it will now be ahead of the uk. and actually the way things are going the outcome of the uk will be below saudi arabia and turkey in terms of its overall contributions.— and turkey in terms of its overall contributions. could you 'ust allow us what difference _ contributions. could you 'ust allow us what difference aid _ contributions. could you just allow us what difference aid spending i us what difference aid spending makes to the people on the receiving end? ., ,., ., end? yeah, well, some headline toline end? yeah, well, some headline topline impacts, _ end? yeah, well, some headline topline impacts, this _ end? yeah, well, some headline topline impacts, this year- end? yeah, well, some headline topline impacts, this year alone, end? yeah, well, some headline i topline impacts, this year alone, we are going to seep through me and
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people who won't be reached with the military and support. —— we will see 3 million people. that will lead to hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths of many of them women and children. we will see millions of girls not getting the education they were promised and we are going to see the impact on people not being supported to tackle climate change. that again being devastating. a couple more examples specifically, so the un population fund, because of the reductions it's had from 85% budget cuts, that is funding which would have prevented a quarter of a million maternal and child deaths. 14.6 million maternal and child deaths. 111.6 million unintended pregnancies and 11.3 million unsafe abortions. we have seen the global polio eradication initiative cut by 95% from 100 million to just £5 million, threatening efforts to eradicate the disease once and for all. we were very nearly there. 380 million
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children now won't be vaccinated against polio. and then taking humanitarian aid and working against famine and hunger, yemen, south sudan, nigeria at which have been topping the uk government's watch list forfamine topping the uk government's watch list for famine have all add their aid budgets slashed by over 50%. that is a very comprehensive list. what would you say to people who say we have just been through a terrible pandemic, government spending has been unprecedented in this country to shore up the economy and we need the money for our own domestic purposes, for the nhs, schools and policing? purposes, for the nhs, schools and olicinu? ~ , �* policing? absolutely. but the thing is the aid budget _ policing? absolutely. but the thing is the aid budget had _ policing? absolutely. but the thing is the aid budget had always - policing? absolutely. but the thing l is the aid budget had always tracked national income. it's a percentage. that's the point of it, it was designed to do so, had already gone down last year in response to our lower national income. these additional cuts have taken it down further. but there are two really
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strong arguments about what this is a really bad idea. one is of the global challenges that affect us all, the aid budget contributes to those. we heard this mantra with covid—19 that no one is safe until we are all safe and actually the funding that is supporting tackling climate change, conflict, disease also benefits the uk. it's also the case that the public is not actually with the government on the kind of decision we have made to date. this year, even sincejanuary, we decision we have made to date. this year, even since january, we have seen more members of the public actually now up to 53% according to trackers like yougov, suggesting that actually the public want overseas aid spending to increase or stay the same. overseas aid spending to increase or stay the same-— stay the same. sorry to but in there, thank _ stay the same. sorry to but in there, thank you _ stay the same. sorry to but in there, thank you very - stay the same. sorry to but in there, thank you very much i | stay the same. sorry to but in i there, thank you very much i did stay the same. sorry to but in - there, thank you very much i did not mean to stop you mid—flood but we will have to wrap it up there. thank you so much, melissa leach there the director of the institute for development studies. thank you will
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stop. more than 60 people have died after a fire in a coronavirus ward at a hospital in the southern iraqi city of nasiriya. the cause of the fire is unclear, but reports said it began after an oxygen tank exploded. angry relatives have protested outside the hospital. iraq's prime minister, mustafa al—kadhimi, ordered the arrest of the head of the hospital. a senior eu official has warned the greek government to stop the alleged deportation of migrants arriving at its borders. some migrants trying to seek asylum in europe claim that greek coastguards have forced their small boats back into turkish waters. others allege that even after landing in greece they've been taken back out to sea, actions greece has denied. the bbc�*s fergal keane reports from the island of lesbos. a warning — you may find some of his report distressing. on europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing.
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please! pushing asylum—seekers across international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, this _ is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish i territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water. all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been victims of push backs. onjune 10th last, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get - a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that. with the war at home,
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the multiple problems, our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities, only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and took- us to a military port, then put us in boats. it was around 8pm. there were police wearingj dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location - at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat. after that, we realised _ we were in regional turkish waters.
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woman yells out. najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece. but also, it's eu law that is not. ..that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu charter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out. some boats from the eu's own border agency are even accused
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of helping with push backs. but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos.
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the stl p mp is facing... the bbc is not naming a soldierfor the stl p mp is facing... the bbc is not naming a soldier for legal reasons after his actions on blondie sunday. —— bloodied sunday. does what we eat impact how our bodies respond to covid? new research has found that people who ate the "highest—quality diet" were around 10% less likely to develop covid—19 than those with the least nutritious diet. the research — which comes from health science company zoe, harvard medical school and king's college london — is the first study of diet and covid—19. with me now is dr sarah berry. she is a reader in nutritional sciences at king's college london and is the study�*s co—lead.
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good afternoon to you. tell us more about the research, first of all. absolutely. so our research found that diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of catching covid and also a reduced severity of covid and also a reduced severity of covid like you mentioned. so we find people who had a high quality diet were about to percent less likely to develop covid and those with a low quality diet more likely to become severely ill. when we analysed this was conduct —— collecting data from 600,000 zoe study volunteers are completed a questionnaire about the food that they ate. this was pre—pandemic so back in february 2020, making it really the largest study of its kind. and we followed them for a six—month period and we monitor those who would on to get covid and those who not as full as a severity of their covid. we found interesting was this was the first study to find that diet quality and
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how good your diet is in the different kinds of food in your diet can really impact the chances of getting covid as well as the severity. getting covid as well as the severi . , ., severity. let me “ump in here. how do ou severity. let me “ump in here. how do you define — severity. let me “ump in here. how do you define a — severity. let mejump in here. how do you define a good _ severity. let mejump in here. how do you define a good diet _ severity. let mejump in here. how do you define a good diet and - severity. let mejump in here. how do you define a good diet and a - severity. let mejump in here. how| do you define a good diet and a bad diet? ., �* , ., do you define a good diet and a bad diet? ., �*, ., ., , , ., diet? that's a really good question. we collected _ diet? that's a really good question. we collected data _ diet? that's a really good question. we collected data on _ diet? that's a really good question. we collected data on the _ diet? that's a really good question. we collected data on the types - diet? that's a really good question. we collected data on the types of. we collected data on the types of foods people were consuming using something called food if questionnaire and then categorise the different foods according to what we know from big health studies that have been conducted over the past 50 years or so what foods are associated with good health outcomes and what foods are associated with poor outcomes. so, for example, an unhealthy or low quality diet would be one reaching very high processed foods, high in carbohydrates and a good quality diet is one that has a diverse diet, so lots of different carbon —based fruits and foods and all your fish as well. so
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carbon -based fruits and foods and all your fish as well.— all your fish as well. so this will have implications _ all your fish as well. so this will have implications for _ all your fish as well. so this will have implications for people - all your fish as well. so this willl have implications for people who cannot necessarily afford a healthy diet, wanted? because all those good foods that you mentioned tend to cause more. foods that you mentioned tend to cause more-— cause more. that's a really good -oint, cause more. that's a really good point. and _ cause more. that's a really good point. and it— cause more. that's a really good point, and it feeds _ cause more. that's a really good point, and it feeds into - cause more. that's a really good point, and it feeds into some i cause more. that's a really good point, and it feeds into some of| cause more. that's a really good i point, and it feeds into some of our findings as well. we have found that the impact of diet quality was amplified by social inequality, so we have found that those people living in areas with higher deprivation actually had even greater risk of getting covid when they had the low quality diet. so we found that those individuals would benefit even more from improving their diet and like you say this raises lots of issues around accessibility and affordability for some of these healthy foods in a regional matrix that are very nutrient dense.— regional matrix that are very nutrient dense. , , ., , nutrient dense. this is potentially a significant _ nutrient dense. this is potentially a significant finding _ nutrient dense. this is potentially a significant finding because - a significant finding because generally you might think that the better nourished your body is, the more he can withstand any sort of attack on it. but you have found a
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specific link, you think? absolutely, and i think what is really reassuring to note is that we don't need to make huge changes to our diet. we have found that actually there is a significant reduction in risk if diet quality improved just by a small amount. that once you got to a generally healthy level in terms of your diet, there was minimalfor healthy level in terms of your diet, there was minimal for the healthy level in terms of your diet, there was minimalfor the benefit healthy level in terms of your diet, there was minimal for the benefit so even small changes can have a big impact and i think that's really important for viewers to remember. so alongside i think the key but the fact that there is no magic bullet when it comes to preventing covid, to cure covid, there are simple strategies people can track such as increasing the diversity in the range of foods we have and eating the foods that i mentioned it. trier? the foods that i mentioned it. very interesting- _ the foods that i mentioned it. very interesting. thank _ the foods that i mentioned it. very interesting. thank you _ the foods that i mentioned it. very interesting. thank you so much, doctor. the haulage industry is one of a number of sectors struggling to recruit enough staff as the economy reopens. with the shortage having an impact
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on the amount of produce that is being delivered, one firm is now working with the government to trial 3000 of its super—sized lorries in an attempt to tackle the problem. simon spark reports. at first, this looks like any kind of lorry. but if you saw it, you'd know about it, because this one just keeps coming around a corner. it's an eco—link combination trailer, and it's over 25m long. it may look like something new, but this has been an idea that's been around for a long time. here it is 17 years ago, and four years ago. this better lorry, as it's being described, has been trying to get on uk roads since 2004, but so far with no luck. but is a driver crisis in the haulage industry giving super—sized vehicles like this another chance? firstly, i'd also welcome any more pay for professional drivers. earlier this month, the minister
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for transport, charlotte vere, announced a temporary extension of drivers' hours to help ease the driver shortage. but dick denby has also written to her and asked her to consider a trial of 3000 of his lorries. its benefits are reducing the number of lorries by certainly a fifth, possibly a quarter, perhaps even a third. you can move 50% more freight potentially, - but still use one driver. and that's a very key thing for us at the moment, - because of the driver shortage. i have to say that i was quite - surprised with the announcement. they are safety rules, after all. and it just demonstrates - what a crisis the industry has, because the government has listened to representations and has _ relaxed these rules. it's a very welcome thing. but, yes, i'm surprised by it. the technology developed means this lorry can go anywhere a normal—sized articulated lorry can, even turn within the same turning circle.
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if i wanted to go round to the left, these wheels would turn to the right to take the front end of this trailer out. this is terry, who's been at the forefront of all the trials so far. i've been to the netherlands. i took my driving test over there, and they actually took us into towns and villages. so, you've seen how it does perform? yeah, yeah. and we've actually been over with this. but as it stands, a driver shortage continues and the ban for this kind of vehicle remains. simon spark, bbc news. for the first time in 400 years, a beaver has been born on exmoor. the national trust has released footage of the baby on its holnicote estate in somerset and said it is "thriving". the once—native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats, but were hunted to extinction for theirfur and meat in the 16th century. from the trail cam footage, we realised we've got a new beaver, and unless one of the beavers had shrunk, we're like, "that is definitely a kit." and it was just a shock,
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but in a nice way. hopefully it's a part of a positive trend to developing, you know, healthy and vibrant wildlife in our river systems. and beaver are definitely a part of that. they're an animal that makes a lot of positive changes, and i think we can work with them. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. this looks promising, does it not? we expect the temperatures to rise and that weekend looks promising. this low pressure with the showers in the rain storms in the last 24 hours, all of that is shifting now and high pressure at this moment is heading in our direction and is going to settle things down. so, so far this month, we really have not had a prolonged smell of warm summer weather but that's exactly what is heading our weight now and the fine weather certainly is going to last into the weekend. so the here and
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the now, is looking quite across many parts of the country and to the night clear spells for many western and central areas most of it will probably turn a bit cloudy out towards the east of london and anywhere from northern scotland down to the kent coast. not cold in the morning. 50 degrees in liverpool. here is the high pressure that's nosing its way in our direction but notice the north of it, there is a weak weather front coming in and thatis weak weather front coming in and that is going to bring thicker cloud and maybe a few spots of rain out towards the northwest of the uk, the western isles of scotland with the vast majority of that should have a fine day. on the immediate coast it may be on the fresh side in order to spots and norwich they're a bit further england they are at 19 but for london and cardiff talking about 24 or 25 degrees in the low 20s expected in northern ireland as well. here is our low—pressure camera really starting to take charge of the weather. shifting the weather fronts in the direction of iceland, so away from us. so i fine
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day on the way for thursday. probably a little bit of cloud building up during the course of the afternoon. there were the cloud but some areas could have clear blue skies and portable some parts of scotland and even in the lowlands of scotland and even in the lowlands of scotland it will be a surprise or temperatures hit the mid—20s and certainly mid—20s expected in the south as well and once again encarta. the high—pressure is with us on friday. it is with us on saturday and sunday as well. the light went and the clear skies and averages can only do one thing they will continue to rise, a gradual rise as we go through the week into the weekend. that cardiff sunshine all around with temperatures up to 27 degrees and the phone with her probably lasting into next week as well. bye—bye.
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at six, scotland will ease covid restrictions from next week but much more cautiously than england. face coverings remain mandatory and social distancing rules will be relaxed but not scrapped. we should not lift important restrictions to make our lives easier and then expect the public to take responsibility for doing the right thing anyway. to take responsibility for doing it comes as the uk has recorded another 50 deaths — the highest daily death toll since early april. also tonight... a manjailed for raping and murdering two 15—year—old girls in leicestershire in the 1980s is to be released after a government challenge failed. a huge show of support for england footballer marcus rashford as a mural — defaced with racist graffiti after england's defeat —
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is now covered in hearts. how the pandemic has brought about a rise in the number

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