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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at two. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm shortly whether covid restrictions can be eased as planned. mps are debating a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera and is
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reported to be thriving! well, a very good afternoon. we are going straight to holyrood. nicola sturgeon has just started speaking about the potential easing of lockdown measures. let's listen in. this is intended to ensure that our piece of easing restrictions insensible in light of the challenge we continue to face from the delta variant. h to face from the delta variant. i will also confirm that certain mitigations such as the mandatory wearing of face coverings will remain in place notjust now but in all likelihood for some time to come. it is important to stress that measures like the continued wearing a face coverings are important, not
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just to give added protection to the population as a whole, but also to give protection and assurance to those amongst us who are particularly vulnerable and who previously had to shield. lifting all restrictions and mitigations right now would put all of us at greater risk, but in particular, it would make it much more difficult for the most clinically vulnerable to go about their normal lives. it would risk the imposition of shielding by default and, in my view, that is not something we should do. before i turn to the detail of all of this, let me summarise today's statistics. the total above positive cases reported yesterday was 2529, 11.5% of all tests and the total number of confirmed cases is now 318,566. there are currently 506 people in hospital, 37 more than yesterday, and 41 people in intensive care, one
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more than yesterday. sadly, for more deaths were reported in the past 2a—hours, bringing the total number of deaths under the daily definition to 7761 and, as always, my condolences go to everyone who has lost a loved one. 3,000,9a0 people have now received a first dose of vaccine, an increase of 7163 since yesterday and 10,286 people got a second dose yesterday, bringing the total number of second dose to 2 million they continued success of the vaccination programme continues to give us real hope. we are now in the final stages of offering first doses to all adults. more than 80% of 30-39 doses to all adults. more than 80% of 30—39 —year—olds have had a first dose around with around two thirds of 18-29 dose around with around two thirds of 18—29 —year—olds and all 18—29
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—year—olds have now had a first toast appointment scheduled. turning toast appointment scheduled. turning to second doses, virtually all over 60s have now had both doses. uptake is 96% amongst 55—59 —year—olds, 89% in 58-54 is 96% amongst 55—59 —year—olds, 89% in 58—54 —year—olds and 61% so far in 58—54 —year—olds and 61% so far in 40-49 in 58—54 —year—olds and 61% so far in 40—49 —year—olds. second dose appointments have been scheduled eight weeks after a first dose, so in the next couple of weeks, coverage of 40—49 —year—olds will get much closer to the levels achieved for older age groups. walk in vaccination clinics are now open in vaccination clinics are now open in all mainland health land areas for anyone over 18 who has not received a first dose or who receive their first toast eight or more months ago —— weeks ago, and i urge anyone requiring a first or second dose to get it as soon as possible. it is the single most important thing any of us can do to protect
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ourselves and each other and get all of us back to normal. as i said earlier, incoming to today's decisions, the government have had to weigh up both positive and more challenging developments. they continued progress of the vaccine programme is obviously positive. also encouraging is that case numbers, which were rising sharply to weeks ago, now appear to have levelled off. in fact, they have fallen in recent days. to illustrate that, in the week to the 11th of july, an average of 3300 positive cases per day were recorded. that is nowjust under 2700, which is a reduction of more than 15%. that said, cases are still high, more than twice the level they were out when i last updated parliament and, of course, not all cases are confirmed through testing, so although this is positive, we must
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continue to cover all data, including on, for example, waste water sampling, to ensure we have a full picture. vaccination is definitely weakening the link between case numbers and severe, acute illness. injanuary, more than 10% of people who tested positive had to go to hospital. that is now around 3%. it is also the case that people admitted to hospital with covid are being discharged more quickly than previously. all of this reflects the fact that a much greater proportion of cases now are in younger people who are much less likely to become seriously ill. however, for all of these welcome signs, there are still reasons to be concerned and, certainly not complacent about the current level of infection. if case numbers are high, evenjust 3% ending up in hospital puts pressure on the nhs and we can see that already. three weeks ago, there were 171 people in hospital with covid and 18 in
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intensive care. today that is 506 and 42, respectively. hopefully with new cases starting to fall, we will also see hospital admissions fall in the next few weeks but at the moment, the pressure on the nhs is of concern stop first and foremost, it means a significant number of people suffering illness. it also means more pressure on a workforce that has already given so much and, of course, it holds back nhs recovery. every hospital bed occupied by a covid patient is one less bed available to tackle the backlog of non—covid care. another reason to take the current level of infection seriously is the risk of long covid. many people, including young people who get the virus, but never need hospital care will still suffer long covid. it is important to remember that this is a condition which experts still do not yet fully understand, but we do know that it is causing misery for many. indeed, it is one of the main reason is
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that, in my view, we cannot be complacent about young people getting this virus. to say that it just doesn't matter when we don't yet fully understand what the long—term consequences might be for some young people would risk treating them as an experiment and it will not surprise anybody to hear that i do not think we should do that. these are just some of the reasons for continued caution even as our optimism about the impact of vaccination does continue to grow. that sense of caution is reinforced by looking at the international situation and by listening to the world health organization. several countries across europe, for example portugal and spain, are now dealing with very sharp rises in numbers of cases. holland hasjust reintroduced restrictions that were lifted at the end ofjune. israel has also seen a significant rise in cases as a result of delta, despite its very high level of vaccination. some countries that did well in
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suppressing the virus last year, for example countries in the asia—pacific region, are now seeing cases rises well. japan has decided not to allow spectators at the olympics. as the delta variance becomes more dominant in more countries, we are likely to see research and sees elsewhere as well. there is no doubt that delta has become, unfortunately, something of a game changer even for countries on course to achieving full vaccine protection, so covid does remain a threat that we must treat seriously. the scottish government understands and i understand the temptation to lift more restrictions more quickly. 0f lift more restrictions more quickly. of course, we understand that. but in our view and in line with clinical advice and modelling, a gradual approach stands the best chance of minimising further health harm and loss of life. and also, because a gradual approach stands the best chance of being a sustainable approach, it will be better in the long—term for the
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economy as well. so we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. let me turn then to the detail of our decisions. from monday the 19th ofjuly, all parts of scotland not currently there will move to level zero, however, this move to level zero, however, this move will be made with certain modifications applied consistently across the country to ensure that we are not easing up faster than is sensible given the current situation that we face. for details of the changes are on our website, but i will highlight some key points just now. in level zero, up to eight people from up to four households can meet indoors at home compared to six people from three households in levels one and two. up to ten people from up to four households can meet in a public indoor space such as a pub or restaurant and up to 15 people from up to 15 households can meet up doors whether any private
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garden or public space. children under 12 already do not count towards the total number of people from monday they will not count towards the total number of households either. in level zero, up to 200 people can attend weddings and funerals. soft play centres can open, as they could at level one but not at level two, and for hospitality businesses, at level zero, unlike in level two, there is no requirement for customers to pre—book a two—hour slot for a restaurant or but they will still be asked for contact details to help test and protect and they will still be required to wear face coverings except when seated. there will still be limits on the size of events and stadium attendances, but these will increase outdoors to 2000 seated and 1000 standing and indoors to 400. as of now, as like now, organisers will be able to apply to stage larger events. let me turn out to the modifications to our indicative
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plans. firstly, hospitality venues in level zero in all parts of scotland will require to close at midnight. this is a change to what we had previously indicated for level zero, that venues would follow local licensing rules. this reflects the fact that indoor hospitality, despite the sector's sterling efforts, and i want to pay tribute to those, does remain a relatively risky environment, particularly later at night when people might be less likely to follow rules. a midnight closing time represents progress from level one and level two, but it will still help to mitigate some of that additional risk. the second modification is to physical distancing and, let me clear, what i am about to set out applies to public places. we had already removed the requirement to distance from groups of family and friends meeting in private houses and gardens as long as these are within permitted limits. in indoor public places, as indicated previously, where there is not already a one metre rule in place,
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the physical distance requirement will reduce from two metres to one metre and will apply between different health groups. the main modification is in relation to outdoor public places. we had hoped to lift physical distancing outdoors completely and by extension remove any limit on the numbers who can gather together outdoors. however, for precautionary reasons at this stage, we intend to keep in place a limit on the size of outdoor group gatherings as indicated earlier, up to 15 people from up to 15 households. because meeting outdoors is less risky than indoors, there will be no requirement to distance within these groups of 15 if there are different households, however, for the next three weeks at least, there will be a requirement for one metre distancing between different groups of 15. the economy secretary intends to work with the events sector on guidance to explore how events already organised might still go ahead with appropriate modifications. the final and perhaps more substantial modification to
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what we had indicative loop land relates to working from home. we had indicated that a gradual return to the office could begin from level zero, but given the current situation, we intend to postpone this until we move beyond level zero, which we still hope will be on the 9th of august. until then, we will continue to ask employers to support home—working where possible. i know this will be disappointing for many businesses and for some employees who are finding home working hard. but this will reduce the extent to which people are meeting up in enclosed environments or travelling together and so, in this phase, will help to contain transmission. residing officer, i hope the move to level zero, albeit in a modified form, will be welcomed. it is not a complete and wholesale lifting of all restrictions and was never intended to be, however, it does restore yet more freedom to all of us. indeed, it is worth emphasising that we are no longer in lockdown. nothing like it. life is much more normal than at
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any time since the start of this pandemic. but the gradual approach we are taking means that sensible precautions will remain in place to limit transmission while we make even more progress on vaccination. to that end, as i indicated earlier, we will also keep in place certain other measures such as the requirement to wear face coverings, cooperate with test and protect and comply with advice on good hygiene and ventilation. and on the issue of mandating mitigations they face coverings, let mejust mandating mitigations they face coverings, let me just say this, it is my view that if government believes measures like this matter and this government does, we should say so. we should do what is necessary to ensure compliance and we should be prepared to take any resulting flak from those who disagree. we should not lift important restrictions to make our lives easier and then expect the public to take responsibility for doing the right thing anyway. residing officer, the move to level zero has been laid out. we
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previously indicated we hope to move beyond level zero on the 9th of august. that remains our expectation. by then, almost everyone over 40 will have had the second dose at least two weeks previously, however, as with today cosmic decisions, we will assess the data before coming to a final decision nearer to the time and i will provide a final update in the week before the 9th of august. i want to confirm our future intentions in requirement to contacts of positive cases needing to self—isolate. we know how onerous and disruptive this is. when we move beyond level zero, we intend to remove the blanket requirement for close contacts to self—isolate as long as they are double vaccinated with at least two weeks having passed since the second dose and take a pcr test which comes back negative. i will publish guidance on the practical operation of this shortly. second, as part of wider preparations for the next academic term, we have asked our education advisory group for advice to
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weather, to what extent and with what mitigations we can remove the self isolation requirements for young people in education settings young people in education settings you are close contacts of positive cases and we will set out our conclusions well in advance of the new term. we are still waiting from advice from the jci as new term. we are still waiting from advice from thejci as to whether children over 12 should be vaccinated. lastly, from monday the 19th ofjuly, so isolation will no longer be required for people arriving from countries on the amber list provided they are fully vaccinated through a uk vaccination programme and take a pcr test on the second day after arrival. we will continue to take a precautionary approach to the inclusion of countries on the amber list and, notwithstanding this change, we do intend to advise against nonessential overseas travel at this time. forthe nonessential overseas travel at this time. for the avoidance of doubt, let me be clear that anyone testing positive for or experiencing symptoms of covid will still require to isolate for ten days. the decisions i have set out today show that despite the impact of delta,
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vaccination is allowing us to continue to ease restrictions, albeit cautiously. that will be a relief to the vast majority, but it will be a source of anxiety to some. let me address again those at the highest clinical risk, many of whom previously shielded. i know many of you feel anxious about any easing of restrictions, particularly if you cannot have the vaccine or if you have conditions or are on treatment that suppresses your immune system. the scottish government is very aware of that. we will not abandon you. foras aware of that. we will not abandon you. for as long as necessary, we will ask people to take necessary precautions such as the wearing of face coverings to allow you, like everyone else, to enjoy more normal life again. we are also launching a survey this week for people in the highest list risk list to ask what support you might need and the chief medical officer will write you this week with advice. we know there are around 13,000 people at high clinical risk who have not yet have
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both doses of the vaccine, so if you are one of them and you are able to get vaccinated, please do so. residing officer, that final note of caution explains again the careful balance at the heart of our decisions today. the vaccination programme is working. it definitely is working, and that gives us confidence to ease restrictions further. case numbers are still high, covid still poses a risk to the health of many. in the race between the vaccine and the virus, we believe the vaccine will win, but we believe the vaccine will win, but we cannot allow the virus to run too far ahead, so we must stick to a cautious approach. we are easing restrictions next week, but we are not abandoning them and even when we move beyond level zero, we will continue to require some baseline measures such as face coverings for a period longer. i will end by emphasising again what we can all do to protect each other. first, get vaccinated if you are over 18 and have not had a first dose appointment or if you are eight
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weeks or more from your second dose, register on the nhs in four website or go to a drop in clinic. second, please get tested regularly. lateral flow tests are available free by post through nhs inform or by collection from test sites and local pharmacies. if you test positive through one of these would you have symptoms, make sure you self—isolate and book a pcr test as soon as possible. third, stick to the remaining rules and follow basic hygiene measures. meet other people outdoors as much as possible. if you are meeting indoors, stick to the limits on group size and open windows. the better ventilated room is, the safer it will be. and remember, physical distancing, hand washing, the cleaning of surfaces, face coverings, all of these basic measures are as important now as ever. if we do all of this, frustrating though it all continues increasingly to be, we will help protect ourselves and our loved ones
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and, as we continue to complete the vaccination programme, which does offer us still the route back to greater normality, it will make it easier for greater normality, it will make it easierfor more greater normality, it will make it easier for more restrictions to greater normality, it will make it easierfor more restrictions to be gradually and sensibly lifted in the weeks ahead. thank you, presiding officer. i look forward now to questions. officer. i look forward now to questions-— officer. i look forward now to cuestions. , ~ , questions. the first minister will now take questions _ questions. the first minister will now take questions on _ questions. the first minister will now take questions on the - questions. the first minister will| now take questions on the issues raised _ now take questions on the issues raised in — now take questions on the issues raised in her statement. i intend to allow— raised in her statement. i intend to allow around 90 minutes for questions and it would be very helpful— questions and it would be very helpful if— questions and it would be very helpful if members who wished to ask a question— helpful if members who wished to ask a question could put r in the chat function _ a question could put r in the chat function now i called douglas ross. thank— function now i called douglas ross. thank you — function now i called douglas ross. thank you very much, providing missing — thank you very much, providing missing my— thank you very much, providing missing my presiding _ thank you very much, providing missing my presiding officer. . thank you very much, providing l missing my presiding officer. the public— missing my presiding officer. the public of— missing my presiding officer. the public of meal _ missing my presiding officer. the public of meat you _ missing my presiding officer. the public of meat you check - missing my presiding officer. the public of meat you check the - missing my presiding officer. thel public of meat you check the faces over the _ public of meat you check the faces over the last — public of meat you check the faces over the last 16— public of meat you check the faces over the last 16 months. _ public of meat you check the faces over the last 16 months. their- public of meat you check the facesi over the last 16 months. their lives have _ over the last 16 months. their lives have lteen— over the last 16 months. their lives have been upturned, _ over the last 16 months. their lives have been upturned, they- over the last 16 months. their lives have been upturned, they have - over the last 16 months. their lives- have been upturned, they have missed out on _ have been upturned, they have missed out on special — have been upturned, they have missed out on special occasions _ have been upturned, they have missed out on special occasions and _ have been upturned, they have missed out on special occasions and moments| out on special occasions and moments that they— out on special occasions and moments that they will — out on special occasions and moments that they will not — out on special occasions and moments that they will not get _ out on special occasions and moments that they will not get back, _ out on special occasions and moments that they will not get back, yet - that they will not get back, yet they— that they will not get back, yet they have _ that they will not get back, yet they have done _ that they will not get back, yet they have done what _ that they will not get back, yet they have done what is - that they will not get back, yet. they have done what is necessary with incredible _ they have done what is necessary with incredible dedication. - they have done what is necessaryj with incredible dedication. before this pandemic— with incredible dedication. before this pandemic struck, _ with incredible dedication. before this pandemic struck, we - with incredible dedication. before
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this pandemic struck, we could i with incredible dedication. before i this pandemic struck, we could have found _ this pandemic struck, we could have found it _ this pandemic struck, we could have found it unbelievable _ this pandemic struck, we could have found it unbelievable that _ this pandemic struck, we could have found it unbelievable that our - found it unbelievable that our government— found it unbelievable that our government had _ found it unbelievable that our government had told - found it unbelievable that our government had told peoplel found it unbelievable that our. government had told people to found it unbelievable that our - government had told people to stay inside _ government had told people to stay inside their— government had told people to stay inside their own _ government had told people to stay inside their own homes, _ government had told people to stay inside their own homes, restrict- government had told people to stayi inside their own homes, restrict how far we _ inside their own homes, restrict how far we could — inside their own homes, restrict how far we could travel, _ inside their own homes, restrict how far we could travel, force _ inside their own homes, restrict how far we could travel, force people - inside their own homes, restrict how far we could travel, force people to. far we could travel, force people to miss the _ far we could travel, force people to miss the birth _ far we could travel, force people to miss the birth of _ far we could travel, force people to miss the birth of their— far we could travel, force people to miss the birth of their children - far we could travel, force people to miss the birth of their children and | miss the birth of their children and the final— miss the birth of their children and the final moments _ miss the birth of their children and the final moments of— miss the birth of their children and the final moments of a _ miss the birth of their children and the final moments of a loved - miss the birth of their children and j the final moments of a loved one's life and _ the final moments of a loved one's life and we — the final moments of a loved one's life and we were _ the final moments of a loved one's life and we were to _ the final moments of a loved one's life and we were to found - the final moments of a loved one's life and we were to found it - the final moments of a loved one's| life and we were to found it equally unbelievable — life and we were to found it equally unbelievable that _ life and we were to found it equally unbelievable that the _ life and we were to found it equallyl unbelievable that the overwhelming majority _ unbelievable that the overwhelming majority of — unbelievable that the overwhelming majority of the _ unbelievable that the overwhelming majority of the public, _ unbelievable that the overwhelming majority of the public, almost - majority of the public, almost everyone. _ majority of the public, almost everyone, would _ majority of the public, almost everyone, would follow- majority of the public, almost everyone, would follow these| everyone, would follow these restrictions _ everyone, would follow these restrictions fastidiously, - everyone, would follow these . restrictions fastidiously, putting the gate — restrictions fastidiously, putting the gate of— restrictions fastidiously, putting the gate of the _ restrictions fastidiously, putting the gate of the country- restrictions fastidiously, putting the gate of the country first. - the gate of the country first. people — the gate of the country first. people across _ the gate of the country first. people across scotland - the gate of the country first. people across scotland and. the gate of the country first. . people across scotland and the united — people across scotland and the united kingdom _ people across scotland and the united kingdom deserve - people across scotland and the united kingdom deserve our. people across scotland and the - united kingdom deserve our upmost thanks— united kingdom deserve our upmost thanks and _ united kingdom deserve our upmost thanks and appreciation _ united kingdom deserve our upmost thanks and appreciation for - thanks and appreciation for everything _ thanks and appreciation for everything they— thanks and appreciation for everything they have - thanks and appreciation for everything they have done. thanks and appreciation for - everything they have done. but now it is high— everything they have done. but now it is high time— everything they have done. but now it is high time to _ everything they have done. but now it is high time to move _ everything they have done. but now it is high time to move forward. - everything they have done. but now it is high time to move forward. we| it is high time to move forward. we cannot— it is high time to move forward. we cannot continue _ it is high time to move forward. we cannot continue asking _ it is high time to move forward. we cannot continue asking the - it is high time to move forward. we cannot continue asking the public. it is high time to move forward. we| cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice _ cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a _ cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a much _ cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a much of— cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a much of their _ cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a much of their lives - cannot continue asking the public to sacrifice a much of their lives whenl sacrifice a much of their lives when we promised — sacrifice a much of their lives when we promised them _ sacrifice a much of their lives when we promised them that— sacrifice a much of their lives when we promised them that the - sacrifice a much of their lives when we promised them that the vaccine would _ we promised them that the vaccine would bring — we promised them that the vaccine would bring an— we promised them that the vaccine would bring an end _ we promised them that the vaccine would bring an end to— we promised them that the vaccine would bring an end to restrictions. | would bring an end to restrictions. conseguences _ would bring an end to restrictions. consequences for— would bring an end to restrictions. consequences for mental - would bring an end to restrictions. consequences for mental health, i consequences for mental health, physical— consequences for mental health, physical health _ consequences for mental health, physical health and _ consequences for mental health, physical health and family- consequences for mental health, i physical health and family finances have already — physical health and family finances have already been _ physical health and family finances have already been catastrophic. i physical health and family finances. have already been catastrophic. the balance _ have already been catastrophic. the balance has— have already been catastrophic. the balance has to — have already been catastrophic. the balance has to tilt _ have already been catastrophic. the balance has to tilt further— have already been catastrophic. the balance has to tilt further in - balance has to tilt further in favour— balance has to tilt further in favour of— balance has to tilt further in favour of moving _ balance has to tilt further in favour of moving forward. l balance has to tilt further in i favour of moving forward. we balance has to tilt further in - favour of moving forward. we have to make _ favour of moving forward. we have to make progress— favour of moving forward. we have to make progress back— favour of moving forward. we have to make progress back to _ favour of moving forward. we have to make progress back to normality. - favour of moving forward. we have to| make progress back to normality. the public _ make progress back to normality. the public have _
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make progress back to normality. the public have done _ make progress back to normality. the public have done what _ make progress back to normality. the public have done what was _ make progress back to normality. the public have done what was expected i public have done what was expected of them _ public have done what was expected of them now— public have done what was expected of them. now it's _ public have done what was expected of them. now it's time _ public have done what was expected of them. now it's time for— public have done what was expected of them. now it's time for this - of them. now it's time for this government— of them. now it's time for this government to _ of them. now it's time for this government to deliver- of them. now it's time for this government to deliver and - of them. now it's time for thisl government to deliver and hold of them. now it's time for this - government to deliver and hold up their end _ government to deliver and hold up their end of— government to deliver and hold up their end of the _ government to deliver and hold up their end of the bargain. _ government to deliver and hold up their end of the bargain. so- government to deliver and hold up their end of the bargain. so it - government to deliver and hold up their end of the bargain. so it is i their end of the bargain. so it is welcome — their end of the bargain. so it is welcome that _ their end of the bargain. so it is welcome that scotland - their end of the bargain. so it is welcome that scotland will- their end of the bargain. so it isl welcome that scotland will move their end of the bargain. so it is - welcome that scotland will move to level zero _ welcome that scotland will move to level zero next _ welcome that scotland will move to level zero next week _ welcome that scotland will move to level zero next week with _ welcome that scotland will move to level zero next week with some - welcome that scotland will move to . level zero next week with some minor modifications— level zero next week with some minor modifications and _ level zero next week with some minor modifications and that _ level zero next week with some minor modifications and that self— modifications and that self isolation _ modifications and that self isolation rules— modifications and that self isolation rules for- modifications and that self isolation rules for people i isolation rules for people travelling _ isolation rules for people travelling will— isolation rules for people travelling will be - isolation rules for people | travelling will be relaxed. isolation rules for people _ travelling will be relaxed. however, while _ travelling will be relaxed. however, while the _ travelling will be relaxed. however, while the statement _ travelling will be relaxed. however, while the statement provide - travelling will be relaxed. however, while the statement provide some i travelling will be relaxed. however, l while the statement provide some of the clarity— while the statement provide some of the clarity and — while the statement provide some of the clarity and answers _ while the statement provide some of the clarity and answers we _ while the statement provide some of| the clarity and answers we expected, the clarity and answers we expected, the challenges — the clarity and answers we expected, the challenges are _ the clarity and answers we expected, the challenges are still— the clarity and answers we expected, the challenges are still piling - the clarity and answers we expected, the challenges are still piling up - the challenges are still piling up for this— the challenges are still piling up for this snp— the challenges are still piling up for this snp government - the challenges are still piling up for this snp government on - the challenges are still piling up - for this snp government on multiple fronts _ for this snp government on multiple fronts for— for this snp government on multiple fronts. for testing _ for this snp government on multiple fronts. for testing protects, - fronts. for testing protects, standards _ fronts. for testing protects, standards have _ fronts. for testing protects, standards have dropped. . fronts. for testing protects, - standards have dropped. instead of restoring _ standards have dropped. instead of restoring those _ standards have dropped. instead of restoring those high _ standards have dropped. instead of restoring those high standards, - standards have dropped. instead of restoring those high standards, the snp have _ restoring those high standards, the snp have lowered _ restoring those high standards, the snp have lowered the _ restoring those high standards, the snp have lowered the bar- restoring those high standards, the snp have lowered the bar and - restoring those high standards, the snp have lowered the bar and we l restoring those high standards, the . snp have lowered the bar and we can to criteria _ snp have lowered the bar and we can to criteria as — snp have lowered the bar and we can to criteria as reports _ snp have lowered the bar and we can to criteria as reports this _ snp have lowered the bar and we can to criteria as reports this week- to criteria as reports this week have _ to criteria as reports this week have uncovered. _ to criteria as reports this week have uncovered. 0n— to criteria as reports this week have uncovered. on the - to criteria as reports this weekl have uncovered. on the vaccine roll-out, — have uncovered. on the vaccine roll—out, which _ have uncovered. on the vaccine roll—out, which is _ have uncovered. on the vaccine roll—out, which is happening. have uncovered. on the vaccine roll—out, which is happening at| have uncovered. on the vaccinel roll—out, which is happening at a phenomenal— roll—out, which is happening at a phenomenal pace _ roll—out, which is happening at a phenomenal pace across - roll—out, which is happening at a phenomenal pace across the - roll—out, which is happening at a . phenomenal pace across the whole roll—out, which is happening at a - phenomenal pace across the whole of the united _ phenomenal pace across the whole of the united kingdom _ phenomenal pace across the whole of the united kingdom and _ phenomenal pace across the whole of the united kingdom and allowed - phenomenal pace across the whole of the united kingdom and allowed us. phenomenal pace across the whole of| the united kingdom and allowed us to safely— the united kingdom and allowed us to safely ease _ the united kingdom and allowed us to safely ease restrictions _ the united kingdom and allowed us to safely ease restrictions at _ the united kingdom and allowed us to safely ease restrictions at a _ the united kingdom and allowed us to safely ease restrictions at a faster- safely ease restrictions at a faster pace, _ safely ease restrictions at a faster pace. progress— safely ease restrictions at a faster pace, progress here _ safely ease restrictions at a faster pace, progress here in— safely ease restrictions at a faster pace, progress here in scotland . safely ease restrictions at a faster. pace, progress here in scotland has now slowed — pace, progress here in scotland has now slowed. today's _ pace, progress here in scotland has now slowed. today's figures - pace, progress here in scotland has now slowed. today's figures are - pace, progress here in scotland hasj now slowed. today's figures are the worst _ now slowed. today's figures are the worst in— now slowed. today's figures are the worst in three — now slowed. today's figures are the worst in three months. _
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now slowed. today's figures are the worst in three months. our- now slowed. today's figures are the worst in three months. our nhs- worst in three months. our nhs readiness, — worst in three months. our nhs readiness, we _ worst in three months. our nhs readiness, we have _ worst in three months. our nhs readiness, we have multiple - readiness, we have multiple hospitals _ readiness, we have multiple hospitals at _ readiness, we have multiple hospitals at breaking - readiness, we have multiple hospitals at breaking point l hospitals at breaking point declaring _ hospitals at breaking point declaring code _ hospitals at breaking point declaring code black- hospitals at breaking point. declaring code black status. hospitals at breaking point - declaring code black status. all long _ declaring code black status. all long covid, _ declaring code black status. all long covid, an— declaring code black status. all long covid, an illness - declaring code black status. all long covid, an illness that- declaring code black status. all long covid, an illness that hasi declaring code black status. all. long covid, an illness that has the potential— long covid, an illness that has the potential to — long covid, an illness that has the potential to overwhelm _ long covid, an illness that has the potential to overwhelm our - long covid, an illness that has the potential to overwhelm our nhs . long covid, an illness that has the potential to overwhelm our nhs if| long covid, an illness that has the i potential to overwhelm our nhs if it is not _ potential to overwhelm our nhs if it is not tackled — potential to overwhelm our nhs if it is not tackled properly, _ potential to overwhelm our nhs if it is not tackled properly, the - potential to overwhelm our nhs if it is not tackled properly, the snp- is not tackled properly, the snp government— is not tackled properly, the snp government have _ is not tackled properly, the snp government have been - is not tackled properly, the snp government have been slow- is not tackled properly, the snp government have been slow toi is not tackled properly, the snp. government have been slow to act is not tackled properly, the snp- government have been slow to act and are refusing _ government have been slow to act and are refusing to— government have been slow to act and are refusing to consider— government have been slow to act and are refusing to consider our— are refusing to consider our proposals _ are refusing to consider our proposals for _ are refusing to consider our proposals for a _ are refusing to consider our proposals for a network - are refusing to consider our proposals for a network of. are refusing to consider our- proposals for a network of long covid _ proposals for a network of long covid clinics. _ proposals for a network of long covid clinics. and _ proposals for a network of long covid clinics. and parents - proposals for a network of long covid clinics. and parents are l proposals for a network of long. covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously— covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously waiting _ covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously waiting to _ covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously waiting to hear - covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously waiting to hear if - covid clinics. and parents are still anxiously waiting to hear if their. anxiously waiting to hear if their children— anxiously waiting to hear if their children will— anxiously waiting to hear if their children will need _ anxiously waiting to hear if their children will need to _ anxiously waiting to hear if their| children will need to self—isolate after _ children will need to self—isolate after a _ children will need to self—isolate after a year _ children will need to self—isolate after a year of _ children will need to self—isolate after a year of disrupted - children will need to self—isolate i after a year of disrupted learning. so let— after a year of disrupted learning. so let me — after a year of disrupted learning. so let me ask— after a year of disrupted learning. so let me ask the _ after a year of disrupted learning. so let me ask the first— after a year of disrupted learning. so let me ask the first minister, i so let me ask the first minister, will she — so let me ask the first minister, will she listen— so let me ask the first minister, will she listen to _ so let me ask the first minister, will she listen to our _ so let me ask the first minister, will she listen to our request - so let me ask the first minister, will she listen to our request for| will she listen to our request for additional— will she listen to our request for additional resources _ will she listen to our request for additional resources to - will she listen to our request for additional resources to boost. will she listen to our request for additional resources to boost a. will she listen to our request for. additional resources to boost a test and protect — additional resources to boost a test and protect and _ additional resources to boost a test and protect and return _ additional resources to boost a test and protect and return it _ additional resources to boost a test and protect and return it to - additional resources to boost a test and protect and return it to the - and protect and return it to the same _ and protect and return it to the same standards— and protect and return it to the same standards as _ and protect and return it to the same standards as before? - and protect and return it to thel same standards as before? now and protect and return it to the - same standards as before? now the vaccine _ same standards as before? now the vaccine roll—out _ same standards as before? now the vaccine roll—out is _ same standards as before? now the vaccine roll—out is at _ same standards as before? now the vaccine roll—out is at its _ same standards as before? now the vaccine roll—out is at its lowest - vaccine roll—out is at its lowest levelm — vaccine roll-out is at its lowest level... ~ ., , ., ., , level... we are 'ust going to pull away from — level... we are 'ust going to pull away from that — level... we are just going to pull away from that parliamentary . away from that parliamentary briefing for nowjust to tell you that you can continue to watch that whole debate. you have heard it will be quite lengthy and you can continue to watch it on iplayer or on bbc one scotland, so that is still running in various other ways, but we want to get the thoughts of our scotland correspondence about
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everything nicola sturgeon has announced. that was the follow—up for the conservatives. a lot of it, as we expected, as in considerable easing of restrictions from next monday and a few caveats besides, though. i should explain that the scottish parliament, in fact, has been recalled for this session from recess, that is why it all looks like that and everyone is dialling in from oakley. i do not think everyone has been pinged, at least we hope not. it is supposed to look like that. let's talk to james short. talk us through the key points because there are elements we expected, but some caveats and interesting comments about long covid and face coverings as well. yes, nicola sturgeon started off by reflecting on the fact that there has been this surge in cases in scotland over the early weeks of the summer. she said the delta variant
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of covid—19 was a game changer and that meant there had to be a gradual approach to easing restrictions. that was the best chance of minimising people going to hospital and the number of people dying. she confirmed, as you said, that scotland will go into level zero next monday. that is a low level of restrictions, but many restrictions still in place. she also said there would be some modifications to that original plan. in particular, they had expected that people would be able to meet in relatively large groups outside without social distancing. however, they have now said that those groups of 15, which are allowed to meet together, would have to distance from each other, so thatis have to distance from each other, so that is one relatively minor change. she emphasised that people should still carry on working from home. she said that was perhaps the most important modification to their plans. and as you say, it is also
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clear that face coverings, masks, are going to carry on being important in scotland in terms of the government's plans, notjust important but mandatory that they will still be required and the first minister said that that would be the case for some time to come. yes. minister said that that would be the case for some time to come. yes, so also, case for some time to come. yes, so also. james. — case for some time to come. yes, so also. james. in _ case for some time to come. yes, so also, james, in terms _ case for some time to come. yes, so also, james, in terms of _ case for some time to come. yes, so also, james, in terms of long - case for some time to come. yes, so also, james, in terms of long covid, | also, james, in terms of long covid, she was quite explicit, making the point that scientists are learning all the time about the impact of long covid, but there is still so much to be learned and she said that is one of the reasons, in her opinion, that this virus just cannot be underestimated and the fact that young people are getting it and, albeit, for the most part are not terribly unwell doesn't detract from theissue terribly unwell doesn't detract from the issue of long covid and we must be aware of it, she was saying. trio. be aware of it, she was saying. no, that's right- — be aware of it, she was saying. no, that's right. her _ be aware of it, she was saying. ijrr, that's right. her emphasis was really to say that clearly there is now this threat to young people who may not be vaccinated, although the
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she did say that first doses for everyone above the age of 18 have now been scheduled, although only about two thirds of them have had a first dose. she said she did not want young people to be a sort of experiment to see whether they could cope with covid—19 without being vaccinated and that, as you say, jane, was a principal reason, one of the main reasons why she said there needed to be caution in the scottish government cosmic approach, to make sure that as many of that age group along with everyone else was vaccinated and fully protected against the virus.— vaccinated and fully protected against the virus. james, many thanks for _ against the virus. james, many thanks for now. _ against the virus. james, many thanks for now. james - against the virus. james, many thanks for now. james sure - against the virus. james, many - thanks for now. james sure they're in glasgow. quite a delay on the line to james, as you will have gathered, but we could hear him loud and clear and later in the afternoon, i will speak to several business owners in various parts of scotland for their reaction to that and how much this announcement from nicola sturgeon may help their business after such a very, very
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difficult 18 months, of course. so more on all of that account. it is nearly half past, we will post right now and take a quick look at the weather. not a bad day out there today with lots of sunny spells. there are a few showers around, but nowhere near as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. into the evening hours, you can see very pleasant temperatures, high teens, low 20s and in some places clear skies. one or two showers may linger into the evening, particularly across central parts of the uk, but for most of us it is going to be a dry evening and night. clear skies across western and central areas, a bit more cloud for aberdeenshire along the north sea coast to east anglia and the south—east. tomorrow, a fine day. a lot of us wake up to clear blue skies. probably a bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon but, on the whole, it is a fine day and temperatures widely into the low or even mid 20s, so it really is going to feel quite warm tomorrow. the outlook, if you like warm
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weather it is a good one for you. it is going to turn increasingly warm and the weekend is looking promising. hello, this is bbc news with jane hill. the headlines... england footballer tyrone mings has criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed on the 19th ofjuly. face masks will remain mandatory,
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but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. mps are debating a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera — and is reported to be thriving! we are going to catch up with all the latest sports news. here's jane dougall. good afternoon. we start with the cricket because england are in action against pakistan in their third and final one day international at edgbaston this afternoon. ben stokes' side already have a 2—0 lead after having to name an entirely new squad ahead of the series. a covid outbreak meant england had to call up nine debutants just two days before the first match. england won the toss
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and elected to bowl — and they got an early wicket. fakhar zaman was caught by zak crawley off the bowling of saqib mahmood — it's currently 85—1 for the visitors after 20 overs. england and manchester united's marcus rashford has said he was "on the verge of tears" when he saw his mural — which was vandalised — had been covered in hearts and supportive notes from members of the public. rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka also received racist abuse online after they missed penalties as england lost to italy in the euro 2020 final. the artwork in manchester, was defaced after the final. but since then, notes and drawings with the words "role model", "wonderful human" and "hero" have been attached to the wall. rashford wrote on social media: "the communities that always wrapped their arms around me continue to hold me up." one father travelled all the way from birmingham with his sons to show them the positive messages. i wanted to remind them that despite what they've heard or may have seen, the players on the pitch that day,
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in particular the black players, are all very much still heroes, and i wanted to show them that not everybody thinks like that, and by coming here and seeing other people who are standing against the vile, visceral treatment that some of the players have seen is actually really heart—warming and fills me with hope. three england players have been selected for the euros team of the tournament — raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. sterling scored three times during the competition — while maguire and walker helped england's defence only conceed two goals in the whole tournament. the team also includes five players from champions italy. the line—up was chosen by uefa's team of 16 technical observers. the rugby league world cup will take place in england this autumn — after all competing nations signed an agreement. the tournament had been in doubt over issues with covid regulations and quarentine rules for those travelling back to australia and new zealand. there could be a surprise return to the british
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and irish lions squad. wales's alun wyn jones may be coming back, despite dislocating his shoulder just a few weeks ago. connor murray captains the team against south africa "a" tomorrow — with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on the 24th ofjuly — and head coach warren gatland will decide whetherjones rejoins the squad later today. he has met her remarkable recovery in terms _ he has met her remarkable recovery in terms of— he has met her remarkable recovery in terms of that injury, which was not as— in terms of that injury, which was not as bad — in terms of that injury, which was not as bad as they first thought. it would _ not as bad as they first thought. it would be — not as bad as they first thought. it would be a — not as bad as they first thought. it would be a boost to the squad. that experience — would be a boost to the squad. that experience and calibre to come back into the _ experience and calibre to come back into the squad. the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay
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on the site and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village in tokyo's harumi waterfront district, amid continuing covid restrictions. your organising committee and all your staff members are doing a fantasticjob in the preparations of this olympic and paralympic games in tokyo 2020. you have managed to make tokyo 2020. you have managed to make tokyo the best ever prepared city for olympic games. that's all the sport for now. you can keep up—to—date on the bbc sport website. a lot of major stories around this afternoon. for a moment, we will return to the debate thatis moment, we will return to the debate that is continuing in parliament. mps have been debating the government's controversial decision to cut the uk's spending
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on international development the proposal is to cut it from 0.7% to 0.5% of national income. they're due to vote on the issue this afternoon. the prime minister opened the debate, telling the commons the decision to cut the foreign aid budget was in response to increased spending in the pandemic. everyone will accept that when you are suddenly compelled to spend £407 billion on sheltering our people from an economic hurricane never experienced in living memory, there must inevitably be consequences for other areas of public spending. last year, under the pressure of the emergency, our borrowing increased five fold to almost £300 billion, more than 14% of gdp. the highest since the second world war. this year, our national debt is climbing towards 100% of gdp,
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the highest for nearly six decades. the house knows that the government has been compelled to take wrenching decisions and the international development act of 2015 expressly provides the fiscal circumstances that can allow a departure from the .7% target. the prime minister opening the debate. labour leader sir keir starmer confirmed his party would vote against the motion. he said that the cut in overseas aid to 0.5% "will effectively carry on indefinitely", despite government assurances it is a temporary measure. the motion is broad, and if i may say so, from this prime minister, typically slippery. the house should have had the opportunity for a straight up—down vote on whether to approve or reject the government's cut to overseas aid to 0.5%. this motion does not do that.
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but the chancellor's written ministerial statement is clear. if the motion is carried then the cut in overseas aid to 0.5% will effectively carry on indefinitely, and i'll expand on that point injust a moment. well, i will expand on that point and i will take interventions on it. but if the motion... just one moment. i'm going to develop that argument. when i get to it, i will give way so that argument can be tested in the usual way. but if the motion is rejected, and i quote, "the government will consequently return to spending of 0.7% of gni on national aid in the _ next calendar year. " so let me be clear, labour will vote to reject this motion tonight and to return
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overseas aid to 0.7% of gni. that was labour's leader. i'm joined now by mark mallock—brown, a former foreign office minister and un deputy secretary general. thank you for your time. you heard the prime minister's reasoning. he talked about the cost of covid. the highest borrowing since world war ii. this is why it has to be done, he said. i ii. this is why it has to be done, he said. . . ii. this is why it has to be done, he said. ., ., _ , ., he said. i have great sympathy for the prime minister _ he said. i have great sympathy for the prime minister around - he said. i have great sympathy for the prime minister around the - he said. i have great sympathy for i the prime minister around the issue of the extraordinary strains that covid has placed on the british economy, but what we've seen with covid is that it's notjust a british emergency, it's a global emergency, and it goes beyond the disease itself to the wider economic impact on public health as victims and development more generally. if thoseissues and development more generally. if those issues are not tackled then the covid crisis, however successful we are within the island of the uk, as we are seeing around issues like
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the delta variant, the problem doesn't go away. this 4 billion that this debate is over at this afternoon, that cut, you can do the maths. they spent 406 billion on covid response. 4 billion is less than 1% of that. this is a fight about relative peanuts in terms of the economic crisis in the uk, but for the poor women and others that are losing health services or the refugees in syria who have seen their aid levels dramatically cut, this is peanuts. this is life and death. —— this isn't peanuts. how do you categorise the government's approach to this, then? the uk is the only g7 country that has chosen to do this. everyone else is
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increasing their assistance, recognising the global dimension to this crisis. my organisation, along with very prominent british foundation, the children's foundation, the child ren's investment foundation, the children's investment fund foundation, we have come together to at least try to plug the hole in the support to poor women's reproductive health services. otherwise there is going to be a covid generation of unwanted pregnancies. while the rest of the world is moving in the direction of responding to this crisis, a prime minister who claims that he is behind a mission of global britain is actually the only one who, as you put it, is going back into his shell of a britain first to this global crisis. , ., ., , of a britain first to this global crisis. ,., ., , ., crisis. the government argues that the fi . ure crisis. the government argues that the figure could _ crisis. the government argues that the figure could go _ crisis. the government argues that the figure could go back— crisis. the government argues that the figure could go back once - crisis. the government argues that the figure could go back once the l the figure could go back once the economy is in a slightly better
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state. if it stayed at 0.54 five years, from your experience, what would be the impact of that? the way the have would be the impact of that? the way they have chosen _ would be the impact of that? the way they have chosen to _ would be the impact of that? the way they have chosen to calculate - would be the impact of that? the way they have chosen to calculate when . they have chosen to calculate when it would go back pushes it way down the road. it is a debt calculation, a clever wheeze from the uk treasury which is full of boffins able to create economic formulas that look good to a tory backbencher who is looking for an excuse on this. in truth, it would cut 0.5 indefinitely and that has meant, for example, family planning agencies international support has been cut by 80% in terms of uk support, and we are trying to plug that. we can only do it on a one—year basis. in my case, we are a human rights organisation, we are not a development organisation. we think
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the rights of women are so affected by this that we have stepped up to the plate for it. long term, it would mean a generation of covid babies, of unplanned pregnancies, of a dramatic effect on the economic well—being and security of poorer families around the world who would have to deal with unanticipated increases in family size, cuts in food aid which would further undermine their economic security, so the cost, because britain has been a proud and freely leading international donor, so the cost of falling back behind the germany and france and us and others, is both a financial one but also a leadership one. a post—brexit britain was meant to show that it had the soft power, leadership around exactly this kind of agenda, and we are a kind of going back into a cave on this one.
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very interesting to hear your thoughts. thank you forjoining us from new york. we will be talking to a government minister about this in the next hour. we will have the result of the vote whenever that comes through in the next couple of hours. so there is much more on that story to come. the time right now, to 44 pm. we are going to talk about the row about racist abuse which has been directed towards some england football players. the england defender has been saying that the home secretary stoked the fire by refusing to criticise fans who booed the england team for taking the knee after she previously described it as
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gesture politics. priti patel has condemned the abuse. the government has been defending her. let's get the very latest of this from our correspondent. politicians, footballers — professions where a career can be defined whether you go to the right or to the left. and rashford has missed! two professions now at the centre of a racism dispute. i know that the whole house willjoin me in condemning the sickening racist abuse directed last night at our heroic england football team on social media. soon after, england defender tyrone mings, who featured at euro 2020, refused the home secretary's support. on twitter he responded to her, claiming she had failed to back the squad's the anti—racism
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message in taking a knee. mings said the minister had stoked the fire ahead of the tournament by calling taking the knee "gesture politics", and now she was pretending to be disgusted. ms patel has yet to comment further. although taking a knee has been contentious, for some the argument that politics and sport should remain separate seems contradictory. the people that run this country are coming out and saying... i booing a gesture that l the players are taking — they're not condemning that. so how can you not condemn that but then come out and say it's . about the social media? sort your own house out first. sort your own house out first and then you can start - talking about other people and other organisations. . you can't say one thing and not do the other. i it just screams hypocrisy. social media companies continue to say they are doing everything they can to combat online abuse, although the sheer numbers using it
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globally makes it a tough task. the government meanwhile says it will start fining social media platforms if they fail to act. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups. that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. england's current squad has been described as the most diverse ever. players socially aware, amplified voices for those in the stands. captain harry kane saying those who abuse its members are not welcomed at games. this mural of marcus rashford here in south manchester was defaced hours after his penalty miss on sunday, but since then hundreds of people have turned up to post good luck messages of thanks and support.
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last night, the manchester united striker tweeted he can apologise for missing a spot kick but won't apologise for the colour of his skin. the mural is currently being restored, but restoring the confidence of the young england players affected by this could take much longer. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. let's discuss all of this with a former professional footballer. leroy rosenior — who played nearly 300 professional games for a number of clubs including fulham, queens park rangers and west ham united in the mid 1980's to early 1990's. he is now the vice president of show racism the red card. thank you forjoining us here. i mean, there is so much despair around all of this, one wonders where to begin. i suppose i'm interested, what went through your mind when you heard that very strong statement condemning priti patel earlier today? i
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statement condemning priti patel earliertoday?_ statement condemning priti patel earlier today? i totally understood where tyrone _ earlier today? i totally understood where tyrone was _ earlier today? i totally understood where tyrone was coming - earlier today? i totally understood where tyrone was coming from, . earlier today? i totally understood where tyrone was coming from, i | where tyrone was coming from, i think a lot of people did. going back to the start of this tournament and gareth southgate, uncertain how england would do and how they would perform, but we need to remember that the first thing they did was decide they wanted to show, as a group of players, how they wanted to campaign against racism and discrimination, and they chose to do it by taking the knee and explained with the deepest sincerity that it wasn't political, it was something that they wanted to do as a group because they as individuals experienced and knew lots of people that have experienced it, and for the sake of our society. and there was a lot of pushback. unfortunately, it was led by people in the government. i don't think it was forgotten. and then it has culminated with saqu at taking that penalty. as soon as he missed it, we all knew it was coming. and tyrone
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has just explained how they feel, that they don't feel supported by the government. somebody said that she didn't camp them the booing, she actually enabled it by saying that they could do it if they want. it made it very difficult for those young players. so why is she surprised when the group of players that are campaigning against this behaviour have to experience it at the end of the tournament when she has in effect enabled that sort of behaviour towards them. serra; has in effect enabled that sort of behaviour towards them. sorry to interru t. behaviour towards them. sorry to interrupt. she _ behaviour towards them. sorry to interrupt. she did _ behaviour towards them. sorry to interrupt. she did say _ behaviour towards them. sorry to interrupt. she did say that - behaviour towards them. sorry to interrupt. she did say that she i interrupt. she did say that she condemns the racist abuse that had been directed at the three young men following on from sunday night's final. ., �* ., , ,. ,, ., final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, _ final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, and _ final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, and as _ final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, and as you - final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, and as you said, i final. you've had this discussion as much as i have, and as you said, it almost despair. how many times we hear people condemning things but not actually doing anything about it. this is a group of players that wanted to do something about it.
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people say it's a gesture. it is a gesture, but it's a gesture that has led to anti racism and discriminatory behaviour being highlighted over a long period of time. that comes from a group of players that have experienced it and are vulnerable, not only in terms of the england team but in terms of the premier league as well, that is extremely powerful. and people cannot get from that. and it hasn't been political and it wasn't political. gareth southgate eloquently put it at the start of the tournament. it was an opportunity for everybody to come together. instead of them receiving pushback from their own government. and that is why tyrone said what he did. i totally understand it, and that is why tyrone said what he did. itotally understand it, i totally agree with it in all honesty, and it's this thing where people say you can't mix politics and sport together. you know, i've said this many times, if you go back in history to adolf hitler turning up in history to adolf hitler turning up at the berlin games trying to mix
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politics and sport. and then priti patel says this is a gesture politics. but our prime minister turns up at the semifinal or quarterfinal in a number ten shirt with beau jo written on the back. politics had sport has always been mixed together, but what this group of players tried to do was that people understood that this was an anti—racist message they were trying to get out there. and then politics has been foisted upon them by their own government. the has been foisted upon them by their own government.— has been foisted upon them by their own government. the government says it one social— own government. the government says it one social media _ own government. the government says it one social media companies - own government. the government says it one social media companies to - own government. the government says it one social media companies to do - it one social media companies to do more. one government minister said that they want to look at legislation that will find social media companies if they don't act against online racism. as a social media part of the problem? we all know it makes it very easy to tap on a keyboard and say things you might not say in public? jen. a keyboard and say things you might not say in public?— not say in public? jen, you're absolutely — not say in public? jen, you're absolutely right. _ not say in public? jen, you're absolutely right. the - not say in public? jen, you're i absolutely right. the keywords not say in public? jen, you're - absolutely right. the keywords in those statements were they want to do more. they have to make sure it
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happens, and they are looking at legislation. they should be putting into law the legislation that is required to change this all around. ijust will say required to change this all around. i just will say that that is something that i've heard for many years and nothing has happened, as we have seen with social media. and something has got to happen because i think everybody has had enough of it. the marcus rashford thing, we all knew that that was going to be defaced, and the people have been magnificent in pushing back against that and saying, "look, the young man has come down from birmingham to show his kids the positive side of what marcus rashford has done," and then covering up the graffiti. because i think people want to do something about it. they don't want to enable the sort of people. so that was a really positive thing, and that is what the government should be doing. they should be making sure that we are taught the resources and weapons to tackle
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this. theyjust talk resources and weapons to tackle this. they just talk about it saying, "we are looking at this." they need to want to do it a little bit more. . . ~ they need to want to do it a little bit more. ., ., ,, i. . ,, ., bit more. can i take you back to something _ bit more. can i take you back to something you _ bit more. can i take you back to something you said _ bit more. can i take you back to something you said at _ bit more. can i take you back to something you said at the - bit more. can i take you back to - something you said at the beginning. you talked about when you were watching the game and bukayo saka took his attempt at the ball and our hearts were in our mouth. you said instantly that you knew what was going to happen. thatjust breaks my heart when you say that, because i was watching along with everybody else and that didn't occur to me. i watched and i thought, "this kid! " he's 19 and he is being so brave, doing something i could never do or most of us could never do in a million years, and it wouldn't have entered my head that there would be a pushback that we are now sitting here, discussing. and ijust really naive? here, discussing. and i 'ust really naive? ., ., ., ., ., naive? you are not naive, and it shouldn't- _ naive? you are not naive, and it shouldn't- l _ naive? you are not naive, and it shouldn't. i was _ naive? you are not naive, and it shouldn't. i was explaining - naive? you are not naive, and it i shouldn't. i was explaining earlier, there is this debate about white
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privilege. the words white privilege don't help the debate at all. i was trying to expend people that white privilege is not about people having loads of things and people not working hard and people having the privileged life where they have everything they need. white privilege is just an absence of inconvenience because you haven't experienced the inconvenience for the impediments that people like me, of my colour, have every day. so you wouldn't recognise it. you would have to have it explained to you. i am seeing that he is a black man, if he misses that penalty the colour of his skin is going to be a major problem. foryou, it is his skin is going to be a major problem. for you, it is something you haven't experienced. it's not naive, it'sjust you haven't experienced. it's not naive, it's just something you don't know, so you need to be told that and explained too that this is how it is for black people. when i walk into a shop. my dad said to me, "when you walk into a shop, make sure you keep your hands where people can see them because they might think you are trying to steal
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something." this is that we have had to deal with in society for all our lives. as you say, he isjust to deal with in society for all our lives. as you say, he is just a young man, 19 years old, a local lad, but as a young black man that is something that he has to experience, which is different to a young white man. and so that is why young white man. and so that is why you didn't recognise it. now you understand because i've explained it to you. and that is what education is all about, understanding what people have to go through and what they have to endure to get to life on a daily basis.— on a daily basis. leroy, i could talk to you _ on a daily basis. leroy, i could talk to you for _ on a daily basis. leroy, i could talk to you for so _ on a daily basis. leroy, i could talk to you for so much - on a daily basis. leroy, i could| talk to you for so much longer. on a daily basis. leroy, i could i talk to you for so much longer. i on a daily basis. leroy, i could - talk to you for so much longer. i am going to have to leave it there but thank you very much for your time this afternoon. there is much more to come on that after three. we are edging up to the weather prospects, but just one edging up to the weather prospects, butjust one more story to bring you. for the first time in 400 years, a beaver has been born on exmoor.
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the national trust has released footage of the baby on an estate in somerset and said it is "thriving." the once—native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats but were hunted to extinction for theirfur and meat in the 16th century. it was a shock, but in a nice way. hopefully— it was a shock, but in a nice way. hopefully it — it was a shock, but in a nice way. hopefully it is part of a positive trend _ hopefully it is part of a positive trend to — hopefully it is part of a positive trend to developing healthy environment for wildlife in our river— environment for wildlife in our river systems, and beaver are definitely _ river systems, and beaver are definitely a part of that. they are an animal— definitely a part of that. they are an animal that makes a lot of positive — an animal that makes a lot of positive changes, and i think we can work— positive changes, and i think we can work with— positive changes, and i think we can work with them. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafenaker. for some of us, yesterday was a total wash—out with flash flooding in places. different story today. the sun is out, scattered cloud. there are a few showers in the forecast but not as many of them and they won't be as heavy. here is the recent satellite picture. not a case of clear blue skies across the uk,
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but a decent enough date. coastal areas bearing best through this afternoon and this evening. into this evening, there might be one or two showers are lingering through the midlands, northern england and scotland, but for many of us it is a case of evening sunshine and comfortable. one or two showers may linger into the late evening hours, but then overnight it is dry for many of us, especially out towards the west. from the coast of kent and around east anglia, along the north sea coast to northern scotland, it is going to be quite an overcast night. a sting in the morning, it might start off cloudy, but thanks to this building from wednesday onwards, the weather is improving. there is a chance clouds could increase for a time in the north—west of the country. they beat
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17 for stornoway. for the vast majority of us, it is in the low or mid 20s. here's a look at thursday. the high pressure is building towards us, keeping the weather front at bay. but are heading towards iceland rather than in our direction, so that means increasingly sunny. here is thursday's forecast. that will probably bubble up, but we are only talking about fairweather clouds. for many of us, it is going to be a case of sunny skies. temperatures on thursday widely into the mid 20s. coastal areas will be a little bit cooler. at the end of the week and into the weekend, the high pressure is right on top of us with light winds, and it's going to feel even warmer. we are expecting temperatures up to about 26, perhaps even 27 celsius. as we head into next week, we keep the high pressure, we keep the fine weather, and it's going to stay warm. it's not looking bad at all. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at 3pm: england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's �*pretending' to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel: she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed next week. facemasks will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. mps are debating a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid
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budget by £4 billion. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera and is reported to be thriving! good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. two days after england's euros final defeat, the row over the online racist abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings says the home secretary priti patel �*stoked the fire' by refusing to criticise fans who booed the england team for taking the knee — after she previously described it as �*gesture politics.�* ms patel has condemned the racist abuse players have faced online following the match, and the government has defended her, saying she fully
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understood the issues of racism having been a victim of "appalling online abuse" herself. and later today, the prime minister will meet social media companies and reiterate the urgent need for action against online abuse. nesta mcgregor reports. politicians, footballers — professions where a career can be defined whether you go to the right or to the left. and rashford has missed! two professions now at the centre of a racism dispute. i know that the whole house willjoin me in condemning the sickening racist abuse directed last night at our heroic england football team on social media. soon after, england defender tyrone mings, who featured at euro 2020, refused the home secretary's support. on twitter he responded to her, claiming she had failed to back the squad's the anti—racism message in taking a knee.
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mings said the minister had stoked the fire ahead of the tournament by calling taking the knee "gesture politics", and now she was pretending to be disgusted. ms patel has yet to comment further. although taking a knee has been contentious, for some the argument that politics and sport should remain separate seems contradictory. the people that run this country are coming out and saying... i booing a gesture that l the players are taking — they're not condemning that. so how can you not condemn that but then come out and say it's . about the social media? sort your own house out first. sort your own house out first and then you can start - talking about other people and other organisations. . you can't say one thing and not do the other. i it just screams hypocrisy. social media companies continue to say they are doing everything they can to combat online abuse,
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although the sheer numbers using it globally makes it a tough task. the government meanwhile says it will start fining social media platforms if they fail to act. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups. that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. england's current squad has been described as the most diverse ever. players socially aware, amplified voices for those in the stands. captain harry kane saying those who abuse its members are not welcomed at games. this mural of marcus rashford here in south manchester was defaced hours after his penalty miss on sunday, but since then hundreds of people have turned up to post good luck messages of thanks and support.
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last night, the manchester united striker tweeted he can apologise for missing a spot kick but won't apologise for the colour of his skin. the mural is currently being restored, but restoring the confidence of the young england players affected by this could take much longer. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. we can speak now to former player marvin sordell, now a member of the fa's inclusion advisory board. he's played for teams including bolton wanderers and burnley. he retired in 2019 at the age of 28. he cites his mental health as one of the reasons for deciding to retire. thank you so much for your time this afternoon. can i start at that point? to what extent, for those who do not know much about your
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professional career, to what extent was the racism that you suffered are part in deciding to leave the game professionally anyway? it part in deciding to leave the game professionally anyway?— part in deciding to leave the game professionally anyway? it played a massive part- _ professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a _ professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big _ professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big role _ professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big role in - professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big role in a - professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big role in a lot i professionally anyway? it played a massive part. a big role in a lot ofj massive part. a big role in a lot of people's lives as well, notjust my own, and their careers, too. it is a traumatic thing that unfortunately a lot of us have to go through. it takes a massive toll in the affecting your mental health. band affecting your mental health. and did ou affecting your mental health. and did you suffer— affecting your mental health. and did you suffer that online, when you were on the pitch? explain the context of this and the frequency with which you had to put up with this? it with which you had to put up with this? ., , ., with which you had to put up with this? .,, ., _, , ., ., ., with which you had to put up with this? .,, ., , ., ., ., , this? it was a combination, to be honest. ithink— this? it was a combination, to be honest. i think one _ this? it was a combination, to be honest. i think one of _ this? it was a combination, to be honest. i think one of the - this? it was a combination, to be| honest. i think one of the biggest things people do not take into consideration so much is that when it happens to fellow team—mates, friends, family members, it hurts just as much as if it was directed straight at me, so as well as me
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personally suffering from it, having seen the effects on all of the other people that i have seen suffer from it, it hurtsjust people that i have seen suffer from it, it hurts just as people that i have seen suffer from it, it hurtsjust as much. band people that i have seen suffer from it, it hurtsjust as much.— it, it hurts 'ust as much. and when ou it, it hurtsjust as much. and when you discussed _ it, it hurtsjust as much. and when you discussed it _ it, it hurtsjust as much. and when you discussed it with _ it, it hurtsjust as much. and when you discussed it with fellow - you discussed it with fellow players, with team management, i mean, what assistance was there? what was said to you? what did people say to try to persuade you, not that you should have to put up with anything at all, but to try to keep going with your career? yeah, i mean, keep going with your career? yeah, i mean. one — keep going with your career? yeah, i mean. one of— keep going with your career? yeah, i mean, one of the _ keep going with your career? yeah, i mean, one of the biggest _ keep going with your career? yeah, i mean, one of the biggest things - keep going with your career? yeah, i mean, one of the biggest things and | mean, one of the biggest things and one of the first things that people often say is rise above it, ignore it, and you get to that stage where you start to think, why should i have to? why should it always be me thatis have to? why should it always be me that is having to take myself out of the situation? and i didn't up walking away from football and i did take myself out of that situation, but that's because i did not see the situation changing whatsoever and that something that we need to really try to figure out how we address that, because we often go
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through these same cycles where an incident happens, we are outraged, we talk about it and then nothing happens and we kind of go into a period of limbo and there we go into the same cycle again in a couple of weeks or a couple of months or whenever it may be. bud weeks or a couple of months or whenever it may be.— weeks or a couple of months or whenever it may be. and yet it seems to me that the — whenever it may be. and yet it seems to me that the england _ whenever it may be. and yet it seems to me that the england team, - whenever it may be. and yet it seems to me that the england team, it - whenever it may be. and yet it seems to me that the england team, it is - to me that the england team, it is being talked about so much, and the differences that gareth southgate has made, his approach, his attitude, his determination to build attitude, his determination to build a really young, diverse, inclusive team, i mean, that, to me, as someone who doesn't understand football, if i am honest, seems really striking. dc positivity in that? , , ., ., , , that? yes, it is great to see, but i don't necessarily _ that? yes, it is great to see, but i don't necessarily think _ that? yes, it is great to see, but i don't necessarily think that - that? yes, it is great to see, but i don't necessarily think that is - that? yes, it is great to see, but i don't necessarily think that is his l don't necessarily think that is his single goal. a single goal is to win football matches and itjust happens that some of the most talented players in the country are black and are from an ethnic minority background. i think he is not
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necessarily actively choosing black players because of that and i don't think that is necessarily right to say that. think that is necessarily right to sa that. �* , , , ., say that. but, sure, his “0b is to t to say that. but, sure, his “0b is to try to win — say that. but, sure, his “0b is to try to win matches _ say that. but, sure, his “0b is to try to win matches and h say that. but, sure, his job is to try to win matches and win - say that. but, sure, his job is to try to win matches and win turn| try to win matches and win turn immense, but use it on the fa's inclusion advisory board, what is being discussed right now, particularly in light of sunday but what, in practical terms, particularly in light of sunday but what, in practicalterms, do particularly in light of sunday but what, in practical terms, do you want to see done? what should government be doing, what should sporting regulatory bodies be doing and watch a social media companies be doing? and watch a social media companies be doinu? . v . and watch a social media companies be doin? ., �*, ., ., and watch a social media companies be doinu? ., �*, ., ., , ., be doing? that's a great question. as a starter _ be doing? that's a great question. as a starter on _ be doing? that's a great question. as a starter on the _ be doing? that's a great question. as a starter on the inclusive - as a starter on the inclusive advisory board, we discussed this and ourjob is to give advice and feed into the executive board at the fa. all we can do is give advice and it is up to them whether they want to take it or not. one of the biggest things in football is collective action and i think a lot of the governing bodies within the game of football and even when you bring in government as well, everyone wants to solve the
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problems, whatever they may be, whether it is racism, whether it is mental health, rather than collectively working together to find a way and find a solution. on the solution, again, this is something i have spoken about several times. something i have spoken about severaltimes. for something i have spoken about several times. for myself, as someone who has been subjected to racial abuse and other players subjected to abuse, it is not up to us to find a solution because in this instance, we are the victims. you would not ask a victim of any other type of abuse to find a solution, you would go to the abusers and say, you need to stop. and that is the only way, really, that racism can stop is by racist people not being racist and we can talk about what we would like, but at the end of the day, that is the number—one solution, is people not being racist. number-one solution, is people not being racist-— being racist. absolutely. are not the perpetrator, _ being racist. absolutely. are not the perpetrator, you _ being racist. absolutely. are not the perpetrator, you are - being racist. absolutely. are not the perpetrator, you are not - being racist. absolutely. are not the perpetrator, you are not the| the perpetrator, you are not the problem. i absolutely take on board what you are saying. but, for
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example, today the government say they are talking to social media companies this afternoon and want to see more done to clampdown on online racist abuse. to what extent is that helpful and to what extent is the problem the explosion of social media? it problem the explosion of social media? ., ., , , ., ., ,, media? it allows people to talk about these — media? it allows people to talk about these hateful _ media? it allows people to talk about these hateful views - media? it allows people to talk about these hateful views that l media? it allows people to talk - about these hateful views that they have in a very open and very direct way to these players and to other people as well, notjust football players but other people in society. the government has its role to play. i do not think they are necessary innocent of perpetuating what is happening and it is the environment, it isn't... it is individuals but notjust individuals alone, it is the environment that they are or perceived to be allowed to do and say these things without repercussions or excuses are made for them. very often it isjust
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repercussions or excuses are made for them. very often it is just an individual, a minority, because of this or because of that, because they missed a penalty, but there should not be able or about. it is wrong and that's it. edit should not be able or about. it is wrong and that's it.— wrong and that's it. of course. marvin, thank _ wrong and that's it. of course. marvin, thank you _ wrong and that's it. of course. marvin, thank you so - wrong and that's it. of course. marvin, thank you so much. i wrong and that's it. of course. i marvin, thank you so much. now wrong and that's it. of course. - marvin, thank you so much. now to one of our other main story here this afternoon. mps have been debating the government's controversial decision to cut the uk's spending on international development from 0.7% to 0.5% of national income. they're due to vote on the issue this afternoon. i'm looking at the monitoring there and it looks like it is continuing. the prime minister opened the debate, telling the chamber the decision to cut the foreign aid budget was in response to increased spending in the pandemic. everyone will accept that when you are suddenly compelled to spend £407 billion on sheltering our people from an economic hurricane never experienced in living memory, there must inevitably consequences
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for other areas of public spending. last year, under the pressure of the emergency, our borrowing increased fivefold to almost £300 million, more than 14% £300 billion, more than 14% of gdp, the highest since the second world war. labour leader sir keir starmer confirmed his party would vote against the motion. he spoke in the commons a little earlier. the question is broad and, if i may say so, from this prime minister, typically slippery. the house should have had the opportunity for a straight up—down vote on whether to approve or reject the government's cuts to overseas aid to 0.5%. this motion does not do that. but the chancellor's written ministerial statement is clear — if the motion is carried, then the cut in overseas aid to 0.5% will effectively carry
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on indefinitely and i will expand theresa may has announced that she's to vote against the government this afternoon for the first time ever. the former prime minister told the commons that the foreign aid cut would mean britain turning "its back on the world's poor". we are told there will be dire consequences for tax and public spending if this motion is defeated tonight. we have borrowed £400 billion. where are the dire warnings about that? it seems that £4 billion is really bad news, 400 billion, who cares? as has been pointed out, the two tests have only been met in one calendar year in the last 20. i have beenin calendar year in the last 20. i have been in this house for nearly a quarter of a century. during that time, i have never voted against a three line whip from my party. i suffered at the hands of rebels as
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prime minister and know what it is like to see party colleagues voting against their government. we made a promise to the poorest people in the world and the government has broken that promise. this motion means the promise may be broken for years to come. with deep regret, i will vote against the motion today.— against the motion today. former prime minister _ against the motion today. former prime minister to _ against the motion today. former prime minister to may _ against the motion today. former prime minister to may there. - simon clarke is mp for middlesbrough south and east cleveland. good afternoon. good afternoon. how will ou be good afternoon. good afternoon. how will you be voting _ good afternoon. good afternoon. how will you be voting and _ good afternoon. good afternoon. how will you be voting and why? _ good afternoon. good afternoon. how will you be voting and why? i - good afternoon. good afternoon. how will you be voting and why? i will- will you be voting and why? i will be votin: will you be voting and why? i will be voting with — will you be voting and why? i will be voting with the _ will you be voting and why? in ll be voting with the government this evening and doing so pleased that a very sensible policy has been set out which will allow us to know exactly how we will return to spending is your .7% of gdp on international aid as soon as the economic circumstances allow anything that is something that people across the country will warmly welcome. we want to make sure that the uk continues with our incredibly strong record on international development assistance but that also we balance that
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against the really difficult circumstances which the prime minister set out. the worst recession in 300 years, borrowing at over £300 billion or 15% of gdp, i think most people think it is absolutely right that we have adjusted our international aid spending until such a time that are economic to have stabilised and i think that is right. but economic to have stabilised and i think that is right.— economic to have stabilised and i think that is right. but many people in our think that is right. but many people in your party _ think that is right. but many people in your party do _ think that is right. but many people in your party do rrot _ think that is right. but many people in your party do not think _ think that is right. but many people in your party do not think that - think that is right. but many people in your party do not think that is - in your party do not think that is right. a former prime ministers voting against her party for the first time ever. you have andrew mitchell pointing out that cutting help for the poorest people on the planet in the middle of a pandemic when the sun we are talking about amounts to 1% of all the borrowing we have done during covid. it is we have done during covid. it is very important _ we have done during covid. it 3 very important that we recognise our finances are in a really very difficult position as we have borrowed over £300 billion in the last year alone compared to £57 billion per year before this pandemic and that is a really serious burden which we are all going to have to pay for and,
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indeed, future generations are going to have to pay for as well and all spending needs to be reviewed in that context. the uk remains one of the leading development funders in the leading development funders in the world. on the basis of mozilla .5 percentage of gdp, we will still be spending £10 billion on international aid this year and that comes on top of our contribution to the international vaccine effort, on top of the british army's commitment top of the british army's commitment to peacekeeping operations, top of our commitment to refugee programmes, we are a major contributor, the second highest contributor, the second highest contributor in the g7 and we have a very proud track record on this and i can look my constituents in the eye and say we are doing a heck of a log for the world's poorest and rightly so. none of us want to do anything other than that we do have to recognise the circumstances in which we are operating. we do have to remember that every pound we are spending is money that we are borrowing from ourselves and borrowing from ourselves and borrowing from ourselves and borrowing from future generations and that the choices involved in
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this are, in fact, less spending or higher taxes every time we go down this path and it is right the government arejust spending this path and it is right the government are just spending to reflect these very difficult circumstances just as it is right that we are also setting out that we will return to spending 0.7% of gdp is sooner we are not borrowing to fund day—to—day spending and when debt is falling and i think that is a sense of place for us to be. in a sense of place for us to be. in the last hour, i spoke to mark maddock brown, a former minister, very experienced with the un and i asked about that point, the fact that the aspiration is for it to go back to 0.7%. he said that is not the case. he says it is a clever wheeze from the uk treasury. in truth, what is being debated will cut it indefinitely. is he right? is not right. we met the circumstances required to return to 0.7% of gdp as recently as 19 and the previous will be our forecast to this showed us
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that when debt was falling, so it is perfectly possible for us to hit these conditions and we all hope that with the economy recovering a bit more strongly than perhaps we feared a few months ago that we might be in a position to do so really reasonably quickly, but it is important to remember that the treasury has to make incredibly difficult decisions here which affect all of our lives, the taxes we pay, the borrowing going on in our name, my name and yours and that of our children, and it is incredibly important that this is always in the balance and incredibly important to remember that the uk is very generous aid contributor on whatever metric we use and we spend far more than most of our international contemporaries even on spending 0.5% of gdp as we a present, so i think we have a very strong track record and we have every intention of returning to 0.7% of gdp as the prime minster said on the floor of the house this afternoon, but we must recognise we are in unprecedented circumstances with the worst recession in three sessions with make centuries on
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every policy priority has to be considered in light of that i think most viewers will think that is right and sensible.— most viewers will think that is right and sensible. simon clarke, thank you- _ scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has announced that the country will move to its lowest level of covid restrictions from next week. limits on the number of people who can meet — both inside and outside — will be relaxed, as will social distancing rules. but she told msps that some legal measures — such as face covering — will remain in place for some time. she gave more detail in holyrood a little earlier. so we will continue to ease restrictions. we're not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. let me turn then to the detail of our decisions. from monday 19th ofjuly, all parts of scotland not currently there will move to level zero — however, this move will be made with certain modifications applied consistently across the country to ensure that we're not easing up faster than is sensible given
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the current situation that we face. full details of the changes are on our website, but i will highlight some key pointsjust now. in level zero, up to eight people from up to four households can meet indoors at home, compared to six people from three households in levels one and two. up to ten people from up to four households can meet in a public indoor space such as a pub or restaurant, and up to 15 people from up to 15 households can meet doors — whether any private garden or public space. whether in a private garden or public space. children under 12 already do not count towards the total number of people, and from monday they will not count towards the total number of households either. in level zero, up to 200 people can attend weddings and funerals. soft play centres can open, as they could at level one but not at level two, and for hospitality businesses, at level zero, unlike in level two, there's no requirement for customers to pre—book a two—hour slot to go to a pub or restaurant.
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however, customers will still be required to provide contact details to help test and protect, and they will still be required to wear face coverings — except when seated. there will still be limits on the size of events and stadium attendances, but these will increase outdoors to 2,000 seated and 1,000 standing and indoors to 400. as of now, as like now, organisers will be able to apply to stage larger events. let me turn out to the modifications to our indicative plans. firstly, hospitality venues in level zero in all parts of scotland will require to close at midnight. this is a change to what we had previously indicated for level zero, that venues would follow local licensing rules. this reflects the fact that indoor hospitality, despite the sector's sterling efforts — and i want to pay tribute to those — does remain a relatively risky environment, particularly later at night when people might be less likely to follow rules.
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a midnight closing time represents progress from level one and level two, but it will still help to mitigate some of that additional risk. nicola sturgeon announcing that at around tpm this afternoon. let's discuss the changes that kick in from next monday. we have two business owners working in very different fields to see what those might mean for them. with me is tracey o'connor who owns two nurseries in musselburgh. nurseries as in children rather than plants. also i'm joined by anna christopherson, co—owner of swedish bar and restaurant group boda bars in edinburgh. how very warm welcome to both of you. thank you very much. i hope you had a chance to go through much of what nicola sturgeon has been outlining. tracy o'connor, your
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broad thoughts first of all, are there things that will kick in next week that will help you, do you feel? ., , ., ., , feel? know, there is not really an hinu feel? know, there is not really anything in _ feel? know, there is not really anything in the _ feel? know, there is not really anything in the announcement| feel? know, there is not really - anything in the announcement that changes for us. we have been open throughout both lockdowns and obviously still continuing to offer a service, so not immediately. for me, i am looking for information on self isolation because that really is affecting us as a business and so we welcome the view of that from nicola sturgeon, but we need more information on that now. so no changes for me at the moment, no. i changes for me at the moment, no. i just quickly on that self isolation points, have you been affected by members of staff being pinged, lots of people are talking about that at the moment, then there's staffing problems? the moment, then there's staffing roblems? ~ , , , ~ problems? absolutely. in this week, i have four staff _ problems? absolutely. in this week, i have four staff members _ problems? absolutely. in this week, i have four staff members who - problems? absolutely. in this week, i have four staff members who are l i have four staff members who are self isolating and that gives me a
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huge issue in trying to offer a service. as a children's nursery, we operate in very tight staffing ratios, so if i do not have the correct snubber of staff, i singly cannot offer the service to parents and remember, those parents are working so they rely on me to do theirjobs, so it really is one of theirjobs, so it really is one of the biggest challenges actually over the biggest challenges actually over the last year that i am facing is staff having to self—isolate. the last year that i am facing is staff having to self-isolate. yes, thank you- _ staff having to self-isolate. yes, thank you. and _ staff having to self-isolate. yes, thank you. and now, _ staff having to self-isolate. yes, thank you. and now, you - staff having to self-isolate. yes, thank you. and now, you run - staff having to self—isolate. yes, thank you. and now, you run bars and restaurants and so there are a number of changes actually. what is your take on it?— your take on it? first of all, i thou~ht your take on it? first of all, i thought it — your take on it? first of all, i thought it was _ your take on it? first of all, i thought it was positive - your take on it? first of all, i thought it was positive that i your take on it? first of all, i i thought it was positive that we your take on it? first of all, i - thought it was positive that we can be open _ thought it was positive that we can be open longer. i think that is the most _ be open longer. i think that is the most important thing for us is to be able to— most important thing for us is to be able to increase our sales. we have already— able to increase our sales. we have already started paying back our loans — already started paying back our loans so — already started paying back our loans. so it is very important that we can— loans. so it is very important that we can be —
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loans. so it is very important that we can be open later, so midnight is a very— we can be open later, so midnight is a very positive thing.— a very positive thing. that's one of the first changes, _ a very positive thing. that's one of the first changes, you _ a very positive thing. that's one of the first changes, you can - a very positive thing. that's one of the first changes, you can stay - a very positive thing. that's one of. the first changes, you can stay open until midnight. i think there is going to be less emphasis on people having to book tables and all sorts of things. that, presumably, is it good for business? yes of things. that, presumably, is it good for business?— of things. that, presumably, is it good for business? yes it is. a lot of businesses _ good for business? yes it is. a lot of businesses have _ good for business? yes it is. a lot of businesses have had _ good for business? yes it is. a lot of businesses have had issues - good for business? yes it is. a lot | of businesses have had issues with no-shows — of businesses have had issues with no—shows and cancellations and it makes _ no—shows and cancellations and it makes it— no—shows and cancellations and it makes it more difficult, but, yeah, that is— makes it more difficult, but, yeah, that is positive. i think we can see a light— that is positive. i think we can see a light in— that is positive. i think we can see a light in the — that is positive. i think we can see a light in the tunnel, for sure. we have _ a light in the tunnel, for sure. we have to _ a light in the tunnel, for sure. we have to keep the facemasks, that is fine, _ have to keep the facemasks, that is fine, one _ have to keep the facemasks, that is fine, one metre distance is also all right, _ fine, one metre distance is also all right, i_ fine, one metre distance is also all right, i think. fine, one metre distance is also all right, ithink. slow fine, one metre distance is also all right, i think. slow progress, fine, one metre distance is also all right, ithink. slow progress, but fine, one metre distance is also all right, i think. slow progress, but i think— right, i think. slow progress, but i think customers are comfortable with that. think customers are comfortable with that as _ think customers are comfortable with that as we _ think customers are comfortable with that. as we said earlier, self isolation _ that. as we said earlier, self isolation is an issue. i think if people — isolation is an issue. i think if people test negative, they should be able to _ people test negative, they should be able to come back to work. well,
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similarly to _ able to come back to work. well, similarly to tracy, _ able to come back to work. well, similarly to tracy, have _ able to come back to work. well, similarly to tracy, have you - able to come back to work. well, similarly to tracy, have you lost i similarly to tracy, have you lost staff in the periods when you have been able to open, again, have you lost staff who phone you up and say they cannot come to work? yes. they cannot come to work? yes, exactl , they cannot come to work? yes, exactly. and _ they cannot come to work? yes, exactly, and they _ they cannot come to work? yes, exactly, and they have - they cannot come to work? yes, exactly, and they have to - they cannot come to work? yes, exactly, and they have to isolate for ten _ exactly, and they have to isolate for ten days. i think there is a difference _ for ten days. i think there is a difference if you live with someone that has _ difference if you live with someone that has tested positive and you are at risk— that has tested positive and you are at risk all— that has tested positive and you are at risk all the time or if you just met— at risk all the time or if you just met someone and then test negative, then you _ met someone and then test negative, then you should be able to go back to work _ then you should be able to go back to work. and it affects financially also the — to work. and it affects financially also the member who has to self—isolate. also the member who has to self-isolate.— self-isolate. yes. at quick thoughts. _ self-isolate. yes. at quick thoughts, you _ self-isolate. yes. at quick thoughts, you mentionedl self-isolate. yes. at quick - thoughts, you mentioned face coverings. i am interested thoughts, you mentioned face coverings. iam interested in thoughts, you mentioned face coverings. i am interested in that's because nicola sturgeon was quite strong on that, made quite a specific political point about face coverings and they will still be needed when you are walking around in any bar or restaurant that you own. i am in any bar or restaurant that you own. iam interested, does that in any bar or restaurant that you own. i am interested, does that put people off coming? can you assess that were actually does it reassure your customers, do you think? i your customers, do you think? i think it is more reassuring than
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putting — think it is more reassuring than putting them. we have not seen any problems _ putting them. we have not seen any problems. people sometimes forget so we have _ problems. people sometimes forget so we have to _ problems. people sometimes forget so we have to remind people a lot, please _ we have to remind people a lot, please put — we have to remind people a lot, please put on your facemask, but when _ please put on your facemask, but when they— please put on your facemask, but when they are sitting down, they still enjoy— when they are sitting down, they still enjoy their meal and drink without— still enjoy their meal and drink without face coverings. i mean, it is probably— without face coverings. i mean, it is probably more difficult for everyone who is working to wear a facemask— everyone who is working to wear a facemask for six or seven hour shifts — facemask for six or seven hour shifts. , ., ., , ., ., ., shifts. yes, not always a lot of fun, is shifts. yes, not always a lot of fun. is it. _ shifts. yes, not always a lot of fun, is it, especially _ shifts. yes, not always a lot of fun, is it, especially when - shifts. yes, not always a lot of fun, is it, especially when you| shifts. yes, not always a lot of - fun, is it, especially when you wear glasses, she said! lots of us in that position. they do get in the way, that is for sure. tracy, can i talk more broadly about your experience over the last 18 months, really? you have had to stay open and provided a rightful service for top if people cannot have their children looked after, they cannot go to work either and so it is so vital that the service you provide, can you even reflect on what the last 18 months have been like for you and whether you have felt
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supported, i suppose?- you and whether you have felt supported, i suppose? yes, i have felt sopported- — supported, i suppose? yes, i have felt supported. i _ supported, i suppose? yes, i have felt supported. i had _ supported, i suppose? yes, i have felt supported. i had really - supported, i suppose? yes, i have felt supported. i had really good i felt supported. i had really good support from our local authority, east lothian council, and they were really great with us. i think like others, i na vely thought it would only last for a few weeks at the very beginning in the first lockdown and then obviously it continued on into the summer and parents were amazing as well. they were great support and really understood that we could only open for key worker parents and we had an amazing group of staff as well. the second lockdown, i think we found harder because certainly by that point, parents were really needing to work, so it was more difficult to offer a service just to those of key worker status and the funding slightly changed for us, so, yes, it has been a roller—coaster of a year, like many other nurseries and businesses, but i would say this is the hardest
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part is now, being fully reopened and with higher community transmission now, so i am actually finding it harder now than i did at any pointjust because staffing is so difficult. any pointjust because staffing is so difficult-— so difficult. goodness, that is really striking. _ so difficult. goodness, that is really striking. so _ so difficult. goodness, that is really striking. so you - so difficult. goodness, that is really striking. so you really, | really striking. so you really, really striking. so you really, really do need to hear about that next stage of potential lifting, don't you? that is clearly really important for you.— don't you? that is clearly really important for you. absolutely, yes. because my — important for you. absolutely, yes. because my thank _ important for you. absolutely, yes. because my thank you _ important for you. absolutely, yes. because my thank you so _ important for you. absolutely, yes. because my thank you so much - important for you. absolutely, yes. because my thank you so much to l important for you. absolutely, yes. - because my thank you so much to both of you. all the best for next week. thank you very much indeed. time for the weather now. abs, not a bad day out there today, with lots of sunny spells. there are a few showers around but nowhere near as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. and into the evening hours, you can see very pleasant temperatures, high teens, low 20s — and in some places clear skies. one or two showers may linger into the evening, particularly across central parts
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of the uk. but for most of us, it is going to be a dry evening and night. clear skies across western and central areas. a bit more cloud from aberdeenshire along the north sea coast to east anglia and the south—east. tomorrow, a fine day. a lot of us wake up to clear blue skies. probably a bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up during the afternoon, but on the whole it's a fine day. and temperatures widely into the low or even the mid 20s, so it is going to feel quite warm tomorrow. and the outlook... well, a few like warm weather, it's a good one for you. it's going to turn increasingly warm and the weekend is looking promising. hello, this is bbc
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news with jane hill. the headlines... england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. tyrone mings' teammate marcus rashford says he will "never apologise for who he is" — after he was subjected to racist abuse online. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed next week. face masks will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. mps are debating a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good afternoon. pakistan are going well against england in their third and final odi at edgbaston, losing just two wickets so far.
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england won the toss and put pakistan in to bat. after saqib mamood took the early wicket of fakhar zaman, england were having trouble breaking up the partnership of babar azam and imam ul haq. matt parkinson finally got the breakthough. he bowled imam ul haq — gone for 56. babar approaching his century on 89. pakistan are 184—2 after 34 overs. ben stoke's side already have a 2—0 lead. now, to the racism row involving england players after the euro 2020 loss to italy. after a mural of marcus rashford was vandalised by racists, the england and manchester united player said he was moved to tears when he saw members of the public had covered the graffiti in hearts and positive messages. the artwork in manchester was defaced after the final. but notes and drawings with the words "role model", and "hero" have been attached to the wall. rashford wrote on social media: "the communities that always
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wrapped their arms around me continue to hold me up." rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka also received racist abuse online after they missed penalties in the final at the weekend. one father travelled all the way from birmingham with his sons to show them the messages. from birmingham with his sons i wanted to remind them that despite what they've heard or may have seen, the players on the pitch that day, in particular the black players, are all very much still heroes, and i wanted to show them that not everybody thinks like that, and by coming here and seeing other people who are standing against the vile, visceral treatment that some of the players have seen is actually really heart—warming and fills me with hope. three england players have been selected for the euros team of the tournament — raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. sterling scored three times during the competition — while maguire and walker helped england's defence only conceed two goals in the whole tournament. the team also includes five players from champions italy. the line—up was chosen by uefa's
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team of 16 technical observers. despite worries about covid restrictions, the rugby league world cup will take place in england this autumn. the decision was announced earlier after all competing nations signed an agreement. the tournament had been in doubt over issues with quarentine rules for those travelling back to australia and new zealand. there could be a surprise return to the british and irish lions squad. wales's alun wyn jones may be coming back, despite dislocating his shoulder just a few weeks ago. connor murray captains the team against south africa "a" tomorrow — with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on the 24th ofjuly — and head coach warren gatland will decide whetherjones rejoins the squad today. the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay on the site and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers
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didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village in tokyo's harumi waterfront district, amid continuing covid restrictions. lewis hamilton says he is aiming to inspire more young black people to take up science and engineering subjects in a bid to help formula one become more diverse. the seven—time world champion has published the results of his commission into lack of diversity in the sport. he says long—term projects need to be put into action to ensure more people of colour work in the sport. very nerve—racking moment but super exciting as well because it is the beginning of a journey for pushing change in my industry. i beginning of a journey for pushing change in my industry.— change in my industry. i thought that me being — change in my industry. i thought that me being in _ change in my industry. i thought that me being in this _ change in my industry. i thought that me being in this sport, - change in my industry. i thought that me being in this sport, and| change in my industry. i thought. that me being in this sport, and we thought, we would break the mould and open pathways to other talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity in the industry no one
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has an answer for it, so that is my purpose in my reason for being here. more on the bbc sport website. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we are going to talk more about covid and the listing of restrictions. doctors' leaders have criticised the government's decision to relax covid restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". it comes as groups representing bus, coach and rail companies have said that face coverings will not be made compulsory for passengers in england — when the rules are lifted in six days' time. the government is advising people to wear masks if services are busy. our health correspondent jim reed reports. the law may be changing in england, but how will the public respond? from next week, masks and social distancing will no longer be enforced.
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instead, it will be up to individuals and businesses to make their own decisions. i think the way he's done it is great and i think lifting it completely, i think, should go slowly. i think it's quite scary. it might be too soon. the vaccines are definitely working, they've done theirjob, _ it's stopping the deaths - which was the main concern, so i don't see it as a big problem. with covid infections rising, the language from government has become more cautious. ministers are stressing that life should not return to normal straightaway. it's about learning to live with the virus, to strike a balance, but also accepting that the restrictions themselves have health consequences as well as economic consequences, so whichever way the government goes on this, there are consequences. the government's scientific advisers think that even with vaccinations,
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this latest wave of the virus could lead to between 1,000 and 2,000 hospital admissions a day. that would be half the level seen injanuary, but the doctors' union is warning there could still be an impact on the nhs. we know the infection rate has gone down in the older population, so why not use that scientific evidence, spend a few more weeks vaccinating the younger population properly, double vaccinating them, and at that time, if you remove these restrictions, you will not see the same impact of increases of infection and hospitalisation. in scotland, the first minister has been setting out whether some restrictions can be relaxed next week. in wales, lockdown rules will be reviewed tomorrow and in northern ireland, some covid measures will be eased on july 26th. in england, new guidance has also been published for the 3.5 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable. that group have been advised to visit supermarkets at quieter times of the day and continue to limit other close contacts if possible.
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if the government were just to say, ok, we recognise that on public transport, where some people have no choice but to go because they don't own a car, and if we put ourselves in the shoes of somebody who has to use public transport to go for chemo or dialysis, it absolutely makes sense that they have confidence that people will be wearing face coverings. the government says that delaying lifting restrictions in england would carry more risk as the weather gets colder and children return after the summer holidays. this is, though, a difficult moment in the pandemic and no—one can really be sure what will happen to infections over the next few months. as we've been discussing, the new rules mean that businesses can open any next few weeks. that includes theatres and cinemas, for example. and the arts sector we know was very badly hit over the course of the last 18 months.
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joining me now is ebenezer bamgboye — deputy director of the jermyn street theatre, and resident director at the almeida theatre. hi, good to see you. what is thejermyn street theatre planning to do? we are going to continue getting our members to wear masks in the theatre. we are going to open up our capacity, and that is great news for us.— to open up our capacity, and that is great news for us. there are several thins great news for us. there are several things going — great news for us. there are several things going on _ great news for us. there are several things going on there. _ great news for us. there are several things going on there. the - great news for us. there are several things going on there. the first - things going on there. the first things going on there. the first thing is full capacity, because we all know that theatres allowed to sell 40% of their tickets, you just can't run a production and make any
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money at all at that picture, can you? that in itself, i assume, is headlined good news for you? absolutely. we are a 70 seat theatre in the west end. opening a theatre for 25 people is just not feasible stop it is essential that we can open at full capacity. i am extremely grateful to the government for giving us the culture recovery fund. we have been able to open as a result of that. very grateful for that. however, that money doesn't last forever. without being able to open at full capacity, we are very much not out of the woods, so we very much welcome this news. i’m very much welcome this news. i'm interested that you say that the audience is still going to wear facemasks when they come to a production. is that something you are doing because you just feel that is what is going to make people feel
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comfortable, and therefore more inclined to book a ticket? yes. comfortable, and therefore more inclined to book a ticket? yes, the organisation _ inclined to book a ticket? yes, the organisation that _ inclined to book a ticket? yes, the organisation that represents - inclined to book a ticket? yes, the organisation that represents the i organisation that represents the majority of theatre, the movers and shakers of the industry, they issued an official statement strongly encouraging their members to encourage audiences, to strongly encourage audiences, to strongly encourage audiences, to strongly encourage audiences to wear a mask. so it is a broader kind of agreement within theatre, and we are going to encourage audience members to do that. it's what audience members want, it's what they want to feel safe, so it's absolutely something we wanted to implement. that safe, so it's absolutely something we wanted to implement. at what oint do we wanted to implement. at what point do you _ we wanted to implement. at what point do you review _ we wanted to implement. at what point do you review that? - we wanted to implement. at what point do you review that? at - we wanted to implement. at what point do you review that? at what j point do you review that? at what point do you review that? at what point do you review that? at what point do how do you decide when you reach a point where some audience members think, "do you know what, i would love to go and see a production that is 2.5 hours long, but that is a really long time to sit with a mask on." frequently do you discuss all of that? we sit with a mask on." frequently do you discuss all of that?— you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves _
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you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves as _ you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves as in _ you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves as in service - you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves as in service to - you discuss all of that? we totally see our selves as in service to the j see our selves as in service to the audience member. we make all of our decisions based on what we believe what they want. the evidence right now point is that audiences wanting to feel a sense of safety and security. we don't make the decisions in discussion, in discussion with each other, it's true that that we come to these decisions. �* . . ~ true that that we come to these decisions-— true that that we come to these decisions. . ., . ,, ., ., ,., decisions. and a quick thought about the last 18 months _ decisions. and a quick thought about the last 18 months generally. - decisions. and a quick thought about the last 18 months generally. we - the last 18 months generally. we can't overstate what a difficult time it's been. and there's been some capitalfunding time it's been. and there's been some capital funding that you referred to, but we also know a huge number of people in the arts fell through the cracks, they weren't eligible for financial support. friends of yours, colleagues of yours is to have been caught up in that. what are your thoughts about the extent to which the industry can bounce back? its the extent to which the industry can bounce back?— bounce back? it's tricky because film and television _ bounce back? it's tricky because film and television have - bounce back? it's tricky because - film and television have government backed insurance and we don't have
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that, so the big issue were facing is that with the test and trace app, people are being pinged. but that means is that people have to isolate for ten days at a time, even if they have taken the test and it is negative. what that means is, productions have to go dark for ten days and the theatres hire a full financial casualty of that. we want the same thing that film and television has, and we desperately need test and release full stop we know that is happening but we need it for us now. lots of shows are having to shut down, and it's financially ruinous and not sustainable.— financially ruinous and not sustainable. m ., ., ,. ,, sustainable. much more to discuss with ou, sustainable. much more to discuss with you. but _ sustainable. much more to discuss with you, but thank _ sustainable. much more to discuss with you, but thank you _ sustainable. much more to discuss with you, but thank you very - sustainable. much more to discuss with you, but thank you very much j with you, but thank you very much and we wish you all the best. we hope ticket sales are going really well. lovely to talk to you. the deputy director ofjermyn street theatre in london. now two entirely
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different matters. a shortage of hgv drivers is hitting crisis level in the uk — with demand increasing across supply chains as the country recovers from covid. from this week, the government is allowing drivers to work slightly longer hours in order to deal with the shortage but the industry has criticised the move, and said it's not nearly enough to deal with the situation. our reality check correspondent chris morris is with me. it's a problem which has been growing for some time. don't forget, hgv lorries are responsible for getting stuff all around the country. a survey of hundreds of haulage companies suggested that there are now more than 100,000 driver vacancies, and that is from a pre—pandemic total. so one in six
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jobs are vacant at the moment, and tens of thousands of those drivers were eu citizens that were living and working here. so the warnings have been flooding in from all sorts of companies. we have heard warnings from tesco and other supermarkets, from tesco and other supermarkets, from harrow though. but also from farmers and picking companies, construction companies, and manufacturers that rely on this just—in—time delivery system. message from all of them is that things are getting worse. haifa message from all of them is that things are getting worse. how much ofthat things are getting worse. how much of that is covid, _ things are getting worse. how much of that is covid, and _ things are getting worse. how much of that is covid, and how _ things are getting worse. how much of that is covid, and how much - things are getting worse. how much of that is covid, and how much of i of that is covid, and how much of thatis of that is covid, and how much of that is other factors?— that is other factors? covid is clearly part — that is other factors? covid is clearly part of _ that is other factors? covid is clearly part of it. _ that is other factors? covid is clearly part of it. as - that is other factors? covid is clearly part of it. as positive | clearly part of it. as positive cases spread across the country, a lot of those european drivers went home and they haven't come back. the other thing that covid has meant is that there have to be hgv driver tests. a lot of them haven't been taking place. last year, there were
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25,000 fewer successful tests in 2019, so not replacing drivers who have gone, and it would appear a lot of the other drivers in the industry have taken covid lock downs as an opportunity to retire. a third reason which has been problematic for drivers is that there have been tax changes. something called ir 35. and i have forgotten the second reason, which is brexit. brute and i have forgotten the second reason, which is brexit. we can't foruet reason, which is brexit. we can't forget that- _ reason, which is brexit. we can't forget that. brexit _ reason, which is brexit. we can't forget that. brexit had _ reason, which is brexit. we can't forget that. brexit had been - reason, which is brexit. we can't forget that. brexit had been a i reason, which is brexit. we can't| forget that. brexit had been a big roblem forget that. brexit had been a big problem because _ forget that. brexit had been a big problem because it _ forget that. brexit had been a big problem because it meant - forget that. brexit had been a big problem because it meant that i forget that. brexit had been a big problem because it meant that a | forget that. brexit had been a big i problem because it meant that a lot of those drivers that used to come and go as they please when we were in the single market now can't do it so easily any more. there is this additional border bureaucracy. a lot of drivers from the rest of the union found that bureaucracy was too much for them. the third reason, i think we can go on to that now, is tax changes. something called ir 35, which involves people who are not on the payroll. a lot of those european
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drivers used to work through agencies. it's more expensive to employ them now and they get less money. all the incentives for those european drivers to come and work here seem to have been taken away, and there are big shortages. so here seem to have been taken away, and there are big shortages.- and there are big shortages. so how does this get _ and there are big shortages. so how does this get solved? _ and there are big shortages. so how does this get solved? as _ and there are big shortages. so how does this get solved? as you - and there are big shortages. so how does this get solved? as you said, i does this get solved? as you said, the government _ does this get solved? as you said, the government has _ does this get solved? as you said, the government has done - does this get solved? as you said, the government has done one - does this get solved? as you said, i the government has done one thing which is for a temporary period it is slightly increasing the number of hours that drivers are allowed to drive. just for a four week period that began this week and runs until early august. for two days a week, a driver that was able to drive nine hours cannot drive 11 hours, as we can deliver a bit more. but of course there had been criticisms, saying they are compromising safety standards. the industry think that is not a big enough move to make a difference anyway. another thing the industry has been calling for is to produce temporary visas for drivers from abroad, even if they are not paid very much they would like to be able to bring them in on an emergency basis. something that the
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home office doesn't seem that keen on. the government says, it is working with industry, it is going to have more apprentices and so forth, but the fear in the industry i think is that summer holidays are looming, even more drivers are going to be taking time off, and the crunch could come sooner rather than later. bill crunch could come sooner rather than later. �* , . ~ later. all right, interesting. thank very much- _ at least 92 people have died in a major fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in southern iraq. more than a 100 others have been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say is likely to have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion. jean mackenzie reports. crews are struggling to fight the fire. rescue workers were unable to
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make it through the thick smoke. this morning, relatives were left to search for their loved ones among a pile of burnt bodies. the temporary covid ward left mangled by the heat. the building was new, opened just three months ago. a basic structure tacked onto the side of the hospital stop unable to withstand the force of what was likely an oxygen tank exploding. it quickly became a tinderbox. the front door was burning and people couldn't get out. the ceiling fell on them. the people couldn't get out. the ceiling fell on them-— fell on them. the pandemic was already proving _ fell on them. the pandemic was already proving too _ fell on them. the pandemic was already proving too much - fell on them. the pandemic was already proving too much for. fell on them. the pandemic was i already proving too much for iraq's woeful health system to cope with. on its knees after years of war,
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neglect and chronic mismanagement. covid cases here climbing. grief quickly turned to anger, crowds gathered outside the hospital, charting against authorities and a health system that has once again failed to protect them. this is the second such tragedy in a matter of months. in april, more than 80 people died after a oxygen cylinder exploded at a covid hospital in baghdad. as more bodies are counted, the prime minister has ordered the arrest of health officials and the hospital manager. promising repercussions for this catastrophic failure at a place intended to save lives, has ended up taking so many.
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we've been talking a lot this afternoon about that debate in the comments about that overseas aid budget. it is continuing. we have just been hearing from the chancellor, but that means we think the vote will certainly be in the next hour. just to say, we are keeping an eye on that. some criticism, a lot of the criticism of the government. to reset mate think she would be voting against the government for the first time in her political career. this is to reduce the overseas aid budget from 0.7% to 0.5%. -- the overseas aid budget from 0.7% to 0.5%. —— former prime minister to reset mate. as soon as we have a vote on that, we will be back to bring the results to you. a man who murdered two children in the 1980s is set to be freed from prison after a review
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into a parole board decision to released him was challenged by the government. colin pitchfork, who is now in his early 60s, was jailed for life in 1988 after raping and strangling 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds gave us this update. what is happening today is that a challenge to that decision, which came from the justice secretary robert buckland, has been rejected by a seniorjudge. when colin pitchfork�*s release was made public, the justice secretary was very concerned. there was a lot of media coverage and concern for the families of the two girls that died in the 1980s. he appealed against the decision, saying it was procedurally unfair or irrational. now a judge has decided today that
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this is a case of considerable seriousness and complexity and notoriety, in his words, terrible consequences of brutal rapes and murders of two innocent girls will forever darken the lives of the families concerned. but he said he was satisfied the decision to release this man was justified. the justice secretary has responded, the ministry ofjustice has responded in the last hour or so, saying that the department is disappointed by this outcome. its sympathies are with the families of lynda mann and don ashworth, and that is changing the law to ensure that child murderers face the life in prison. a 53—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a woman who was stabbed to death
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in myroe near limavady in londonderry. police said the woman, and the man who has been arrested, had been on holiday in the area. a report of a stabbing was received last night. officers, along with the ambulance service, attended the scene but the woman was pronounced dead. google has been fined a record 427 million pounds by the french authorities in a row over copyright. the authority said google had not negotiated in good faith about paying for press reports it runs on its news aggregator site. it has given google two months to fix the problem or face further fines of up to a million dollars a day. for the first time in 400 years, a beaver has been born on exmoor. the national trust has released footage of the baby
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on its estate in somerset and said it is �*thriving' the once—native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats but were hunted to extinction for theirfur and meat in the 16th century. u nless unless one of the beavers had shrunk, we were like, "that is definitely a kit." hopefully it is part of a positive trend to developing healthy environment and wildlife in our river systems, and beaver are definitely a part of that. they are an animal that makes a lot of positive changes, and i think we can work with them. much more coming _ think we can work with them. much more coming pp — think we can work with them. much more coming up from _ think we can work with them. much more coming up from 4pm. - think we can work with them. much more coming up from 4pm. now for the weather prospect. a different story today. the sun is out, scattered cloud. there are a few showers in the forecast, but not as many of them and they won't be as heavy. coastal areas faring best through the course of this afternoon
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and this evening. into this evening, there might be one or two showers lingering through the midlands, northern england and scotland, but for many of us it is a case of evening sunshine and comfortable temperatures between the high teens and the low 20s. one or two showers may linger into the late evening hours, but then overnight it is dry for many of us, especially out towards the west. central areas, too. from the coast of kent to northern scotland, it is going to be quite an overcast night. it will police are of a little cloudy, but thanks to this high pressure building from wednesday onwards, the weather is improving. increasingly more sunny as we go to the next few days. wednesday morning, a little cloudy to start. there is a chance clouds will actually increase for a time in the north—west of the country. maybe 17 for stornoway. for the vast majority of us, it is in in the vast majority of us, it is in in the low or mid 20s. he will start to
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feel that work from wednesday onwards. the high pressure we have been promising is building towards us, keeping the weather fronts at bay. moving towards iceland rather than to our direction, meaning increasingly sunny. here is thursday's forecast. cloud could bottle up during the course of the afternoon, butjust fairweather cloud. it is going to be a case for many of us of sunny skies. temperatures widely into the mid 20s. coastal areas will be a little bit cooler. at the end of the week and into the weekend, the high pressure is right on top of us with light winds, and it's going to feel even warmer. we are expecting temperatures up to about 26, perhaps even 27 celsius as we head into next week. we keep the high pressure, we keep the good weather, and it's going to stay warm. it's not looking not at all. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at four. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's �*pretending' to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel: she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed next week. face coverings will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. mps have been voting on a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion.
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former prime minister theresa may says she is voting against the government for the first time ever: we made a promise to the poorest people in the world. the government has broken that promise. this motion means that promise may be broken for years to come. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera and is reported to be thriving! two days after england's euros final defeat, the row over the online we are to go straight to the commons. we are to go straight to the commons-— we are to go straight to the commons. ._ , ., ._ , commons. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. _
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commons. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. chancellor, - commons. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. chancellor, point- have it. unlock. chancellor, point of order — have it. unlock. chancellor, point of order fsir— have it. unlock. chancellor, point of order. ~ ., ,, have it. unlock. chancellor, point of order. ~ .«r , of order. mr speaker, i recognise the passion _ of order. mr speaker, i recognise the passion and _ of order. mr speaker, i recognise the passion and conviction - of order. mr speaker, i recognise the passion and conviction with i the passion and conviction with which many members spoke today in favour of the 0.7% target, member voted both for and against the government's motion, in fact, and to me that is the salient point, mr speaker. while not every memberfelt able to vote for the compromise, the substantive matter as to whether we remain committed to the 0.7% target notjust now but for decades to come is clearly a point of significant unity in this house. today's vote has made that commitment more secure for the long—term whilst helping the government to fix the problems with our public finances and continue to deliver for our constituents today. i want to commit to the house, mr speaker, but both i and the prime minister and the foreign secretary will continue to work with all honourable members on how we can continue to be a global leader, helping the world's poorest, and how
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to improve our aid to spending, targeted most effectively and ensure it is getting to those who need it most and having now provided the house with an effective vote on this matter, the government will move forward with its planned approach. i forward with its planned approach. i now suspend the house for two minutes— now suspend the house for two minutes to enable the necessary arrangements for the next business. so the _ arrangements for the next business. so the government has won, as you can see there, by 35 votes. the overseas aid budget will be cut from 0.7% of output to 0.5%. helen kat has been following the debate and the vote... is this the sort of narrow win that the government was anticipating, helen? it narrow win that the government was anticipating, helen?— anticipating, helen? it was always lookin: anticipating, helen? it was always looking like _ anticipating, helen? it was always looking like the _ anticipating, helen? it was always looking like the numbers - anticipating, helen? it was always looking like the numbers were - anticipating, helen? it was always i looking like the numbers were going to be pretty tight. this is probably actually, i would think, slightly better than the government was hoping for at some point in previous months. there have been some attempts by backbench mps to force a vote on this issue earlier because the cut is already in place. that's
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actually came into place injanuary and that is why mps were angry because there was not an opportunity to vote before the cuts coming into place, so this is more about when it will be restored. if the government had not managed to pass this motion this afternoon, then the implication was that it would be restored to 0.7% from january next year. what this does is say that it will stay in place, it will stay at 0.5% until the treasury's two tests are met, at which point it will return to 0.7%. those are that the government is no longer borrowing to fund day—to—day spending and that the underlying debt is also falling. there was a lot of concern among some mps speaking in the debate this afternoon about how long it might take for that to happen. several people said there were only a few instances of that happening within the last few decades, so there were concerns about how it might take, some treasury sources said a couple of years, some forecasted for five
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years, but the government says we are reasserting a commitment to returning to 0.7% at some point, not about the principle but about when you return. find about the principle but about when ou return. �* , ., you return. and yet, even with that, some very — you return. and yet, even with that, some very strong — you return. and yet, even with that, some very strong words _ you return. and yet, even with that, some very strong words from - you return. and yet, even with that, some very strong words from some | some very strong words from some very senior conservatives as you have a former prime minister saying she is voting against the government for the first time in her entire political career and very strongly using the word promise, the government is breaking a promise. this is what was notable, i think, about some of the objections to this from the conservative backbenches. they were from some very senior figures. theresa may has had a very long career in parliament and she said she had never once voted against what is called a three line whip in parliament, the strongest instruction from parliament to vote for it, she had never everfull to do against one of those and said she had done that today. we'll have to see from the list whether she did that and how many conservatives full
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to get the government, but that gives you some sense of the strength of feeling the other former ministers such as andrew mitchell talked about possibility of trashing the uk's reputation. david davies spoke about choosing between life and money, so there were a lot of strong feelings on both sides of the chamber, actually, about this decision to do this. the government's argument was that if you did not find the money there, it would have to come from elsewhere. there were others speaking about the need, the manifesto commitment to fiscal responsibility, but there was a huge amount of passion we heard this afternoon, actually, in those speeches, worrying about the impact that this continuing cuts would have, because that difference between 0.7% of national income in 0.5% of national income is worth about £4 billion a year and so the concern is that that is money that goes to projects that do all sorts of things, an example raised was family planning in some regions of
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the world, and so the un's family planning would see a cut of 86% of its ukfunding. planning would see a cut of 86% of its uk funding. so for individual projects, that is quite big, and there was a lot of concerns raised about how this will mean fewer girls going to school, for example, less money for these projects. the government says it fancies things in other ways, government says it fancies things in otherways, notjust government says it fancies things in other ways, not just overseas government says it fancies things in other ways, notjust overseas aid funding and it remains one of the biggest donors by share of gdp in the world in terms of giving foreign aid, but, obviously, there will be an impact and particularly in some of those individual projects on the ground. of those individual pro'ects on the round. , ., ., ground. helen, we will let you go and gather— ground. helen, we will let you go and gather reaction. _ ground. helen, we will let you go and gather reaction. thank - ground. helen, we will let you go and gather reaction. thank you i ground. helen, we will let you go i and gather reaction. thank you very much for now. just to tell you that after half past four, i will be talking to the ceo of the charity care international for their reaction to that cut in the budget. that is coming up a little later. two days after england's euros final defeat, the row over the online
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racist abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings says the home secretary priti patel �*stoked the fire' by refusing to criticise fans who booed the england team for taking the knee — after she previously described it as �*gesture politics. ms patel has condemned the racist abuse players have faced online following the match, and the government has defended her — saying she fully understood the issues of racism having been a victim of "appalling online abuse" herself. and later today — the prime minister will meet social media companies — and reiterate the urgent need for action against online abuse. nesta mcgregor reports. politicians, footballers — professions where a career can be defined whether you go to the right or to the left. and rashford has missed! two professions now at the centre of a racism dispute.
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i know that the whole house willjoin me in condemning the sickening racist abuse directed last night at our heroic england football team on social media. soon after, england defender tyrone mings, who featured at euro 2020, refused the home secretary's support. on twitter he responded to her, claiming she had failed to back the squad's the anti—racism message in taking a knee. mings said the minister had stoked the fire ahead of the tournament by calling taking the knee "gesture politics", and now she was pretending to be disgusted. ms patel has yet to comment further. although taking a knee has been contentious, for some the argument that politics and sport should remain separate seems contradictory. the people that run this country are coming out and saying... i booing a gesture that i the players are taking — they're not condemning that.
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so how can you not condemn that but then come out and say it's i about the social media? sort your own house out first. sort your own house out first and then you can start i talking about other people and other organisations. i you can't say one thing and not do the other. i it just screams hypocrisy. social media companies continue to say they are doing everything they can to combat online abuse, although the sheer numbers using it globally makes it a tough task. the government meanwhile says it will start fining social media platforms if they fail to act. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups. that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. england's current squad has been
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described as the most diverse ever. players socially aware, amplified voices for those in the stands. captain harry kane saying those who abuse its members are not welcomed at games. this mural of marcus rashford here in south manchester was defaced hours after his penalty miss on sunday, but since then hundreds of people have turned up to post good luck messages of thanks and support. last night, the manchester united striker tweeted he can apologise for missing a spot kick but won't apologise for the colour of his skin. the mural is currently being restored, but restoring the confidence of the young england players affected by this could take much longer. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. leroy rosenior played for clubs including fulham, queens park rangers and west ham in the mid 1980s and early 1990s. he's now vice president
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of show racism the red card and told me why he supports tyrone mings' comments. i totally understood where tyrone was coming from. i think a lot of people do. i mean, we remember going back to the start of this tournament and gareth southgate, you know, all that uncertainty about what england would do, how they would perform, but we've got to remember that the first thing they did was to say that they wanted to show, as a group of players, how they wanted to campaign against racism and discrimination and they chose to do it by taking a knee and explained with the deepest sincerity that it wasn't political, it was something that they wanted to do as a group because they, as individuals, experienced it and knew lots of people who had experienced it and for the sake of our society and there was lots of pushback on that and, unfortunately, it was led by people in the government and i don't think it was forgotten and then it's culminated with saka taking that penalty and as soon as he took that penalty, i said to my partner sat next to me, i said, here it comes. as soon as he missed it,
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we all knew it was coming. and tyrone has just explained how they feel, that they don't feel supported by the government and that she actually said, somebody said, that she did not condemn the booing. she actually enabled it by saying, look, they can do that if they want. and it made it very difficult for those young players. so why is she surprised when the group of players who are campaigning against the sort of behaviour have to experience it at the end of a tournament when she has, in effect, enabled that sort of behaviour towards them? i'm so sorry to interrupt you. she did say she condemned the racist abuse that had been directed at the three young men following on from sunday night's final. jane, do you know what? you have had this discussion as much as i have over many, many years, and as you said, it's almost we are in despair. how many times have we heard people condemning things but not actually doing anything about it? this is a group of players
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who wanted to do something about it and people say it is a gesture. it is a gesture, but it is a gesture which has led to racism, antiracism and discriminatory behaviour being highlighted over a long period of time. it is a gesture which comes from a group of players who have experienced it and are role models, notjust in terms of the england team but in terms of the premier league as well and that is extremely powerful and people cannot get away from that and it hasn't been political and it wasn't political. as gareth southgate so eloquently put it at the start of the tournament. and it was an opportunity for everybody to come together instead of them receiving pushback from their own government. and that is why tyrone said what he did and i totally understand it, i totally agree with him in all honesty. the vice president of show racism
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the vice president of show racism the red card. the headlines on bbc news: england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's �*pretending' to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. mps have backed a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by four billion pounds, by a majority of 35 votes. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed next week. facemasks will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has announced that the country will move to its lowest level of covid restrictions from next week. limits on the number of people who can meet — both inside and outside — will be relaxed, as will social distancing rules. but she told msps that some legal measures — such as face coverings —
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will remain in place for some time. so we will continue to ease restrictions. we're not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. let me turn then to the detail of our decisions. from monday 19th ofjuly, all parts of scotland not currently there will move to level zero — however, this move will be made with certain modifications applied consistently across the country to ensure that we're not easing up faster than is sensible given the current situation that we face. full details of the changes are on our website, but i will highlight some key pointsjust now. in level zero, up to eight people from up to four households can meet indoors at home, compared to six people from three households in levels one and two. up to ten people from up to four households can meet in a public indoor space such as a pub or restaurant, and up to 15 people from up to 15 households can meet outdoors — whether in a private garden or public space.
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children under 12 already do not count towards the total number of people, and from monday they will not count towards the total number of households either. in level zero, up to 200 people can attend weddings and funerals. soft play centres can open, as they could at level one but not at level two, and for hospitality businesses, at level zero, unlike in level two, there's no requirement for customers to pre—book a two—hour slot to go to a pub or restaurant. however, customers will still be required to provide contact details to help test and protect, and they will still be required to wear face coverings — except when seated. there will still be limits on the size of events and stadium attendances, but these will increase outdoors to 2,000 seated and 1,000 standing and indoors to 400. as of now, as like now, organisers will be able to apply to stage larger events. let me turn now to the modifications to our indicative plans.
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firstly, hospitality venues in level zero in all parts of scotland will require to close at midnight. this is a change to what we had previously indicated for level zero, that venues would follow local licensing rules. this reflects the fact that indoor hospitality, despite the sector's sterling efforts — and i want to pay tribute to those — does remain a relatively risky environment, particularly later at night when people might be less likely to follow rules. a midnight closing time represents progress from level one and level two, but it will still help to mitigate some of that additional risk. nicola sturgeon there at that briefing, the announcement in the last couple of hours, rules changing in scotland next week. doctors' leaders have criticised the government's decision to relax covid restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". it comes as groups representing bus, coach, and rail companies have said
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that face coverings will not be made compulsory for passengers in england, when the rules are lifted in six days' time. the government is advising people to wear masks if services are busy. our health correspondent jim reed reports. the law may be changing in england, but how will the public respond? from next week, masks and social distancing will no longer be enforced. instead, it will be up to individuals and businesses to make their own decisions. i think the way he's done it is great and i think lifting it completely, i think, should go slowly. i think it's quite scary. it might be too soon. the vaccines are definitely working, they've done theirjob, _ it's stopping the deaths i which was the main concern, so i don't see it as a big problem. with covid infections rising, the language from government has become more cautious. ministers are stressing that life should not return to normal straightaway.
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it's about learning to live with the virus, to strike a balance, but also accepting that the restrictions themselves have health consequences as well as economic consequences, so whichever way the government goes on this, there are consequences. the government's scientific advisers think that even with vaccinations, this latest wave of the virus could lead to between 1,000 and 2,000 hospital admissions a day. that would be half the level seen injanuary, but the doctors' union is warning there could still be an impact on the nhs. we know the infection rate has gone down in the older population, so why not use that scientific evidence, spend a few more weeks vaccinating the younger population properly, double vaccinating them, and at that time, if you remove these restrictions, you will not see the same impact of increases of infection and hospitalisation. in scotland, the first minister has been setting out whether some restrictions can be relaxed next week.
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in wales, lockdown rules will be reviewed tomorrow and in northern ireland, some covid measures will be eased on july 26th. in england, new guidance has also been published for the 3.5 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable. that group have been advised to visit supermarkets at quieter times of the day and continue to limit other close contacts if possible. if the government were just to say, ok, we recognise that on public transport, where some people have no choice but to go because they don't own a car, and if we put ourselves in the shoes of somebody who has to use public transport to go for chemo or dialysis, it absolutely makes sense that they have confidence that people will be wearing face coverings. the government says that delaying lifting restrictions in england would carry more risk as the weather gets colder and children return after the summer holidays. this is, though, a difficult moment in the pandemic and no—one can really be sure what will happen to infections over the next few months.
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let's bring you some of the latest data that has come through to us in the last few minutes in terms of the latest covid statistics. we are hearing that... as you can see there, more than 36.5 thousand new infections have been recorded over the last 34 hours, 50 deaths in the last 24—hour period. a reminder, thatis last 24—hour period. a reminder, that is someone who has died within 28 days of having a positive covid test. in terms of the vaccine programme, more than 54,000 people have received their first dose of vaccine and 125,000... i will leave that finalfigure, because i have been sent it in a way that is
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confusing and i do not want to give you an incorrect figure, but i hope you an incorrect figure, but i hope you can see those are the latest daily figures, the key number there being 50 deaths in the last 24—hour period. a man who killed two children in the 1980s is set to be freed from prison after a review into a parole board decision to release him was challenged by the government. colin pitchfork, who is now in his early 60s, was jailed for life after raping and strangling 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire in 1983 and 1986. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds explained what's happened today. well, the grounds for his releases that the case is being considered by the parole board and that he is safe to release. that is the main decision the parole board took,
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but what has happened today is that a challenge to that decision, which came from thejustice secretary, robert buckland, has been rejected by a seniorjudge. now, when pitchfork�*s release was announced or became public, robert buckland, thejustice secretary, was very concerned. there was a lot of media coverage and concern for the families of the two girls who died in the 1980s. he appealed against the decision, saying it was procedurally unfair or irrational. now a judge has decided today that this is a case of considerable seriousness, complexity and notoriety, in his words, terrible consequences of brutal rapes and murders of two innocent girls will forever darken the lives of the families concerned, but he said he was satisfied the decision to release this man was justified. now, thejustice secretary has responded or the ministry ofjustice has responded in the last hour or so saying that the department
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is disappointed with this outcome, that its sympathies are with the families of lynda mann and dawn ashworth and also that it is changing the law to ensure child murderers face life in prison without possibility of parole as the default sentence. home affairs correspondence tom symons. a senior eu official has warned the greek government to stop the alleged deportation of migrants arriving at its borders. some migrants trying to seek asylum in europe claim that greek coastguards have forced their small boats back into turkish waters. others allege that even after landing in greece they've been taken back out to sea, actions greece has denied. the bbc�*s fergal keane reports from the island of lesbos. a warning — you may find some of his report distressing. on europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing. please!
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pushing asylum seekers across international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, _ this is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water. all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been victims of push backs. onjune 10th last, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get - a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that.
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with the war at home, the multiple problems, our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey, without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and took us - to a military port, then put us in boats. it was around 8pm, there were police wearing dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat. after that we realised we were in regional turkish waters.
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woman yells out. najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines, and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece. but also, it's eu law that is not...that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu chapter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out. some boats from the eu's
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own border agency are even accused of helping with push backs. but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on, without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos. more than 60 people have died
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after a fire in a coronavirus ward at a hospital in the southern iraqi city of nasiriya. the cause of the fire is unclear, but reports said it began after an oxygen tank exploded. angry relatives have protested outside the hospital. iraq's prime minister mustafa al—kadhimi ordered the arrest of the head of the hospital. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. not a bad day out there today with lots of sunny spells. there are a few showers around, but nowhere near as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. into the evening hours, you can see very pleasant temperatures, high teens, low 20s and in some places clear skies. one or two showers may linger into the evening, particularly across central parts of the uk, but for most of us it is going to be a dry evening and night. clear skies across western and central areas, a bit more cloud
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from aberdeenshire along the north sea coast to east anglia and the south—east. tomorrow, a fine day. a lot of us wake up to clear blue skies. probably a bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon but, on the whole, it is a fine day and temperatures widely into the low or even mid 20s, so it really is going to feel quite warm tomorrow. the outlook, if you like warm weather it is a good one for you. it is going to turn increasingly warm and the weekend is looking promising. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. tyrone mings' teammate marcus rashford says he will never
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apologise for who he is", after he was subjected to racist abuse online. mps have backed a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion. the government won with a majority of 35 votes. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed on the 19th ofjuly. face coverings will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera — and is reported to be thriving! more coming up in this half hour. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good afternoon. uefa has opened displinary proceedings against the football
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association following the euro 2020 final between england and italy at wembley on sunday. there are four charges against the fa, including "disturbance caused by its supporters during the national anthem" as well as a pitch invasion, throwing of objects and lighting of a firework. meanwhile, separately, a uefa ethics and disiplinary inspector has been appointed to conduct an investigation into the events involving supporters inside and around the stadium. we'll inside and around the stadium. bring you more on breaking we'll bring you more on that breaking news as we get it. following the racist graffiti sprayed over marcus rashford's mural, members of the public have covered it in positive messages and hearts. the england and manchester united player said he was moved to tears when he saw what members of the public had done. the artwork in manchester, was defaced after the final. but notes and drawings with the words "role model", and "hero" have been attached to the wall. rashford wrote on social media: "the communities that always wrapped their arms around me continue to hold me up." rashford, jadon sancho
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and bukayo saka also received racist abuse online after they missed penalties in the final at the weekend. three england players have been selected for the euros team of the tournament — raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. sterling scored three times during the competition — while maguire and walker helped england's defence only conceed two goals in the whole tournament. the team also includes five players from champions italy. the line—up was chosen by uefa's team of 16 technical observers. pakistan are heading towards a great innings in their third and final odi against england at edgbaston, thanks mostly to the batting of babar azam who's passed his century. england won the toss and put pakistan in to bat. after saqib mamood took the early wicket of fakhar zaman. england struggled to get their second. matt parkinson finally got the breakthough, bowling imam ul haq for 56. his replacement mohamed rizwan has gone for 74. babar is on 154.
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pakistan are 319—4 after 46 overs. ben stoke's side already have a 2—0 lead. despite worries about covid restrictions, the rugby league world cup will take place in england this autumn. the decision was announced earlier after all competing nations signed an agreement. the tournament had been in doubt over issues with quarentine rules for those travelling back to australia and new zealand. there could be a surprise return to the british and irish lions squad. wales's alun wyn jones may be coming back, despite dislocating his shoulder just a few weeks ago. connor murray captains the team against south africa "a" tomorrow — with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on the 24th ofjuly — and head coach warren gatland will decide whetherjones rejoins the squad. he has made a remarkable recovery in terms of that injury
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which the assessment was initially it wasn't as bad as they first thought so it's a real positive and would be a boost to the squad having someone of his experience and calibre to come back into the squad. let's ta ke let's take you to tokyo now. the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay on the site and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village in tokyo's harumi waterfront district, amid continuing covid restrictions. your organising committee and all your staff members are doing a fantasticjob in the preparations of this olympic and paralympic games in tokyo 2020. you've managed to make tokyo the best ever prepared city for olympic games.
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just to quickly update you, there has been another wicket in the cricket. 324—6 now. that means babbar as is still in. there is more on the bbc website. all the latest sport there. let's turn to events at westminster this afternoon. there has been that vote in the last hour. as we heard earlier, mps voted 333 to 298 — a majority of 35 — to approve a government motion to continue with overseas aid spending cuts until economic conditions allow the budget to be restored. it means it is cut from 0.7% of output to 0.5%. i'm joined now by laurie lee, ceo of care international.
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a very good afternoon. the impact i think is about 4 billion. what is that mean on the ground? what differences is your charity seeing as a of this?— as a of this? the impacts are terrible- _ as a of this? the impacts are terrible. the _ as a of this? the impacts are terrible. the government i as a of this? the impacts are | terrible. the government has announced, for example, that it is stopping monthly food allowances for in yemen. and that cut is now indefinite. and there is no guarantee that those people will survive the next five years until these impossible treasury criteria are met. we also know that girls's education has been cut by 25% in various countries. and missing five years worth of school for those girls means no school altogether. so the impact is huge. you
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girls means no school altogether. so the impact is huge.— the impact is huge. you will know, i'm sure, the impact is huge. you will know, l'm sure. that— the impact is huge. you will know, i'm sure, that the _ the impact is huge. you will know, i'm sure, that the government i the impact is huge. you will know, i i'm sure, that the government would point out that borrowing here is at levels we haven't seen since the end of the second world war because of covid, of course. and that money to pay for that domestically has to come from somewhere. what is your take on that, given the state of our country's finances?— country's finances? everybody understands _ country's finances? everybody understands why _ country's finances? everybody understands why the - country's finances? everybody i understands why the government needed to borrow a lot of money to respond to the covid pandemic, but the pandemic has affected countries all over the world. we have seen poverty going up for the first time in about 30 years in the rest of the world, purely because of covid. and as andrew mitchell has said, the government should not be balancing our books on the backs of the poorest people in the whole world. you've outlined there are obvious moral reasons that you have clearly highlighted. what about those who
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say we can't pay indefinitely. when i say we, the british government still pays a substantial sum of money in overseas aid. the government would say it still pays more than some european countries pro rata. and that domestic considerations have to be taken into account. the pandemic is unprecedented.— account. the pandemic is un - recedented. :: ., account. the pandemic is unrecedented. :: ., .«r , unprecedented. the 0.7 target takes account of that _ unprecedented. the 0.7 target takes account of that because _ unprecedented. the 0.7 target takes account of that because the - unprecedented. the 0.7 target takes account of that because the value i unprecedented. the 0.7 target takes account of that because the value of| account of that because the value of 0.7 changes in lines with changes in the economy, and the point is that the economy, and the point is that the uk has set itself out as a world leader on these things and we decided to put that in legislation in a cross—party piece of legislation several years ago. and it was the manifesto on which every single mp in parliament was elected just 18 months ago. and it's the wrong thing. and this motion today
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does not make the cut legal. it is still the case that in primary legislation in this country we have promised the poorest people in the world to give them 70p of every hundred pounds of our national income. that is all it is. and that is a promise which we should be meeting, and remains clearly in the law. , , ., meeting, and remains clearly in the law. , ., ., meeting, and remains clearly in the law. does this have a reputational im act, law. does this have a reputational impact. as — law. does this have a reputational impact. as far _ law. does this have a reputational impact, as far as _ law. does this have a reputational impact, as far as your _ law. does this have a reputational| impact, as far as your organisation is concerned? as well as the very obvious practical humanitarian impact that you outlined? exactly, it does, impact that you outlined? exactly, it does. as — impact that you outlined? exactly, it does. as we _ impact that you outlined? exactly, it does, as we saw _ impact that you outlined? exactly, it does, as we saw recently - impact that you outlined? exactly, it does, as we saw recently in i it does, as we saw recently in cornwall at the g7 summit. the uk's reputation was tarnished because of these aid cuts, and we were not able to encourage the rest of the g7 to take some of the steps that the government wanted them to take because of that. and we also know that we have the climate summit
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coming up in this country at the end of the year, and we know that the world needs to provide more finance, more climate adaptation, and the uk is going to need to ask other countries to do that. and it is going to be much more difficult for the uk presidency of the climate summit because of this cut, and that is going to be bad news for the whole world if the climate summit cannot reach an ambitious conclusion, because developing countries at the summit are not sure that the richest countries in the world are going to support them. thank you very much. i think we can just show you a tweet from the labour leader, keir starmer, which he has posted in the last few minutes.
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that's the response of the labour leader. let's get more now on the parole board decision to release a man who murdered two children in the 1980s. colin pitchfork, who is now in his early 60s, was jailed for life after raping and strangling 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. alberto costa is the mp for leicestershire south — the constituency where victims lynda mann and dawn ashworth were from. your response to that ruling today? the secretary of state to justice,
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who had — the secretary of state to justice, who had the reconsider mechanism tools _ who had the reconsider mechanism tools he _ who had the reconsider mechanism tools. he replied to the independent parole _ tools. he replied to the independent parole board and asked that it reconsider the decision that they made _ reconsider the decision that they made in — reconsider the decision that they made in terms of releasing colin pitchfork — made in terms of releasing colin pitchfork. i'm extremely saddened by the decision of the parole board. i believe _ the decision of the parole board. i believe in — the decision of the parole board. i believe in a — the decision of the parole board. i believe in a fair and appropriate parole _ believe in a fair and appropriate parole system in our country, and i do think— parole system in our country, and i do think it — parole system in our country, and i do think it right that these decisions must be made independent of members of parliament, or indeed members _ of members of parliament, or indeed members of government. but it is a very sad _ members of government. but it is a very sad decision that the parole board _ very sad decision that the parole board has— very sad decision that the parole board has once again reaffirmed its decision— board has once again reaffirmed its decision to — board has once again reaffirmed its decision to release colin pitchfork, who we _ decision to release colin pitchfork, who we must never forget brutally raped _ who we must never forget brutally raped and — who we must never forget brutally raped and callously murdered two innocent — raped and callously murdered two innocent teenage girls in my constituency. the family and friends of those _ constituency. the family and friends of those victims were served
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themselves a life sentence, and this situation~~~ — themselves a life sentence, and this situation... notjust in my constituency, but across the country _ constituency, but across the country. how can it be that somebody who has _ country. how can it be that somebody who has committed that kind of egregious sexual offence, murder against _ egregious sexual offence, murder against young women, could ever be released? _ against young women, could ever be released? . , ., against young women, could ever be released? ., , ., , against young women, could ever be released? ., i. , ., released? have you spoken to the famil of released? have you spoken to the family of lynda — released? have you spoken to the family of lynda mann _ released? have you spoken to the family of lynda mann and - released? have you spoken to the family of lynda mann and dawn i family of lynda mann and dawn ashworth since this decision? i’ere ashworth since this decision? i've been receiving a lot of correspondence from constituents, many _ correspondence from constituents, many of _ correspondence from constituents, many of whom remember both dawn ashworth _ many of whom remember both dawn ashworth and lynda mann, to give the teenage _ ashworth and lynda mann, to give the teenage victims their names. and as i teenage victims their names. and as i say, _ teenage victims their names. and as i say, this— teenage victims their names. and as i say, this was an incident that is still very— i say, this was an incident that is still very raw in the minds of people — still very raw in the minds of people who are never going to school as school— people who are never going to school as school children. they would roughly— as school children. they would roughly be my age if they had not been _ roughly be my age if they had not been so _ roughly be my age if they had not been so horrifically murdered. and i think— been so horrifically murdered. and i think it's _ been so horrifically murdered. and i think it's right that your viewers rightly— think it's right that your viewers rightly ask, is it right to believe someone — rightly ask, is it right to believe someone who has committed that of offence? _ someone who has committed that of offence? i_ someone who has committed that of offence? i think if colin pitchfork
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had committed just one of those offences— had committed just one of those offences today, he would likely get what is _ offences today, he would likely get what is called a whole life tariff, and that — what is called a whole life tariff, and that would result probably him spending _ and that would result probably him spending the whole of his natural life in— spending the whole of his natural life in prison. so we've certainly moved — life in prison. so we've certainly moved on — life in prison. so we've certainly moved on as a society, with government and parliament recognising that sexual offences, murders — recognising that sexual offences, murders of women in this nature, can never— murders of women in this nature, can never give _ murders of women in this nature, can never give anything other than a life sentence. but it is a sad day that colin — life sentence. but it is a sad day that colin pitchfork, he was only 61, that colin pitchfork, he was only 61. he _ that colin pitchfork, he was only 61. he has— that colin pitchfork, he was only 61, he has years and decades of life ahead, _ 61, he has years and decades of life ahead, he _ 61, he has years and decades of life ahead, he gets his freedom but the family— ahead, he gets his freedom but the family and — ahead, he gets his freedom but the family and friends of the victims, i'm family and friends of the victims, i'm afraid, — family and friends of the victims, i'm afraid, don't. we family and friends of the victims, i'm afraid, don't.— family and friends of the victims, i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there, i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there. l'm — i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there, i'm afraid. _ i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there, i'm afraid. thank _ i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there, i'm afraid. thank you - i'm afraid, don't. we must leave it there, i'm afraid. thank you for. there, i'm afraid. thank you for joining us. the conservative mp for leicestershire itself. the headlines on bbc news... england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players
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after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. mps have backed a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion, the government won with a majority of 35 votes. covid rules in scotland will be relaxed next week. face masks will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. and hospitality. a shortage of hgv drivers is hitting crisis level in the uk — with demand increasing across supply chains as the country recovers from covid—19. from this week, the government is allowing drivers to work slightly longer hours in order to deal with the shortage but the industry has criticised the move, and said it's not nearly enough to deal with the situation. earlier, i asked our reality check
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correspondent chris morris how big a problem this was. so, it's a problem that's been growing for some time and don't forget hgv lorries, we may not like to be behind them on the motorway, but they're responsible for getting stuff all around the country, and a survey of hundreds of haulage companies which were sent in a letter to the prime minister late last month suggested there are now more than 100,000 driver vacancies and that's from a pre—covid total of 600,000, so potentially one in six jobs are vacant at the moment and tens of thousands of those drivers were eu citizens who were living and working here who have now gone home, so the warnings have been flooding in from all sorts of companies. we've heard warnings, for example, from tesco and other supermarkets, from haribo, the german sweet manufacturer, but also from farmers and fruit picking companies, from construction companies and from manufacturers who rely on this kind ofjust—in—time delivery system and the message from all of them is pretty much things are getting worse. wow, so how much of that is covid
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and how much is otherfactors, then? covid is clearly part of it. what happened last year, as positive cases spread around the country and large parts of the economy went into lockdown, a lot of those european drivers i talked about went home and they haven't come back. the other thing that covid has meant is that there haven't been able to be tests, new hgv driver tests. a lot of them haven't been taking place, so last year, for example, there were 25,000 fewer successful tests than there were in 2019, so not replacing drivers who have gone and it would appear that a lot of the older drivers in the industry have taken covid lockdowns as an opportunity to retire, so they have left the industry. and a third reason which has been problematic for drivers is that there have been tax changes, something called ir35. i've forgotten the second reason which is brexit. let's do that one first! you know i love to talk about brexit. you can't forget that! let's talk about brexit first. so brexit has been a big
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problem because, again, it has meant a lot of those drivers are used to come and go as they pleased when we were in the single market can't do that so easily any more. there's all this additional border bureaucracy and a lot of drivers from the rest of the european union found that that bureaucracy was just too much for them, it wasn't worth their while to come and drive here any more. and the third reason, and i will get onto that now, is tax changes and the tax changes, something called ir35 which involves people who are not on the payroll, and a lot of drivers, lots of those european drivers, used to work through agencies. it's more expensive to employ them now and they get less money, so all the incentives for those european drivers to come and work here seem to have been taken away and there are big shortages, clearly. right, so, how does this get solved? who is doing what about it? so, as you said in your introduction, the government has done one thing which is for a temporary period, it has slightly increased the number of hours that drivers are allowed to drive. this is for a four—week period which began this week and runs until early august. so, for example, for two days a week, a driver that was able
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to drive nine hours can now drive 11 hours, so he can deliver a bit more. the big criticism, some people saying you're compromising safety standards and the industry saying that it is not a big enough move to make much difference anyway. another thing the industry has been calling for is to produce temporary visas for workers from abroad, drivers from abroad. even if they are not paid very much, they would like to be able to bring them in on an emergency basis, something which the home office doesn't seem that keen on, so the government says, look, it is working with industry, it will have more apprenticeships and so forth, but some of these are long—term issues and i think the fear in the industry is that summer holidays are looming, even more drivers are going to be taking time off, and that a crunch could come sooner rather than later. that was chris morris is talking to me in the last hour. he s won seven world titles and is the most successful driver formula one has ever seen. now lewis hamilton has a new mission — to make the sport more diverse.
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sally nugent has been chatting to him about his plans. it's a very nerve—racking moment but it's super exciting as well because it's the beginning of a journey for pushing for change within my industry. where it really kind of stemmed from is that i thought me being in this sport, and we thought as a family that us making it to the sport, we would break the mould and it would open up doors and pathways to other young black talent. when i asked why there is such a lack of diversity in the industry, no one has an answer. so that's my purpose, my reason for being here. i have two young people who are really excited to talk to you. hi. what i've noticed while watching formula! is that there are actually very few black women in your team, and stephanie travers being one of them, one of the only black female fluid engineers. what would you say to black
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girls aspiring to be engineers in formula 1? stephanie is a hero. she is absolutely amazing. and all she has had to overcome to be in our sport is incredible. and last year i got to be on the podium with her for the first time. she was the first black woman to be on the podium in the 70 years of the sport. so it's really encouraging young girls to be following stem subjects. of course, the triple science is a super, super important. but itjust opened up so many great avenues within our industry. there's a 40,000 jobs within our industry and apparently there is only 1% of those that are from black backgrounds. that's what we need to change. have you got a question for me? haifa that's what we need to change. have you got a question for me?— you got a question for me? how did our you got a question for me? how did your family — you got a question for me? how did your family react — you got a question for me? how did your family react when _ you got a question for me? how did your family react when you - you got a question for me? how did your family react when you told i you got a question for me? how did i your family react when you told them he wanted _ your family react when you told them he wanted to — your family react when you told them he wanted to become _ your family react when you told them he wanted to become a _ your family react when you told them he wanted to become a formula i your family react when you told them he wanted to become a formula 1 i he wanted to become a formula! driver? _ he wanted to become a formula 1 driver? , ., ., ., driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing — driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driver. _ driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driver. i _ driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driver. i was _ driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driver. i was already i be a racing driver. i was already five years old. i knew that was what i wanted to do. at the time of
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course it was just such a far—fetched dream stop i started racing when i was eight years old so that was the beginning of that journey. that was the beginning of that “ourne . ~ . , that was the beginning of that “ourne . ~ ., , that was the beginning of that “ourne .~ ., , ., journey. what is your sports need to do now? do — journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you _ journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you think— journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you think it _ journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you think it is _ journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you think it is time - journey. what is your sports need to do now? do you think it is time to i do now? do you think it is time to introduce — do now? do you think it is time to introduce a — do now? do you think it is time to introduce a quota system when it comes— introduce a quota system when it comes to — introduce a quota system when it comes to apprenticeships and employment, perhaps? one comes to apprenticeships and employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations. _ employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations. in _ employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations. in signing - employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations. in signing a i recommendations. in signing a diversity and inclusion charter. we just need to get all the teams on board. that is the goal over the next 5—10 years. when i look back, i don't want to look back and think... i want to look back and think i was a part of something. for the first time in 400 years,
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a beaver has been born on exmoor. the national trust has released footage of the baby on its holnicote estate in somerset and said it is "thriving". the once—native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats but were hunted to extinction for theirfur and meat in the 16th century. from the trail cam footage, we realised we'd got a new beaver and unless one of the beavers had shrunk, we were like, that is definitely a kit. it was a shock, but in a nice way. hopefully it's part of a positive trend to developing healthy and vibrant wildlife in our river systems, and beaver are definitely a part of that. they're an animal that makes a lot of positive changes, and i think we can work with them. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. for some of us, yesterday was a total wash—out
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with flash flooding in places. a different story today. the sun is out, scattered cloud. there are a few showers in the forecast, but not as many of them and they won't be as heavy. not a case of clear blue skies across the uk, but a decent enough day. coastal areas faring best through the course of this afternoon and this evening. into this evening, there might be one or two showers lingering through the midlands, northern england and scotland, but for many of us it is a case of evening sunshine and comfortable temperatures between the high teens and the low 20s. one or two showers may linger into the late evening hours, but then overnight it is dry for many of us, especially out towards the west. central areas, too. from the coast of kent to northern scotland, it is going to be quite an overcast night. here it will probably start off a little cloudy, but thanks to this high—pressure building from wednesday onwards, the weather is improving, increasingly more sunny as we go through the next few days. wednesday morning,
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a little cloudy to start. there is a chance clouds will actually increase for a time in the north—west of the country. maybe 17 for stornoway. for the vast majority of us, it's in the low or mid 20s. you will start to feel that warmth from wednesday onwards. the high pressure we have been promising is building towards us, keeping the weather fronts at bay. moving towards iceland rather than to our direction, meaning increasingly sunny. here is thursday's forecast. cloud could bubble up during the course of the afternoon, but just fairweather cloud. it is going to be a case for many of us of sunny skies. temperatures widely into the mid 20s. coastal areas will be a little bit cooler. at the end of the week and into the weekend, the high pressure is right on top of us with light winds, and it's going to feel even warmer. we're expecting temperatures up to about 26, perhaps even 27 celsius as we head into next week.
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we keep the high pressure, we keep the fine weather, and it's going to stay warm. it's not looking bad at all. goodbye.
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this is bbc news i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at five. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's �*pretending' to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. covid rules in scotland set to be relaxed next week. face coverings will remain mandatory, but rules for weddings and funerals will be eased. we will continue to ease restrictions. we are not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. mps back a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by four billion pounds — charities say it will have
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a devastating impact for the world's poor.

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