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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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for the honourable grateful for the honourable gentleman given way. would you also acknowledge that they may have raised _ acknowledge that they may have raised it — acknowledge that they may have raised it from a much lower level and we _ raised it from a much lower level and we shall still be the third highest — and we shall still be the third highest in the g7.| and we shall still be the third highest in the g7.— highest in the g7. i thank my honourable _ highest in the g7. i thank my honourable member - highest in the g7. i thank my honourable member for - highest in the g7. i thank my honourable member for his l highest in the g7. i thank my _ honourable member for his comments. this isn't— honourable member for his comments. this isn't a _ honourable member for his comments. this isn't a question _ honourable member for his comments. this isn't a question of— honourable member for his comments. this isn't a question of pride _ honourable member for his comments. this isn't a question of pride that- this isn't a question of pride that we are _ this isn't a question of pride that we are still— this isn't a question of pride that we are still giving _ this isn't a question of pride that we are still giving very— this isn't a question of pride that. we are still giving very generously, we are still giving very generously, we have _ we are still giving very generously, we have a — we are still giving very generously, we have a sixth _ we are still giving very generously, we have a sixth wealthiest - we are still giving very generously, we have a sixth wealthiest nation l we have a sixth wealthiest nation and given— we have a sixth wealthiest nation and given the _ we have a sixth wealthiest nation and given the fact _ we have a sixth wealthiest nation and given the fact he _ we have a sixth wealthiest nation and given the fact he keep- we have a sixth wealthiest nation| and given the fact he keep talking about_ and given the fact he keep talking about global — and given the fact he keep talking about global britain, _ and given the fact he keep talking about global britain, we - and given the fact he keep talking about global britain, we are - and given the fact he keep talking about global britain, we are as i about global britain, we are as shrinking — about global britain, we are as shrinking britain. _ about global britain, we are as shrinking britain. we - about global britain, we are as shrinking britain. we are - about global britain, we are as| shrinking britain. we are losing power — shrinking britain. we are losing power. you are _ shrinking britain. we are losing power. you are going _ shrinking britain. we are losing power. you are going against. power. you are going against nationat— power. you are going against national security, _ power. you are going against national security, i— power. you are going against national security, i collective | national security, i collective national _ national security, i collective national interest _ national security, i collective national interest right - national security, i collective national interest right acrossi national security, i collective - national interest right across this house _ national interest right across this house and — national interest right across this house and every _ national interest right across this house and every party _ national interest right across this house and every party here - national interest right across this. house and every party here today. the massive increase from germany was effectively — the massive increase from germany was effectively cancelled _ the massive increase from germany was effectively cancelled by - the massive increase from germany was effectively cancelled by the - was effectively cancelled by the uk's production. _ the scottish government has increased _ the scottish government has increased its _ the scottish government has increased its international. the scottish government has| increased its international aid budget— increased its international aid
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budget by— increased its international aid budget by 50%~ _ increased its international aid budget by 50%. it _ increased its international aid budget by 50%. it puts- increased its international aid budget by 50%. it puts this . increased its international aid - budget by 50%. it puts this house to shame _ budget by 50%. it puts this house to shame with — budget by 50%. it puts this house to shame with this _ budget by 50%. it puts this house to shame with this motion. _ budget by 50%. it puts this house to shame with this motion. the - shame with this motion. the chanceiior— shame with this motion. the chancellor and _ shame with this motion. the chancellor and the _ shame with this motion. the chancellor and the prime - shame with this motion. the - chancellor and the prime minister has shown— chancellor and the prime minister has shown where _ chancellor and the prime minister has shown where their _ chancellor and the prime minister has shown where their priorities l has shown where their priorities lie. has shown where their priorities iie~ let's— has shown where their priorities iie~ let's not— has shown where their priorities lie. let's not kid _ has shown where their priorities lie. let's not kid ourselves - has shown where their priorities lie. let's not kid ourselves to. lie. let's not kid ourselves to think— lie. let's not kid ourselves to think this _ lie. let's not kid ourselves to think this is _ lie. let's not kid ourselves to think this is being _ lie. let's not kid ourselves to think this is being spent- lie. let's not kid ourselves to think this is being spent on. lie. let's not kid ourselves to- think this is being spent on health, welfare _ think this is being spent on health, welfare or— think this is being spent on health, welfare or education— think this is being spent on health, welfare or education at _ think this is being spent on health, welfare or education at home - think this is being spent on health, i welfare or education at home because it clearly— welfare or education at home because it clearly isn't~ — welfare or education at home because it clearly isn't. the _ welfare or education at home because it clearly isn't. the chancellor - it clearly isn't. the chancellor chose — it clearly isn't. the chancellor chose to _ it clearly isn't. the chancellor chose to take _ it clearly isn't. the chancellor chose to take money - it clearly isn't. the chancellor chose to take money away . it clearly isn't. the chancellor . chose to take money away from preventing _ chose to take money away from preventing famine _ chose to take money away from preventing famine and - chose to take money away from - preventing famine and malnutrition on conflict — preventing famine and malnutrition on conflict prevention _ preventing famine and malnutrition on conflict prevention and - preventing famine and malnutrition on conflict prevention and are - on conflict prevention and are protecting _ on conflict prevention and are protecting our— on conflict prevention and are protecting our planet - on conflict prevention and are protecting our planet and - protecting our planet and marginalised _ protecting our planet andi marginalised communities protecting our planet and - marginalised communities from protecting our planet and _ marginalised communities from the devastating — marginalised communities from the devastating effect— marginalised communities from the devastating effect of— marginalised communities from the devastating effect of climate - devastating effect of climate change. _ devastating effect of climate change, instead, _ devastating effect of climate change, instead, and- devastating effect of climate change, instead, and i'm - devastating effect of climate. change, instead, and i'm glad devastating effect of climate - change, instead, and i'm glad to see the chancetior— change, instead, and i'm glad to see the chancellor in _ change, instead, and i'm glad to see the chancellor in his— change, instead, and i'm glad to see the chancellor in his position - the chancellor in his position today, — the chancellor in his position today, he _ the chancellor in his position today, he chose _ the chancellor in his position today, he chose to _ the chancellor in his position today, he chose to spend - the chancellor in his position| today, he chose to spend the the chancellor in his position - today, he chose to spend the money on enhanced — today, he chose to spend the money on enhanced cyber— today, he chose to spend the money on enhanced cyber weapons, - today, he chose to spend the money on enhanced cyber weapons, dronesi on enhanced cyber weapons, drones and the _ on enhanced cyber weapons, drones and the biggest _ on enhanced cyber weapons, drones and the biggest folly— on enhanced cyber weapons, drones and the biggest folly of— on enhanced cyber weapons, drones and the biggest folly of all, - and the biggest folly of all, increased _ and the biggest folly of all, increased stockpiles - and the biggest folly of all, increased stockpiles of - and the biggest folly of all, . increased stockpiles of nuclear weapons, _ increased stockpiles of nuclear weapons, weapons _ increased stockpiles of nuclear weapons, weapons of - increased stockpiles of nuclear weapons, weapons of mass i weapons, weapons of mass destruction. _ weapons, weapons of mass destruction, after— weapons, weapons of mass destruction, after he - weapons, weapons of mass i destruction, after he delivered weapons, weapons of mass - destruction, after he delivered a windfall— destruction, after he delivered a windfall to — destruction, after he delivered a windfall to the _ destruction, after he delivered a windfall to the defence - destruction, after he delivered a windfall to the defence budget l destruction, after he delivered a l windfall to the defence budget the very same — windfall to the defence budget the very same month _ windfall to the defence budget the very same month that _ windfall to the defence budget the very same month that the - windfall to the defence budget the very same month that the count . windfall to the defence budget the i very same month that the count from 0.7 very same month that the count from 07 to— very same month that the count from 07 to 05% _ very same month that the count from 07 to 05% was— very same month that the count from 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. - very same month that the count from 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if- very same month that the count from 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this i 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is not _ 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is notan— 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is not an act— 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is not an act of— 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is not an act of national— 0.7 to 0.5% was announced. if this is not an act of national shame, . is not an act of national shame, iet's_ is not an act of national shame, let's look— is not an act of national shame, let's look at _ is not an act of national shame, let's look at the _ is not an act of national shame, let's look at the icing _
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is not an act of national shame, let's look at the icing on - is not an act of national shame, let's look at the icing on the - is not an act of national shame, . let's look at the icing on the cake. the prime — let's look at the icing on the cake. the prime minister— let's look at the icing on the cake. the prime minister believes- let's look at the icing on the cake. the prime minister believes that i the prime minister believes that spending — the prime minister believes that spending upwards— the prime minister believes that spending upwards of— the prime minister believes that spending upwards of £200 - the prime minister believes that. spending upwards of £200 million the prime minister believes that - spending upwards of £200 million on a shiny— spending upwards of £200 million on a shiny brand—new— spending upwards of £200 million on a shiny brand—new role _ spending upwards of £200 million on a shiny brand—new role jolt _ a shiny brand—new role jolt britannia _ a shiny brand—new role jolt britannia 2.0 _ a shiny brand—new role jolt britannia 2.0 is _ a shiny brand—new role jolt britannia 2.0 is more - a shiny brand—new role jolt - britannia 2.0 is more important than using _ britannia 2.0 is more important than using iife-saving _ britannia 2.0 is more important than using life—saving aid _ britannia 2.0 is more important than using life—saving aid to— britannia 2.0 is more important than using life—saving aid to deliver- britannia 2.0 is more important than using life—saving aid to deliver a - using life—saving aid to deliver a more _ using life—saving aid to deliver a more just. — using life—saving aid to deliver a morejust, peaceful— using life—saving aid to deliver a more just, peaceful and - using life—saving aid to deliver a more just, peaceful and securel more just, peaceful and secure worid — more just, peaceful and secure world this— more just, peaceful and secure world this is— more just, peaceful and secure world. this is despite - more just, peaceful and secure world. this is despite the - more just, peaceful and secure world. this is despite the fact i more just, peaceful and secure . world. this is despite the fact the royal— world. this is despite the fact the royal family— world. this is despite the fact the royal family because _ world. this is despite the fact the royal family because my - world. this is despite the fact the i royal family because my complete displeasure — royal family because my complete displeasure. even... _ royal family because my complete displeasure. even...— displeasure. even... normally we don't bring _ displeasure. even... normally we don't bring the — displeasure. even... normally we don't bring the royal— displeasure. even... normally we don't bring the royal family - displeasure. even... normally we don't bring the royal family into i don't bring the royal family into our debates. these are the rules of the house — our debates. these are the rules of the house |— our debates. these are the rules of the house. ., , our debates. these are the rules of the house-— the house. i only raised it because it is on the — the house. i only raised it because it is on the record _ the house. i only raised it because it is on the record elsewhere, - the house. i only raised it because. it is on the record elsewhere, thank you _ it is on the record elsewhere, thank you. every— it is on the record elsewhere, thank you. every former— it is on the record elsewhere, thank you. every former living _ it is on the record elsewhere, thank you. every former living pro - you. every former living pro minister— you. every former living pro minister supports _ you. every former living pro minister supports this- you. every former living pro minister supports this —— i you. every former living pro . minister supports this —— does you. every former living pro - minister supports this —— does not support— minister supports this —— does not support this — minister supports this —— does not support this cut _ minister supports this —— does not support this cut. spending - minister supports this —— does not support this cut. spending has - minister supports this —— does not. support this cut. spending has been in minister's — support this cut. spending has been in minister's sites _ support this cut. spending has been
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in minister's sites ever— support this cut. spending has been in minister's sites ever since - support this cut. spending has been in minister's sites ever since he - in minister's sites ever since he said _ in minister's sites ever since he said that — in minister's sites ever since he said that we _ in minister's sites ever since he said that we are _ in minister's sites ever since he said that we are spending - in minister's sites ever since he said that we are spending huge| said that we are spending huge amounts — said that we are spending huge amounts of— said that we are spending huge amounts of british _ said that we are spending huge amounts of british money- said that we are spending huge amounts of british money likel said that we are spending huge - amounts of british money like some scandinavian — amounts of british money like some scandinavian ngo. _ amounts of british money like some scandinavian ngo. he _ amounts of british money like some scandinavian ngo. he has— amounts of british money like some scandinavian ngo. he has chosen . amounts of british money like some| scandinavian ngo. he has chosen to id scandinavian ngo. he has chosen to go across— scandinavian ngo. he has chosen to go across a — scandinavian ngo. he has chosen to go across a cross—party— scandinavian ngo. he has chosen to go across a cross—party consensus, l go across a cross—party consensus, breaking _ go across a cross—party consensus, breaking his — go across a cross—party consensus, breaking his manifesto _ go across a cross—party consensus, breaking his manifesto consensus i go across a cross—party consensus, i breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged — breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged far— breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged far right _ breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged far right by— breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged far right by ukip - breaking his manifesto consensus as he is charged far right by ukip and l he is charged far right by ukip and the brexit— he is charged far right by ukip and the brexit party. _ he is charged far right by ukip and the brexit party. this _ he is charged far right by ukip and the brexit party. this will- he is charged far right by ukip and the brexit party. this will likely. the brexit party. this will likely heraid — the brexit party. this will likely heraid a — the brexit party. this will likely heraid a new— the brexit party. this will likely herald a new decade _ the brexit party. this will likely herald a new decade of - the brexit party. this will likely. herald a new decade of austerity. let's _ herald a new decade of austerity. let's call— herald a new decade of austerity. let's call it — herald a new decade of austerity. let's call it austerity _ herald a new decade of austerity. let's call it austerity 2.0. - herald a new decade of austerity. let's call it austerity 2.0. we - herald a new decade of austerity. let's call it austerity 2.0. we alll let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know— let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know that — let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know that the _ let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know that the first _ let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know that the first decade - let's call it austerity 2.0. we all know that the first decade was l let's call it austerity 2.0. we all . know that the first decade was like. there _ know that the first decade was like. there is— know that the first decade was like. there is nothing _ know that the first decade was like. there is nothing temporary- know that the first decade was like. there is nothing temporary about . there is nothing temporary about this motion _ there is nothing temporary about this motion. this— there is nothing temporary about this motion. this is— there is nothing temporary about this motion. this is a _ there is nothing temporary about this motion. this is a global- this motion. this is a global britain, _ this motion. this is a global britain, this— this motion. this is a global britain, this is— this motion. this is a global britain, this is a _ this motion. this is a global britain, this is a nasty, - this motion. this is a global. britain, this is a nasty, short, pure — britain, this is a nasty, short, pure and _ britain, this is a nasty, short, pure and british _ britain, this is a nasty, short, pure and british and - britain, this is a nasty, short, pure and british and most - britain, this is a nasty, short, pure and british and most ofi britain, this is a nasty, short, l pure and british and most of all britain, this is a nasty, short, - pure and british and most of all a very littie — pure and british and most of all a very little britain. _ pure and british and most of all a very little britain. across - pure and british and most of all a very little britain. across this - very little britain. across this house — very little britain. across this house we _ very little britain. across this house we all _ very little britain. across this house we all stood _ very little britain. across this house we all stood on - very little britain. across this house we all stood on a - very little britain. across this - house we all stood on a manifesto commitment — house we all stood on a manifesto commitment to— house we all stood on a manifesto commitment to protect _ house we all stood on a manifesto commitment to protect the - house we all stood on a manifesto commitment to protect the no - house we all stood on a manifesto commitment to protect the no .7% spends _ commitment to protect the no .7% spends on — commitment to protect the no .7% spends on international— commitment to protect the no .7% i spends on international commitment. that is— spends on international commitment. that is 7p _ spends on international commitment. that is 7p in _ spends on international commitment. that is 7p in every— spends on international commitment. that is 7p in every £10. _ spends on international commitment. that is 7p in every £10. when- spends on international commitment. that is 7p in every £10. when i- that is 7p in every £10. when i describe — that is 7p in every £10. when i describe this— that is 7p in every £10. when i describe this to _ that is 7p in every £10. when i describe this to children - that is 7p in every £10. when i describe this to children in - that is 7p in every £10. when i-
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describe this to children in primary schools. _ describe this to children in primary schools. young _ describe this to children in primary schools, young people _ describe this to children in primary schools, young people in- describe this to children in primary schools, young people in my- schools, young people in my constituency, _ schools, young people in my constituency, they— schools, young people in my constituency, they are - schools, young people in my. constituency, they are surprised schools, young people in my- constituency, they are surprised at how little — constituency, they are surprised at how little we — constituency, they are surprised at how little we spent _ constituency, they are surprised at how little we spent as _ constituency, they are surprised at how little we spent as the - constituency, they are surprised at how little we spent as the sixth - how little we spent as the sixth weaithiest _ how little we spent as the sixth wealthiest nation _ how little we spent as the sixth wealthiest nation in _ how little we spent as the sixth wealthiest nation in the - how little we spent as the sixth wealthiest nation in the world, | how little we spent as the sixth - wealthiest nation in the world, and they are _ wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right— wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right to _ wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right to be _ wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right to be so. _ wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right to be so. today- wealthiest nation in the world, and they are right to be so. today we l they are right to be so. today we have _ they are right to be so. today we have an — they are right to be so. today we have an opportunity _ they are right to be so. today we have an opportunity to _ they are right to be so. today we have an opportunity to reaffirm l they are right to be so. today we l have an opportunity to reaffirm our values _ have an opportunity to reaffirm our values rather— have an opportunity to reaffirm our values rather than _ have an opportunity to reaffirm our values rather than trying _ have an opportunity to reaffirm our values rather than trying to - have an opportunity to reaffirm our| values rather than trying to balance the books _ values rather than trying to balance the books of— values rather than trying to balance the books of the _ values rather than trying to balance the books of the world's _ values rather than trying to balance the books of the world's poorest, . values rather than trying to balance i the books of the world's poorest, we must _ the books of the world's poorest, we must follow — the books of the world's poorest, we must follow through _ the books of the world's poorest, we must follow through on _ the books of the world's poorest, we must follow through on promises - the books of the world's poorest, we must follow through on promises to i must follow through on promises to the most _ must follow through on promises to the most marginalised _ must follow through on promises to the most marginalised and - must follow through on promises to l the most marginalised and vulnerable peopie _ the most marginalised and vulnerable peopie on— the most marginalised and vulnerable peopie on earth _ the most marginalised and vulnerable peopie on earth if— the most marginalised and vulnerable people on earth. if covid _ the most marginalised and vulnerable people on earth. if covid has- the most marginalised and vulnerable people on earth. if covid has taught l people on earth. if covid has taught us anything. — people on earth. if covid has taught us anything. that— people on earth. if covid has taught us anything, that we _ people on earth. if covid has taught us anything, that we all— people on earth. if covid has taught us anything, that we all share - people on earth. if covid has taught us anything, that we all share in - us anything, that we all share in the same — us anything, that we all share in the same struggles _ us anything, that we all share in the same struggles and - us anything, that we all share in - the same struggles and challenges, but also _ the same struggles and challenges, but also the — the same struggles and challenges, but also the hopes _ the same struggles and challenges, but also the hopes and _ the same struggles and challenges, but also the hopes and dreams - the same struggles and challenges, but also the hopes and dreams of l the same struggles and challenges, but also the hopes and dreams of a | but also the hopes and dreams of a better— but also the hopes and dreams of a better future, — but also the hopes and dreams of a better future, working _ but also the hopes and dreams of a better future, working together- but also the hopes and dreams of a better future, working together asi better future, working together as one ptanet — better future, working together as one planet in _ better future, working together as one planet in one _ better future, working together as one planet in one community. - better future, working together as | one planet in one community. now more _ one planet in one community. now more than — one planet in one community. now more than ever— one planet in one community. now more than ever before _ one planet in one community. now more than ever before we - one planet in one community. now more than ever before we must - one planet in one community. now| more than ever before we must set one planet in one community. now. more than ever before we must set up -- step— more than ever before we must set up -- step up— more than ever before we must set up -- step up to — more than ever before we must set up -- step up to support— more than ever before we must set up -- step up to support a— more than ever before we must set up —— step up to support a global- —— step up to support a global community _ —— step up to support a global community. there _ —— step up to support a global community. there is- —— step up to support a global community. there is no- —— step up to support a globall community. there is no honour —— step up to support a global- community. there is no honour for those _ community. there is no honour for those who— community. there is no honour for those who have _ community. there is no honour for those who have suffered _ community. there is no honour for those who have suffered as - community. there is no honour for those who have suffered as a - community. there is no honour fori those who have suffered as a result of this— those who have suffered as a result of this pandemic. _ those who have suffered as a result of this pandemic. there _ those who have suffered as a result of this pandemic. there is - those who have suffered as a result of this pandemic. there is no - of this pandemic. there is no meaning _ of this pandemic. there is no meaning in— of this pandemic. there is no meaning in the _ of this pandemic. there is no meaning in the phrase - of this pandemic. there is no i meaning in the phrase building of this pandemic. there is no - meaning in the phrase building back better— meaning in the phrase building back better if— meaning in the phrase building back better if we — meaning in the phrase building back better if we turn _ meaning in the phrase building back better if we turn our— meaning in the phrase building back better if we turn our backs. - meaning in the phrase building back better if we turn our backs. for- better if we turn our backs. for those _ better if we turn our backs. for those who _ better if we turn our backs. for those who decide _ better if we turn our backs. for those who decide to _ better if we turn our backs. for those who decide to vote -
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better if we turn our backs. for those who decide to vote for i better if we turn our backs. for. those who decide to vote for this immoral— those who decide to vote for this immoral motion _ those who decide to vote for this immoral motion today, - those who decide to vote for this immoral motion today, there - those who decide to vote for this immoral motion today, there is. those who decide to vote for this i immoral motion today, there is no place _ immoral motion today, there is no ptace for— immoral motion today, there is no place for you — immoral motion today, there is no place for you to _ immoral motion today, there is no place for you to hide _ immoral motion today, there is no place for you to hide when - immoral motion today, there is no place for you to hide when asked l immoral motion today, there is no . place for you to hide when asked the question— place for you to hide when asked the question why — place for you to hide when asked the question why did _ place for you to hide when asked the question why did you _ place for you to hide when asked the question why did you vote _ place for you to hide when asked the question why did you vote for- place for you to hide when asked the question why did you vote for this i question why did you vote for this by your— question why did you vote for this by your own — question why did you vote for this by your own children, _ question why did you vote for this by your own children, your- question why did you vote for this by your own children, your own i by your own children, your own friends, — by your own children, your own friends, your— by your own children, your own friends, your family, _ by your own children, your own friends, yourfamily, and - by your own children, your own friends, yourfamily, and your. friends, your family, and your constituents, _ friends, your family, and your constituents, it— friends, your family, and your constituents, it will— friends, your family, and your constituents, it will be - friends, your family, and your constituents, it will be an - constituents, it will be an indelible _ constituents, it will be an indelible mark— constituents, it will be an indelible mark against - constituents, it will be an i indelible mark against your opportunity— indelible mark against your opportunity to— indelible mark against your opportunity to do _ indelible mark against your opportunity to do the - indelible mark against your opportunity to do the right| indelible mark against your - opportunity to do the right thing here today— opportunity to do the right thing here today and _ opportunity to do the right thing here today and you _ opportunity to do the right thing here today and you will- opportunity to do the right thing here today and you will have - opportunity to do the right thing here today and you will have to. opportunity to do the right thing i here today and you will have to live with it _ here today and you will have to live with it for _ here today and you will have to live with it for the — here today and you will have to live with it for the rest _ here today and you will have to live with it for the rest of _ here today and you will have to live with it for the rest of your- here today and you will have to live with it for the rest of your time - here today and you will have to live with it for the rest of your time in. with it for the rest of your time in this house — with it for the rest of your time in this house l— with it for the rest of your time in this house-— with it for the rest of your time in this house. i draw the attention of the house to _ this house. i draw the attention of the house to my — this house. i draw the attention of the house to my interest - this house. i draw the attention of the house to my interest in - this house. i draw the attention of the house to my interest in the . the house to my interest in the register. the government has done the right thing today in ensuring that this house has a vote on this matter and thank you mr speaker for standing upfor matter and thank you mr speaker for standing up for parliament in that respect. there is a straight choice as outlined by the leader of the housed yesterday in his statement and it is between rejecting this motion tonight, in which case the government will restore the 0.7 from next year, that was the olive branch that i am my right honourable friend suggested, oraccept that i am my right honourable friend suggested, or accept this so—called
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treasury compromise. i tell the house this is no compromise at all. it is a fiscal trap for the unwary. first of all, it is quite possible that these conditions will never be met and you don't need to look in the crystal ball, you can read the book. it is indisputably the case that there have only been one occasion in the last two decades, in 2001, when these conditions would have been met. if you look at what the obr has said, it is very clear that the debts and gdp will not be fallen until 2025. given that the 0.7 goes up and down with our economic performance, a very important point is, that the 0.7% policy protects us from that. does he not accept _ policy protects us from that. does he not accept that _ policy protects us from that. does he not accept that the _ policy protects us from that. does he not accept that the obr - he not accept that the obr exaggerated the gloom on the debt and deficit particularly in the last
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two years, they exaggerated by 50 billion for last year between november and march, so why on earth does he believe their gloomy figures now? i'm sure we will get deficit down. . ., ., ~ now? i'm sure we will get deficit down. , . i, . down. he is looking in the crystal ball, i down. he is looking in the crystal ball. i am — down. he is looking in the crystal ball, i am looking _ down. he is looking in the crystal ball, i am looking in _ down. he is looking in the crystal ball, i am looking in the - down. he is looking in the crystal ball, i am looking in the book. in| ball, i am looking in the book. in the last 20 years there would have just been one occasion. i vote for the government tonight is to end the 0.7% commitment.— 0.7% commitment. does it say something _ 0.7% commitment. does it say something when _ 0.7% commitment. does it say something when every - 0.7% commitment. does it say something when every single i 0.7% commitment. does it say - something when every single economic and political commentator has said that this new mechanism will not see the no .7% return in the way that it should, that it is a copout of the highest order? he should, that it is a copout of the highest order?— highest order? he is absolutely ri . ht. highest order? he is absolutely riht. it highest order? he is absolutely right- it is _ highest order? he is absolutely right- it is a _ highest order? he is absolutely right. it is a trap _ highest order? he is absolutely right. it is a trap for— highest order? he is absolutely right. it is a trap for the - highest order? he is absolutely right. it is a trap for the unwary and a tribute to the chancellor of the exchequer�*s silver tongue. i shall certainly tonight be voting against this motion and against the government today. i shall do so with absolute conviction and a profound disappointment. this is only the
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third time since i was elected in 1987 that i have voted against the government and one of those occasions was in the company of the prime minister. it is never easy to repel and i thank those who stood with us to support our manifesto. we should not be breaking our promise in the way. we should not be looking to balance the books on the backs of the poorest people in the world. i'm incredibly proud to have been a member of a conservative administration which declined to do that even with the austerity that we faced. for goodness' sake, this is 1% of the borrowing that the chancellor quite rightly made last year to shore up our country from covid. 1%. at tiny figure. it is the only cat that he has announced. it will have an enormous impact on our role in the world and it will affect the huge number of people there will be very severely damaged, maimed, blighted or die as a result of these
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cuts. i remind the house that the cuts. i remind the house that the cuts include 25% on the education of girls, a top priority of the prime minister and his administration, for neglected tropical diseases were thank goodness that philanthropists have stepped in for one year only to protect the british taxpayer investment. we cover by 90%. in the yemen, by 60%. which is literally the equivalent of taking food away from starving people. that is what we are doing to the poorest in the world. this is how we are trashing our international reputation. we are the only country in the g7 cutting in the middle of the pandemic. everyone else is increasing. this is a decision we do not need to make. since we started this campaign there has been a 9% increase in support across our country for the government's policies. it is worse than a crime, it is a mistake. may i
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say, in humble respect to my own party, some of us have seen this movie before. it took us 23 years, until 2015, to achieve an overall majority by wiping out the liberal democrat seats and to achieve it we secured the support of decent internationalist prodevelopment spending, who saw from time in austerity that we would stand by this promise. the former brexit secretary and i visited chesham and amersham and cheryl gillan would be voting with us on this issue tonight. anyone who thinks this is not affecting the reputation of our party is living in cloud cuckoo land. in chesham and amersham they have the biggest christian aid group in the country. this is not who we are, this is not what google britain is and i urge my right honourable and honourable friends tonight to vote against this motion. we and honourable friends tonight to vote against this motion.- and honourable friends tonight to vote against this motion. we now go
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to the chair— vote against this motion. we now go to the chair of— vote against this motion. we now go to the chair of the _ vote against this motion. we now go to the chair of the select _ to the chair of the select committee, sarah champion. it committee, sarah champion. doesn't committee, sarah champion. it doesn't show respect for the house to ask us to take such a significant decision with little notice, little explanation and no clarity about the consequences of today? vote. it doesn't show respect to the communities in the poorest parts of the world when this government is willing to play games with their lives and livelihoods in this way. the government presents a motion is giving parliament an opportunity to have a say on when and how the uk will return to standing up .7% of gni on eight. today isn't really about that target or the cuts or livelihoods that are already being affected by reduced spending, it is about exerting pressure on government backbenchers who have been brave enough to collar with the government is doing. basically, back this or you will be blamed when taxes rise or spending falls, things that will likely happen because of the pandemic anyway. today is yet another example of this government because my complete lack of regard
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for parliamentary scrutiny and they have form. there is a pattern that this —— of this government withholding information to the last minute and then only making the most basic details available. let's be clear, the government hasn't brought forward a substantive motion for this debate. the motion they have tabled is made in neutral terms and advice that was intended to allow the house to debate an issue without coming to a view. they claimed this debate is binding. it is not our procedures to make a binding, it is there a political choice. this is a kneejerk reaction dreamt up between last thursday and yesterday in the face of growing criticism of this government. talks of returning to 0.7%, yesterday's wms talks about returning to 0.71 we are not borrowing for day—to—day spending and underlying debt is falling, or on their own in each of these test is a high hurdle when combined, these conditions become incredibly
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strict. since the no .7% target was introduced these tests have been met only once. they explicitly link spending to policy decisions made by other government departments on tax and spending. this double lock could lead to an indefinite cut in aid spending. of course the test do nothing to prevent them dropping lower than the not .5%. the obr has said the uk's economy is forecast to return to pre—pandemic levels in the second quarter of 2020, faster than originally thought. so if the return to economic reality is getting closer, why the need to introduce these extra checks? they are just added roadblocks, artfully placed by the treasury on the track back to the treasury on the track back to the legally mandated level of not .57%. fundamentally, this statement puts aid as an either or choice, either on spending on domestic public services or international
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aid. it is an artificial choice mps are being forced to make. this is a breathtakingly... tote are being forced to make. this is a breathtakingly. . .— breathtakingly... we are going to leave that debate _ breathtakingly... we are going to leave that debate now, _ breathtakingly... we are going to leave that debate now, but - breathtakingly... we are going to i leave that debate now, but seriously want to continue watching it cannot scorch to show on bbc parliament. now on bbc news, it's time to take a look at some of the stories making the headlines this lunchtime from our newsrooms across the uk. we'll be hearing stories from shropshire and hampshire shortly, but first to south wales where a victim of crime says some people are put off reporting incidents because of the delays in getting justice. despite investment during the pandemic, the time it takes for a case to come to court has increased. now roxy freebury, from newport, is one of a number of victims who have worked with gwent police to improve support. wales today's home affairs correspondentjenny rees reports. a bite mark on her cheek.
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a knee—shaped bruise to the chest. the blood dripped from cuts to her head. roxy freebury sought help from the police when she was twice a victim of domestic abuse. each time the individuals are prosecuted but the journey wasn't always perfect. i know they can only keep you for 24—hours without reasonable charging. but because my officer in charge was then on leave, i didn't hear anything. i had to ring the police myself. i had to go into the police station with my friend just to find out what was going on because i had just, sort of, reported someone who women's aid had described to me before as dangerous, and said i was high risk of serious harm or murder. i thought they would be looking out for me a bit more but i didn't even know if he was released, if he was remanded. in the end he was on remand but i didn't know until i chase them. and then i felt like a nuisance as well. she has since helped gwent police improve the support given and a new victim care unit has been setup. there is a wider risk
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if it isn't done well. we'll be hearing stories from shropshire and hampshire i've had girls come to me because they know what i've been through and they are like, can i ask you a question, can i have your advice on this. and i'm saying, go to the police. and they are like, no, i don't want to, i don't feel safe enough, i don't feel they will do anything. there is a unit now dedicated to that and they can provide what victims need to feel safe. the uk government acknowledges major challenges remain in the justice system. there are more than 57,000 cases across england and wales waiting to be heard on the crown courts alone in spite of millions of pounds of investment. naturally, that impacts on the number of victims and defendants waiting. by putting this victims care unit together, we allow, first of all, the right support to be available through the criminal justice process and we are also releasing around 12% of our core demand from our 101 call takers. it is a win—win, we are speeding up the 101 service but, more importantly, we are also making sure we provide the right service at the right time for victims who need that support.
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roxy reported the crimes against her. she gotjustice and a sense of empowerment. she says she'd encourage anyone else to do the same. shropshire has more river? pollution incidents than any other local authority in the midlands. that's according to new bbc research investigating the state of our rivers. across england, only cornwall recorded more pollution. midlands today's environment correspondent david gregory kumar has been investigating. meet the team putting right a decade old problem, 30 years ago shropshire's river was radically changed, dug out an address to create as sharp sighted, often fast loan channel, allowing farmers to grow high value crops —— crops without flooding. you grow high value crops -- crops without flooding.— grow high value crops -- crops without flooding. you end up with this channel. _ without flooding. you end up with this channel, that _ without flooding. you end up with this channel, that is _ without flooding. you end up with this channel, that is very - without flooding. you end up with | this channel, that is very uniform, square cut, it drains the land which
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improves it for agriculture, but it removes all the diversity we might enjoy for ecology and habitats. but en'oy for ecology and habitats. but it enjoy for ecology and habitats. but it is the farmer who is here now he wants to try help with this right. this restoration work is one example of how everyone from farmers to water companies to wildlife groups are trying hard to tackle the many causes of pollution and poor water quality in our rivers. according to bbc research, it is shropshire and herefordshire that account for most of the midlands's series river pollution incidents. in england, only cornwall reported more. there is no one quick fix here, no simple way to improve the quality of the water in our rivers. it comes down to hundreds of different choices and improvements we all need to make, everything from how we handle pesticides near to rivers, right through to all of us —— what happens when all of us flush the toilet.
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where does it all go? when track through the riverton river severn, you have these peaks of water pollution. we are still using our river systems to deal with their waist and we need to stop, but that costs a lot of money.— costs a lot of money. once we thou . ht costs a lot of money. once we thought of _ costs a lot of money. once we thought of our _ costs a lot of money. once we thought of our rivers - costs a lot of money. once we thought of our rivers as - costs a lot of money. once we thought of our rivers asjust i costs a lot of money. once we - thought of our rivers asjust places thought of our rivers as just places to get rid of stuff we didn't want and we treated them pretty badly. now we see them as havens for wildlife and places to enjoy in their own right, but unpicking the choices older generations made and putting them right won't be easy. bbc south today has heard it can take up to a week to get a call back from a gp and many haven t had face to face appointment since before the pandemic began. some patients in hampshire say access to primary care has never been more difficult. while nhs figures for april show more than 53% of people in the county saw a gp face—to—face, one 95—year—old man told us he waited eight days to even speak to a doctor. here's our health
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correspondent alastair fee. donald lives alone in fairham and at 95 is in good health but at his age, speedy access to a doctor is important. he recently waited eight days for a call—back a gp. at 95, i could have been gone. up there. it is absolutely ridiculous. where it is all the seven doctors that used to be down the road? they want to think of the people that have normal run—of—the—mill illnesses. in langley near southampton, marjorie has had similar issues. she says she is not seen a gp in person for well over a year. you just can't get an appointment no matter how hard you try. you ring up, they tell you they haven't got an appointment, ring at eight o'clock in the morning. you ring up and they tell you they haven't got any appointments. that is if they haven't got you on hold for over half an hour some days.
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gp practices have been under additional pressure because of the vaccination roll—out. seven were helping run a clinic at the weekend in the guildhall in southampton. after talking with the doctor, donald was then given a home visit. the local nhs clinical commissioning group says his care is being prioritised. he has since had a follow—up appointment. the nhs says it is working hard to ensure all patients who need to see someone face—to—face can do so. at least 64 people have died in a major fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in southern iraq. many more have been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say is likely to have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion. jean mackenzie reports.
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the flames soared high and spread fast. crews struggling to fight the fire to save those trapped inside fighting covid—19. rescue workers were unable to make it through the thick smoke. this morning, relatives were left to search for their loved ones among a pile of burnt bodies. the temporary covid award left mangled by the heat. the building was new, opened just three months ago, a basic structure tacked onto the side of the hospital, unable to withstand the force of what was likely an oxygen tank exploding. it quickly became a tinderbox. the front door was burning and the back door was closed so people couldn't get out, this witness says.
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people were stuck inside and then the ceiling fell on them. the pandemic was already proving too much for iraq's woeful health system to cope with, on its knees after years of war, neglect and chronic mismanagement. covid cases here were climbing. grief quickly turned to anger. crowds gathered outside the hospital chanting against authorities and a health system that has, once again, failed to protect them. this is the second such tragedy in a matter of months. in april, more than 80 people died after an oxygen cylinder exploded at a covid hospital in baghdad. as more bodies were counted, the prime minister, mustafa al—kadhimi, has ordered the arrest of health officials and the hospital manager, promising repercussions for this catastrophic failing,
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that a place intended to save lives has ended up taking so many. france says all healthcare workers must be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by september, or they risk not being paid. the announcement, by president emmanuel macron, comes as cases of the delta variant there are rising. greece is following suit, after similar measures were unveiled by italy in april. mark lobel reports. to france's health care workers, a message from the president: get vaccinated in the next two months or risk not being paid. translation: it is the only way to return to normal life. initially for health care staff in hospitals, clinics, retirement homes, institutions for people with disabilities, for all professionals or volunteers who work in contact with the elderly
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orfrail, including at home, vaccination will be made compulsory without delay. president macron says it is a race against the clock as the take—up of firstjabs is falling and less than 40% of the population has had two shots. that's a concern because of a rise in cases of coronavirus with the delta variant causing a surge in hospital admissions. not everyone has welcomed the move. translation: if it's compulsory, we will do it, of course. translation: for me, forcing an agent to be vaccinated with a specific product is total nonsense. new rules also mean that from next month the nonvaccinated will struggle to get into one of these, these, these, or get away without a negative covid test. greece has announced vaccines are now mandatory for care home staff and will be for health care workers from september, with new restrictions for the
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nonvaccinated in bars, cinemas and theatres. in holland, there has been a screeching u—turn of the loosening of restrictions unveiled just three weeks ago as nightlife resumed, infection levels surged to their highest levels this year. the dutch prime minister admitted an error ofjudgment. translation: i do think the prime minister opened things too early. it would have been better to wait a few more weeks because now we are in a surge again. it's a shame because everybody expected to have like an open summer with a lot of activities. i know that my friends were all buying tickets and everything, and now it'sjust all cancelled again. as europe faces rising numbers of infections, mainly due to the delta variant, several countries' tolerance of those avoiding injections appears to be waning. mark lobel, bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafenaker. for some of us yesterday it was a total wash—out with flash flooding in places. a different story today, the sun is out, scattered clouds. there are a few showers in the forecast but not as many of them and they want to be as heavy. wont to be as heavy. here is the recent satellite picture. you can see, not a case of clear blue skies across the uk but a decent enough day. coastal areas are faring best through the course of this afternoon and into this evening. into this evening, there might be one or two showers are lingering one or two showers lingering through the midlands, northern england and scotland. for many of us, it is a case of evening sunshine and comfortable temperatures between the high teens and low 205. one or two showers may linger into the late evening hours but overnight it is dry for many of us especially out towards the west, central areas as well. but for the coast of kent,
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round east anglia, along the north sea coast, it is going to be quite an overcast night. so, here first thing in the morning, we will probably start off a little cloudy, but thanks to this high pressure building from wednesday onwards the weather is improving, increasingly more sunny as we go through the next few days. wednesday morning, a little cloudy to start with in the east but the cloud break up and that is a chance the clouds will increase for a time in the north—west of the country so keeping things a little cooler, 17 for stornoway but for the vast majority of us it is in the low, even mid 205. you will start to feel that warmth from wednesday onwards. here is a look at thursday. the high pressure we have been promising is building towards us keeping the weather front at bay. they are heading towards iceland rather than our direction. that means increasingly sunny. here is thursday's forecast. clouds will bubble up through the course of the afternoon but we are only talking about fairweather cloud and for many of us it is going to be a case of sunny skies. temperatures on thursday into the mid 205, 25, 26 in some spots.
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coastal areas will be a little bit cooler. at the end of the week and into the weekend, the high—pressure is right on top of us with light winds and it is going to feel even warmer. we are expecting temperatures of 26, perhaps even 27 celsius. as we head into next week, we keep the high—pressure, we keep the fine weather and it is going to stay warm. not looking bad at all. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at two. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary, saying she's "pretending" to be disgusted by the racist abuse directed at players after the euro 2020 final. the government has defended priti patel. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm shortly whether covid restrictions can be eased as planned. mps are debating a controversial decision to cut the overseas aid budget by £4 billion. and the first beaver born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera and is
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reported to be thriving!

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