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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the uk home secretary for �*pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at his team mates following the euro 2020 final. the british government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. we d like to hear your reaction to the tyrone mings�* tweet. you can get in touch with me on twitter @annita?mcveigh at least 64 people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing. some senior doctors condemn the uk
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government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th ofjuly as "irresponsible". this will definitely have an impact on a lot of patients who have been suffering and waiting for too long for their operations and treatments, being cancelled. migrants trying to cross the mediterranean to europe say they're being forcibly pushed—back by greece. the eu calls it illegal deportation. formula one's most successful driver — lewis hamilton — speaks exclusively to the bbc. he says helping motorsport to become more diverse would be "the most valuable" thing he has achieved and the first baby beaver to be born on exmoor in the uk in 400 years has been captured on camera, and is reported to be thriving!
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. two days after england's euros final defeat, and the row over the online abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings has criticised the uk home secretary priti patel for her response to racist abuse after she previously described taking the knee as "gesture politics". tyrone mings tweeted his reaction to priti patel last night, saying that the home secretary had "stoked the fire" at the beginning of the tournament. the home secretary had earlier said that she was "disgusted" by the online abuse of england players. priti patel has not responded to the comments by tyrone mings. the three black england players — jadon sancho, marcus rashford and bukayo saka — faced online abuse after missing penalties at sunday night's final.
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let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. good morning to you. what has the response been from the uk government to what the england footballer tyrone mings has said? good morning. i think it's a — tyrone mings has said? good morning. i think it's a striking _ tyrone mings has said? good morning. i think it's a striking intervention - i think it's a striking intervention from _ i think it's a striking intervention from tyrone mings to directly and unequivocally challenge the home secretary, one of the most senior figures _ secretary, one of the most senior figures in — secretary, one of the most senior figures in government about her stance _ figures in government about her stance on— figures in government about her stance on this whole idea of taking the knee _ stance on this whole idea of taking the knee that has been such a crucial— the knee that has been such a crucial part of the pre—game ritual for england throughout the euros and indeed _ for england throughout the euros and indeed in _ for england throughout the euros and indeed in the games prior to the tournament. what response has it provoked? — tournament. what response has it provoked? the answer as far as priti patet— provoked? the answer as far as priti patel is— provoked? the answer as far as priti patel is concerned is nothing direct yet, patel is concerned is nothing direct yet. we _ patel is concerned is nothing direct yet, we have spoken to her team, spoken— yet, we have spoken to her team, spoken to — yet, we have spoken to her team, spoken to the home office, they point _ spoken to the home office, they point us — spoken to the home office, they point us to what she said on twitter and what _ point us to what she said on twitter and what she said in the house of commons — and what she said in the house of commons over the last 24 hours where she has— commons over the last 24 hours where she has treen— commons over the last 24 hours where she has been unequivocal in her condemnation of the racist abuse of
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england _ condemnation of the racist abuse of england players after the penalty shoot _ england players after the penalty shoot out the other night but has not addressed the specific and direct— not addressed the specific and direct accusation made by tyrone mings— direct accusation made by tyrone mings as — direct accusation made by tyrone mings as faras direct accusation made by tyrone mings as far as taking the knee is concerned — mings as far as taking the knee is concerned. i think it's worth looking _ concerned. i think it's worth looking again at the words from the england _ looking again at the words from the england footballer tyrone mings. because — england footballer tyrone mings. because they are packed with punch. you don't _ because they are packed with punch. you don't get to stoke the fire at the beginning of the tournament by tabeiiing _ the beginning of the tournament by labelling our antiracism message, the reference to taking the knee, as gesture _ the reference to taking the knee, as gesture politics and then pretend to be disgusted when the very thing we are campaigning against happens. he's clearly boiling with anger on that specific of whether or not taking — that specific of whether or not taking the knee was something worth doing _ taking the knee was something worth doing and _ taking the knee was something worth doing. and the equivocation that we -ot doing. and the equivocation that we got from _ doing. and the equivocation that we got from priti patel and others in government as to whether or not it was a _ government as to whether or not it was a good — government as to whether or not it was a good idea firstly, and secondly, specifically as far as priti _ secondly, specifically as far as priti patel is concerned, whether or not she _ priti patel is concerned, whether or not she would criticise those fans who chose — not she would criticise those fans who chose to do the taking of the
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knee, _ who chose to do the taking of the knee. priti — who chose to do the taking of the knee, priti patel saying round about a n1onth— knee, priti patel saying round about a month ago that is a choice for them, — a month ago that is a choice for them, quite frankly. in other words, she was— them, quite frankly. in other words, she was given the chance to condemn the booing _ she was given the chance to condemn the booing and she did not take it. no word _ the booing and she did not take it. no word yet from priti patel today. here is _ no word yet from priti patel today. here is what one of her senior colleagues had to say. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups, that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. and we are acting as a government. the culture secretary has been working closely with platform owners, football authorities, other sports organisations, to work with them to tackle this. chris, earlier i spoke to the chief executive of the antiracism organisation kick it out, tony burnett and he said to me it really wasn't up to or should not be up to
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gareth southgate and the england footballers to guide the reaction to all of this, too, if you like, shape the national conversation but i wonder will some politicians be feeling very uncomfortable and thinking there might be a vacuum of leadership from the government on this and that is what you have footballers speaking out? i think siml footballers speaking out? i think simply put. _ footballers speaking out? i think simply put. what _ footballers speaking out? i think simply put, what we've - footballers speaking out? i think simply put, what we've got - footballers speaking out? i think simply put, what we've got here | footballers speaking out? i think. simply put, what we've got here is footballers speaking out? i think- simply put, what we've got here is a footballer— simply put, what we've got here is a foothaiier in — simply put, what we've got here is a footballer in tyrone mings who is clearly _ footballer in tyrone mings who is clearly very passionate about this issue _ clearly very passionate about this issue of— clearly very passionate about this issue of taking the knee and why it's an _ issue of taking the knee and why it's an important issue and an attempt — it's an important issue and an attempt to make a powerful visual argument — attempt to make a powerful visual argument and the equivocation and its listening to stephen barclay, he would _ its listening to stephen barclay, he would not — its listening to stephen barclay, he would not answer the question. when
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he was _ would not answer the question. when he was asked whether it was gesture poiitics. _ he was asked whether it was gesture politics. or— he was asked whether it was gesture politics, orwas he was asked whether it was gesture politics, or was priti patel wrong he simply— politics, or was priti patel wrong he simply would not go anywhere near it and _ he simply would not go anywhere near it and he _ he simply would not go anywhere near it and he was repeating the unanimous condemnation of the racist abuse _ unanimous condemnation of the racist abuse online. targeting some of those _ abuse online. targeting some of those england players. nobody is suggesting those in government have not been _ suggesting those in government have not been unequivocal on that, what is so _ not been unequivocal on that, what is so striking about tyrone mings intervention is how specific and targeted — intervention is how specific and targeted it is and i think in the end priti — targeted it is and i think in the end priti patel is going to have to answer— end priti patel is going to have to answer the — end priti patel is going to have to answer the question directly one way or the _ answer the question directly one way or the other— answer the question directly one way or the other because her view, a month— or the other because her view, a month ago. _ or the other because her view, a month ago, she said taking the knee was gesture politics and there are other— was gesture politics and there are other ways — was gesture politics and there are other ways of fighting the scourge of racism — other ways of fighting the scourge of racism she has described it or will she — of racism she has described it or will she acknowledge perhaps she got it wrong? _ will she acknowledge perhaps she got it wrong? i_ will she acknowledge perhaps she got it wrong? i think one way or another, _ it wrong? i think one way or another, in _ it wrong? i think one way or another, in the end, she will have to answer— another, in the end, she will have to answer that question directly. chris— to answer that question directly. chris mason, thank you. tony burnett, from the campaign group kick it out, told me that footballers need more protection
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from online abuse. i have been a really proud englishman, i always am, but even more so throughout this tournament, tyrone mings has every right to question a government, a number of people in the echelons of politics did not support the players in their anti—discrimination stand, irrespective of the gesture they chose, that is irrelevant, a side issue. they were unequivocally clear this is nothing to do with politics, this is nothing to do with politics, this is nothing to do with politics, this is antiracism and anti—discrimination and politicians still chose to end up following a populist agenda and creating divisive messages that led to a work we are now and they are wrong and they need to sort it. do we are now and they are wrong and they need to sort it.— they need to sort it. do you think some footballers _ they need to sort it. do you think some footballers are _ they need to sort it. do you think some footballers are stepping . they need to sort it. do you think. some footballers are stepping into more political territory because they feel there is a vacuum of leadership on the issue? i can't seak for leadership on the issue? i can't speak for footballers _ leadership on the issue? i can't speak for footballers on - leadership on the issue? i can't speak for footballers on that i leadership on the issue? i can't . speak for footballers on that level, to be absolutely honest. i think what i see is a group of human beings, young men in the public eye,
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with strong values, huge integrity, led by a human being who has also a huge amount of integrity and strong values and they are in pain, seeing and feeling and experiencing hate from people that should not have the ability to hurt them and they are absolutely right to stand up against that and say we deserve more protection and social media organisations and more protection from the government. they are not getting that. they absolutely have the right to enforce that and i fully support the players on this completely. fully support the players on this completely-— completely. let's look at that interview stephen _ completely. let's look at that interview stephen barclay - completely. let's look at that i interview stephen barclay gave completely. let's look at that - interview stephen barclay gave on behalf of the government this morning to bbc breakfast and he was asked about all of this and he directed his answers towards the work he said priti patel was doing with social media companies to try and clamp down on racist abuse. is that enough, words clearly matter, as i was discussing with chris mason, do we need to hear something more specific and explicit from priti patel en where she stands on this issue of taking the knee and how she regards that? i
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this issue of taking the knee and how she regards that?— this issue of taking the knee and how she regards that? i think it's a bi aer how she regards that? i think it's a bigger issue. _ how she regards that? i think it's a bigger issue, it's _ how she regards that? i think it's a bigger issue, it's a _ how she regards that? i think it's a bigger issue, it's a far _ how she regards that? i think it's a bigger issue, it's a far bigger- bigger issue, it's a far bigger issue, absolutely social media organisations need to do far more, the online forms built needs to be pushed through as quickly as possible. that is a priority but we also need to have a really serious think about where we stand as a society when it comes to discussions on race and i genuinely don't believe over the last few years government and politicians from all persuasions have set the right tone when it comes to how we discuss race and what it has led to is a divisive situation, a lot of people feel they have to be in one camp or another and we end up discussing gestures rather than fact and the fact for me is what happened the other night, britain has a massive issue when it comes to racism and there are a number of people in our country who think it is ok to have views that are apparent to the majority they need to dealt with. that are apparent to the ma'ority they need to dealt with._ are apparent to the ma'ority they need to dealt with. that was tony burnett from _ need to dealt with. that was tony burnett from the _ need to dealt with. that was tony burnett from the campaign - need to dealt with. that was tony burnett from the campaign group| need to dealt with. that was tony - burnett from the campaign group kick it out. marcus rashford has said he �*will never�* apologise for who he is after suffering racist abuse online after missing a penality in sunday's euros final. a mural of the 23—year—old was defaced after the game.
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our reporter phil mccann sent this update from withington near manchester. this area here in south manchester, withington, is proud of one of its most famous sons, sir marcus rashford and you can see how proud here, this multicoloured mosaic of post—it notes, flags, all sorts of messages left by all sorts of different people. this is a diverse area of south manchester, we saw police turning up this morning to leave messages, mothers and fathers with their kids on their way to school, people on their way to work, people out for a morning jog and lots of people here now taking in the atmosphere. we now the artist who staggers at the bottom of the mural, he put this up back in november last year after he shot to fame with the school meals campaign, he will be turning up here to try and restore the mural to its former glory but the question is what happens to all of these messages. we can speak to jay, you took part and
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you spearheaded the spoken word project in november when this was put up. that was all about explaining putting this in context for people. why it is marcus rashford are so important to this area? i rashford are so important to this area? ., ., ,., .., , area? i wrote a poem called these walls, area? i wrote a poem called these walls. using _ area? i wrote a poem called these walls, using the _ area? i wrote a poem called these walls, using the wars _ area? i wrote a poem called these walls, using the wars as _ area? i wrote a poem called these walls, using the wars as a - area? i wrote a poem called these l walls, using the wars as a metaphor for individual struggles, the coat take pride in knowing your struggle will plate _ take pride in knowing your struggle will plate the biggest role in fulfilling your purpose which i think— fulfilling your purpose which i think his _ fulfilling your purpose which i think his mother said, the perfect metaphor— think his mother said, the perfect metaphor for what it is like to be a person— metaphor for what it is like to be a person of— metaphor for what it is like to be a person of colour in the uk, knowing the struggles you go through define you, the struggles you go through define you. and _ the struggles you go through define you, and marcus is a sporting icon who did _ you, and marcus is a sporting icon who did not — you, and marcus is a sporting icon who did not necessarily to come into the realm _ who did not necessarily to come into the realm of— who did not necessarily to come into the realm of creating social change but he _ the realm of creating social change but he decided to support us at a time _ but he decided to support us at a time the — but he decided to support us at a time the government was not doing so and he _ time the government was not doing so and he has _ time the government was not doing so and he has had a really big impact on peopie — and he has had a really big impact on people and i think it's wonderful and i_ on people and i think it's wonderful and i wanted to try and contextualise that, these walls and local areas — contextualise that, these walls and local areas and communities define who we _ local areas and communities define who we are — local areas and communities define who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse — who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse he _ who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse he has _ who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse he has got _ who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse he has got here _ who we are and where we go. and the racist abuse he has got here today, i racist abuse he has got here today, what do you think that says, and the
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response here? the what do you think that says, and the response here?— response here? the racist abuse he suffered a systemic _ response here? the racist abuse he suffered a systemic of _ response here? the racist abuse he suffered a systemic of what - response here? the racist abuse he suffered a systemic of what it - response here? the racist abuse he suffered a systemic of what it is - suffered a systemic of what it is like to _ suffered a systemic of what it is like to be — suffered a systemic of what it is like to be a black person in the uk, that value — like to be a black person in the uk, that value is — like to be a black person in the uk, that value is mitigated by what we bring, _ that value is mitigated by what we bring, as— that value is mitigated by what we bring, as soon as marcus did well in football— bring, as soon as marcus did well in football he — bring, as soon as marcus did well in football he was a great british icon and as— football he was a great british icon and as soon as he made one mistake his colour— and as soon as he made one mistake his colour was brought into it and i think— his colour was brought into it and i think that — his colour was brought into it and i think that is — his colour was brought into it and i think that is the perfect metaphor for what _ think that is the perfect metaphor for what is — think that is the perfect metaphor for what is it is like to be black and british— for what is it is like to be black and british in modern times, the response — and british in modern times, the response has been great, manchester is a place _ response has been great, manchester is a place that does things differently and we don't really have that many— differently and we don't really have that many issues and i think it's great _ that many issues and i think it's great withington has come out and created _ great withington has come out and created such a positive response to something — created such a positive response to something quite negative. the created such a positive response to something quite negative.- something quite negative. the big auestion is something quite negative. the big question is what _ something quite negative. the big question is what happens - something quite negative. the big question is what happens next? i something quite negative. the big. question is what happens next? we know the mural will be restored, the abuse will be removed, these messages say something also about this area and his importance here? they do. hopefully some art exhibition is going to be done, that would _ exhibition is going to be done, that would be _ exhibition is going to be done, that would be nice, to document another moment— would be nice, to document another moment manchester came together to show how— moment manchester came together to show how great we are.—
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show how great we are. thank you. that is the — show how great we are. thank you. that is the big _ show how great we are. thank you. that is the big question, _ show how great we are. thank you. that is the big question, what - show how great we are. thank you. that is the big question, what will. that is the big question, what will happen to all of these messages? these messages, marcus rashford said on social media overnight, brought him to tears because as i said at the beginning, this is his home town, withington, telling him how they feel about him. that town, withington, telling him how they feel about him.— town, withington, telling him how they feel about him. that was a film in withington- _ they feel about him. that was a film in withington. some _ they feel about him. that was a film in withington. some more - they feel about him. that was a film in withington. some more of - they feel about him. that was a film in withington. some more of your. in withington. some more of your tweets on the subject of tyrone mings street. and also the wider issue of racism in politics. one viewer ask the question of taking the knee is not gesture politics, then what is it classed as? this from another viewer, tyrone mings street is spot on, no matter how much back peddling the government does now the viewer says it is clear that the statement from the home secretary has been seen as condoning racism. another bureau says i agree with what tyrone mings said regarding the actions of the home secretary. and i think... that is
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most of the tweets for now. there is no such thing but there is freedom of expression, with that comes responsibility and consequences says anthony. you cannot shout fire in a crowded building and avoid blame for the resulting panic, and andy, i think i read another one from andy, tyrone mings is not stepping into politics, he is stepping into the space vacated by eight media. says andy, whosejob it should be told the government to account. i think thatis the government to account. i think that is what we are trying to do today, asking questions, that's what ourjob is, asking questions about theissues ourjob is, asking questions about the issues of the day. thank you very much for sending in all of those tweets, you can continue to sendin those tweets, you can continue to send in your thoughts on twitter. and use the hashtag bbc your questions. at least 64 people have died in a major fire at a hospital treating coronavirus
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patients in southern iraq. dozens of other people have been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say is likely to have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion. tanya dendrinos reports. a roaring inferno and a sea of desperate voices. fire crews battled the flames raging against the night sky. dozens of people have died, many were injured and others are still unaccounted for. what makes this scene all the more devastating is the fact it is at a coronavirus hospital in a country already ravaged by war with a health system under significant strain. as medical teams work to treat victims, the search operation continued in the burnt out wards. charred bodies carried out of the building. the blaze was likely caused by the explosion of an oxygen tank and it wasn't long before rage spilled out onto the streets.
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chanting. protesters gathered outside the hospital and the mayor's office, demanding the resignation of officials. the prime minister has held an emergency meeting, initiating a high—level investigation into the incident and directing urgent medical aid to the region. yet another tragedy just months after a similar incident at a hospital in baghdad which claimed more than 80 lives. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the government defends the home secretary priti patel, who has been criticised by england footballer tyrone mings for �*pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players at least 64 people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing. migrants trying to cross the
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mediterranean to europe say they are being forcibly pushed back by greece. the eu calls it illegal deportation. senior doctors have criticised uk prime minister borisjohnson's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". mrjohnson confirmed that most remaining measures — including social distancing and the legal requirement to wear masks — would be dropped from the 19th ofjuly. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports. in under a week's time, life in england will look very different. no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer be legally required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible. borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over, but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying
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is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases aren't rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop. it makes no sense to be knowingly accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than the law in england. bus and rail industry groups have said they won't require passengers to wear them. in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon will announce today whether its restrictions can be
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eased next monday, as planned. wales is due to review its restrictions on wednesday, and northern ireland is due to ease some covid measures on july the 26th. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act. aruna iyengar, bbc news. trish greenhalgh is a professor of primary care health sciences at the university of oxford. thank you forjoining us and we heard the prime minister in that report, the clip used, saying scientists say this is the right day to do this, ease restrictions on the 19th ofjuly. you would beg to differ with that date, wouldn't you? i think most scientists would disagree that now is the right time.
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i think the government itself, boris johnson himself, only a couple of weeks ago had a slogan data not dates and now he's gone right back on that and he's saying scientists agree on this day, how can they agree on this day, how can they agree on this day, how can they agree on the date? we don't know what's going to be happening on the 19th ofjuly but he is firmly tied into that. i think probably for political reasons he is under a lot of political pressure from his own backbenchers in particular to take away the mask mandate, the distancing, so that people can feel free, actually we are going to be a lot less free from the 19th ofjuly, as he set when you introduce this item. it's going to look very different on the 19th ofjuly and an awful lot of people will feel less safe and they are going to feel less able to do basic things like going to the shops, getting on a bus, that kind of thing. i to the shops, getting on a bus, that kind of thing-— kind of thing. i 'ust wonder how many people _ kind of thing. i just wonder how many people are _ kind of thing. i just wonder how many people are going - kind of thing. i just wonder how many people are going to - kind of thing. i just wonder how many people are going to make kind of thing. i just wonder how. many people are going to make a personal decision to try to retain
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social distancing, to keep wearing masks? some surveys suggest a majority of people would make that decision themselves, of course the issueisif decision themselves, of course the issue is if there is no legal requirement to do so, it's potentially going to lead to all sorts of conflict, isn't it?- potentially going to lead to all sorts of conflict, isn't it? yes, it is and i think— sorts of conflict, isn't it? yes, it is and i think scientifically - sorts of conflict, isn't it? yes, it is and i think scientifically we i is and i think scientifically we need to be absolutely clear about the way this virus spreads. it spreads by floating in the air so if you are in for example a supermarket for 80% of people are wearing masks voluntarily, the other 20% are going to be exhaling and some of those are going to be exhaling virus into the air and it going to be exhaling virus into the airand it will going to be exhaling virus into the air and it will state suspended in the air and so when someone else goes into that supermarket, they are at risk. now of course, if you are wearing a mask, it protects you to some extent but we know masks are not 100% effective so by far the best way of protecting ourselves is for everybody certainly everybody who is an adult, perhaps even an
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older teenager, would be wearing a mask unless they had a medical reason not to, that is the safest way for giving everyone the freedom to go about their lives in the normal way. and particularly on public transport. these are small volume spaces. you know, inside a bus, there's not much air there and a lot of people are sharing it and i think there was one thing i want to get across to the prime minister it's to say we need to keep the mask mandates on public transport. that of course is — mandates on public transport. that of course is going _ mandates on public transport. that of course is going to be an area that a lot of people are focusing on in the time remaining between now and the 19th ofjuly and looking at what decisions individual companies make. looking at the modelling on hospitalisations and potential debts, there are some very worrying figures there. it has to be said the most worrying figures are if everyone was to go back to behaving completely normally, pre—pandemic
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normally straightaway which clearly a lot of people aren't going to do. at what point though do you think we are going to see an impact on the nhs and by that i mean dealing with the backlog of treatment required for non—corona virus related issues, that they are trying currently to get a handle on. ii that they are trying currently to get a handle on.— get a handle on. if we fill the hospitals _ get a handle on. if we fill the hospitals with _ get a handle on. if we fill the hospitals with people - get a handle on. if we fill the hospitals with people with i get a handle on. if we fill the i hospitals with people with covid we will be cancelling routine operations and some of those operations and some of those operations are people who have been waiting for months and even years for an operation for their hip or their hernia or whatever it might be. there is a big backlog. if the words are full of people with covid, you won't even be wanting to go into hospital, there won't be any room for you anyway, it will be cancelled, just like it was a year ago. so the idea that freedom dates somehow will allow the nhs to deal with this backlog is backward thinking, it's going to do precisely
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the opposite which is another reason for delaying. one of the things that the prior minister talked about a lot was this uncoupling of the link between vaccination and hospitalisation and debts. he's got to some extent got a point there, it's not a complete uncoupling but we are in a much better situation the more people are vaccinated so why not wait until a much higher proportion of the population has had both of their jabs proportion of the population has had both of theirjabs because then it would be much safer to open up so opening up now, when only half of the entire population is vaccinated, it's a crazy thing to do.— it's a crazy thing to do. professor, thank ou it's a crazy thing to do. professor, thank you for— it's a crazy thing to do. professor, thank you for your _ it's a crazy thing to do. professor, thank you for your time _ it's a crazy thing to do. professor, thank you for your time today. i scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will reveal today whether coronavirus restrictions will be eased as planned next monday, after a review of the latest data. the scottish government had intended to move the whole country to the lowest level of restrictions from the 19th ofjuly, however it's since been hit by a record—breaking wave of infections.
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nicola sturgeon says she's still hopeful some changes will go ahead. the bank of england's financial policy committee has said the rapid rollout of the uk s vaccination programme has led to an improvement in the uk's economic outlook but risks to the recovery remain. the committee says households and businesses are likely to need continuing support from the financial system as the economy recovers and as government assistance declines. a top eu official has told the bbc that the greek government must stop the illegal deportation of migrants arriving on the country s borders. ?the eu commissioner for home affairs said that the very well founded reports of pushbacks at sea and on land were violations of fundamental european values.
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human rights groups allege that thousands of people seeking asylum in europe have been pushed back from greece to turkey before being given a chance to apply for asylum. greece has always denied the allegations. fergal keane reports now from the island of lesbos. a warning — you may find some of his report distressing. on europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing. please! pushing asylum seekers across international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, this is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water. all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been
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victims of push backs. onjune 10th last, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that. with the war at home, the multiple problems, our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey,
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without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and took us to a military port, then put us in boats. it was around 8pm, there were police wearing dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat. after that we realised we were in regional turkish waters. woman yells. najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines, and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece.
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but also, it's eu law that is not — that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu chapter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out. some boats from the eu's own border agency are even accused of helping with push backs. but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on,
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without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos. the headlines on bbc news: england footballer tyrone mings criticises the uk home secretary for �*pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at his team mates following the euro 2020 final. she hasn't responded to the accusations, but the british government has defended her at least 64 people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th ofjuly as "irresponsible".
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migrants trying to cross the mediterranean to europe say they're being forcibly pushed—back by greece. the eu calls it illegal deportation. more now on covid restrictions being lifted fully in england from next week, and senior doctors have criticised uk prime minister borisjohnson's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week, calling the move "irresponsible". i spoke to dr chaand nagpaul, council chair of the british medical association, about the reaction from the health care industry. we think that the prime minister's announcement goes against their own criteria for easing restrictions. we are seeing significant increases in hospitalisation. we were dismayed to hear that the government expects us to see about 2,000 admissions per day, which is about 20 fold more than the middle of may. we saw last week one hospital
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in leeds having to turn down patients with cancer because of an influx of covid—i9 patients. we think the message from the government is really quite contradictory, because it is the freedom day, according to the prime minister, the prime minister was at pains to explain that people should carry on wearing facemasks in crowded places such as transport, at pains to say that people should be cautious, we won't be going back to the days before covid—i9, and so what we don't understand is why such a contradictory and ideological message which will only confuse the public. it is a bit like saying we have seen more road traffic accidents. we want people to stick to speed limits but we are going to remove the requirement to stick to speed limits. it doesn't make sense. and i don't think it is about an issue, a choice between living with the virus are not, it's a choice about living with the virus safely. and, actually, making sure that people don't infect each other when they are close by, maybe inches away, on a crowded underground train. you know, it doesn't seem to me about stopping us reopening
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the economy or stopping us opening society, it is about us making sure that there are safe measures which are proven to reduce the spread of infection. you mentioned that you thought this was a contradictory and ideological message. do you think this is the prime minister under pressure from some in his party to go down this route, but he is trying to hedge his bets, i suppose is a way of putting it, by urging people to be cautious without making it a legal requirement for them to do so? doesn't make sense. if the prime minister believes that the right thing for people to do is to wear face coverings on a crowded underground train, then why is it saying on the one hand, you should do that, but we are going to remove the restriction? it doesn't even make logical sense. and what we do know is that the virus will spread in those situations. the government itself has accepted seeing as many as 100,000 new cases per day, it will, as the government itself has said, result
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in more people in hospital, probably the highest numbers in the whole of europe. so, you know, wejust don't understand why he would be risking the nation's health in this way. and why it will add further pressure on the nhs at a time, and i can tell you as a doctor, we are trying to plough through over five million patients who have been waiting for their operations and all of those patients are at risk of being delayed if we see more patients from covid—i9 being admitted. the hospitality industry and events industry have been some of the hardest hit by restrictions , and with the unlocking of england next week, will be able to return to full capacity. with me isjessica barker, who owns the north yorkshire wedding venue thief hall. thank you for your time. how are you feeling about next week? i wonder, people make wedding plans well in
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advance, well you have some couples there with smaller numbers than they would ideally have liked? yes. there with smaller numbers than they would ideally have liked?— would ideally have liked? yes, we've not a would ideally have liked? yes, we've got a mixture — would ideally have liked? yes, we've got a mixture of— would ideally have liked? yes, we've got a mixture of couples, _ would ideally have liked? yes, we've got a mixture of couples, couples i got a mixture of couples, couples jumping up and down, wanting 150 guest weddings, we have got people who understand that covid—i9 has not disappeared, it is a little bit risky, and they are pulling back with the guest list of 30 to 50 because they are looking after their loved ones. that is interesting. different approaches, people trying to have all the numbers they would have liked to pre—covid—i9, and some people who arejust liked to pre—covid—i9, and some people who are just being a little bit more cautious. as the business owner there, bit more cautious. as the business ownerthere, how bit more cautious. as the business owner there, how are you going to try to accommodate those different wishes? brute try to accommodate those different wishes? ~ ., ~' , try to accommodate those different wishes? ~ ., ,, , , wishes? we work with every couple individually. _ wishes? we work with every couple individually. it _ wishes? we work with every couple individually, it is _ wishes? we work with every couple individually, it is their _ wishes? we work with every couple individually, it is their day, - wishes? we work with every couple individually, it is their day, it i wishes? we work with every couple individually, it is their day, it is i individually, it is their day, it is “p individually, it is their day, it is up to them, they have everything that they want, our biggest concern
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with the business is that there are no covid—i9 cases following a wedding. it is the best day of your life and you do not want to end up in hospital are your parents in hospital. it's a variety of guest, elderly guests at every wedding and the young people who want to jump up and down on the dance floor all night. you have to find a happy medium. in the business, we are testing every guest into the wedding, lateralflow testing every guest into the wedding, lateral flow test, testing every guest into the wedding, lateralflow test, what else can you do? you have to open the doors at some point but we want to stay safe. we have couples in september, october, november, december, panicking that a lockdown will happen again and their wedding will happen again and their wedding will be affected. there is no answer to that right now but it looks like it could be a possibility and that is really scary. let me pick up on you were asking everyone to do a lateral flow test coming into the venue. you are
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choosing to follow that advice. it is not a legal requirement, but advice from the government that you make sure that your customers are doubly vaccinated or covid—i9 free. you could be doubly vaccinated and still have covid—i9, can't you? you are doing your utmost to protect your guests and your staff who will be working at the tables and so on. absolutely. we have got to keep our venue open. if a restaurant closes part ten days, the guests will come back again and service resumes. if we close our venue for ten days because of covid—i9 cases are lack of staff, that could affect people's weddings that cannot be postponed because there is nowhere to put them any more, the amount of postponements over the last 18 months has had a knock—on effect and we are fully booked into 2024 as a result. if we have to close, it could be catastrophic for our
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couples. we have to do everything we can to stay open and to stay running and keep everyone safe, including our staff. despite being fully booked until 2024 which is fantastic for any business to have that level of bookings, how much uncertainty do you still feel? i know you are having to pay back the business bounce back a loan. you want to be certain you have the revenue coming in to be able to do that and to run your business properly. xties. in to be able to do that and to run your business properly.— your business properly. yes. as i said, your business properly. yes. as i said. some _ your business properly. yes. as i said. some of — your business properly. yes. as i said, some of the _ your business properly. yes. as i said, some of the couples i your business properly. yes. as i said, some of the couples are i said, some of the couples are choosing to have a smaller guestlist, the revenue is not as good as it should be and a knock—on effect of reopening which could be too quick, if we go back into another lockdown, i don't have anywhere to put my couples if they want to postpone or have to postpone. as a country, we need to stay open, we just have to stay open
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this year i do not want to go into another lockdown and i am sure every business in the uk feels like this. if it means keeping a lead on the restrictions right now to stay open, long term, would that not be more sensible? would you have liked to have seen more of a legal requirement rather than advice and encouraging people make sensible decisions? yes. than advice and encouraging people make sensible decisions?— make sensible decisions? yes, this is not freedom _ make sensible decisions? yes, this is not freedom day, _ make sensible decisions? yes, this is not freedom day, the _ make sensible decisions? yes, this is not freedom day, the pandemic. make sensible decisions? yes, this| is not freedom day, the pandemic is worse and worse, it is going up, i would have liked to have seen advice and restrictions to continue may be at the 50% of the venue capacity just to keep us all thank you very much for talking to us. really interesting to hear your thoughts on this. france says all health care workers must be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by september, or they risk not being paid. the announcement, by president emmanuel macron,
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comes as cases of the delta variant there are rising. greece is following suit, after similar measures were unveiled by italy in april. mark lobel reports. to france's health care workers, a message from the president: get vaccinated in the next two months or risk not being paid. translation: it is the only way to return to normal life. initially for health care staff in hospitals, clinics, retirement homes, institutions for people with disabilities, for all professionals or volunteers who work in contact with the elderly orfrail, including at home, vaccination will be made compulsory without delay. president macron says it is a race against the clock as the take—up of firstjabs is falling and less than 40% of the population has had two shots. that's a concern because of a rise in cases of coronavirus with the delta variant causing a surge in hospital admissions. not everyone has welcomed the move.
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translation: if it's compulsory, we will do it, of course. translation: for me, forcing an agent to be vaccinated with a specific product is total nonsense. new rules also mean that from next month the nonvaccinated will struggle to get into one of these, these, these, or get away without a negative covid test. greece has announced vaccines are now mandatory for care home staff and will be for health care workers from september, with new restrictions for the nonvaccinated in bars, cinemas and theatres. in holland, there has been a screeching u—turn of the loosening of restrictions unveiled just three weeks ago as nightlife resumed, infection levels surged to their highest levels this year. the dutch prime minister admitted an error ofjudgment. translation: i do think the prime minister opened
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things too early. it would have been better to wait a few more weeks because now we are in a surge again. it's a shame because everybody expected to have like an open summer with a lot of activities. i know that my friends were all buying tickets and everything, and now it'sjust all cancelled again. as europe faces rising numbers of infections, mainly due to the delta variant, several countries' tolerance of those avoiding injections appears to be waning. mark lobel, bbc news. google has been fined a record 600 million dollars by the french authorities in a row over copyright. they said google had not negotiated in good faith about paying for press reports it runs on its news aggregator site. it has given google two months to fix the problem or face further fines of up to nine hundred thousand euros or a million dollars a day. detectives investigating international money laundering have
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seized nearly £180 million of bitcoin. the seizure by the metropolitan police's economic crime command follows a confiscation of £114 million of the cryptocurrency in june. the two confiscations were made following intelligence received about the transfer of criminal assets. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by four—billion—pounds will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7 percent to 0.5 percent because of the pandemic, but was met with cross—party criticism. mps will be asked to choose whether overseas aid spending should return to its previous amount or tie aid spending to government borrowing and debt. and for viewers in the uk, the debate on foreign aid begins in the house of commons at 12.30 — we'll bring that to you live on the bbc news channel a fraudster threatened to harm a bbc reporter after using a fake parcel delivery text
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to obtain his personal details. the man, who called from what looked like a genuine number for first direct, said he was calling from the bank's fraud department. ? but the caller became abusive after being challenged byjon ironmonger, who recorded their conversation. ?a warning this report includes language that some people may find offensive. i know you've got some of my details, richard... that was me a few weeks ago. i'd fallen for a really common parcel delivery text scam and handed over some of my details and days later, i got a call from a man claiming to be from my bank fraud department and he said that people had been trying to use my card up in bradford and that they needed to protect my online bank account. minutes into the call, i began to think, am i being scammed again? so i made excuses, got him off the line and checked with my bank and sure enough, he was indeed a scammer. when he called me back later that evening, i recorded oui’ conversation. tell me your name again. i didn't catch it.
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mr richard jones, sir. regarding the safeguarding process. i am just going to place you on hold while we start that process, 0k? thank you very much for your patience. 0k, 0k. so what do you need from me then? just launch your mobile app for me but do not log in. this is onlyjust for the safeguarding process. it might have a lot of information. richard, richard... ..because of that phishing scam. richard, i am not taken in by this. i think other people might be, though. and that does worry me. scammers have been cashing in since the pandemic. according to which, three out of five people have received fake delivery texts in the past year. we are all working from home and using technology so much more. even people who were not shopping online or banking online and have been forced into that and we are seeing a lot
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of scams come through. i do not believe you are calling from first direct. i do actually wonder... ..how many vulnerable or elderly people you have defrauded like this? now, that is quite disrespectful, sir,... you could cause serious psychological harm, you know, this can. richard, you are not convincing me, richard, i know you are a scammer, if that is even your name. action fraud received reports of 138,000 suspicious texts and calls in the 12 months to april. that is up 80% on 2019/20. this dedicated card and payment crime unit is leading a police crackdown on so—called smashing scammers like richard. i am going to ask you a question, 0k? go on, yes, shoot. so you lived in... richard, i know you've got... i know you've got some of my details, richard, because you have scammed me already
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via a phishing scam. i will harm you at your home address if you bleep dirty hugger. wow. 0k. so there we go. he turned. he turned right at the last minute. and that is how committed these scammers are. watch out for those scams. now to france and a story with historical resonance: the remains of a general who died in russia after being hit by a cannonball fired by napoleon's army in 1812 will be returned to france today. his descendants are angry with french president macron as he will not be given a national commemoration. originally a national repatriation ceremony was planned but since then relations between paris and moscow have become tense. here's our correspondent in paris, hugh schofield.
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this general, i had not heard of him before, but napoleon probably had about 2000 generals, but this man knew napoleon personally and serve the king and the revolution and followed napoleon and sir tim through the european campaigns and went with him to russia on the campaign to take moscow an 1812. it was halfway to moscow, over half way to moscow that he failed. he was given orders to charge the russian rearguard, he was hit by a cannon ball and lost his leg and died three days later with gangrene having been visited by napoleon on his death bed. he was buried there and there are records of where he has been buried. thanks to a rather odd character, a frenchman in moscow, a
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bit of a maverick, the detective work and archaeological work was carried out and led to the discovery of his body which was identified by dna comparison with other family members and the saga began of how to bring him back, campaigning fora major diplomatic... to bring back the two leaders, but that was said no buy aung san suu kyi run, it was not the right thing to do now. the bodyis not the right thing to do now. the body is coming back today, there is low level recognition, of this man who served in france. military values and all the rest of it but it will not be getting french state approval which is what was originally planned. what was originally planned. he's won seven world titles and is the most successful driver formula one has ever seen. now, lewis hamilton has a new mission — to make the sport more diverse.
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sally nugent has been chatting to him about his plan to get more young black people to take up stem subjects. lewis hamilton, good morning. good morning. you're making a very special announcement today, aren't you? something you have been working on for a really long time. it's a very nerve—racking moment. but super—exciting, as well. because it's the beginning of a journey for pushing for change within my industry. where it stemmed from is i thought that me being in this sport, and we thought as a family, making it in the sport, we would break the mould. and it would open up doors and pathways to other young black talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity within our industry, nobody has an answer for it. so that's my purpose, that's my reason for being here.
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i have two young people who are really excited to talk to you. hi. how are you? i'm fine. i like your hair. thank you. what i've noticed, what i watch in formula! is that there are actually very few black women in your team. and stephanie travers being one of the only black female fluid engineers. what would you say to black girls aspiring to be engineers in formula 1? stephanie is a hero. she is absolutely amazing. and what she has had to overcome in order to be in our sport is incredible. last year, i got to be on the podium with her for the first time. she was the first black woman to be on the podium in the 70 years of the sport. so it is really encouraging young girls to be following stem subjects. of course, the triple science, super—important. but itjust opens up so many great avenues within our industry. there's 40,000 jobs and
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currently there's only 1% of those are from black backgrounds. so that's what we need to change. so we need lots... more and more people like you, with great minds, to come, because, ultimately, a more diverse workforce is beneficial for everyone. this is lewis. how are you doing? i'm good. you look very smart. thank you. so you're good, yes? yeah, i'm fine. you've got a question for me? yeah, how did your family react when you told them that you wanted to become an f1 driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driverfrom the age... i was already five, six years old, so i knew that was what i wanted to do, as we were watching grands prix. and, at the time, of course, it was just such a far—fetched dream, but it was a big dream.
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i started racing when i was eight years old. so that was then the beginning of thatjourney. keep working hard at school, 0k? yes. work hard at trying to catch max verstappen, as well. trust me, i'm working hard. trust me, i will. bye, guys. bye! so, lewis, there you have it. two young people challenging you to come up with the goods now. because motorsport does not represent society, does it? it doesn't — at the moment. but that's what we're here to change. and i actually believe that it's possible. and, again, those lovely kids wejust met, you know, it's showing them and their families that this is actually a real route for them, a real opportunity, a careerfor them. what does your sport need to do now? do you think it's time to introduce may be a quota system when it comes to apprenticeships
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and employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations we have is for formula 1 teams to take the lead, and in signing a diversity and inclusion charter it's about us coming together on this journey. i can't do it on my own. we just need to get all the teams on board, because that's the goal over this next 5—10 years. when i look back i don't want to look back and think, "lewis hamilton is a seven—time world champion." i want to look back and say that i was a part of something. for the first time in 400 years, a baby beaver has been born on exmoor. this youngster, known as a kit, was caught on camera by staff at the holnicote estate in somerset. the rodents were introduced into the wild there last year, as part of a national trust project
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to restore streams and reduce flooding. reports say the baby is doing very well. you're watching bbc news. now, it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. well, thankfully we won't be seeing a repeat through the rest of this week to what happened weather—wise yesterday, deluge in some parts of the country. here are some of the wettest spots. how much rainfall fell during monday compared to what you would normally expect during the entirety ofjuly. the kew gardens as well, saw a month's worth of rain falling in just the space of a few hours. it was the wettest day in nearly 40 years. thankfully, the showers that we do see today, 0k, the odd sharp one will be about, but nowhere near as intense as those, fewer in number as well with more of you dry and increasing amounts of sunshine as we go through the afternoon. the clouds will linger in some spots, particularly around some of the coast, better chance of some sunshine at times inland.
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as temperatures rise, it will set off one or two sharp showers here. western scotland, parts of wales, western and southern england in particular. but even those will be fewer in number, most places avoiding them and temperatures around where we should be for this stage in july, 18 to 24 degrees. let's go to this evening and overnight, showers will continue for a time but they will gradually fade as temperatures drop through the night. not going to be dropping too much, though, whilst there will be some clear skies, there will be some mist and fog around, some low cloud on the east coast, west of scotland and northern ireland, but the odd mist and fog patch inland and temperatures 15, 16 degrees for one or two of you as we start tomorrow morning. as you go into tomorrow, almost in between that low pressure that brought the storms yesterday pulling away eastwards, high pressure for the end of the week pushing its way in. around the top of it, we will see these weather fronts gradually working to western scotland, northern ireland. not much to them, though, bringing a little bit more breeze, a bit more cloud and some patchy rain and drizzle to western isles later. the vast majority, other than isolated showers, will be dry. most of you having
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a fine day on wednesday. morning mist and fog clearing, some low cloud to eastern coasts, some strong sunshine inland. unlike this afternoon, temperatures lifting into the 20s fairly widely. and then as we see the week out and head towards the weekend, that area of high pressure to the west, finally builds its way to sit right on top of the uk. high pressure generally means dry weather and with it, an increasing amount of strong sunshine overhead and increasingly warm weather too. temperatures rising across the country as we head towards the weekend and with the blue skies overhead through saturday and sunday, we could see temperatures anywhere between around 24 and 28 celsius. 28 is 82 in fahrenheit. see you soon.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11.00am. footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for "pretending" to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. i generally don't believe, certainly over the last few years, that government and politicians from all persuasions have set the right tone when it comes to how we discuss race. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th ofjuly as "irresponsible". and in scotland the first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned.
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at least 64 people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing. will the uk government have to restore its foreign aid budget to 0.7% of national income? mps will vote in the house of commons today. and the first baby beaver to be born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera, and is reported to be thriving! two days after england's euros final defeat, and the row over the online abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings has criticised the home secretary priti patel for her response to racist
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abuse — after she previously described taking the knee as "gesture politics". tyrone mings tweeted his reaction to priti patel last night, saying that the home secretary had "stoked the fire" at the beginning of the tournament and accused her of "pretending to be disgusted" when the players were racially abused. priti patel has not responded to the comments by tyrone mings. the chief secretary to the treasury, stephen barclay has defended the home secretary, telling the bbc that she fully understood the issues of racism after being subject to online abuse herself. the three black england players jadon sancho, marcus rashford and bukayo saka faced online abuse after missing penalties at sunday night's final. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. how correspondent chris mason. is this a being seen th it how is this a being seen there? it is quite something this, i think, if you take a couple of steps back. you have a prominent spurt ——
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sportsmen, an england player after a tournament in which they had been the dominating national conversation within england, given their passage to the final. heery is and unequivocally challenging the home secretary on a specific, on a whole specific taking the knee and whether or not it is a good idea as part of a campaign to try to eradicate racism from football and from society. priti patel the home secretary has been pretty strong in her own view saying as he said in his tweets, it is gesture politics. when she was asked last month whether or not she would condemn those who had booed england players taking the knee, she said, that is a choice for them, quite frankly. she was offered the opportunity to condemn those who booed and she didn't take it. no response from priti patel yet, we are trying to
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get a response but we've not managed to find her. this is what stephen barclay, you mentioned him earlier, this is what he had to say this morning when asked specifically about this issue. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups, that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. and we are acting as a government. the culture secretary has been working closely with platform owners, football authorities, other sports organisations, to work with them to tackle this. there is no disputing that voices all across government have been unanimous in condemning the racist abuse that some of england because my players were subjected to after that penalty shoot—out at the other night. that is not of the point
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tyrone mings is making. he is saying, you cannot simultaneously condemn that abuse while also come in his view, being of the position that priti patel has bent on taking the knee. those crucial words in tyrone mings tweet saying, you can't pretend to be disgusted when the very thing we are campaigning against happens. stephen barclay this morning wouldn't go anywhere near addressing that particular issue directly. we have sought to give priti patel a right to reply, her team have pointed us to that initial tweet from her yesterday in which she did condemn the racist abuse on social media and the common statements when she said pretty much the same thing but he hasn't addressed the specific of taking the new that tyrone mings is taking issue with. we're joined now by the former footballer paul canoville, who played for chelsea and reading, and is executive director of the paul canoville foundation and an anti racism campaigner.
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thank you forjoining us. how do you see that discrepancy, the language being used now by the home secretary, by the prime minister and what was said before about taking the knee? ., . , what was said before about taking the knee? ., ., ., , �* what was said before about taking theknee? ., ., ., ,�* , what was said before about taking theknee? ., ., ., ,�* ., the knee? politics doesn't play a art in the knee? politics doesn't play a part in football _ the knee? politics doesn't play a part in football itself. _ the knee? politics doesn't play a part in football itself. it - the knee? politics doesn't play a part in football itself. it is i the knee? politics doesn't play a part in football itself. it is when | part in football itself. it is when we hear things like this from a leader like that, he you just don't expect it. players will be upset and want to hear the feedback. it is one of those things. the main point is what these lads received after representing their country. how far does it go? where does it lead to and what can then about it? itrul’hat does it go? where does it lead to and what can then about it? what is our and what can then about it? what is your answer— and what can then about it? what is your answer to _ and what can then about it? what is your answer to that, _ and what can then about it? what is your answer to that, what _ and what can then about it? what is your answer to that, what needs i and what can then about it? what is your answer to that, what needs to | your answer to that, what needs to be done? , ., ., , ., , be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously _
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be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously by _ be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously by the _ be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously by the fa _ be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously by the fa and i be done? the situation needs to be taken seriously by the fa and the i taken seriously by the fa and the met police. they need to find these culprits to be convicted, that is how serious it is a step. this has been going on forfar too long. the fa know this is where i need to take steps on this. we have boycotted a month ago the media, social media, and look at where it is taking us? it is back there again. it is a fight unlike myself and people campaign against racism. it's not all real true fans. those ignorant ones, those are the ones we need to get out now. ones, those are the ones we need to get out now— ones, those are the ones we need to get out now. ones, those are the ones we need to net out now. ~ ,., .., , ., get out now. when something comes to hue get out now. when something comes to huge prominence _ get out now. when something comes to huge prominence in _ get out now. when something comes to huge prominence in the _ get out now. when something comes to huge prominence in the way _ get out now. when something comes to huge prominence in the way this i get out now. when something comes to huge prominence in the way this has, i huge prominence in the way this has, an issue many have campaigned on for an issue many have campaigned on for
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a very long time and then there is certainly a big moment, there's always the question, is this a watershed moment? [30 always the question, is this a watershed moment?- always the question, is this a watershed moment? do you think it could be? no. _ watershed moment? do you think it could be? no. i— watershed moment? do you think it could be? no, i hope _ watershed moment? do you think it could be? no, i hope it _ watershed moment? do you think it could be? no, i hope it isn't. i watershed moment? do you think it could be? no, i hope it isn't. don'tl could be? no, i hope it isn't. don't get me wrong. we hearfrom could be? no, i hope it isn't. don't get me wrong. we hear from the people above saying they are going to do something about it. this stage and now we need to go further. i hope the fa do just that. the situation happened when we played the danish and a danish family were racially abused. we are hoping they will come to the chelsea football ground. hopefully this will help and go a step forward. i hope it doesn't just stop here because, as i said, it is far too long, it is far, far
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too long this has been going on. it needs some mysterious investigation. thank you very much. == needs some mysterious investigation. thank you very much.— needs some mysterious investigation. thank you very much. -- some serious investigation- — senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week, calling the move "irresponsible". borisjohnson confirmed that most remaining measures, including social distancing and the legal requirement to wear masks, would be dropped from the 19th ofjuly. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports. in under a week's time, life in england will look very different. no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer be legally required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible. borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over,
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but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases are not rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop. it makes no sense to be knowingly accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than the law in england. bus and rail industry groups have said they won't require
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passengers to wear them. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. in scotland, nicola sturgeon will announce today whether restrictions will be lifted on monday. wales are going to look at the restrictions on wednesday. northern ireland is going to ease some restriction onjuly 26. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act. aruna iyengar, bbc news. andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester, has said he's not ruling out making masks compulsory on public transport in his area but isn't currently adopting the policy. mr burnham said the "simple solution" would be for the government to make face coverings obligatory for all public transport. there is a recent study from the university of bristol that says wearing a face covering by large numbers of people can
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reduce the r rate by around 0.25. there is real evidence out there to show that they work. the message i will be giving to them and the train operators and also our own tram system is to strongly encourage the wearing of face coverings. we will have people on the system on monday, that'll be the message that is coming through on our trams. it would be made much easier for us if the government were just to say, we recognise that on public transport, where some people have no choice but to go because they don't own a car, and if we put ourselves in the shoes of somebody who has to use public transport to go for chemo or dialysis, it absolutely makes sense they have confidence people will be wearing face coverings around them. this needs to be seen as well in the context of the guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable. they were told yesterday they should avoid people who are not vaccinated. how on earth are they to know who is vaccinated and who is not? you can even read this guidance as though it is asking them, or recommendin to them,
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that they should shield again. freedom day for some people will definitely not be freedom day for 3.8 million people, and that is why the government has got this wrong. let's speak to professor christina pagel, director of the clinical operational research unit at ucl. she's also a a member of the group that established itself as an alternative to the government's official scientific advisors, calling themselves the independent sage group. welcome, thank you forjoining us. chris witty the government adviser says all options right now lead to a broadly similar outcomes with no clear evidence of a delay will make a difference. what will make a difference is going slowly and the responsibility is to be put in all our hands. do you agree with that? no, i don't agree. it is an infectious disease, that is a collective responsibility. but i do
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affect other people and what other people do affect me. me choosing not to wear a mass impact others. it isn't a personal choice. in terms of other options, they have taken options off the table. that is what i don't understand. we can get immunity flu infection or get it through vaccination. there is evidence immunity you get from vaccination is longer lasting and more robust than immunity you get from infection. halfway through our vaccination programme, we are now saying, we don't care any more. can choose to wait until we have vaccinated more people which is what that bmi is advising. we can choose to put in public health measures that help listed the virus as we have for the last year, which includes physical distance income of mask wearing. we can invest in ventilation and makes school safer. this idea that is no option is
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completely, there is no evidence. would you say that the policy in place now is effectively going for herd immunity through the vaccination programme as far as it has been rolled out and then letting it to spread freely through those who are unvaccinated? primarily the under 18. 87.2% of over 18 have had wonders. , , ., wonders. yes. it is lower in under 30s but that _ wonders. yes. it is lower in under 30s but that is _ wonders. yes. it is lower in under 30s but that is the _ wonders. yes. it is lower in under 30s but that is the impact. i wonders. yes. it is lower in under 30s but that is the impact. they l wonders. yes. it is lower in under. 30s but that is the impact. they are expecting another 2 million infections this summer and the imperial model suggests may be 7 million infections before december. that has to be the conclusion. it is not inevitable. the idea it is inevitable, i don't understand where it has come from. we have seen israel which waited to restrict measures until they had vaccinated a higher number of adults, they opened up higher number of adults, they opened up without an extra wave and they
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did it by slowly removing measures. a few months later, unfortunately, imported belter which is causing a new search and rear of the implementing measures. —— imported belter. implementing measures. -- imported belter. ., ., , implementing measures. -- imported belter. ., belter. the government has said it will no belter. the government has said it will go back _ belter. the government has said it will go back to _ belter. the government has said it will go back to restrictions - belter. the government has said it will go back to restrictions if i will go back to restrictions if there is an issue with hospitals being overwhelmed. does the government needs to spell out what those levels might be because it isn't clear at the moment, and do you have a view of what the levels should be? 1000 hospitalisations a day or higher, or lower?— should be? 1000 hospitalisations a day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are — day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are going _ day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are going to _ day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are going to get _ day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are going to get to _ day or higher, or lower? people seem sure we are going to get to a - sure we are going to get to a thousand a day. the question is, what can be any tesco played? we have seen a lot of reporting how busy hospitals are. we know there is 5 million people waiting for treatment. any covid admissions add
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strength to that and that is what the nhs ceo said last week, it is what the bma is a saying. what i can't understand theirs there seems to be the spanish mag about as long as it isn't as bad as what happened in january, as it isn't as bad as what happened injanuary, we are ok. january overwhelmed the nhs, so much else was cancelled. the nhs was exhausted. we have lowered our standards that we are not willing to try a bit better and fewer than 8000 admissions a day.— admissions a day. thank you very much forjoining _ admissions a day. thank you very much forjoining us. _ admissions a day. thank you very much forjoining us. we - admissions a day. thank you very much forjoining us. we are i admissions a day. thank you very much forjoining us. we are just i much forjoining us. we are just hearing from the courts that colin pitchfork who raped and murdered two schoolgirls in the 1980s will be released from prison. it has become an issue since he was cleared for
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release by the parole board. he was jailed for raping and murdering two girls in leicestershire in the 19805. girls in leicestershire in the 1980s. he has spent 33 years in prison. he was last denied parole in 2018. the parole board had said it was satisfied that he was suitable for release which is subject to conditions. the government took issue with the decision of the parole board and challenged it but we are hearing now that challenge has been rejected. colin pitchfork will be released from prison. no doubt, there will be more reaction to come to that decision so we will keep you updated with what happens as we get more information on that. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will reveal today whether coronavirus restrictions will be eased as planned next monday, after a review of the latest data.
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the scottish government had intended to move the whole country to the lowest level of restrictions from the 19th ofjuly, however it's since been hit by a record—breaking wave of infections. nicola sturgeon says she's still hopeful some changes will go ahead. let's talk to our scotland correspondent james shaw. james, what is the expectation? as you say, the expectation had been that there would be significant and locking, significant easing next monday and then a removal of the bulk of legal controls on the 9th of august. but since those announcements were made at the end of last month, there has been at this wave of infections in scotland. at one point scotland have the highest infection rate in europe. clearly, that has led to nicola sturgeon and her cabinet having a rethink of those decisions they made a few weeks ago. we don't know
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exactly the extent to which they will hold back on the unlocking that had been expected. that is the possibility that some of that unlocking will not happen. in fact, it is already the case that easing in scotland is going at a much slower pace than it is in england. in england next monday, legal restrictions will be removed, a lot will remain in place in scotland, particularly around it of people gathering in different settings and the wearing of masks. it is even the case there will be restrictions, some restrictions after 9th of august when most legal restrictions will be removed. as has so often been the case during this pandemic, scotland and england taking similar roots out of unlocking the scotland doing it a little bit more slowly and a little bit more cautiously. thank you very much.
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a senior eu official has warned the greek government to stop the alleged deportation of migrants arriving at its borders. some migrants trying to seek asylum in europe claim that greek coastguards have forced their small boats back into turkish waters. 0thers allege that even after landing in greece they've been taken back out to sea, actions greece has denied. the bbc�*s fergal keane reports from the island of lesbos. a warning, you may find some of his report distressing. 0n europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing please! pushing asylum seekers across international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, _ this is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took. place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water.
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all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been victims of push backs. 0njune 10th last, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get i a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that. with the war at home, the multiple problems, our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities
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only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey, without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and took us - to a military port, then put us in boats. it was around 8pm, there were police wearing dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat. after that we realised we were in regional turkish waters. woman yells najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines, and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law
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by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece. but also, it's eu law that is not — that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu chapter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out. some boats from the eu's own border agency are even accused of helping with push backs. but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are
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defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on, without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos. i'm joined now by the united nations special rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, felipe gonzalez morales. welcome, thank you forjoining us. do you have any doubt that greece is doing push backs? i do you have any doubt that greece is doing push backs?— doing push backs? i don't have doubts at all. _ doing push backs? i don't have doubts at all. from _ doing push backs? i don't have doubts at all. from my - doing push backs? i don't have doubts at all. from my office l doing push backs? i don't have. doubts at all. from my office we have been monitoring the situation for over a year now. we have made
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repeated calls to greece to stop this practice. in fact, a couple of weeks ago i presented a report to the human rights council of the united nations about the practice of push backs. this includes specific mention of greece in this regard. brute mention of greece in this regard. we heard and our report a claim, some say the eu is turning a blind eye to this. we heard there from the eu commissioner who said protecting eu borders is also about defending values and this must not happen. what do you think about the line eu takes on this? i what do you think about the line eu takes on this?— takes on this? i think the eu definitely — takes on this? i think the eu definitely should _ takes on this? i think the eu definitely should have i takes on this? i think the eu definitely should have a i takes on this? i think the eu | definitely should have a much stronger stake in this issue. i have seen other human rights council, the specific countries defending
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themselves such as greece itself but i haven't seen a strong role on the part of the european union in terms of monitoring, investigating the violations and also trying to make a stronger case for having also receiving asylum seekers in countries in the mediterranean coast. ., ., ,., ., coast. you mentioned the report that ou coast. you mentioned the report that you submitted _ coast. you mentioned the report that you submitted to _ coast. you mentioned the report that you submitted to the _ coast. you mentioned the report that you submitted to the united - coast. you mentioned the report that you submitted to the united nations, what does it conclude in terms of the legality of what greece is doing and what sanctions they could potentially be to prevent this? well, the push backs out of practice against international law. it implies that people cannot exercise
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their right to seek asylum law they can have due process for the allegations that they want to make. that is very clear from the view of the international standards. my office as such cannot issue any sanctions but what i can make is to do calls to the international community, the regional organisations so they take stronger action in this regard by monitoring, investigating and calling the state to sanction the responsible of changing its policies when necessary. ii changing its policies when necessary-— changing its policies when necessa . ., ., , �* necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece — necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece be _ necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece be held _ necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece be held to _ necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece be held to account i necessary. if that doesn't happen, can greece be held to account for| can greece be held to account for what is happening here? i can greece be held to account for what is happening here?- can greece be held to account for what is happening here? i hope that the international _ what is happening here? i hope that the international community - what is happening here? i hope that the international community will i the international community will take a stand in this regard. when i presented my report, we made a call
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to the united nations human rights council to create a specific monitoring group on the issue of push backs. i hope that will have an impact on the behaviour of greece as well. . ~ impact on the behaviour of greece as well. ., ,, , ., impact on the behaviour of greece as well. . ~' , ., , impact on the behaviour of greece as well. ., ,, i. , . impact on the behaviour of greece as well. . ~ ,, , . ., well. thank you very much for “oininu well. thank you very much for joining us- — the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by £4 billion will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7% to 0.5% due to the impact of the pandemic on public finances, but the decision was met with cross—party criticism. andrew mitchell is the former international development secretary and leader of the conservative rebels opposed to the cut in the foreign aid budget. thank you very much forjoining us. this is a vote you have been
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wanting. i do think the prospects are of you actually winning it? you are of you actually winning it? you are riuht. are of you actually winning it? you are right- the _ are of you actually winning it? gm. are right. the government has done the right thing in holding this vote and if we win this afternoon then the olive branch which we offered a month ago, which was the suggestion they should bring it back next day not this year, would be accepted that the government has made it clear from the dispatch box. i that the government has made it clearfrom the dispatch box. i don't know whether that is going to be. we would have won a month ago, there is a proposal on the table from the treasury which we don't think amounts to anything but a number of my colleagues are considering that. we hope very much to win this afternoon that is what we are trying to achieve. the afternoon that is what we are trying to achieve. ., ., , ., j~ to achieve. the government has an 82 seat majority — to achieve. the government has an 82 seat majority sunni _ to achieve. the government has an 82 seat majority sunni are _ to achieve. the government has an 82 seat majority sunni are going - to achieve. the government has an 82 seat majority sunni are going to i seat majority sunni are going to need a lot of rebels to win this, how many do you think you've got? even when it is so politely asked by people like you we don't discuss number. we have got a lot of support because people want the government to stand by the manifesto commitment we all made just 18 months ago at the general election. whatever the
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crisis, we wouldn't balance the books on the backs of the poorest people of the world. hundreds of people of the world. hundreds of people —— hundreds of thousands of people —— hundreds of thousands of people rely on britain. the only g7 can do that is cutting its apart, is not the right thing to do. if you lost this vote later, how would you feel about your position in the labour party? you fight your battles internally, you to persuade your colleagues what is the right position to proceed. it took us from 1992 after 2015 to get an overall majority in the tory party and we got that overall majority because we wiped out many of the liberal successes, particularly in the west country and we did it because we were seen as a
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broad, internationalist, supporting party. if you narrow the dna of any political party in this way you take a great risk your future. jacob rees-mogg — a great risk your future. jacob rees-mogg has _ a great risk your future. jacob rees-mogg has said - a great risk your future. jacob rees-mogg has said the i a great risk your future. jacob rees—mogg has said the question for the debate today is because this house wish to see the public finances kept under reasonable control, or on the other hand do we want to hard pressed our hard—pressed taxpayers even further. we are talking about 1% of the money that the government quite rightly borrowed last year to shore up the country against covid—19. they are quite wrong to announce the only cat is this cat. balancing the books on the backs of the poorest people in the backs of the poorest people in the world. the 0.7 goes up and down with their economic performance. it is simply not true to say it takes no account of our economy, it certainly does. in my view post people in britain do not think you should cut humanitarian aid, in some
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cases literally taking the food away from starving people at any time let alone in the middle of a global pandemic. alone in the middle of a global pandemic— alone in the middle of a global andemic. . ~' , ., , . pandemic. thank you very much, andrew mitchell. _ pandemic. thank you very much, andrew mitchell. we _ pandemic. thank you very much, andrew mitchell. we will - pandemic. thank you very much, andrew mitchell. we will have i andrew mitchell. we will have coverage of that debate at about 12:1i5pm. we will bring it to you live. hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for �*pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her. teammate marcus rashford says he will "never apologise for who he is" after he was subjected to racist abuse online. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on i9thjuly as "irresponsible". in scotland, the first minister,
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nicola sturgeon, will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. will the uk government have to restore its foreign aid budget to 0.7% of national income? mps will vote in the house of commons today. sport now and, for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre here's jane dougal. good morning. marcus rashford has said messages of support left at his mural after it was defaced almost brought him to tears. rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka received racist abuse online after missing penalties as england lost to italy in the euro 2020 final. their teammates, including captain harry kane and tyrone mings, have hit out at the abuse. after a mural in honour of rashford's charity work was vandalised, hundreds of positive notes have now covered the graffiti. in a post on social media,
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rashford said he was "sorry" for the penalty miss, but he will never apologise for who he is and where he came from. former footballer anton ferdinand said he anticipated the racial abuse as the penalties were being taken. for it to turn so sour and in the way that it did was something that, one, i wasn't surprised, and as someone of black origin i'm sitting there hoping nobody misses a penalty, but especially thinking to myself, none of the young black boys miss a penalty, because if they do they could pay for some serious, serious abuse. that is what i was thinking. i don't want to think like that but the way things have been going a copy thinking like that. on a more positive note, three england players have been chosen in the euros team of the tournament — raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. that has just been released in the last few minutes. some lovely footage of jack grealish
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making a young fans night has emerged on social media. this is oliver, not only did he get to pose for a photo with jack, but got to keep his football boots. his dad, dan, called it a "moment he would cherish forever". breaking news in the last hour — confirmation that the rugby league world cup will take place in england this autumn, after all competing nations signed an agreement. the tournament had been in doubt over issues with covid regulations and quarentine rules for those travelling back to australia and new zealand. there could be a surprise return to the british and irish lions squad. wales' alun wynjones may be coming back despite dislocating his shoulder just a few weeks ago. connor murray captains the team against south africa a tomorrow, with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on 24thjuly, and head coach warren gatland said he will decide whetherjones rejoins the squad today.
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he has made a remarkable recovery in terms of that injury, which the assessment was initially that it wasn't as bad as they first thought, so that's a real positive and it would be a boost to the squad to have someone of his experience and calibre to come back into the squad. back into the squad. the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay on the site and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village in tokyo's harumi waterfront district. the international olympic committee president thomas bach is full of praise for the organisers. lewis hamilton is aiming to inspire more young black people to take up science and engineering subjects in a bid to help formula one become more diverse.
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the seven—time world champion published the results of his commission into lack of diversity in the sport and it's findings. he says long term projects need to be put into action to ensure more people of colour work in the sport. it's a very nerve—racking moment, but super sighting as well because it is the beginning of a journey for pushing for change within my industry. were it really could have stemmed from as i thought may being in the sport, we thought as a family, as making it into the sport would break the mould and it would open up doors and pathways for other young black talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity within industry, nobody has an answer for it, within industry, nobody has an answerfor it, so within industry, nobody has an answer for it, so that is my purpose, my reason for being here. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's get more on our top story, and the home secretary, priti patel, who's been accused of hypocrisy over racism
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by an england footballer. tyrone mings said she had "stoked the fire" of online abuse against players by failing to condemn fans who booed the the team when they took the knee to protest against racial inequality. joining me now is dr halima begum, ceo of the runnymede trust. that is the uk's leading independent think tank on race. do you see a direct line between the home secretary refusing to condemn people who booed those taking the knee and what subsequently happened with that racist trolling of the players on social media?— racist trolling of the players on social media? ., ., ., , social media? thanks for having us on the show _ social media? thanks for having us on the show i _ social media? thanks for having us on the show. i see _ social media? thanks for having us on the show. i see a _ social media? thanks for having us on the show. i see a direct - social media? thanks for having us| on the show. i see a direct absence of leadership on issues around race, that starts long before a football match. if you want to look at leadership and where it is missing you only have to look at gareth southgate. he has provided the sort of moral leadership that we would expect to see in this country. i
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would rather show a positive model of leadership and talk about that in the hope that we could bring the country together, where it has been united in these games, and not forgetting the joy of the immense pleasure that the english football team gave us this summer. we mustn't let this backlash focus us away on what we did achieve. maybe focus on the positive leadership from gareth southgate and learn from it. what southgate and learn from it. what about the players _ southgate and learn from it. what about the players themselves as role models? we had that tweet from tyrone mings sent to the home secretary, you don't get to stoke the fire at the beginning of the tournament and then pretend to be disgusted when the racism happens. harry kane basically saying anyone who does that is not an england fan and they are not welcome. find who does that is not an england fan and they are not welcome. and harry kane is right- — and they are not welcome. and harry kane is right. the _ and they are not welcome. and harry kane is right. the english _ and they are not welcome. and harry kane is right. the english football. kane is right. the english football team is the most inclusive team that we can think of and, frankly, to try and suggest that the place of a
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young footballers and what they achieve for this country is somewhat questionable because we lost on penalties is unacceptable. every time i young black or asian footballer goes on to play football they are notjust footballer goes on to play football they are not just taking a footballer goes on to play football they are notjust taking a step in a stadium, they have been off the pitch battling against racism to get to play their cut —— to play for and represent their country. sometimes you lose, sometimes you win, but to then face that's racism reminds us that racism isn't cheating in our society, it is endemic, so let's get behind our young black footballers. they are a young team and we need to get them to come back stronger for the world cup tournament, so that is where we need to be. we the world cup tournament, so that is where we need to be.— where we need to be. we have had stron: where we need to be. we have had strong condemnation _ where we need to be. we have had strong condemnation now- where we need to be. we have had strong condemnation now from - where we need to be. we have had strong condemnation now from the home secretary at the prime minister, the prime minister said shame on you, i hope you crawl back
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under the rock from which you emerged. could this be a moment of change in how the politicians see the role that they play? politicians have a rule — the role that they play? politicians have a rule to _ the role that they play? politicians have a rule to bring _ the role that they play? politicians have a rule to bring about - the role that they play? politicians have a rule to bring about unity. . have a rule to bring about unity. they have a role to bring about consensus and for some time now we have seen our politicians behind the curve a bit on what we saw with the football match is that politicians need to play a more enabling role and it was good of our prime minister and secretary to step up very quickly. what they now need to do is focus on a wider culture of antiracism bit comes from every level of leadership, it doesn'tjust come about because we call out racism on the pictures. it needs to come earlier and we need to see concerted leadership from the government of prime minister and i look forward to seeing more of that leadership. more now on covid restrictions being lifted fully in england from next week. senior doctors have criticised uk prime minister borisjohnson's
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decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week, calling the move "irresponsible". scotland will find out later today whether coronavirus restrictions will be eased as planned next monday, after a review of the latest data. the hospitality industry has been one of the hardest hit by restrictions and, with the unlocking of england and potentially scotland next week, will be able to return to full capacity. with me to discuss this isjoanna nethery, co—owner of glasgow restaurant five march. i'm also joined by carl gratty, owner of nightclub gossip in hanley. thank you very much forjoining us. coral, you can open, how will you handle that? will you impose any constraints on those wanting to come to the club in terms of having to have a vaccination certificate were proof of a negative test? we have a vaccination certificate were proof of a negative test?- have a vaccination certificate were proof of a negative test? we have a series of checks _
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proof of a negative test? we have a series of checks that _ proof of a negative test? we have a series of checks that we _ proof of a negative test? we have a series of checks that we will - proof of a negative test? we have a series of checks that we will be - series of checks that we will be performing throughout this covid pandemic. we have our hand sanitiser —— hand sanitiser is in place. we will be doing temperature checks on the door but we will not be requiring people to show their passports. this is about society not just nightclubs being able to give people back a piece of their lives that they have missed. the prime minister has _ that they have missed. the prime minister has said _ that they have missed. the prime minister has said that _ that they have missed. the prime minister has said that it _ that they have missed. the prime minister has said that it is - that they have missed. the prime minister has said that it is a - minister has said that it is a matter of social responsibility for venues to ensure as far as possible that the virus doesn't spread. there is the prospect if it does, if there is the prospect if it does, if there is a problem that is identified, then we could go back into tougher restrictions. what do you think about that? it restrictions. what do you think about that?— about that? it is always a possibility _ about that? it is always a possibility of _ about that? it is always a possibility of taking - about that? it is always a possibility of taking a - about that? it is always a | possibility of taking a step backwards. we do not have a strong virus shield against coronavirus in
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the uk. it will never go away, it will always be something we have to live with. it will be a balancing act. but it is essential that we restore these freedoms that society needs. that social interaction is crucial for developing younger people as adults in the future. would it be in your best interest to ensure, you said you will do the temperature check, but they are not infallible, nothing is, but to say if you are double jabbed that we want that, or we want proof of a negative test?— want that, or we want proof of a ne . ative test? ., ., . ., negative test? you are then creating a two tier society. _ negative test? you are then creating a two tier society. that _ negative test? you are then creating a two tier society. that will - a two tier society. that will alienate people and cause friction. it is a sensible thing to give people the option if they want to
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wear face coverings, people the option if they want to wearface coverings, but people the option if they want to wear face coverings, but if you are in an environment like a nightclub where people are going to be dancing around, interacting socially, that is the whole reasonable, that goes against that whole mindset. joanna, how are things _ against that whole mindset. joanna, how are things with _ against that whole mindset. joanna, how are things with your _ against that whole mindset. joanna, | how are things with your restaurant? what are you hoping might happen? we are operating to a certain extent. to be _ are operating to a certain extent. to be honest i don't think there is any chance — to be honest i don't think there is any chance we will be dropped down to level_ any chance we will be dropped down to level zero. i think nicola sturgeon will make sure that masks remain_ sturgeon will make sure that masks remain mandatory and i would completely agree with that. i don't understand how this is rising at the rate that _ understand how this is rising at the rate that it— understand how this is rising at the rate that it is, so we will certainly _ rate that it is, so we will certainly be pretty careful with maintaining masks for all the staff, temperature checks, the very basics. i am not _ temperature checks, the very basics. i am not entirely sure that seeing it as _ i am not entirely sure that seeing it as a _ i am not entirely sure that seeing it as a civil— i am not entirely sure that seeing it as a civil liberty is the way to id it as a civil liberty is the way to go on — it as a civil liberty is the way to
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go on this _ it as a civil liberty is the way to go on this. some of it makes a mockery— go on this. some of it makes a mockery of— go on this. some of it makes a mockery of the last year, as far as i see _ mockery of the last year, as far as i see. , . ., ., . mockery of the last year, as far as isee. , ., i see. there is the economic aspect of it. if i see. there is the economic aspect of it- if the — i see. there is the economic aspect of it. if the social _ i see. there is the economic aspect of it. if the social distancing - of it. if the social distancing remains, that means that profits are constraints. what about that aspect for you? constraints. what about that aspect for ou? . , . constraints. what about that aspect for ou? ., , ., ., . for you? that is a real thing. we are still operating _ for you? that is a real thing. we are still operating at _ for you? that is a real thing. we are still operating atjust - for you? that is a real thing. we are still operating atjust underl are still operating atjust under two thirds capacity, and we see the financiat— two thirds capacity, and we see the financial impact for the company. thurtow _ financial impact for the company. thurlow was a wonderful system, but it was _ thurlow was a wonderful system, but it was certainly wasn't free for us, are kept— it was certainly wasn't free for us, are keptjust undera hundred grand to keep— are keptjust undera hundred grand to keep everybody on furlough for the year~ — to keep everybody on furlough for the year. that is when the monies starts _ the year. that is when the monies starts to— the year. that is when the monies starts to disappear quickly. at the moment— starts to disappear quickly. at the moment we can balance it by having fewer— moment we can balance it by having fewer staff— moment we can balance it by having fewer staff on, modifying how much we bring _ fewer staff on, modifying how much we bring in — fewer staff on, modifying how much we bring in in terms of stock. when you are _ we bring in in terms of stock. when you are in _ we bring in in terms of stock. when you are in complete lockdown, there is no _ you are in complete lockdown, there is no way _ you are in complete lockdown, there is no way to — you are in complete lockdown, there is no way to know when you can reopen —
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is no way to know when you can reo en. . ~' is no way to know when you can reoen. ., ~ i. ,., is no way to know when you can reoen. ., ~ , . ., reopen. thank you both very much for our reopen. thank you both very much for your perspectives _ reopen. thank you both very much for your perspectives on _ reopen. thank you both very much for your perspectives on this. _ a shortage of hgv drivers is hitting crisis level in the uk, with demand increasing across supply chains as the country recovers from covid—i9. from this week, the government is allowing drivers to work slightly longer hours in order to deal with the shortage, but the industry has criticised the move and said it's not nearly enough to deal with the situation. our reality check correspondent chris morris is with me. a shortage of hgv drivers is hitting crisis level in the uk, our reality check correspondent chris morris is with me. how big is the problem? well, the road haulage association, based on a survey of its members, estimates that there is now a shortage of more than 100,000 drivers. that was a figure they put at 60,00
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even before the pandemic hit. tens of thousands of those drivers were from the eu. the warnings have been flooding in from companies and hauliers that they can no longer guarantee pick—ups or deliveries. we ve heard recently from tesco, from the sweetmaker haribo, but also concern coming from farmers, from the construction sector and elsewhere that things are getting worse. they are talking about extending driver hours, but there is a safety issue that comes with that. a sect of the driver workforce has just gone. of the driver workforce has 'ust one. , , ., gone. the drivers will be given a slirhtl gone. the drivers will be given a slightly longer— gone. the drivers will be given a slightly longer period _ gone. the drivers will be given a slightly longer period they - gone. the drivers will be given a slightly longer period they can i gone. the drivers will be given a i slightly longer period they can work for over a four—week period. the
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four—week period has just begun. instead of driving for nine hours a day for a couple of days a week, they can drive for ii day for a couple of days a week, they can drive for 11 hours. it is not a huge increase. the industry says it isn't enough. there has been criticism of the government saying that the government is compromising safety standards. the industry is calling for a temporary relaxation of work visas drivers from abroad, evenif of work visas drivers from abroad, even if they are on very low pay. that is something the government seems to be looking up at the home office is not keen to add lorry drivers to an emergency list of workers that can be brought in to keep the economy moving. that is also a problem. the government says it is working with the industry but of course we have the summer holidays looming night. a lot of drivers will be taking summer holidays. there is a fear that things will get worse. it is about iust-in-time _ things will get worse. it is about just-in-time deliveries, - things will get worse. it is about just-in-time deliveries, how - things will get worse. it is about i just-in-time deliveries, how come things will get worse. it is about - just-in-time deliveries, how come we just—in—time deliveries, how come we haven't been seeing shortages, or
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haven't been seeing shortages, or have we been but not really noticing? how quickly could things get worse? noticing? how quickly could things aet worse? , ., ., ., , get worse? there is a whole variety of thin . s get worse? there is a whole variety of things happening _ get worse? there is a whole variety of things happening at _ get worse? there is a whole variety of things happening at the - get worse? there is a whole variety of things happening at the same . of things happening at the same time. obviously covid has made things worse. a further pandemic there were shortages anyway, but when the economy started to lockdown a lot of those european drivers simply went home and they haven't come back. the pandemic is also meant that hgv driving tests have not been taking place to bring new people into the industry. last year there were 25,000 fewer successful testing in the previous year. a lot of the older drivers have been retiring, so that has increased the shortages. then of course there is brexit. a lot of those european drivers used to be able to come and go as they please, they can do that night, there is additional bureaucracy. with the tax changes, a lot of them used to be able to work
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on of off payroll basis. the tax rules have been tightened making it more difficult to employ people in that way. there is a variety of reasons that mean these drivers aren't coming. i don't think the shortages on the shelves have been particularly noticeable so far, but the fruit picking season is now upon us. the fruit pickers are worried that if it doesn't rot in the field, it could rot in the warehouses if they don't have people to come and pick it up. at least 64 people have died in a major fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in southern iraq. many more have been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say is likely to have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion. tanya dendrinos reports. google has been fined a record $600 million by the french authorities in a row over copyright. the authority said google had not negotiated in good faith about paying for press reports it runs on its news aggregator site.
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it has given google two months to fix the problem or face further fines of up to 900,000 euros, or $1 million, a day. detectives investigating international money—laundering have seized nearly £180 million of bitcoin. the seizure by the metropolitan police's economic crime command follows a confiscation of £114 million of the cryptocurrency in june. the two confiscations were made following intelligence received about the transfer of criminal assets. one of the uk's largest agricultural events, the great yorkshire show, is back for the first time since the pandemic. sarah corker has more from harrogate 100,000 people are expected here in
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harrogate for this four—day event. it was virtual back in 2020 but, as you can see, they are doing it for real this year. at the main grandstand they are showing horses and ponies at the moment. i'm told that they are judged on their movement and their manners. some are better behaved than others. there will be some show—jumping later on today. one of the talking points amongst farmers here will be the challenges of attracting workers, so people who pick and pack the nation's fruit and vegetables. eu nationals have previously done many of those roles, but the pandemic and brexit has had an impact on the supply of labour. issues we can discuss with the deputy president of the national farmers' union, stuart roberts. hi, stuart. hi. how significant, then, is this shortage of workers? for a number of businesses it has been very, very challenging, but notjust on farm, it's also about further down the supply chain, so those that are packing our product, those that are processing our product, those that are transporting our product, so it has been challenging. we are working hard, but we also need to see some solutions to some of the real issues we have got at the moment about where that workforce comes from. seasonal work doesn't always suit a uk workforce and that's why it has been so important. what is the solution, then?
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how do you attract that next generation of farm workers? how do you persuade domestic workers, isuppose, to do those jobs? well, i think one of the issues in terms of our workforce in general is events like this, for example. it's about the agriculture industry, the horticulture industry showing off how great it is, what a great place to work it is, but it's also about looking at technology solutions, it's about looking at permits. it is about looking at turning what is currently a pilot scheme the government have got for seasonal workers into a permanent scheme. there are plenty of solutions there, but we need people to work hard on them if we are to get the people we need to get the great british product onto the supermarket shelves. and as you say, events like this are about showcasing british produce. they are about increasing trade. not having events like this over the last year has been challenging, so how important is this to the rural economy? i think these sorts of events are fantastic. they are a showcase. we know the british public support
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british food, british farming, and these are a great shop window for us. i take my hat off to the guys up here in yorkshire for putting on this event at the moment in challenging circumstances, but it's great to see people out and it's great for people like me, farmers like me, to be able to talk to our customers, the great british public. stuart, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us today. i just want to show you over here because over the next four days 8,000 animals will be taking part in various competitions. you can just see the warm—up area here, crowds beginning to build. there is a cap on tickets today because of the pandemic. 26,000 tickets on sale. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt.
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hello. after yesterday's storms for parts of the country, many of you will be staying dry through the rest of the day. there will be some showers around, the odd heavier one here and there, parts of western england, wales, towards the south and maybe one or two over the hills in scotland, but most of you will see a bit more sunshine around this afternoon than many saw this morning. some low cloud around the coasts admittedly and that will stop temperatures rising here, but inland 18 to 2a celsius — around where we should be at this stage injuly. as we go into this evening and overnight, showers for a time. they will gradually fade. still some low cloud around the coast, but inland a few mist and fog patches form under clear skies, but it certainly won't be a cold night by any means. in fact, for some of you quite muggy into tomorrow morning — 15 or 16 degrees potentially around liverpool and greater manchester. as we go into wednesday, well, we have some of that mist and fog.
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that will clear. low cloud across the eastern coast, a bit more breeze here tomorrow, and clouding over to western scotland and northern ireland later.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for 'pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. but campaigners are calling on politicians to be more responsible when discussing race—related issues i genuinely don't believe, certainly over the last few years, that government and politicians from all persuasions have set the right tone when it comes to how we discuss race. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th ofjuly as "irresponsible". and in scotland the first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can
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be eased as planned. colin pitchfork, who raped and murdered two schoolgirls in the 1980s, will be released from prison after the parole board rejected a government challenge against its ruling. will the uk government have to restore its foreign aid budget to 0.7% of national income? mps will vote in the house of commons today. and the first baby beaver to be born on exmoor in 400 years has been captured on camera, and is reported to be thriving! two days after england's euros final defeat, and the row over the online abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings has criticised the home secretary priti patel for her response to racist
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abuse — after she previously described taking the knee as "gesture politics". tyrone mings tweeted his reaction to priti patel last night, saying that the home secretary had "stoked the fire" at the beginning of the tournament and accused her of "pretending to be disgusted" when the players were racially abused. priti patel has not responded to the comments by tyrone mings. the chief secretary to the treasury, stephen barclay has defended the home secretary, telling the bbc that she fully understood the issues of racism after being subject to online abuse herself. the three black england players jadon sancho, marcus rashford and bukayo saka faced online abuse after missing penalties at sunday night's final. our political correspondent chris mason has more. it chris mason has more. is quite something vest, it if it is quite something vest, i think. if you take a couple of steps back, you have a prominent sportsman in tyrone mings and an england player after the tournament in which they have been the dominating
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conversation in england given their passage to the final. here he is directly and unequivocally challenging the home secretary on a specific come on this whole specific of taking the knee and whether or not it is a good idea as part of a campaign to try to eradicate racism from football and from society. priti patel, the home secretary, has been pretty strong in her own view around the home view of taking the knee. he said it was gesture politics. when she was asked last month whether or not she would condemn those who had booed england players taking the knee, she said, thatis players taking the knee, she said, that is a choice for them. she was offered the opportunity to condemn those who booed and she didn't take it. as you say, no response from priti patel yet. we are trying to get a response that we have not managed to find her yet with our camera. this is what stephen barclay
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the aforementioned stephen barclay you mentioned, this is what he had to say this morning when asked specifically about this issue. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups, that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. and we are acting as a government. the culture secretary has been working closely with platform owners, football authorities, other sports organisations, to work with them to tackle this. there is no dispute that voices all across government had been unanimous in condemning the racist abuse that some of england boss mike players were subjected to after their penalty shoot—out. that is not the point is tyrone mings is making here. he is saying, you cannot
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simultaneously condemn that abuse whilst also, in his view, being of the position that priti patel has been on taking the knee. those crucial words in tyrone mings tweet saying you cannot pretend to be disgusted when the very thing we are campaigning against happens. stephen barclay this morning wouldn't go anywhere near addressing that particular issue directly. we have sought to give priti patel a right to reply, her team have pointed us to reply, her team have pointed us to that initial tweet from her yesterday in which she did condemn the racist abuse on social media. a commons statement when she said pretty much the same but she hasn't addressed the specific taking the knee that tyrone mings is taking issue with. i'm nowjoined by kelyvn quagraine, from football beyond borders which is a education and social inclusion charity using the power of football to change the lives of young people. welcome, thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts on all of
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this? , ., . ., , what are your thoughts on all of this? , ., .., , ., this? the first thing that comes to mind is is not— this? the first thing that comes to mind is is not surprising _ this? the first thing that comes to mind is is not surprising at - this? the first thing that comes to mind is is not surprising at all. - this? the first thing that comes to mind is is not surprising at all. a l mind is is not surprising at all. a lot of people in the nation saw three black players missing a penalty and knew what was coming at the back of it. when you look at the three players that had been abuse, one is 19 and was put in a position not many people have been n. he had to be subjected to racist abuse. you see a player in marcus rashford, because of him, he's managed to provide free school meals to young people across the country and the minute he misses a penalty to create a piece of history that ultimately he is not allowed to be part of, he is incarcerated. we then see other players who have contributed so much to was the success of england through the course of this tournament, who created a level of historyjust by being in the final, had to be subjected to racial abuse.
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you are asking the question, are you just a part of the uk, part of britain, part of this culture and identity when it is successful to be so and then racially abused when you fail? ithink it so and then racially abused when you fail? i think it was a really, really sad moment to see. for a lot of young people out there looking at these role models, these icons that have grown up in communities like theirs, that have risen to the heights of football, be reduced to such negative abuse online, i think it is more and more clear now that social media organisations have to do something about the issue. the eyes of the country are looking at them to see how they respond to this sort of stuff. i also really agree with what gareth southgate has done with what gareth southgate has done with the team and how he has tried to inspire that level of unity and look after those players and protect them at all costs. more than ever, we need the country to come together and drown out the negative noise of
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their minority and really push for this level of unity across the nation. �* , ,, this level of unity across the nation. a this level of unity across the nation. r , this level of unity across the nation. a , ., ., , nation. as you say, it is a minority and it has — nation. as you say, it is a minority and it has shone _ nation. as you say, it is a minority and it has shone a _ nation. as you say, it is a minority and it has shone a spotlight - nation. as you say, it is a minority and it has shone a spotlight for . and it has shone a spotlight for anyone that didn't understand perhaps therefore, the level of this, the impact of this. those boys, those men have been amazing role models throughout this tournament, they have spoken immaculately about their job that they have had in hand, they have been, as you say, 19 doing something that most of us can even imagine. how much does this get to somebody when it is clear that it is still out there?— when it is clear that it is still out there? �* , ., ., out there? albeit a minority? it lets out there? albeit a minority? it nets to out there? albeit a minority? it gets to me _ out there? albeit a minority? it gets to me so _ out there? albeit a minority? it gets to me so incredibly. - out there? albeit a minority? it gets to me so incredibly. to - out there? albeit a minority? it| gets to me so incredibly. to feel the weight of feeling like, it was your fault that england went out of the competition and then to hear so
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much hatred come towards you for anyone individual, it is quite traumatising. what we try to really coach and what we tighter work on our schools programme is building a sense of self value, building a value of self worth of, to feel a part of this nation. when you look at the heads of footballing and you look at the height of football, so many times people have been disappointed by the remarks of the minority. social media challenges perpetuates this sort of behaviour. what sort of messages are sent to young people and society about our ambition is to stamp racism out of all aspects of society? we need to be more clear with ourselves as individuals and understand and recognise that racism exists at all levels. we need to learn from this and start really action in those questions, asking the difficult questions, asking the difficult questions and pushing organisations,
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pushing media outlets, pushing wider society to challenge racism at all levels and it shouldn'tjust be black people doing that but the whole community.— black people doing that but the whole community. black people doing that but the whole communi . ., ~ , ., , . whole community. thank you very much indeed forjoining _ whole community. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. _ we can speak now to the labour mp and shadow secretary culture and sport secretary, jo stevens. welcome, thank you very much for joining us. what about that point he was just making joining us. what about that point he wasjust making their joining us. what about that point he was just making their about the responsibility of everybody to stand up responsibility of everybody to stand up on this. i responsibility of everybody to stand u- on this. u, �* responsibility of everybody to stand u- on this. .., �* ., ., up on this. i couldn't agree more. he encapsulated _ up on this. i couldn't agree more. he encapsulated what _ up on this. i couldn't agree more. he encapsulated what the - he encapsulated what the responsibility of everyone across the country is, both in terms of our individual— the country is, both in terms of our individual responsibility and our collective responsibility as well. if we _ collective responsibility as well. if we hear— collective responsibility as well. if we hear racism or if we see people — if we hear racism or if we see people that aren't doing anything about— people that aren't doing anything about it. — people that aren't doing anything about it, we need to say something because _ about it, we need to say something because that is the only way we will read society of art is ugly and vile strand _ read society of art is ugly and vile strand that, unfortunately, is being
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amplified _ strand that, unfortunately, is being amplified more amplified more and more _ amplified more amplified more and more through social media. what does that look like — more through social media. what does that look like for _ more through social media. what does that look like for the _ more through social media. what does that look like for the labour _ more through social media. what does that look like for the labour party? - that look like for the labour party? he was talking about concrete action. what would you suggest? certainly, we have been calling for a long _ certainly, we have been calling for a longtime — certainly, we have been calling for a long time for the regulation of social— a long time for the regulation of social media platforms. the online safety— social media platforms. the online safety bill— social media platforms. the online safety bill as it is called has finally— safety bill as it is called has finally been published by the government. we think it is too weak, we think— government. we think it is too weak, we think there need to be changes to it. we think there need to be changes to it the _ we think there need to be changes to it. the problem is, it gives a voice to racists — it. the problem is, it gives a voice to racists across the country. people — to racists across the country. people use social media to amplify racist _ people use social media to amplify racist abuse and we have seen that through— racist abuse and we have seen that through the football examples this week _ through the football examples this week. there needs to be regulation on social— week. there needs to be regulation on social media companies, putting my responsibility and then to make sure their— my responsibility and then to make sure their products are not being usedm — sure their products are not being used... children are not born
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racist, — used... children are not born racist, people become racist through seeing _ racist, people become racist through seeing and _ racist, people become racist through seeing and hearing things around them _ seeing and hearing things around them if— seeing and hearing things around them. if there are products that are amplifying — them. if there are products that are amplifying that, we need to make sure it _ amplifying that, we need to make sure it stops. amplifying that, we need to make sure it stops-— sure it stops. should anybody be able to have _ sure it stops. should anybody be able to have an _ sure it stops. should anybody be able to have an account - sure it stops. should anybody be able to have an account that - sure it stops. should anybody be | able to have an account that isn't properly verified? than able to have an account that isn't properly verified?— properly verified? an anonymous account? racism _ properly verified? an anonymous account? racism happens - properly verified? an anonymous account? racism happens on - properly verified? an anonymous| account? racism happens on both anonymous and verified accounts which _ anonymous and verified accounts which is — anonymous and verified accounts which is why the social media platforms need to get their house in order— platforms need to get their house in order and _ platforms need to get their house in order and remove this content and a move _ order and remove this content and a move that _ order and remove this content and a move that macrojust order and remove this content and a move that macro just on the specific points, _ move that macro just on the specific points, in— move that macro just on the specific points, in the wake of the online trolling, — points, in the wake of the online trolling, there has been the racist trolling, _ trolling, there has been the racist trolling, accounts were removed but without— trolling, accounts were removed but without any— trolling, accounts were removed but without any rules that say you actually — without any rules that say you actually have to produce identification setting up an account, there is nothing stopping those _ account, there is nothing stopping those people setting up another account — account. that is why self—regulation by social— that is why self—regulation by social media companies has been a disaster~ _
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social media companies has been a disaster. they have been given so much _ disaster. they have been given so much chances to put their houses in order~ _ much chances to put their houses in order. ,, ., much chances to put their houses in order, ,, ., , ., , much chances to put their houses in order. ,, ., , ., ., order. should people have to give ro er order. should people have to give proper identification _ order. should people have to give proper identification to _ order. should people have to give proper identification to have - order. should people have to give l proper identification to have advice on social media?— on social media? there are strong arguments — on social media? there are strong arguments in _ on social media? there are strong arguments in favour— on social media? there are strong arguments in favour of _ on social media? there are strong arguments in favour of having - arguments in favour of having verification on social media so you can either— verification on social media so you can either choose not to have anonymous accounts appearing on your timeline _ anonymous accounts appearing on your timeline or— anonymous accounts appearing on your timeline or stopping anonymous accounts — timeline or stopping anonymous accounts being setup. there are accounts being set up. there are groups— accounts being set up. there are groups of— accounts being setup. there are groups of people that need anonymity online, _ groups of people that need anonymity online, people who are in danger, we need to— online, people who are in danger, we need to think carefully about the effect _ need to think carefully about the effect on — need to think carefully about the effect on them. what it comes down to is, _ effect on them. what it comes down to is, if— effect on them. what it comes down to is, if people want to be racist on a _ to is, if people want to be racist on a project that is available to everybody, the people who owned that product _ everybody, the people who owned that product and let it happen need to make _ product and let it happen need to make sure — product and let it happen need to make sure they have all possible measures — make sure they have all possible measures in place to provide that happening. this is why social media companies — happening. this is why social media companies need to take more responsibility and we say, the government needs to make its legislation, the draft bill needs to
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be much — legislation, the draft bill needs to be much stronger with the threat of criminal— be much stronger with the threat of criminal sanctions for senior tech executives— criminal sanctions for senior tech executives if they repeatedly break the law _ executives if they repeatedly break the law and allow racist abuse on their— the law and allow racist abuse on their platforms. we have allowed thatm _ their platforms. we have allowed that... ~ ., ., ., that... we have to leave it there because it _ that... we have to leave it there because it is _ that... we have to leave it there because it is time _ that... we have to leave it there because it is time to _ that... we have to leave it there because it is time to say - that... we have to leave it there | because it is time to say goodbye that... we have to leave it there - because it is time to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. we had to cut that is before saying thank you. the headlines on bbc news... the government defends the home secretary priti patel, who has been criticised by england footballer tyrone mings for "pretending" to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th ofjuly as "irresponsible". and in scotland the first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. sport and for a full
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round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good afternoon. marcus rashford has said messages of support left at his mural after it was defaced, almost brought him to tears. rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka received racist abuse online after they missed penalties as england lost to italy in the euro 2020 final. their team—mates, including captain harry kane and tyrone mings, have condemed the abuse. the mural in honour of rashford's charity work was vandalised, but hundreds of positive notes have now covered the graffiti. in a post on social media, rashford said he was "sorry" for the penalty miss but that he would never apologise for who he is and where he's from. on a more positive note, three england players have been selection for the euros team of the tournament. raheem sterling, kyle walker and harry maguire. that's just been released in the last few minutes. some lovely footage of jack grealish making a young fans
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night has emerged on social media. this is oliver. not only did he get to pose for a photo with jack, but got to keep his football boots. his dad, dan, called it a "moment he would cherish forever". breaking news in the last hour, confirmation that the rugby league world cup will take place in england this autumn after all competing nations signed an agreement. the tournament had been in doubt over issues with covid regulations and quarentine rules for those travelling back to australia and new zealand. there could be a surprise return to the british and irish lions squad. wales's alun wyn jones may be coming back, despite dislocating his shoulder just a few weeks ago. connor murray captains the team against south africa a tomorrow, with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on 24thjuly and head coach warren gatland will decide whetherjones rejoins the squad today.
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the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay on the site and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village in tokyo's harumi waterfront district, amid continuing covid restrictions. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week calling the move "irresponsible". borisjohnson confirmed that most remaining measures, including social distancing and the legal requirement to wear masks, would be dropped from the 19th ofjuly. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports. in under a week's time, life in england will look very different.
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no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer be legally required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible. borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over, but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases aren't rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop. it makes no sense to be knowingly accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that
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infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than the law in england. bus and rail industry groups have said they won't require passengers to wear them. in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon will announce today whether its restrictions can be eased next monday, as planned. wales is due to review its restrictions on wednesday, and northern ireland is due to ease some covid measures on july the 26th. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act. aruna iyengar, bbc news. andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester, has said he's not ruling out making
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masks compulsory on public transport in his area but isn't currently adopting the policy. mr burnham said the "simple solution'" would be for the government to make face coverings obligatory for all public transport. there is a recent study from the university of bristol that says wearing a face covering by large numbers of people can reduce the r rate by around 0.25. there is real evidence out there to show that they work. the message i will be giving to them and the train operators and also our own tram system is to strongly encourage the wearing of face coverings. we will have people on the system on monday, that'll be the message that is coming through on our trams. it would be made much easier for us if the government were just to say, we recognise that on public transport, where some people have no choice but to go because they don't own a car, and if we put ourselves in the shoes of somebody who has to use public transport to go for chemo or dialysis, it absolutely makes sense they have confidence people will be wearing face coverings around them.
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this needs to be seen as well in the context of the guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable. they were told yesterday they should avoid people who are not vaccinated. how on earth are they to know who is vaccinated and who is not? you can even read this guidance as though it is asking them, or recommending to them, that they should shield again. freedom day for some people will definitely not be freedom day for 3.8 million people, and that is why the government has got this wrong. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will reveal today whether coronavirus restrictions will be eased as planned next monday, after a review of the latest data. the scottish government had intended to move the whole country to the lowest level of restrictions from the 19th ofjuly, however it's since been hit by a record—breaking wave of infections. nicola sturgeon says she's still hopeful some changes will go ahead. an owner of a hoteljoins us now. a
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good place to set this because we can see how gorgeous it is where you are. how are things? are you hoping you can open up properly? i am hoinr you can open up properly? i am hoping the — you can open up properly? i am hoping the restrictions - you can open up properly? i —n hoping the restrictions will stay in place. i think it is disastrous to lift them at this time. if keeping the restrictions can help to save the restrictions can help to save the lives and help prevent instances of long covid i am listening to the scientists and the medical professionals and wondering why is our government are choosing to do something so reckless. we have a new slogan for it and it is opening society to close society. where we are, unfortunately, yesterday we had to close our hotel temporarily because of the people who own self—isolating. we are in a small close knit community here and there is of that is, one positive test has a ripple amongst a small community
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who all work in various places which results in hospitality, which is already short—staffed, getting to the stage where there is not enough people to keep the place operational. that is what has happened with our hotel. we will be hopefully opening again on 19th july. the fact that we are out of action and not able to run the business means we have had to temporarily close. what can we do? we have 17 staff and we are scrambling around looking to see what support is there for people like us who have chosen to close our hotel, obviously the long term staff have been in furlough. we are going to have to provide for everybody and we've got stuck sitting. on an island you get a delivery twice a week. ifeel for island you get a delivery twice a week. ifeelforthe island you get a delivery twice a week. ifeel for the nhs. island you get a delivery twice a week. ifeelforthe nhs. forthis to be allowed to let rip and spread
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throughout the communities is going to be devastating. all businesses are going to have people who are either self—isolating or have covid. what is the point of opening society like this? keep your masks on, keep your distance, what is the effect on people because my mental health? i could go on and on. i am people because my mental health? i could go on and on.— could go on and on. i am convinced on this matter. _ could go on and on. i am convinced on this matter. if _ could go on and on. i am convinced on this matter. if you _ could go on and on. i am convinced on this matter. if you take - could go on and on. i am convinced on this matter. if you take an - on this matter. if you take an interesting perspective for a business person who has got a hotel to learn, many to make my bills to ny- to learn, many to make my bills to pay. i'm assuming part of that is because of the location where you are, you said being an island you only get deliveries twice a week. i would have assumed from the setting that your island might have been quite protected from covid but you are saying there are cases there now. can you fill in some of those blanks around that picture. we have done so well — blanks around that picture. we have
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done so well for _ blanks around that picture. we have done so well for so long. _ blanks around that picture. we have done so well for so long. people - done so well for so long. people here take it seriously. all the mitigations are in place. people feel safe to come here. you wouldn't believe that this is glasgow fair week. there is plenty of room on arran. however, iwill give week. there is plenty of room on arran. however, i will give you an example of one of our staff. she had herself isolated because her son tested positive. her daughter works in another hotel, the son works on another hotel. she works for us and her partner works for delivery company. that is for businesses who have been impacted from one family. in a small net communities it only takes a couple of cases for the house of cards. they asked us to do
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a lateral flow test, cases are going to be on the rise. there are going to be on the rise. there are going to be on the rise. there are going to be cases everywhere, there's no getting away from it. while we appreciate we need to move forward it doesn't hurt to wear a mask, it doesn't hurt to keep your distance. we can do that. i'm in hospitality so i understand hospitality has been so i understand hospitality has been so hard hurt and they wanted to be able to do mark evans per night. but when it comes to having to close your doors again because the covers are rife, but it's not good either. it's not time to ease off. don't take restrictions out of the picture because they are helping. what is the impact of going to be on the nhs? how are they going to cope? when we reopened we had four members of staff who resigned within the first four weeks. for a couple of
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them, it is because they couldn't face the pressure of 200 people through the door every day. for others it was they no longer to live that high energy type job where you are working nights, weekends, you do the long shifts and you don't get to eat at mealtimes. they couldn't do that after lockdown. lots of people have left hospitality, the agencies have left hospitality, the agencies have dried up. if you have somebody off with covid, you wants people to get replacements from an agency. you can see the bigger picture. thank ou so can see the bigger picture. thank you so much _ can see the bigger picture. thank you so much for— can see the bigger picture. thank you so much forjoining _ can see the bigger picture. thank you so much forjoining us. - can see the bigger picture. thank you so much forjoining us. what| can see the bigger picture. thank| you so much forjoining us. what a beautiful view. and we'll bring you nicola sturgeon's statement live on the news channel at 2pm.
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the latest figures indicate one in four secondary schoolchildren were out of school in the past week. for both cove are deleted and non—covid reasons. 821,000 children were out of school due to covid and self isolation. those numbers are stark and have gone up again. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by £4 billion will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7% to 0.5% percent due to the impact of the pandemic on public finances, but the decision was met with cross—party criticism. the debate is that in the house of commons is about 12:a5pm and we will bring it to you live on the bbc news
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channel. britain has long led the way in helping some of the world's poorest and most vulnerable people with humanitarian assistance. but, last november, the government unexpectedly cut aid spending by £4 billion. sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of our national income on overseas aid is difficult to justify to the british people, especially when we are seeing the highest peacetime levels of borrowing on record. many mps were furious but the chancellor refused to give them a vote. now he has changed his mind and conceded one can't be avoided. when they come to westminster, mps will have two options. they can defeat the government and restore aid spending next year to its previous target of 0.7% of national income. or they can support the government and make any increase in aid dependent on the state of the public finances.
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the treasury wants two new tests to be met before aid spending rises — national debt has to be falling and the government budget has to be in surplus with no borrowing used for day—to—day spending. treasury sources said the new tests could mean uk aid spending rises again in a couple of years as the economy recovers. but mps and charities fear the aid cut would instead be locked in for the long—term. with a sizeable conservative rebellion expected, the vote may well be tight, and the result will matter for millions around the world who benefit from uk aid. james landale, bbc news. and the debate on the uk's foreign aid starts in the house of commons at around 12.a5pm. we'll bring that to you live on the bbc news channel. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. not a bad day out there today with lots of sunny spells. there are a few showers around, but nowhere near as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. into the evening hours, you can see very pleasant
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temperatures, high teens, low 20s and in some places clear skies. one or two showers may linger into the evening, particularly across central parts of the uk, but for most of us it is going to be a dry evening and night. clear skies across western and central areas, a bit more cloud for aberdeenshire along the north sea coast to east anglia and the south—east. tomorrow, a fine day. a lot of us wake up to clear blue skies. probably a bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon but, on the whole, it is a fine day and temperatures widely into the low or even mid 20s, so it really is going to feel quite warm tomorrow. the outlook, if you like warm weather it is a good one for you. it is going to turn increasingly warm and the weekend is looking promising. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: footballer tyrone mings criticises
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the home secretary for "pretending" to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. priti patel is yet to respond, but the government has defended her. marcus rashford says he will "never apologise for who he is" after he was subjected to racist abuse online. some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on 19thjuly as "irresponsible". in scotland, the first minister, nicola sturgeon, will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. colin pitchfork, who raped and murdered two schoolgirls in the 1980s, will be released from prison after the parole board rejected a government challenge against its ruling. more on our main story now concerning the online abuse of england players following their defeat to italy at the euros on sunday night.
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an online petition calling for racists to be banned from all football matches in england has now received more than 817,000 signatures. and joined now by two of the women who have set up the petition. welcome to both of you. tell us more about what's you want to happen. we set about what's you want to happen. , set up this petition on monday morning. like many england fans we woke up and were devastated by we didn't win and the horrific amount of racism that the three young black footballers are being subjected to. we thought we had to do something. society needs to understand that we all have a role to play when it comes down to getting rid of racism. we are humble to see nearly a
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million people have signed this petition in less than 48 hours. we believe we have captured the mood of a lot of people who feel outraged and angry and they want to challenge that into something positive. we are calling on the football position to make sure that racists are banned from attending football matches for life. we feel that there has to be a strong reaction to ensure there is anti racism. strong reaction to ensure there is anti racism-— strong reaction to ensure there is anti racism. ,, ., , , ., , anti racism. separately, but on this issue, we anti racism. separately, but on this issue. we are _ anti racism. separately, but on this issue, we are getting _ anti racism. separately, but on this issue, we are getting worried - issue, we are getting worried through from the prime minister's spokesman talking about what action the prime minister is taking, saying that he is going to be meeting social media companies later to reiterate the urgent need for action against online abuse ahead of tougher laws coming into force. the spokesman for borisjohnson said social media firms must do everything they can to identify
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these people. part of the issue online is that it is not always easy to identify people, accounts can be stopped, but then they can set up again. how easy is it to identify racists, to actually deliver that long—term ban, that lifetime ban from matches that you would like to see? it from matches that you would like to see? , ., ., see? it is one thing that the government _ see? it is one thing that the government is _ see? it is one thing that the government is now - see? it is one thing that the | government is now speaking see? it is one thing that the - government is now speaking up on this issue — government is now speaking up on this issue. campaigners have been talking _ this issue. campaigners have been talking about this for a very long time _ talking about this for a very long time and — talking about this for a very long time and calling on the social media companies — time and calling on the social media companies to react and to do something about it. i know that tyrone — something about it. i know that tyrone mings has also said the same thing. _ tyrone mings has also said the same thing. if— tyrone mings has also said the same thing. ifyou— tyrone mings has also said the same thing, if you can detect covid through— thing, if you can detect covid through a _ thing, if you can detect covid through a lot of our devices, then how can _ through a lot of our devices, then how can you — through a lot of our devices, then how can you not understand when somebody— how can you not understand when somebody is creating racist abuse online _ somebody is creating racist abuse online and — somebody is creating racist abuse online and not be able to do anything _ online and not be able to do anything about it? there needs to be more _ anything about it? there needs to be more action— anything about it? there needs to be
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more action and it is about making sure that _ more action and it is about making sure that we are being actively antiracist~ _ sure that we are being actively antiracist. unfortunately, many people — antiracist. unfortunately, many people are not doing that. the government has to understand that some _ government has to understand that some of— government has to understand that some of the ways they have been talking _ some of the ways they have been talking about the black lives matter movement, the talking about the taking _ movement, the talking about the taking of— movement, the talking about the taking of the knee by the players at the beginning of the german, all adds— the beginning of the german, all adds up— the beginning of the german, all adds up to — the beginning of the german, all adds up to what we have seen at the end of— adds up to what we have seen at the end of this _ adds up to what we have seen at the end of this brilliant tournament, this fantastic team of diverse and inclusive — this fantastic team of diverse and inclusive team that has collected so many _ inclusive team that has collected so many of _ inclusive team that has collected so many of us — inclusive team that has collected so many of us to the football again. so, many of us to the football again. so. yeah. — many of us to the football again. so, yeah, let's call on all these things — so, yeah, let's call on all these things i— so, yeah, let's call on all these things. i think it is possible and solutions— things. i think it is possible and solutions are out there, just requires _ solutions are out there, just requires us to want to do that action— requires us to want to do that action and _ requires us to want to do that action and that is what we are calling — action and that is what we are calling for. less talk and, more action— calling for. less talk and, more action now— calling for. less talk and, more action now because things have to change _ action now because things have to change we — action now because things have to change we have to protect those players. — change we have to protect those players, but we also have to shift the way _ players, but we also have to shift the way that we do anti racism in this country.
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the way that we do anti racism in this country-— the way that we do anti racism in this count . ~ , ., , this country. the prime minister has been very strong _ this country. the prime minister has been very strong in _ this country. the prime minister has been very strong in his _ this country. the prime minister has| been very strong in his condemnation since the abuse, he said shame on you, i hope you crawl back under the rock from which you emerged. what difference does it make where the prime minister speaks like that? riff prime minister speaks like that? of course it prime minister speaks like that? oi course it makes a difference prime minister speaks like that? (zii course it makes a difference when the leader of this country condemns racism. that is exactly what he should be doing. we now need to see urgent action. for too long there has been a lot of talk and discussion around racism in this country. everyday we are hearing more and more racism, but racism continues to be denied from top to bottom in this country. our daily lives are impacted by racism. we are seeing a real moment now for people in this country, mostly the leaders in this country, mostly the leaders in this country, the big tech firms, to come together and produce an
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action plan. football is a really important sport, part of the cultural currency of this country, and the racism isjust limited cultural currency of this country, and the racism is just limited to football. i think that is why our petition has had such a strong response. we don't want to see another generation of black footballers being abused in the way that these german art. of course there are ways to stop this happening. the question is, due to people who have the power to make a change want to make the change? we are joined by another co—founder of the petition. do you feel that this could be a moment, because these are not new issues but it is being talked about differently, perhaps? i think let my friends have said, we are interested _ think let my friends have said, we are interested in— think let my friends have said, we are interested in turning - think let my friends have said, we are interested in turning this - are interested in turning this petition _ are interested in turning this
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petition into— are interested in turning this petition into channelling - are interested in turning this petition into channelling thisj petition into channelling this energy— petition into channelling this energy into _ petition into channelling this energy into real— petition into channelling this energy into real action. - petition into channelling this energy into real action. this| energy into real action. this petition _ energy into real action. this petition started _ energy into real action. this petition started out - energy into real action. this petition started out as - energy into real action. this petition started out as an i petition started out as an expression _ petition started out as an expression of— petition started out as an expression of real- petition started out as an expression of real deep l petition started out as an - expression of real deep concern of the way— expression of real deep concern of the way our— expression of real deep concern of the way our team _ expression of real deep concern of the way our team have _ expression of real deep concern of the way our team have conducted i the way our team have conducted themselves. _ the way our team have conducted themselves, but— the way our team have conducted themselves, but now— the way our team have conducted themselves, but now it— the way our team have conducted themselves, but now it has- the way our team have conducted . themselves, but now it has become themselves, but now it has become the opinion— themselves, but now it has become the opinion of— themselves, but now it has become the opinion of the _ themselves, but now it has become the opinion of the nation— themselves, but now it has become the opinion of the nation and - themselves, but now it has become the opinion of the nation and we - the opinion of the nation and we need _ the opinion of the nation and we need those _ the opinion of the nation and we need those in _ the opinion of the nation and we need those in power— the opinion of the nation and we need those in power to- the opinion of the nation and we need those in power to hear- the opinion of the nation and wel need those in power to hear what people _ need those in power to hear what people are — need those in power to hear what people are saying _ need those in power to hear what people are saying. we _ need those in power to hear what people are saying. we want - need those in power to hear what people are saying. we want an. need those in power to hear what. people are saying. we want an end need those in power to hear what- people are saying. we want an end to racism _ people are saying. we want an end to racism in _ people are saying. we want an end to racism in football, _ people are saying. we want an end to racism in football, in _ people are saying. we want an end to racism in football, in society. - people are saying. we want an end to racism in football, in society. we - racism in football, in society. we need _ racism in football, in society. we need to— racism in football, in society. we need to see _ racism in football, in society. we need to see political _ racism in football, in society. we need to see political will - racism in football, in society. we need to see political will from . need to see political will from everybody _ need to see political will from everybody involved _ need to see political will from everybody involved to - need to see political will from everybody involved to get - need to see political will from . everybody involved to get things done _ everybody involved to get things done enough— everybody involved to get things done. enough is— everybody involved to get things done. enough is enough. - everybody involved to get things done. enough is enough. what. everybody involved to get things done. enough is enough. what is the latest number _ done. enough is enough. what is the latest number in _ done. enough is enough. what is the latest number in terms _ done. enough is enough. what is the latest number in terms of _ done. enough is enough. what is the latest number in terms of who - done. enough is enough. what is the latest number in terms of who has i latest number in terms of who has signed the petition, what action do you take? i signed the petition, what action do ou take? . , signed the petition, what action do ou take? ., , , signed the petition, what action do ou take? .,, , ., ., you take? i was 'ust going to say we are aioin you take? i was 'ust going to say we going to — you take? i wasjust going to say we are going to leave _ you take? i wasjust going to say we are going to leave it _ you take? i wasjust going to say we are going to leave it open _ you take? i wasjust going to say we are going to leave it open as - you take? i wasjust going to say we are going to leave it open as long i are going to leave it open as long as possible — are going to leave it open as long as possible we _ are going to leave it open as long as possible. we are _ are going to leave it open as long as possible. we are going - are going to leave it open as long as possible. we are going to - are going to leave it open as longl as possible. we are going to leave it for— as possible. we are going to leave it for people — as possible. we are going to leave it for people to _ as possible. we are going to leave it for people to carry _ as possible. we are going to leave it for people to carry on _ as possible. we are going to leave it for people to carry on sharing, l it for people to carry on sharing, carry— it for people to carry on sharing, carry on— it for people to carry on sharing, carry on signing _ it for people to carry on sharing, carry on signing. we _ it for people to carry on sharing, carry on signing. we want- it for people to carry on sharing,
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carry on signing. we want to - it for people to carry on sharing, i carry on signing. we want to drown out the _ carry on signing. we want to drown out the racists. _ carry on signing. we want to drown out the racists. we _ carry on signing. we want to drown out the racists. we want _ carry on signing. we want to drown out the racists. we want as - carry on signing. we want to drown out the racists. we want as many. out the racists. we want as many people _ out the racists. we want as many people as — out the racists. we want as many people as possible _ out the racists. we want as many people as possible to _ out the racists. we want as many people as possible to be - out the racists. we want as manyl people as possible to be involved. we are _ people as possible to be involved. we are over — people as possible to be involved. we are over 800,000 _ people as possible to be involved. we are over 800,000 at - people as possible to be involved. we are over 800,000 at the - people as possible to be involved. - we are over 800,000 at the moment. the last time i checked it was 822,000 or something. the last time i checked it was 822,000 orsomething. it the last time i checked it was 822,000 or something. it is increasing as we keep going and it is a real testament to the feeling around this country of supporters who want to see a change, they want to see things being done differently. we are having lots of conversations about what that might look like, but we do call on the fa to respond to the petition and ensure that we have a response. we need an action plan. what is going to happen, how are we going to change things because this can be tolerated. all of us have had enough and we need to see that change happening now. and we need to see that change happening now— and we need to see that change happening now. thank you all very much forjoining _ happening now. thank you all very much forjoining us. _ double child killer colin pitchfork is set to be freed from prison after the parole board rejected a government challenge against its ruling.
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pitchfork, now in his early 60s, was jailed for life after raping and strangling 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire in the 1980s. following a hearing in march, the parole board ruled he was "suitable for release". but last monthjustice secretary robert buckland asked the board to re—examine the decision. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has more. so they have considered and said he will still be released. thea;r so they have considered and said he will still be released.— will still be released. they have. this is one _ will still be released. they have. this is one of _ will still be released. they have. this is one of the _ will still be released. they have. this is one of the most - will still be released. they have. | this is one of the most notorious cases that the country has ever seen. colin pitchfork was the first person convicted in the uk with dna evidence. he was given a 30 year sentence, increased to 33... sorry, of which he served 33 years. he has been trying to get parole for some time. he was given parole recently and immediately the justice
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secretary stepped in, prompted and immediately thejustice secretary stepped in, prompted i think by a lot of media coverage of the concern of the families of the two young girls who were murdered, and he challenged the decision by the parole board to released colin pitchfork at this moment. he said he thought it was irrational for him to be released. he said that the board which decided that colin pitchfork should be released had failed to provide sufficient reasons as to why that decision had been made. quite a lot goes into these parole board decisions. in the case of colin pitchfork there was a consideration over whether he had provided any suggestion of remorse and that was taken into account. also whether clearly he provided a risk to people if he was going to be released. the decision today is that the release should go ahead. this is what the decision says. that this was a case
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of considerable seriousness, complexity and notoriety. the terrible consequences of the brutal rape and murders of the two innocent girls will forever darken the lives of the families concerned, but the decision is that the release was justified on the basis of the evidence placed before the panel. in the last few minutes we have had a response from the ministry of justice and they are disappointed. a spokesperson says that their sympathy is with the family, but they can be reassured that colin pitchfork be subjected to a close regime of probation when he is released, which should take place within the next few weeks. the government is changing the law so that child murders such as colin pitchfork face life in prison without the possibility of parole as the default sentence. at least 64 people have died in a major fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in southern iraq. many more have
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been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say is likely to have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion. jean mackenzie reports. the flames soared high and spread fast. crews struggling to fight the fire to save those trapped inside fighting covid—19. rescue workers were unable to make it through the thick smoke. this morning, relatives were left to search for their loved ones among a pile of burnt bodies. the temporary covid award left mangled by the heat. the building was new, opened just three months ago, a basic structure tacked onto the side of the hospital, the temporary covid award left mangled by the heat. unable to withstand the force of what was likely an oxygen tank exploding. it quickly became a tinderbox. the front door was burning and the back door was closed
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so people couldn't get out, this witness says. people were stuck inside and then the ceiling fell on them. the pandemic was already proving too much for iraq's woeful health system to cope with, on its knees after years of war, neglect and chronic mismanagement. covid cases here climbing. grief quickly turned to anger. crowds gathered outside the hospital chanting against authorities and a health system that has, once again, failed to protect them. this is the second such tragedy in a matter of months. in april, more than 80 people died after an oxygen cylinder exploded at a covid hospital in baghdad.
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as more bodies were counted, the prime minister, mustafa al—kadhimi, has ordered the arrest of health officials and the hospital manager, promising repercussions for this catastrophic failing at a place catastrophic failing, that a place intended to save lives has ended up taking so many. google has been fined a record 427 million pounds by the french authorities in a row over copyright. the authority said google had not negotiated in good faith about paying for press reports it runs on its news aggregator site. it has given google two months to fix the problem or face further fines of up to a million dollars a day. detectives investigating international money—laundering have seized nearly 180 million pounds of bitcoin. the seizure by the metropolitan police's economic crime command follows a confiscation of 114 million pounds of the cryptocurrency in june. the two confiscations were made following intelligence
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received about the transfer of criminal assets. now to france and a story with historical resonance — the remains of a general who died in russia after being hit by a cannonball fired by napoleon's army in 1812 will be returned to france today. his descendants are angry with french president macron as he will not be given a national commemoration. originally a national repatriation ceremony was planned but since then relations between paris and moscow have become tense. here's our correspondent in paris, hugh schofield. this is a general, not somebody i had heard of before, but when you think napoleon had about 2,000 generals under his banner. he knew napoleon personally. having served the king and the revolution he followed napoleon, served him to the european campaigns and then went off with him on russia on the doomed
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campaign to take moscow in 1812. it was at smolensk, just over halfway to moscow, that he fell. he was given orders by napoleon to charge the russian rearguard, he did but was hit by a cannon ball and lost a leg and died three days later of gangrene after having been visited personally by napoleon on his deathbed. there are records of where he had been buried, but his burial place was forgotten. it was thanks to an odd character, a rather odd character, a frenchman in moscow, a bit of artwork, that the detective work was carried out that led to the discovery of his coffin and his body that was then identified by dna comparisons with other family members. then the saga began of how to bring him back. there was a campaign for to bring him back. there was a campaignfora to bring him back. there was a campaign for a major diplomatic coup to bring together the two leaders,
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but that was all mixed by emmanuel macron who said there might be opportune at one point but was certainly not the right thing to do now. it is likely under a cloak that the body is coming back today with certain low level official recognition of this man who served france, he was an exemplar of military values are not the rest of it, but he won't be getting french state approval, which was what originally planned. the haulage industry is one of a number of sectors struggling to recruit enough staff as the economy reopens. with the shortage having an impact on the amount of produce that is being delivered, one firm is now working with the government to trial three—thousand of its super—sized lorries, in an attempt to tackle the problem. simon spark reports. at first this looks like an kind of glory, but if you thought you would
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know about it because this one just keeps coming around the corner. it is over 25 metres long. it may look like something new, but this has been an idea that has been around for a long time. here it is 17 years ago and four years ago. this better lorry, as it has been described has been trying to get on uk roads and street thousand four, but so far with no luck. but with a driver crisis in the haulage industry giving super—size vehicles like this a second chance? earlier this month, the ministerfor a second chance? earlier this month, the minister for transport announced a temporary extension of driver hours to help ease the driver shortage. there has also been a letter written to try these lorries. we want to increase the number of lorries by a fifth, quarter,
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possibly even a third. lorries by a fifth, quarter, ossibl even a third. ., ., possibly even a third. you can move 50% more possibly even a third. you can move 5096 more freights, _ possibly even a third. you can move 5096 more freights, but _ possibly even a third. you can move 5096 more freights, but still - possibly even a third. you can move 5096 more freights, but still use - possibly even a third. you can move| 5096 more freights, but still use one 50% more freights, but still use one driven _ 50% more freights, but still use one driver. that's the key thing for us at the _ driver. that's the key thing for us at the moment because of the driver shortage _ at the moment because of the driver shortage i_ at the moment because of the driver shortage. i was surprised with the announcement, they are safety rules, after all~ _ announcement, they are safety rules, after all~ it _ announcement, they are safety rules, afterall. itjust announcement, they are safety rules, after all. itjust demonstrates announcement, they are safety rules, after all. it just demonstrates what after all. it just demonstrates what a crisis _ after all. it just demonstrates what a crisis the — after all. it just demonstrates what a crisis the industry has because the government has listened to representations and has relaxed these _ representations and has relaxed these rules. it is a very welcome thing. _ these rules. it is a very welcome thing. but — these rules. it is a very welcome thing, but yes, i these rules. it is a very welcome thing, but yes, lam these rules. it is a very welcome thing, but yes, i am surprised by it. . ., ., y thing, but yes, i am surprised by it. . ., ., , ., , , thing, but yes, i am surprised by it. the technology developments this [or can no it. the technology developments this lorry can go anywhere _ it. the technology developments this lorry can go anywhere and _ lorry can go anywhere and normal—sized lorry can, even turn within the same turning circle. iii within the same turning circle. if i wanted within the same turning circle. iii wanted to go round to the left, these wheels would turn to the right to take the of this trailer out. this is terry, who has been at the forefront of all the trial so far. i have been to the netherlands, took my driving test over there and they took into towns and villages. to see how to perform? — took into towns and villages. to see how to perform? yes, _
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took into towns and villages. to see how to perform? yes, we _ took into towns and villages. to see how to perform? yes, we have - how to perform? yes, we have actually been _ how to perform? yes, we have actually been over— how to perform? yes, we have actually been over this. - how to perform? yes, we have actually been over this. as - how to perform? yes, we have actually been over this. as it i actually been over this. as it stands, actually been over this. as it stands. a — actually been over this. as it stands, a driver _ actually been over this. as it stands, a driver shortage - actually been over this. as it stands, a driver shortage continues and the band for this type of vehicle remains. the debate in the reduction of the foreign aid budget is happening at any moment. let's go over to the house of commons. mps are debating the government's controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget from 0.7% to 0.5% of national income. it is not clear how many tories will vote against the government on this, but the government obviously has an 82 seat majority so it will need a lot to get what they want, which is basically that 0.7% reinstated up from the cutback of no .5%. the debate is due to begin shortly. i'm
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afraid i can't actually see clearly what is happening in the house of commons so i'm not sure how close we are to it. the rebels want a vote. the government held out against one. the government held out against one. the rebels tried to force a vote with an amendment, but the speaker at the points out that the amendment they were putting forward wasn't in keeping with protocol. here we go, now it is starting. i keeping with protocol. here we go, now it is starting.— now it is starting. i beg to move the motion _ now it is starting. i beg to move the motion standing _ now it is starting. i beg to move the motion standing in - now it is starting. i beg to move the motion standing in my - now it is starting. i beg to move | the motion standing in my name now it is starting. i beg to move - the motion standing in my name and the motion standing in my name and the names of my right honourable friends. i believe on this vital subject there is common ground between the government and honourable members on all sides of the house and a sense that we believe in the power of eight to transform millions of lives. that is why we continue to agree that the uk should dedicate 0.7% of our gross national income to official development assistance. this is not an argument about principle. the only question is when we return to
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0.7%. my purpose today is to describe how we propose to achieve this shared cool and an affordable way. here we must face the harsh fact that the world is now enduring a catastrophe of the kind that happens only once a century. this pandemic has cast a country into its deepest recession on record, paralysing our national life, threatening the survival of entire sectors of the economy and causing the chancellor to find over £407 billion to safeguard jobs and livelihoods, to support businesses and public services across the united kingdom. he has managed that task with consummate skill and ingenuity. everyone will accept that when you are suddenly compelled to spend £407 billion on sheltering our people from an economic hurricane never experienced in living memory, there must inevitably be consequences for other areas of
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public spending. last year, under the pressure of the emergency, are borrowing increased fivefold to almost £300 billion, more than 14% of gdp, the highest since the second world war. this year, our national debt is climbing towards 100% of gdp, the highest for nearly six decades. the house knows that the government has been compelled to take wrenching decisions and the international benevolent act of 2015 expressly provides this fiscal circumstances that allow a departure from the 0.7% target. i am circumstances that allow a departure from the 0.796 target.— from the 0.796 target. i am grateful to my right — from the 0.796 target. i am grateful to my right honourable _ from the 0.796 target. i am grateful to my right honourable friend, - from the 0.796 target. i am grateful to my right honourable friend, andl to my right honourable friend, and the chancellor for their constructive engagement with those of us who have been profoundly concerned about the departure from the aid target. will he confirm to
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me at the house that this is not a fiscal trap, that the mechanism set out in the statement is a genuine and full hearted temp two return to our commitment of 0.7% at the very earliest economically sustainable opportunity? i earliest economically sustainable opportunity?— opportunity? i thank my right honourable _ opportunity? i thank my right honourable friend _ opportunity? i thank my right honourable friend for - opportunity? i thank my right honourable friend for his - opportunity? i thank my right| honourable friend for his work opportunity? i thank my right - honourable friend for his work on this matter, his expertise and i know how deeply he cares about this, in common with many other members across this house and i can indeed give him that confirmation and the decision that we made was temporary to reduce our aid budget to 0.5% of national income. if the house will allow me, i will make as much progress as i can in the speech and then allow the 77 others who to have their say, sol then allow the 77 others who to have their say, so i won't take any more interventions. in the teeth of this
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crisis, amidst all the other calls, the uk will still invest over £10 billion in aid this year, more of a share of our gdp than canada, japan, italy and the united states. it would be a travesty of honourable members were to give the impression that the uk is somehow retreating from the field of international development were lacking in global solidarity. as i speak, this country is playing a vital role in the biggest and fastest global vaccination programme in history. we help to create the coalition to vaccinate the developing world and we have invested over half £1 billion in this crucial effort which is so far distributed more than 100 million doses to 135 countries. this government's agreement with oxford university and astrazeneca have succeeded in producing the rope is
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back most popular vaccine with over 500 million doses released to the world, mainly to low and middle—income countries, saving lives every hour of every day. the uk's expertise and resources have been central to the global response to this emergency, discovering both a vaccine and the first life—saving treatment for covid. we have an agreement from ourfriends in treatment for covid. we have an agreement from our friends in the g7 to provide a billion vaccines to protect the world by the end of next year, of which 100 million will come from the uk. we are the third biggest sovereign donor to the world health organization and the top donor to the institution that vaccinate children. we are donating £11.6 billion, double our previous commitment, to help developing countries deal with climate change,
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by protecting their forests and introducing clean energy. i can tell the house that this vital investment will be protected. when it comes to addressing one of the world's greatest injustices, the tragedy that millions of girls are denied the chance to go to school, the uk has played more than any other country, £430 million to the global partnership for education, in addition to the £400 million we will spend on girls education this year. later this month i will co—host the summit of this partnership in london with the president of kenny. wherever civil wars are displacing millions were threatening to inflict problems, in syria, yemen, ethiopia or elsewhere, the uk is responding with over £900 million of health this year, making our country the third largest bilateral humanitarian donor in the world, and it bears
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repeating that we are doing this in the midst of a terrible crisis, when public finances are under the greater strain than ever before in peacetime history and every pound we spent in aid has to be borrowed. in fact, it represents not our money, but money that we are taking from future generations. last year we dissolve the old by creating the new commonwealth and an element of this. in doing so, my objective was to ensure that every diplomat in our service was activated by the mission and vision of our finest development officials. and that our aid was better in tune with our national values and our desire to do. good the world. i can assure any honourable member who wishes to make the case for aid that they are, when it comes to me, or to
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anyone in

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