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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for �*pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. we d like to hear your reaction to the tyrone mings�* tweet. you can get in touch with me on twitter @annita?mcveigh the government confirms that all remaining covid restrictions in england will end on the 19th ofjuly. some senior doctors call it "irresponsible". and in scotland, the first minister
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nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. at least 64 people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing. will the uk government slash its foreign aid budget? mps will vote on the controversial proposals today and the first baby beaver to be born on exmoor in 400 years has captured on camera and is reported to be thriving! good morning and welcome to bbc
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news. two days after england's euros final defeat, and the row over the online abuse of some players has deepened. england defender tyrone mings has criticised home secretary priti patel for her response to racist abuse — after she previously described taking the knee as "gesture politics". tyrone mings tweeted his reaction to priti patel last night, saying that the home secretary had "stoked the fire" at the beginning of the tournament. the home secretary had earlier said that she was "disgusted" by the online abuse of england players. priti patel has not responded to the comments by tyrone mings. the three black england players jadon sancho, marcus rashford and bukayo saka faced online abuse after missing penalties at sunday night's final. the chief secretary to the treasury, stephen barclay, defended priti patel saying the home secretary fully understood the issues of racism after being subject to online abuse herself. from working with the home secretary that she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. she is taking action
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against the extreme right—wing groups that ferment many of these things and she is acting as home secretary to tackle this, as indeed is the culture secretary. and as i say, through the online harms bill, we are committed as a government to legislating to tackle these social media platforms who frankly, should be doing far more to clamp down on this sort of unacceptable racism and abuse online. it's part of a wider problem in terms of online abuse. and we will legislate to punish those companies financially if they fail to act and i call on them this morning to take more action to stop their platforms being abused in this way. mr barclay, you seem to be saying that it's ok to say you agree with what priti patel is saying but also agree with what tyrone mings is saying. tyrone mings has directly and publicly gone toe to toe with the home secretary on this issue. he says, essentially, he is saying the government have encouraged this. they are not on the same page.
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this is a prominent england footballer calling out the home secretary. this is a really serious allegation. all i'm saying is the home secretary is committed to tackling racism. she is taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups, that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear that the government will also legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this sort of filth to be peddled online. and we are acting as a government. the culture secretary has been working closely with platform owners, football authorities, other sports organisations, to work with them to tackle this and i think this is something that pretty much all of your viewers agree with us on which is we need to take action to tackle this. this is something that brings the country together. they talk over one another. i think we all condemn the abuse that has happened,
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it's something that unites us, the football team has been the best of england, it's brought our country together, it's something we can unite around and i think in terms of this abuse, again, it's something we will work with the football authorities to clamp down on and ensure the social media platforms are held to account. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. good morning. words matter, don't they, the home secretary, what she says, arguably has as much impact as what she does and that tweet from tyrone mings references an interview she gave last month when the home secretary was criticised if she would boot fans —— she would criticise fans who booed when players took the knee. we criticise fans who booed when players took the knee. we are trying to net a players took the knee. we are trying to get a resnonse — players took the knee. we are trying to get a response from _ players took the knee. we are trying to get a response from the - players took the knee. we are trying to get a response from the home i to get a response from the home secretary, that is our plan this morning, to see if we can get a camera in the direction of priti patel to give her a right to reply, we have offered out on the telephone and she has pointed us towards her
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tweets condemning the racist abuse of england players and indeed a statement in the house of commons to that effect yesterday but we have not had a direct response to the specific question around whether or not taking the knee was in her words gesture politics. and whether or not she now regrets saying that she wasn't going to offer any view as to whether or not it was right or wrong for some england fans to boo the taking of the knee. it's worth taking of the knee. it's worth taking a couple of steps back, this is one heck of an intervention from a senior sportsman after a very high—profile tournament in which he is directly and publicly and unequivocally governing for one of the most senior names in the british government. and that gives very little space for either her or her colleagues, as we saw in the exchange with stephen barclay, to
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avoid answering the specific question that tyrone mings is asking so the government makes the point about what it said unequivocally about what it said unequivocally about the racist abuse on social media of england players since the game. they talk about the online harms bill and what they seek to do in terms of regulation of social media. but on the specifics of taking the knee, there are strong views on both sides, so far, stephen barclay was pretty equivocal, did not really want to answer the question, let's be blunt. we will see what response we get from priti patel when we managed to find her! what about the prime minister? do we expect anything from him on this? when i spoke to downing street this morning they said ring the home office, what they say is two things, firstly, they point us to what boris johnson said yesterday in the news conference about coronavirus restrictions in which he said shame on them for those who had abused racially england players online and they should crawl back under the
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stone from which they had emerged. downing street also make the point before england had kicked a ball in the years, borisjohnson had said that fans should be cheering not booing the england players. but the criticism that has been made by others and now by tyrone mings is that in their view, too many people in government were to willing for too long to not be explicit in saying if this is what fans, this is what fans want to do as far as taking the knee is concerned we will support them in so doing. there is clearly a concern from some and there has been for a while about the black lives matter movement in the united states and its political agenda which i suspect for the vast majority of those taking the knee in the uk, is not part of what they are trying to argue for, instead, making this gesture as far as racism is concerned and standing up for what they believe in on that. that's
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where i think you now have some arguments within the conservatives, johnny mercer, former minister and mp making the argument he thinks some in his party have ended up in the wrong place by perhaps drawing those two things together rather than acknowledging the england players were merely trying to take a stand on racism.— players were merely trying to take a stand on racism. chris mason, thank ou. we can hear now from tony burnett chief executive of the campaign group kick it out. thank you for your time this morning. i was looking at the twitter account of kick it out a little earlier and something that you had posted there recently saying taking the knee is a symbol of the continuing battle against racial inequality, during the players is also cheering what the gesture stands for. do you want to hear directly from the home secretary, perhaps from the prime minister about what tyrone mings has had to say and what he is saying about the
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home secretary �*s previous comments. —— jeerjng. home secretary �*s previous comments. ——jeerjng. i home secretary 's previous comments. -- 'eer'nu. ~' , ., home secretary 's previous comments. --'eer'n~. ~' , ., ~ , home secretary 's previous comments. -- 'eer'nu. ~ , ., ~ , ., -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and gareth southgate _ -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and gareth southgate and _ -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and gareth southgate and the _ -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and gareth southgate and the rest - -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and gareth southgate and the rest of. -- jeerjng. i think tyrone mings and| gareth southgate and the rest of the players have been a excellent example of role models through this tournament. the example that they have said, tyrone mings has every right to question a government, there are a number of people within there are a number of people within the excellence of politics who did not support the players in their stand on discrimination and irrespective of the gesture that they chose, that is irrelevant, that is a side issue, they were really clear, unequivocally clear, this is nothing to do with politics, this is about antiracism and anti—discrimination yet politicians still chose to end up following a populist agenda and creating divisive messages that have led us to work we are now and they are wrong and they need to sort it. do ou wrong and they need to sort it. do you think some footballers are stepping into more political territory because they feel there is a vacuum of leadership on the issue?
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i can't speak for footballers on that level, to be absolutely honest. what i see is a group of human beings, young men in the public eye who have got strong values and huge integrity, who are led by a human being who also has a huge amount of integrity and strong values and they are in pain, seeing and feeling and experiencing height from people who should not have the ability to hurt them and they are absolutely right to stand up against that and say we deserve more protection from social media organisations and deserve more protection from the government and they are not getting that so they have absolutely got the right to avoid that and i fully support the players on this completely. let’s players on this completely. let's look at the _ players on this completely. let's look at the interview _ players on this completely. let's look at the interview stephen barclay gave on behalf of the government this morning to bbc breakfast and he was asked about all of this and he directed his answers towards the work he said priti patel was doing with social media companies to try to clamp down on racist abuse. is that enough, words clearly matter, as i had said in my
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discussion with chris mason, do we need to have something more specific and explicit from priti patel on where she stands on this issue of taking the knee and how she regards that? i taking the knee and how she regards that? “ taking the knee and how she regards that? ~ �* , ., , taking the knee and how she regards that? ~ �*, ., , ,, that? i think it's a bigger issue, it is a far bigger— that? i think it's a bigger issue, it is a far bigger issue, - that? i think it's a bigger issue, l it is a far bigger issue, absolutely social media organisations need to do for more. the online harms bill needs to be pushed through as quickly as possible. that is a priority but we also need to have a serious think about where we stand as a society when it comes to discussions on race and i genuinely don't believe, over the last few years, government and politicians from all persuasions have set the right tone when it comes to discussing race and it has led to a divisive situation, a lot of people feel they have to be in one camp or another and we end up discussing gestures rather than the facts and the fact for me is what happened the other night, britain has a massive issue when it comes to racism and there are a number of people in our country who think it is ok to have use which are apparent to the majority and they need to be dealt with. ., ., , ., majority and they need to be dealt with. ., ., ,, ., . ~ ., .,
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with. how do you tackle that? you sa the with. how do you tackle that? you say the right _ with. how do you tackle that? you say the right tone _ with. how do you tackle that? you say the right tone has _ with. how do you tackle that? you say the right tone has not - with. how do you tackle that? you say the right tone has not been i with. how do you tackle that? you i say the right tone has not been set, how do you set the right tone on this discussion? it how do you set the right tone on this discussion?— how do you set the right tone on this discussion? it needs to be an 0 en and this discussion? it needs to be an open and genuine _ this discussion? it needs to be an open and genuine discussion, - this discussion? it needs to be an . open and genuine discussion, people do not feel the need to take science, discuss the genuine issues, autocracy is a great example, we talk about representation, there isn't a single chief executive in top 100 organisations that is black, we still have representation issues in football, coaching and management, this myth of meritocracy, the best people get the jobs, is not holding out by fax. and we need to have an open conversation about that, the best people should get the job, they are not getting thejob is get the job, they are not getting the job is currently because quite often it is a close network or a club that decides who gets the best position so we need an open conversation and we need better punishments for people particularly on—line who decide to perpetrate crimes. it's too difficult at the minute to prosecute those people. it's a bit like what lewis hamilton talks about with his report on inclusivity in formula 1. it’s talks about with his report on inclusivity in formula 1. it's about
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caettin inclusivity in formula 1. it's about getting peeple _ inclusivity in formula 1. it's about getting people from _ inclusivity in formula 1. it's about getting people from all _ inclusivity in formula 1. it's about getting people from all sorts - inclusivity in formula 1. it's about getting people from all sorts of. getting people from all sorts of backgrounds totally representative of society in key places, key positions. completely. but that's got to be done, i was asked this morning about positive discrimination, i'm notan morning about positive discrimination, i'm not an advocate because i think it dries their own behaviours. what we need to do is create a level playing field, if we make systems and processes the right people will rise through the ranks and we will see organisations and institutions who represent our society. institutions who represent our socie . ~ ., , institutions who represent our socie . ~ . , ., society. when we look at this euro tournament _ society. when we look at this euro tournament and _ society. when we look at this euro tournament and the _ society. when we look at this euro tournament and the people - society. when we look at this euro tournament and the people who i tournament and the people who supported england and people talking about how they felt they were part of the team when they never had before, that has come from gareth southgate and the players so ultimately, are you positive that as well is going to drive change and drive out racism? i well is going to drive change and drive out racism?— well is going to drive change and drive out racism? i think that is a hue drive out racism? i think that is a huge ask. — drive out racism? i think that is a huge ask. what — drive out racism? i think that is a huge ask, what gareth _ drive out racism? i think that is a j huge ask, what gareth southgate drive out racism? i think that is a - huge ask, what gareth southgate and this squad have done is beyond our
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wildest expectations when it comes to creating social cohesion. they have done the job that many governments before them have let us down with, essentially, bringing people together in communities together and it's not up to gareth southgate and footballers to try social cohesion. they've been a fantastic example and a credit to our country but our politicians from all persuasions need to step up and do better on this agenda because it should not be done to our footballers and fantastic leaders like gareth to try this.— footballers and fantastic leaders like gareth to try this. tony, thank ou so like gareth to try this. tony, thank you so much _ like gareth to try this. tony, thank you so much for— like gareth to try this. tony, thank you so much for talking _ like gareth to try this. tony, thank you so much for talking to - like gareth to try this. tony, thank you so much for talking to us - like gareth to try this. tony, thank. you so much for talking to us today, really interesting to hear from you on that. marcus rashford has said he 'will never�* apologise for who he is after suffer racist abuse online after missing a penality in sunday's euros final. a mural of the 23—year—old was defaced after the game. our reporter phil mccann is by the mural in withington. a beautiful response to the ugliness
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of racism behind you.— of racism behind you. absolutely. this area in _ of racism behind you. absolutely. this area in south _ of racism behind you. absolutely. this area in south manchester - of racism behind you. absolutely. this area in south manchester is i this area in south manchester is proud of one of its most famous sons, marcus rashford, and you can see how proud on the small, this multicoloured mosaic of post—it notes, flags, all sorts of different kinds of messages left by all sorts of different people, this is a diverse area of south manchester, we saw police turning up this morning to leave messages, mothers and fathers with their kids on their way to school, people out for a morning jog. to school, people out for a morning jog, people on their way to work, people taking in the atmosphere here now. we know the artist who put this up, his tigers at the bottom of the nero, he put this up in november last year, he will be turning up here to try and restore the mural to its former glory but the question is what happens to all of these messages and we can speak to che, you took part and you spearheaded
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the spoken word project in november when this was put up. that was all about explaining not the significance but putting this in context for people, about why it is marcus rashford is so important in this area. i wrote a poem called these holes, using doubles as a metaphor for individual struggles people must overcome, the code take pride in knowing your struggle will play the biggest role in fulfilling your purpose which i think his mother said, your purpose which i think his mothersaid, it's your purpose which i think his mother said, it's the perfect metaphor for what it is like to be a person of in the uk, it is knowing that the struggles you go through do not define you, marcus rashford did not define you, marcus rashford did not necessarily need to come into the role of creating social change but he supported us at a time the government was not doing so and he has had a big impact on people and it's wonderful and i wanted to contextualise that and how these walls and other local areas and communities define who we are. the racist abuse — communities define who we are. the racist abuse he has got here today, what do you think that says and the response there has been here? the
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racist abuse — response there has been here? tue: racist abuse he response there has been here? t'te: racist abuse he suffered response there has been here? tte: racist abuse he suffered a response there has been here? t'te: racist abuse he suffered a systemic of what it is like to be a black person in the uk, our values are completely mitigated by what we bring. as soon as he did well in football he was a great british icon and as soon as he made one mistake his collar was brought into it and i think that is the perfect metaphor for what it is like to be black and british in modern times. the response is great. manchester is a place that does things differently and we really don't have that many issues here and i think it's great withington has come out and created such a positive response. what such a positive response. what ha--ens such a positive response. what happens next. _ such a positive response. what happens next, we _ such a positive response. what happens next, we note - such a positive response. what happens next, we note the - such a positive response. what happens next, we note the murals will be restored, the abuse will be removed but these messages also say something about this area and the importance of magus to this area? t importance of magus to this area? i think we might do some sort of art exhibition, that would be nice to keep it and document another moment manchester has come together and shown how great we are.— manchester has come together and shown how great we are. thank you so much. shown how great we are. thank you so much- that — shown how great we are. thank you so much- that is — shown how great we are. thank you so much. that is the _ shown how great we are. thank you so much. that is the big _
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shown how great we are. thank you so much. that is the big question, - shown how great we are. thank you so much. that is the big question, what l much. that is the big question, what will happen to all of these messages? these messages marcus rashford said on social media over night brought him to tears because as i said at the beginning, this is his home town, withington, telling him how they feel about him. let me read out some of your comments. one viewer says tyrone has said what needs to be said, politicians accusing people of gesture politics when it comes to taking the knee, racists booing under the guise of kicking politics out of football. and this one from gracie who says on the mural, well done withington, great you show this remarkable young man the love and respect that he deserves. and another viewer says tyrone is spot on, 100% correct, he says what so many of us should say including keir starmer, priti patel
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is an embarrassment to the asian community and she should hang her head in shame. thank you for sending those tweets in. if you would like to send me your comments on that tweet from tyrone mings on this issue of racism in football please do that on twitter. senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week calling the move "irresponsible". borisjohnson confirmed that most remaining measures — including social distancing and the legal requirement to wear masks — would be dropped from the 19th ofjuly. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports. in under a week's time, life in england will look very different. no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer be legally required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible.
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borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over, but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases aren't rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop. it makes no sense to be knowingly accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than the law in england.
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bus and rail industry groups have said they won't require passengers to wear them. in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon will announce today whether its restrictions can be eased next monday, as planned. wales is due to review its restrictions on wednesday, and northern ireland is due to ease some covid measures on july the 26th. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act. aruna iyengar, bbc news. dr chaand nagpaul, council chair of the british medical association, who was featured in that report, joins me now. thank you forjoining us today. i think it's fair to say, putting it simply, you are pretty dismayed by what the prime ministers said
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yesterday?— what the prime ministers said esterda ? , ., ~ ., yesterday? yes, we are. we think the prime minister _ yesterday? yes, we are. we think the prime minister 's _ yesterday? yes, we are. we think the prime minister 's announcement - yesterday? yes, we are. we think the prime minister 's announcement goes against their own criteria for easing restrictions. we are seeing significant increases in hospitalisation, we were dismayed to hear the government expects us to see about 2000 admissions a day, 20 fold more than the middle of may. we saw last week one hospital in leeds having to turn down patients with cancer because of the influx of covid patients. and i think the message from the government is really quite contradictory, it is not freedom day, according to the prime minister, the prime minister was at pains to explain people should carry on wearing masks in crowded places such as transport, at pains to say people should be cautious that they won't be going back to the place before covid, what we don't understand is why such a contradictory and ideological message will only confuse the public because it is like saying we are seeing more road traffic accident, we want people to stick to the speed
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limits but we are going to remove the requirement to stick to the speed limits, it doesn't make sense and i don't think it is about an issue about a choice between living with a virus or not. it is a choice between living with the virus safely and actually, making sure that people don't infect each other when they are close by, which is on a crowded underground train, doesn't seem to be about being stopping reopening the economy or society, it's about safe measures which are proven to reduce the spread of infection. ., ., , ., ., infection. you mentioned you thought this was contradictory _ infection. you mentioned you thought this was contradictory and _ this was contradictory and ideological message, do you think the prime minister is under pressure from some in his party to go down this route but he is trying to hedge his bets, i suppose, this route but he is trying to hedge his bets, isuppose, is this route but he is trying to hedge his bets, i suppose, is a way of putting it by urging people to be cautious without making it a legal requirement for them to do so? it doesn't make scientific sense, if the prime minister believes the
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right thing for people to do is to wearface right thing for people to do is to wear face coverings right thing for people to do is to wearface coverings in right thing for people to do is to wear face coverings in a crowded underground train then why is it saying on the one hand you should do that but then remove the restrictions? it doesn't even make logical sense. and what we do know is that the virus will spread in those situations, the government itself has accepted seeing as many as 100,000 new cases a day, it will as 100,000 new cases a day, it will as the government has itself said, result in more people in hospital, probably the highest numbers in the whole of europe. so we just don't understand why it would be risking people's health in this way and why it will add further pressure on the nhs at a time and i tell you as a doctor, we are trying to plough through over 5 million patients who have been waiting for their operations and all of those patients are at risk of being delayed. we see more patients from covid being admitted. i more patients from covid being admitted. ., ., , , ., ., admitted. i want to pick up on that if i could. you _ admitted. i want to pick up on that if! could. you mentioned - admitted. i want to pick up on that if! could. you mentioned in - admitted. i want to pick up on that if i could. you mentioned in your l if i could. you mentioned in your first answer about one hospital, cancer patients had to be turned
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away last week or so they could not come in for appointments. if we do see cases of 1—2000 per day, that's one of the more conservative estimates, perhaps up to a800 a day was another estimate, if everyone relaxes their behaviour too soon and i don't think everyone will be doing that, of course. but with those sorts of figures even at the lower end of those sorts of figures, what kind of impact is that going to have on clearing the covid backlog and i mean all sorts of other medical issues and how quickly might we see that impact?— issues and how quickly might we see that imact? . ., , , that impact? that impact will happen . uite that impact? that impact will happen uuite soon that impact? that impact will happen quite soon because _ that impact? that impact will happen quite soon because we _ that impact? that impact will happen quite soon because we run _ that impact? that impact will happen quite soon because we run a - that impact? that impact will happen quite soon because we run a health l quite soon because we run a health service with no spare capacity. so when you see increases in patients being hospitalised, they actually displace other patients and we are likely to see this happen much more over the summer if we start to have 2000 plus additional admissions a day. and the other problem we have is that when you have large numbers of patients in hospital with covid,
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the hospital itself cannot have the same capacity, you have to put infection control measures, red zones, green zones, pure beds to have people spaced out, you actually probably have a 10% reduction so this will have an impact on a lot of patients who have been suffering, and waiting for too long for their operations, being cancelled. this is not guesswork, it's because hospitals are full and we do not run a health service with spare capacity. i think the other thing to say is about the right time to remove these restrictions. i don't think it is true to say there is never a right time, there are better times, what we need to do is vaccinate the younger population, we note the older population have been double vaccinated, we know the infection rate has gone down in the older population so why not use that scientific evidence and spent a few more weeks vaccinating the younger population properly, double
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vaccinate them and at that time you remove any of these restrictions, you won't see the same impact of increases in infection and hospitalisation? then there is a public health reason to have done this in a graded way and the bma has always said this is not a choice between opening up or not, it's always been about making sure we open up in a safe way and measures such as social distancing and wearing masks in crowded shops or certainly wearing masks in a train, you know, it makes absolute sense and it isn't about personal responsibility because when it comes to wearing masks or being close to others, you can't make that choice and decision. if you have to go to work by train, you don't have a choice about going to work in a crowded environment. and your safety depends on what other people do. that's where governments come in and governed by making rules to protect its citizens. ., ., governed by making rules to protect its citizens. ., ,, , ., ., , ., its citizens. thank you for your time this morning. _ scotland's first minister nicola
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sturgeon will reveal today whether coronavirus restrictions will be eased as planned next monday, after a review of the latest data. the scottish government had intended to move the whole country to the lowest level of restrictions from the 19th ofjuly, however it's since been hit by a record—breaking wave of infections. nicola sturgeon says she's still hopeful some changes will go ahead. the bank of england's financial policy committee has said the rapid rollout of the uk s vaccination programme has led to an improvement in the uk's economic outlook but risks to the recovery remain. the committee says households and businesses are likely to need continuing support from the financial system as the economy recovers and as government assistance declines. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor i was very glad to leave my position at wembley before the deluge started but goodness me, quite some images
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of the rainfall yesterday? there is some good news, not repeated through the rest of the week. only a few showers around and not as intense as yesterday. sharp showers in scotland, wales and england. the cloud will break up two sunny spells, messy around the coast in western scotland and northern ireland and down towards eastern parts of england. a day of low 20s and not a cold night tonight, clear skies inland, mist and fog, cloud around the coast with temperatures from 11 to 16 celsius. tomorrow, a trend for the rest of the week. mostly dry, a pet of cloud on the east coast, the cloud in the west will break up and more in the way of patchy drizzle for the western isles. but an afternoon for most of
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you of strong sunshine and temperatures where they should be forjuly, 19 to 2a celsius. hello this is bbc news: the headlines: footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for 'pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her... and team mate marcus rashford says he will never apologise for who he is" after he was subjected to racist abuse online. the government confirms that all remaining covid restrictions in england will end on the 19th ofjuly. some senior doctors call it "irresponsible". and in scotland the first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. will the uk government slash its foreign aid budget? mps will vote on the controversial proposals today
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally nugent. good morning... much to discuss in terms of the responses of marcus rashford and tyrone mings to the racist abuse. marcus rashford has said messages of support that have been left at his mural after it defaced, almost brought him to tears. rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka received racist abuse online after missing penalties as england lost to italy in the euro 2020 final. their team mates — including captain harry kane and tyrone mings — have hit out at the abuse. in a lengthy social media post rashford said he's "sorry" and that something "didn't feel quite right" as he stepped up to take the penalty. he says it's been playing in his head over and over since he struck the ball. but he said he will never apologise for who he is and where he came from.
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former footballer anton ferdinand.... quick to turn so sour in the way that it did. it was something that i wasn't surprised. as someone of black origin, i am hoping wasn't surprised. as someone of black origin, iam hoping nobody misses a penalty but especially, none of the young black players miss a penalty because you could be in for serious abuse. that is the way i was thinking, i do not way to want to think like that, but the way things are going, it has made me think like that. now, a more positive story to bring you from the game. despite that crushing defeat, england's jack grealish made this young boys night. not only did oliver get to pose for a photo with jack — but got to keep his football boots. his dad dan called it a ”moment i will cherish forever.” a really special moment there. alun wynjones could be set for a sensational return
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to the british and irish lions squad — just weeks after the tour captain dislocated his shoulder. connor murray captain's the team against south africa a tomorrow — with 12 changes to the side that beat sharks. the first test against the springboks is due to be played in cape town on the 2athjuly — and head coach warren gatland said he'll decide whetherjones rejoins the squad today. he has made a remarkable recovery in terms of that injury which the assessment was initially it wasn't assessment was initially it wasn't as bad as they first thought so it is a real positive and would be a boost to the squad having someone of his experience and calibre to come back into the squad. the former open winner — zachjohnson — is the latest player to pull out of this week's championship, after testing positive for covid—19. the american won the event in 2015. masters champion hideki matsuyama and louis dejager also miss out after testing positive. the open begins this thursday
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at royal st george's in kent. after a day's rest, the tour de france resumes later today. there will be three tough mountain stages in the pyrenees for mark cavendish to get through if he's to get the chance to break the record for stage wins at the race. every opportunity there is for a sprint, i'd like to win, and every opportunity there is for a stage win elsewhere. this is still probably the hardest tour de france i've ever done. don't know whether i'm looking forward to the next three days, but, hopefully, we should be ok. he s won seven world titles and is the most successful driver formula one has ever seen. now lewis hamilton has a new mission — to make the sport more diverse.he wants to get more young black people to take up science and engineering subjects. it's a very nerve—racking moment but challenging as well because it is the beginning of a journey part pushing for change in my industry.
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it stemmed from i thought that me being in the sport and we thought as a family, it would break the mould, open up doors and pathways to other young black talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity, no one has an answer. that is my purpose and that is my reason for being here. that's all the sport for now. more now on one of today's top stories — the removal of restrictions in england from 19th ofjuly, which will see nightclubs, theatres and sports stadiums fully re—open. those businesses are now being advised to only let in people if they're got proof they're fully vaccinated or are covid—free. so what does this mean for the hospitality industry? i'm joined by miranda richardson, landlady of the live and let live pub in harpole, northampton great to have you with us today. thank you so much. before we talk
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about the restrictions, gave us a sense of where you are, you are the only pub in the village and you have done a lot for the community in the last 18 months or so.— last 18 months or so. absolutely. it has been key _ last 18 months or so. absolutely. it has been key to _ last 18 months or so. absolutely. it has been key to making _ last 18 months or so. absolutely. it has been key to making sure - last 18 months or so. absolutely. it has been key to making sure that l last 18 months or so. absolutely. it l has been key to making sure that the village know that one of their assets is still here. i am keeping myself sane and it's very important, making sure the customers and my regulars have a pub to come back to. it has been a full on 18 months despite the restrictions, despite opening every now and again and when we have been allowed to trade and the hours we've been allowed to trade, it has been pretty busy. you have done medication runs, takeaways, mothers day deliveries, well done to you for all of that effort and it has helped keep you sane and busy. how are you feeling now as you lessen yesterday what to
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what the prime minister had to say about the 19th ofjuly and getting back to full capacity? it is wonderful _ back to full capacity? it is wonderful to _ back to full capacity? it is wonderful to breathe - back to full capacity? it is wonderful to breathe a i back to full capacity? it 3 wonderful to breathe a little bit of a sigh of relief. we are not fully there because we will still find people are uncomfortable at coming out, unsure about how they feel and thatis out, unsure about how they feel and that is fine. i am looking forward to my customers not being confused when they come out any more. do they have to wear a facemask if they go to the toilet? when they come in the door... all that kind of scenario, people not coming out with groups of friends, that is going to be really nice, so many groups who all come out together, and they have missed that or they have had to reduce their numbers, not all of them being able to mix. that is going to be lovely, to see some of those people who spent it quite a bit of time with us to all come out again. it is
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going to make a difference notjust as an industry and the business back to them socially. people are being advised by government to use their own judgment if they are indoors, to think carefully about wearing facemasks, they have been told it is advisable if it is busy. you are being advised to only let people in if they have got proof they are fully vaccinated and covid—19 free. how are you going to handle that? we and covid-19 free. how are you going to handle that?— to handle that? we have to now say we are grown-ups. _ to handle that? we have to now say we are grown-ups. we _ to handle that? we have to now say we are grown-ups. we have - to handle that? we have to now say we are grown-ups. we have to - to handle that? we have to now say we are grown-ups. we have to takej we are grown—ups. we have to take responsibility for our own actions now. we should have always been washing our hands, we should always have been clean. having that explain to us i found was a bit bonkers. i will keep the sanitising stations that we have got, we have reports of
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sanitiser on our that our customers use during their time sat at the asking people to show proof, that is almost as difficult as asking people to show proof as to why they are exempt from wearing a facemask as well. ., . , ., exempt from wearing a facemask as well. ., ., , ., ., ., exempt from wearing a facemask as well. ., ., ., ., ., well. how are you going to handle that? well you — well. how are you going to handle that? well you asked _ well. how are you going to handle that? well you asked for- well. how are you going to handle that? well you asked for proof- well. how are you going to handle that? well you asked for proof of| that? well you asked for proof of vaccination or a negative lateral flow test? ., , _, , flow test? no. until it becomes... if it flow test? no. until it becomes... if it becomes _ flow test? no. until it becomes... if it becomes a _ flow test? no. until it becomes... if it becomes a rule, _ flow test? no. until it becomes... if it becomes a rule, a _ flow test? no. until it becomes... if it becomes a rule, a legal- if it becomes a rule, a legal requirement, then obviously i will do that. i want people to feel comfortable coming out. i would hate to think that anyone knowingly would come into any environment. even going to the are the supermarket. but people can be asymptomatic. they could be carrying the virus and not
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feel unwell until a few days after. do you think some of your clients might be happier if they knew they were coming into a pub where these things had been checked? there might be one or two — things had been checked? there might be one or two that _ things had been checked? there might be one or two that do, _ things had been checked? there might be one or two that do, but _ things had been checked? there might be one or two that do, but they - be one or two that do, but they probably don't generally come out to the pub anyway. they would be people who show more caution and where they were going and what they were doing and it comes down to giving people a responsibility to be able to do that. it is difficult when you could be potentially asymptomatic but that has been the case for 18 months no matter where you go or what you do. it makes no definite sitting down in a pub, putting a facemask on, getting up, you could still be stacked with your friends around a table, no facemask because you are sat down and be asymptomatic. just because those changes coming on monday that it is not obligatory to
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wear a facemask and to socially distance, that would have been an issue beforehand anyway, we have to take responsibility back as grown—ups to be able to deal with that. would you have liked to see a difference any advice? some legal requirement for people to do certain things? are you content with what you have heard from the government yesterday? i am very content. it is a sensible decision now. those that are wary and conscious, they will continue to wear their facemasks. they will continue to come out wearing gloves. that is fine because as individuals, we are allowed to make that decision and we should be able to make that decision. thank ou ve able to make that decision. thank you very much — able to make that decision. thank you very much for _ able to make that decision. thank you very much for talking - able to make that decision. thank you very much for talking to - able to make that decision. thank you very much for talking to us i you very much for talking to us today. at least 6a people have died in a major fire at a hospital
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treating coronavirus patients in southern iraq. dozens of other people have been injured in the fire at the al—hussain hospital in the city of nassiriya, which officials say has been been likely caused by an oxygen tank explosion. tanya dendrinos reports. a roaring inferno and a sea of desperate voices. fire crews battled the flames raging against the night sky. dozens of people have died, many were injured and others are still unaccounted for. what makes this scene all the more devastating is the fact it is at a coronavirus hospital in a country already ravaged by war with a health system under significant strain. as medical teams work to treat victims, the search operation continued in the burnt out wards. charred bodies carried out of the building. the blaze was likely caused by the explosion of an oxygen tank and it wasn't long before rage spilled out onto the streets.
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protesters gathered outside the hospital and the mayor's office, demanding the resignation of officials. the prime minister has held an emergency meeting, initiating a high—level investigation into the incident and directing urgent medical aid to the region. yet another tragedy just months after a similar incident at a hospital in baghdad which claimed more than 80 lives. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by four—billion—pounds will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7 percent to 0.5 percent due to the impact of the pandemic on public finances, but the decision was met with cross—party criticism. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. britain has long led the way in helping some of the world's
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poorest and most vulnerable people with humanitarian assistance. but, last november, the government unexpectedly cut aid spending by ea billion. sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of our national income on overseas aid is difficult to justify to the british people, especially when we are seeing the highest peacetime levels of borrowing on record. many mps were furious but the chancellor refused to give them a vote. now he has changed his mind and conceded one can't be avoided. when they come to westminster, mps will have two options. they can defeat the government and restore aid spending next year to its previous target of 0.7% of national income. or they can support the government and make any increase in aid dependent on the state of the public finances. the treasury wants two new tests to be met before aid spending rises — national debt has to be falling and the government budget has to be in surplus with no borrowing used
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for day—to—day spending. treasury sources said the new tests could mean uk aid spending rises again in a couple of years as the economy recovers. but mps and charities fear the aid cut would instead be locked in for the long—term. with a sizeable conservative rebellion expected, the vote may well be tight, and the result will matter for millions around the world who benefit from uk aid. james landale, bbc news. and the debate on foreign aid begins in the house of commons at 12.30 — we'll bring that to you live on the bbc news channel the headlines on bbc news... the government defends the home secretary priti patel, who has been criticised by england footballer tyrone mings for 'pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players the government confirms that all remaining covid restrictions in england will end on the 19th ofjuly. some senior doctors call it "irresponsible". and in scotland the first minister nicola sturgeon
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will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned. a top eu official has told the bbc that the greek government must stop the illegal deportation of migrants arriving on the country s borders. ?the eu commissioner for home affairs said that the very well founded reports of pushbacks at sea and on land were violations of fundamental european values. human rights groups allege that thousands of people seeking asylum in europe have been pushed back from greece to turkey before being given a chance to apply for asylum. greece has always denied the allegations. fergal keane reports now from the island of lesbos. a warning — you may find some of his report distressing. on europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing. please! pushing asylum seekers
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across international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, this is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water. all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been victims of push backs. onjune tenth last, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that. with the war at home, the multiple problems,
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our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey, without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and took us to a military port, then put us in boats. it was around 8pm, there were police wearing dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat. after that we realised
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we were in regional turkish waters. woman yells out. najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines, and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece. but also, it's eu law that is not — that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu chapter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out. some boats from the eu's own border agency are even accused of helping with push backs.
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but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on, without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos.
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some more of your tweets reacting to the tweet from tyrone mings criticising the home secretary for pretending to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players. one message says, the robust response to the race as her reflect the worst of our society has been heartening. another message, my 1a—year—old made the link yesterday between footballers taking the knee and the racism that followed their penalties. it is not biased to point out that link. another message, tyrone mings is right to stand up to racist abuse as black ethnic background should not encounter theirs. nobody should be encountering racism. thank you very much for sending those n. if you want to send in your comments, please contact me on twitter.
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one of the uk's largest agricultural events — the great yorkshire show, is back for the first time since the pandemic. sarah corker has more from harrogate 100,000 people are expected here for the four day event. it was virtual in 2020, as you can see, they are doing it for real this year. the main grandstand, showing horses and ponies at the moment. i am told they arejudged on movement and manner, some are better behaved than others. some showjumping later on today. of the talking points amongst farmers, the talking points amongst farmers, the challenge of attracting workers, people who pack the nation's fruit and vegetables, eu nationals previously did this, the pandemic and brexit has that impact on the supply of labour. we can talk with
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the deputy president of the national farmers' union. how significant is the shortage of workers? for farmers' union. how significant is the shortage of workers?- the shortage of workers? for a number of _ the shortage of workers? for a number of businesses - the shortage of workers? for a number of businesses it - the shortage of workers? for a number of businesses it has i the shortage of workers? for a i number of businesses it has been very challenging, not only on farms but further down the supply chain, the packers and processors, the people who transport our product, it has been challenging and we are working hard but we need to see some solutions to some of the issues we have got about where the workforce come from. seasonal work does not suit the uk workforce and that is why it has been so important. iloathed why it has been so important. what is the solution? _ why it has been so important. what is the solution? how _ why it has been so important. what is the solution? how do _ why it has been so important. what is the solution? how do you attract domestic workers to do those jobs? one of the issues in terms of workforce in general, events like this, agricultural industry, horticultural industry showing off what a great place it is to work. it is about looking at technology solutions, looking at permits, turning what is currently a pilot
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scheme the government has for seasonal workers into a permanent scheme. there are solutions but we need people to work hard on them to get the people we need to get the great british product onto the supermarket shelf.— great british product onto the supermarket shelf. events like this are about showcasing _ supermarket shelf. events like this are about showcasing british - are about showcasing british produce, increasing trade, not having events like this over the last year, it has been challenging, so how important is this to the rural economy?— so how important is this to the rural economy? these events are fantastic, they _ rural economy? these events are fantastic, they are _ rural economy? these events are fantastic, they are a _ rural economy? these events are fantastic, they are a showcase, i rural economy? these events are l fantastic, they are a showcase, we know the british public support british food and farming, it is a great shop window for us. i take my hat off to the guys in yorkshire for putting this event own in challenging circumstances, it is great to see people out, for farmers like me to talk to our customers, the great british public.— like me to talk to our customers, the great british public. thank you for talkinu
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the great british public. thank you for talking us _ the great british public. thank you for talking us today. _ the great british public. thank you for talking us today. over - the great british public. thank you for talking us today. over here, i for talking us today. over here, over the next four days, 8000 animals will be taking part in various competitions. you can see the warm up area here. the crowd is beginning to build. there is a cap on tickets because of the pandemic, 26,000 tickets on sale. for the first time in four—hundred years, a baby beaver has been born on exmoor. this youngster, known as a kit, was caught on camera by staff at the holnicote estate in somerset. the rodents were introduced into the wild there last year, as part of a national trust project to restore streams and reduce flooding. that little baby is thriving and doing very well. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello.
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well, thankfully we won't be seeing a repeat through the rest of this week to what happened weather—wise yesterday, deluge in some parts of the country. here are some of the wettest spots. how much rainfall fell during monday compared to what you would normally expect during the entirety ofjuly. the kew gardens as well, saw a month's worth of rain falling in just the space of a few hours. it was the wettest day in nearly a0 years. thankfully, the showers that we do see today, ok, the odd sharp one will be about, but nowhere near as intense as those, fewer in number as well with more of you dry and increasing amounts of sunshine as we go through the afternoon. the clouds will linger in some spots, particularly around some of the coast, better chance of some sunshine at times inland. as temperatures rise, it will set off one or two sharp showers here. western scotland, parts of wales, western and southern england in particular. but even those will be fewer in number, most places avoiding them and temperatures around where we should be for this stage in july, 18 to 2a degrees. let's go to this evening and overnight, showers will continue for a time but they will gradually fade as temperatures drop through the night. not going to be dropping too much, though, whilst there will be some clear skies, there will be some mist
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and fog around, some low cloud on the east coast, west of scotland and northern ireland, but the odd mist and fog patch inland and temperatures 15, 16 degrees for one or two of you as we start tomorrow morning. as you go into tomorrow, almost in between that low pressure that brought the storms yesterday pulling away eastwards, high pressure for the end of the week pushing its way in. around the top of it, we will see these weather fronts gradually working to western scotland, northern ireland. not much to them, though, bringing a little bit more breeze, a bit more cloud and some patchy rain and drizzle to western isles later. the vast majority, other than isolated showers, will be dry. most of you having a fine day on wednesday. morning mist and fog clearing, some low cloud to eastern coasts, some strong sunshine inland. unlike this afternoon, temperatures lifting into the 20s fairly widely. and then as we see the week out and head towards the weekend, that area of high pressure to the west, finally builds its way to sit right on top of the uk. high pressure generally means dry weather and with it, an increasing amount of strong sunshine overhead and increasingly warm weather too. temperatures rising across the country as we head
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towards the weekend and with the blue skies overhead through saturday and sunday, we could see temperatures anywhere between around 2a and 28 celsius. 28 is 82 in fahrenheit. see you soon.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. england footballer tyrone mings criticises the uk home secretary for 'pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at his team mates following the euro 2020 final. the british government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. we d like to hear your reaction to the tyrone mings' tweet. you can get in touch with me on twitter @annita?mcveigh at least 6a people have been killed in a fire at a iraqi hospital treating coronavirus patients. many patients are missing.
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some senior doctors condemn the uk government's decision to scrap all remaining covid restrictions in england on the 19th

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