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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 13, 2021 6:00am-9:00am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today. "irresponsible" — doctors leaders condemn borisjohnson�*s decision to press ahead with lockdown lifting, despite rising covid infections. marcus rashford says he'll never apologise for who he is after being racially abused online for his penalty miss against italy. england defender tyrone mings accuses the home secretary of "pretending to be disgusted" after her criticism of players taking the knee. i have spoken exclusively to formula 1 champion lewis hamilton. he tells me he wants to change the way the sport looks for ever, and help young black
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people into engineering. good morning from the great yorkshire show here in harrogate. the celebration of all things farming and rural life. there are growing concerns about the shortage of farm workers and what that could mean for prices in the shops. after yesterday's severe storms and flooding some comic today if you wish i was, a bit more sunshine and it is set to turn warmer as we head through the week. the full forecast here on breakfast. it's tuesday 13th july. senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". in england next week — borisjohnson has confirmed that most remaining measures — including social distancing — would be dropped from the 19th of july. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports.
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in under a week's time, life in england will look very different. no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer legally be required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible. borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over, but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases are not rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop.
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it makes no sense to be knowingly accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than law in england. bus and rail industry groups have said they will not require passengers to wear them. in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon will announce today whether its restrictions can be eased next monday, as is planned. wales is due to review its restrictions on thursday, and northern ireland is due to ease some covid measures on the 26th ofjuly. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act. aruna iyengar, bbc news.
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we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. so much to talk about. good morning. if anybody watched the news conference from the prime minister yesterday there is a slight change in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. goad in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. good morninu. in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. good morning- a — in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. good morning- a huge — in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. good morning. a huge change _ in tone ahead ofjuly the 19th. (13mm morning. a huge change in tone. there was no sense of imminent liberation, nojubilation at liberation, no jubilation at throwing liberation, nojubilation at throwing off the shackles of the rules. instead every syllable, every paragraph, was etched with caution and what was striking, as well, is that a couple of hours later the government published a document to supplement what we heard at the news conference and again that emphasis on vigilance runs throughout. what has changed in the last week is not the government's commitment to removing the remaining limits in social contact, we know there was i going and that is what they said a week ago. what has changed is they are now taking a view on what they recommend our behaviour should be beyond next monday. they say that
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they recommend that we should wear a facemask in indoor settings when there is lots of people about. we should wear one on public transport. if we have been working from home we can be encouraged to go back to the workplace, but it doesn't all have to happen all at once. the huge question, and this is where we hear the criticism from the doctor's union and from labour, is how does the government know how all of us collectively it will act when we don't have government diktats tell us how to behave. at some stage they will have to be handing back in power from will have to be handing back in powerfrom government to will have to be handing back in power from government to us as individuals. the question is the timing, the government thinks the time is right, in the summer, but critics do not. i’m time is right, in the summer, but critics do not.— critics do not. i'm sure this is a discussion _ critics do not. i'm sure this is a discussion we _ critics do not. i'm sure this is a discussion we will _ critics do not. i'm sure this is a discussion we will continue - critics do not. i'm sure this is a discussion we will continue to l critics do not. i'm sure this is a - discussion we will continue to have. let's talk about elsewhere, the home secretary has been criticised for her response to racist abuse directed at several england players. take us through what has been going
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on. , , take us through what has been going on, , , ., take us through what has been going on. , _, ._ on. this is an extraordinary intervention _ on. this is an extraordinary intervention from - on. this is an extraordinary intervention from tyrone i on. this is an extraordinary - intervention from tyrone mings. i cannot remember an incident where as high—profile a sporting figure has directly and publicly and unequivocally taken issue with the remarks of someone as a senior in government as the home secretary. take a look at this tweet from tyrone mings last night. he quote tweeted the home secretary, and for those not familiar with twitter it means you are talking directly to the person who has previously tweeted a message, and everybody can see that conversation. earlier in the day priti patel, the home secretary, has said she was
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disgusted that england players had been subjected to what she described as a vile racist abuse on social media, and it had no place in our country. we heard from the prime minister at conference that he felt those who had indulged in racist abuse should crawl back under the stone from which they had come. it shows how much anger there is amongst some within the england squad that some in government at the beginning of the tournament appeared equivocal about whether it taking the knee was a good idea.- equivocal about whether it taking the knee was a good idea. thank you for takinu the knee was a good idea. thank you for taking us — the knee was a good idea. thank you for taking us through _ the knee was a good idea. thank you for taking us through both _ the knee was a good idea. thank you for taking us through both of- the knee was a good idea. thank you for taking us through both of those. l for taking us through both of those. thank you. marcus rashford says he will never apologise for who he is after being subjected to racist abuse online for missing a penalty in sunday's euro 2020 final. a mural of the 23—year—old in manchester was also defaced following the game. our reporter phil mccann is there for us this morning. good morning to you. give us an idea does i think we can see from some of
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the messages behind you, or how the community have responded. yeah. the messages behind you, or how the community have responded. yeah, you can see it. community have responded. yeah, you can see it- just — community have responded. yeah, you can see it. just look _ community have responded. yeah, you can see it. just look at _ community have responded. yeah, you can see it. just look at all _ community have responded. yeah, you can see it. just look at all of _ can see it. just look at all of this. it has been love bombed. these are the streets of south manchester, where he grew up. just a few hours after he missed that penalty on sunday night, this wasn't defaced with racist graffiti which has now more than been covered up. jadon sancho, buckeye seco, also faced abuse online, like marcus rashford, but what we saw is that when people try to give them abuse online, thousands more people flooded in with positive, supportive comments, and tried to call out racism. that is what you see here in physical form. police are investigating the defacing but look at what some people have said here. you made us proud. well done, said a marcus rashford, we are proud of you. we all bleed the same colour. racism is
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all bleed the same colour. racism is a pandemic, as well. absolutely huge. what we understand will happen later on, in a few hours, the artist, orsome later on, in a few hours, the artist, or some clean—up crews will come along to remove the racist graffiti and restore it to the position it was in before. the team that was behind this mural said yesterday that this is depressing but they felt at some point it was predictable, likely to happen. marcus rashford has responded to all of this, he addressed in a social media post last night. he addressed the penalty miss and said it should have gone in but i will never apologise for who i am and where i came from and he said, seeing the response here has left me on the verge of two years. he said the communities that always wrapped their arms around me continue to hold me up. i am a marcus rashford, 23—year—old black man from withington and wythenshawe in south manchester. if i have nothing else, i have that. manchester. ifi have nothing else, i have that-— manchester. ifi have nothing else, i have that. ., ~ , . ~ i have that. thank you very much. we will be with —
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i have that. thank you very much. we will be with phil— i have that. thank you very much. we will be with phil through _ i have that. thank you very much. we will be with phil through the - will be with phil through the morning. it will be with phil through the mornin:. , .., . , will be with phil through the mornin:. , .., ., , ., , morning. it is extraordinary to see all those messages _ morning. it is extraordinary to see all those messages this _ morning. it is extraordinary to see all those messages this morning. | all those messages this morning. giving you a sense of how much it has changed in the last few hours because that was obviously taken yesterday at the start of people putting these messages on that mural and again let's go back quickly and look at that. so many different people coming down there to offer their support to marcus rashford and we will be down there through the morning. the artist who painted the mural will be coming back there later today. mural will be coming back there later today-— mural will be coming back there latertoda . . ,. ., ., ., . later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots _ later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots to _ later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots to talk— later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots to talk to _ later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots to talk to you - later today. fascinating to watch, isn't it? lots to talk to you about | isn't it? lots to talk to you about today. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by £4 billion will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7% to 0.5% because of the pandemic, but was met with cross—party criticism. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has this report. britain has long led the way in helping some of the world's poorest and most vulnerable people
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with humanitarian assistance. but, last november, the government unexpectedly cut aid spending by £4 billion. sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of our national income on overseas aid is difficult to justify to the british people, especially when we are seeing the highest peacetime levels of borrowing on record. many mps were furious that the chancellor refused but the chancellor refused to give them a vote. now he has changed his mind. he conceded one can't be avoided. when they come to westminster, mps will have two options. they can defeat the government and restore aid spending next year to its previous target of 0.7% of national income. or they can support the government and make any increase in aid dependent on the state of the public finances. the treasury wants two new tests to be met before aid spending rises —
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national debt has to be falling and the government budget has to be in surplus with no borrowing used for day—to—day spending. treasury sources said the new tests could mean uk aid spending rises again in a couple of years as the economy recovers. but mps and charities fear the aid cut would instead be locked in for the long—term. with a sizeable conservative rebellion expected, the vote may well be tight, and the result will matter for millions around the world who benefit from uk aid. james landale, bbc news. more than 50 people have died and dozens more injured in a fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in iraq. it's thought the blaze began after an oxygen cylinder exploded. iraq's prime minister has called for the arrest of the hospital's boss, following protests by the families of victims. water companies in england are falling short when it comes to protecting the environment — according to the industry regulator. the environment agency said rivers are still too polluted and warned that companies need to make "substantial" improvements.
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it comes after southern water was fined a record—breaking £90 million after pleading guilty to illegally dumping billions of litres of raw sewage into the sea. torrential downpours have caused flash flooding in towns and cities across the south of england. in london, train and tube stations were forced to close and there were more than 1,000 calls to the fire brigade in a few hours. and in some parts of dorset, cars were left stranded after attempting to drive through floodwater. the met office says the weather will brighten up from tomorrow. we will find out what is happening with matt in a number. for the first time in 400 years, a baby beaver has been born on exmoor. take a look at this. the youngster — known as a kit — was caught on camera by staff at the holnicote estate in somerset. the rodents were introduced into the wild there last year,
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as part of a national trust project to restore streams and reduce flooding. there you go. baby aviva. one of the uk's largest agricultural events — the great yorkshire show, is back for the first time since the pandemic. sarah is there for us this morning. good morning. that's right. good mornin: good morning. that's right. good morning from _ good morning. that's right. good morning from a _ good morning. that's right. good morning from a very _ good morning. that's right. good morning from a very wet - good morning. that's right. good i morning from a very wet harrogate. we are, as you say, live at the great yorkshire show throughout the morning. 0ne great yorkshire show throughout the morning. one of the star attractions todayis morning. one of the star attractions today is this, the world's lie just combine harvester. there is even an massage chair back there which will help you through the long days in the fields. away from the farming equipment around 8000 animals that will be taking part in a range of competitions. there is also a large food hall celebrating the best of british produce. but also a major
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talking point amongst those he is todayit talking point amongst those he is today it will be the shortage of farm workers, the people who pick and pack our fruits and vegetables. these are roles that have previously been done by eu nationals, but brexit and the pandemic has had an impact on the supply of labour, especially from eastern europe, and here is a view from one farmer, a strawberry farmer, based near leeds. we are a 280—acre farm growing 400 kilometres of strawberries. depending on the time of the year, it really does determine the amount of staff that we need, but in the height of the summer — now — for instance, we're using between 100 to 200 pickers each day. the majority of our staff come from bulgaria, romania, the ukraine and we are so reliant on them. english people just don't want to do this job. we are managing, but we are... you know, staff are working very, very long hours and it's not
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sustainable long term. i think next year there's going to be a real struggle unless the government do something about it. if we don't have foreign labour, we do not have a business and we do not have british fruit. so some of the challenges that farmers... we can speak to the director of the shell, child's mills. also a family. good morning. —— charles mills. what does it take to put on a show this size in the pandemic? fix, to put on a show this size in the pandemic?— to put on a show this size in the andemic? �* ~ . ~ to put on a show this size in the andemic? �* . . ~ ., pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead _ pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of— pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of 12 _ pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of 12 to _ pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of 12 to put - pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of 12 to put it - pandemic? a huge challenge. we have x months instead of 12 to put it on. - x months instead of 12 to put it on. a great— x months instead of 12 to put it on. a great team effort.— x months instead of 12 to put it on. a great team effort. there will be a few differences, _ a great team effort. there will be a few differences, everything - a great team effort. there will be a few differences, everything has - a great team effort. there will be a few differences, everything has to i few differences, everything has to be a covid secure, testing, things you are having to do to make this happen. you are having to do to make this ha en. , , a you are having to do to make this ha en, , , ., , you are having to do to make this hauen. , , ., , . happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers are _ happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers are cut _ happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers are cut by _ happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers are cut by almost - happen. sadly it is ticket only and i numbers are cut by almost 50%| happen. sadly it is ticket only and l i numbers are cut by almost 5096 so i numbers are cut by almost 50% so we are _ i numbers are cut by almost 50% so we are very— i numbers are cut by almost 50% so we are very sorry for those who wanted — we are very sorry for those who wanted to — we are very sorry for those who wanted to come and could not get a
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ticket _ wanted to come and could not get a ticket. disease covid has done that. 100,000 people are exoeeted — covid has done that. 100,000 people are exoeeted at _ covid has done that. 100,000 people are expected at this _ covid has done that. 100,000 people are expected at this four _ covid has done that. 100,000 people are expected at this four day - covid has done that. 100,000 people are expected at this four day event. l are expected at this four day event. we can chat with hannah, a farming journalist. last year's event was virtual. this year they are back for real. how important is this for the rural economy and farmers to be able to trade at events like this?— to trade at events like this? really im ortant to trade at events like this? really important for _ to trade at events like this? really important for a _ to trade at events like this? really important for a number _ to trade at events like this? really important for a number of - to trade at events like this? really| important for a number of reasons. first _ important for a number of reasons. first the _ important for a number of reasons. first the social aspect, a chance to -et first the social aspect, a chance to get out _ first the social aspect, a chance to get out and — first the social aspect, a chance to get out and about away from the farm, _ get out and about away from the farm, meet people they haven't seen for the _ farm, meet people they haven't seen for the past _ farm, meet people they haven't seen for the past year or so and have a chat _ for the past year or so and have a chat ruret— for the past year or so and have a chat. rural isolation has been a big issue _ chat. rural isolation has been a big issue so— chat. rural isolation has been a big issue so it — chat. rural isolation has been a big issue so it is — chat. rural isolation has been a big issue so it is all a chance to get feelings— issue so it is all a chance to get feelings out in the open and chat about— feelings out in the open and chat about industry changes in person and have a _ about industry changes in person and have a catch — about industry changes in person and have a catch up. and about industry changes in person and have a catch up-_ have a catch up. and be able to showcase _ have a catch up. and be able to showcase the _ have a catch up. and be able to showcase the machinery, - have a catch up. and be able to showcase the machinery, the l have a catch up. and be able to - showcase the machinery, the food, the livestock. a lot to celebrate. the other aspect is a competitive angle _
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the other aspect is a competitive angle. farmers like to get involved in showing — angle. farmers like to get involved in showing their stock, that is interesting and fascinating for them — interesting and fascinating for them. they like healthy competition and it— them. they like healthy competition and it is— them. they like healthy competition and it is a _ them. they like healthy competition and it is a chance to educate consumers about the feud with great food hails _ consumers about the feud with great food halls. just reconnect consumers with the _ food halls. just reconnect consumers with the food they eat.— with the food they eat. thank you for “oininr with the food they eat. thank you forjoining us— with the food they eat. thank you forjoining us bright _ with the food they eat. thank you forjoining us bright and - with the food they eat. thank you forjoining us bright and early. . forjoining us bright and early. lots to discuss. the doors open at 8am and there will be 26,000 tickets here today. it is less than previous years but obviously the social distancing, and this is a covid secure event. we hope to bring you some animals later as we will be down with the horses and sheep. plenty to come.— down with the horses and sheep. plen to come. ., ,, i. , . plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward _ plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward to _ plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward to it. _ plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward to it. that _ plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward to it. that is - plenty to come. thank you very much, we look forward to it. that is a - we look forward to it. that is a who er we look forward to it. that is a whopper of — we look forward to it. that is a whopper of a _ we look forward to it. that is a whopper of a combine - we look forward to it. that is a i whopper of a combine harvester. we look forward to it. that is a - whopper of a combine harvester. matt has the weather. _ whopper of a combine harvester. matt has the weather. good _ whopper of a combine harvester. matt has the weather. good morning. - has the weather. good morning. reau has the weather. good morning. really dramatic _ has the weather. good morning. really dramatic storms - has the weather. good morning. really dramatic storms across i has the weather. good morning. | really dramatic storms across the south _ really dramatic storms across the south and — really dramatic storms across the south and east yesterday. the good news _ south and east yesterday. the good news is _ south and east yesterday. the good news is if _ south and east yesterday. the good news is if few air showers around today _ news is if few air showers around today and — news is if few air showers around today and those you see will not be
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as heavy~ _ today and those you see will not be as heavy~ it — today and those you see will not be as heavy. it also means more sunshine _ as heavy. it also means more sunshine breaking through, including in harrogate! at the moment it is one of— in harrogate! at the moment it is one of the — in harrogate! at the moment it is one of the wetter spots. this is where — one of the wetter spots. this is where we — one of the wetter spots. this is where we have a showers across parts of northern _ where we have a showers across parts of northern england. elsewhere, largeiy— of northern england. elsewhere, largely dry start, some showers creeping — largely dry start, some showers creeping to the channel islands. plenty— creeping to the channel islands. plenty of— creeping to the channel islands. plenty of cloud, some sunshine across — plenty of cloud, some sunshine across central england, some to the west and _ across central england, some to the west and the cloud should thin and break— west and the cloud should thin and break more through the day for many, allowing _ break more through the day for many, allowing more sunshine three. overati— allowing more sunshine three. overall a — allowing more sunshine three. overall a dry day but there will be one or— overall a dry day but there will be one or two — overall a dry day but there will be one or two showers cropping up. in the sunshine — one or two showers cropping up. in the sunshine and temperatures in the low 20s, _ the sunshine and temperatures in the low 20s, closer to where we should be for _ low 20s, closer to where we should be for this— low 20s, closer to where we should be for this stage injuly. you can see a _ be for this stage injuly. you can see a few— be for this stage injuly. you can see a few lighter showers dotted around, — see a few lighter showers dotted around, particularly to the south of england. _ around, particularly to the south of england, southwest, southern parts of wales _ england, southwest, southern parts of wales. one or two showers across northern— of wales. one or two showers across northern england but not as wet this afternoon _ northern england but not as wet this afternoon as it is now. the odd one in the _ afternoon as it is now. the odd one in the highlands. the vast majority will he _ in the highlands. the vast majority will be dry. — in the highlands. the vast majority will be dry, lots of cloud to the north-east _ will be dry, lots of cloud to the north—east of scotland, could produce — north—east of scotland, could
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produce some drizzle around parts of shetland _ produce some drizzle around parts of shetland and that will continue for a time _ shetland and that will continue for a time this— shetland and that will continue for a time this evening, as will some showers — a time this evening, as will some showers. most will fade through the night, _ showers. most will fade through the night, lengthy clear skies. we will see a _ night, lengthy clear skies. we will see a few— night, lengthy clear skies. we will see a few mist and fog patches or an antenna _ see a few mist and fog patches or an antenna start tomorrow morning. it -ets antenna start tomorrow morning. it gets warmer and sunnier for all of us through— gets warmer and sunnier for all of us through the week. more detail in around _ us through the week. more detail in around half— us through the week. more detail in around half an hour. we us through the week. more detail in around half an hour.— us through the week. more detail in around half an hour. we look forward to that. around half an hour. we look forward to that- thank— around half an hour. we look forward to that. thank you, _ around half an hour. we look forward to that. thank you, we _ around half an hour. we look forward to that. thank you, we will _ around half an hour. we look forward to that. thank you, we will see - around half an hour. we look forward to that. thank you, we will see you l to that. thank you, we will see you later. let's take a look at today's papers. the metro leads with england defender tyrone mings' accusation that the home secretary, priti patel "stoked the fire" of racist abuse, after she criticised the squad for taking the knee earlier in the tournament. "we've got your back" is the sun's headline. it features pictures of england players marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka, and says the nation has "united" behind them. the daily mail's front page asks how long freedom will last, focusing on the prime minister's urge for caution ahead of restrictions being lifted in england next monday. meanwhile the guardian
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leads on warnings of an "exit wave", reporting that ending restrictions could cause more than 200 daily deaths. we will be speaking to the chief secretary to the treasury, stephen barclay, about that and other things at 7:30am. . ., barclay, about that and other things at 7:30am. ,, . ., ., ~' barclay, about that and other things at 7:30am. ,, ., ., ., ~ ., barclay, about that and other things at 7:30am. ,, ., ., barclay, about that and other things at 7:30am. ,, . ., ., at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? _ at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? i _ at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? i like _ at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? i like this - at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? i like this but - at 7:30am. shall we look at some of the inside pages? i like this but i - the inside pages? i like this but i don't think it will have another programme. a lot of people have brought pets injury lockdown. visit to bring your pet to work day? yes! that boss isn't listening, come on! some firms are allowing staff to bring in their lockdown companions. we have rufus, a labrador puppy, who has been allowed into the office. rufus ate the shoes of the founder, which was hilarious. x�*fork rufus ate the shoes of the founder, which was hilarious.— which was hilarious. york dogs are oorl which was hilarious. york dogs are poorly behaved. — which was hilarious. york dogs are poorly behaved, i'd _ which was hilarious. york dogs are poorly behaved, i'd say? - poorly behaved, i'd say? laughter what are you talking about? laughter what are ou talkin: about? .,
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what are you talking about? you tell me all sorts — what are you talking about? you tell me all sorts of _ what are you talking about? you tell me all sorts of things. _ what are you talking about? you tell me all sorts of things. are _ what are you talking about? you tell me all sorts of things. are you - me all sorts of things. are you talkin: me all sorts of things. are you talking about _ me all sorts of things. are you talking about the _ me all sorts of things. are you talking about the fact - me all sorts of things. are you talking about the fact that - me all sorts of things. are you talking about the fact that my| me all sorts of things. are you - talking about the fact that my dog ate myself a? i don't think the boss would mind if the dog ate this sofa. lots of different offices considering flexible working and accommodating new pets into the office. i think it is a lovely idea but i agree... i am not sure it would necessarily work here. filial]! would necessarily work here. shall we ask? is — would necessarily work here. shall we ask? is this _ would necessarily work here. shall we ask? is this possible? - would necessarily work here. si:ii we ask? is this possible? "not would necessarily work here. suii we ask? is this possible? "not a chance," he says. did you ever play super mario on the nintendo? i am aware of this- _ super mario on the nintendo? i am aware of this. galaxy. _ super mario on the nintendo? i am aware of this. galaxy. unopened i super mario on the nintendo? i am i aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of su er aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario _ aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario 64 _ aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario 64 has _ aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario 64 has a _ aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario 64 has a soul - aware of this. galaxy. unopened copy of super mario 64 has a soul for. .. i of super mario 64 has a soul for... how much? 1996, it came out? £20,000?— how much? 1996, it came out? £20,000? ' ' ., �* ., £20,000? £1.1 million. a record for a sinale £20,000? £1.1 million. a record for a single game- _ £20,000? £1.1 million. a record for a single game. the _ £20,000? £1.1 million. a record for a single game. the auctioneer - £20,000? £1.1 million. a record for a single game. the auctioneer whol a single game. the auctioneer who sold it claimed there were fewer than five of the sealed cartridges anywhere in the world in such good
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condition, which is why it has gone for such a ridiculous amount of money. you would probably keep that in the case and never touch it, it could be worth even more in years to come. ., , ~ ., ., ~ , come. how will they know it works? of course it — come. how will they know it works? of course it works! _ come. how will they know it works? of course it works! or _ come. how will they know it works? of course it works! or if _ come. how will they know it works? of course it works! or if it _ come. how will they know it works? of course it works! or if it is - come. how will they know it works? of course it works! or if it is even i of course it works! or if it is even in there. lots _ of course it works! or if it is even in there. lots of— of course it works! or if it is even in there. lots of people _ of course it works! or if it is even in there. lots of people have - of course it works! or if it is even | in there. lots of people have been auoin in there. lots of people have been going through _ in there. lots of people have been going through their— in there. lots of people have been going through their houses - in there. lots of people have been going through their houses and . going through their houses and clearing out and one lady went into a charity shop and she picked up what she thought was a box set of that soprano. she put on that first dvd and it was actually a wedding video. someone had put it into the box set as a mistake. imagine you have lost your wedding video, it is in their! she tracked them down, give it back to them.— in their! she tracked them down, give it back to them. something we will talk about _ give it back to them. something we will talk about a _ give it back to them. something we will talk about a lot _ give it back to them. something we will talk about a lot today... - will talk about a lot today... tyrone mings on social media, his extraordinary intervention of taking on front line politician in priti patel, the home secretary. we are
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discussing that, and later on we will be talking to anton ferdinand, who is part of this pope united team, helping to stamp out racism. and alsojosh team, helping to stamp out racism. and also josh denzelle good, who used to be on love cameco island, and he has spent a lot of time with england players, been doing a daily podcast. he can give us a real interesting insight into what the players are feeling about what is now happening at the response to the racist abuse to those three players who had their penalties are saved, how they have responded and how he feels england players think and what they feel about that racist abuse. we will be back later at that mural of marcus rashford because we understand the artist will be back there laterjust like we working on it. —— back up to begin working on it. —— back up to begin working on it again. from doing your weekly shop
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to getting on the bus, wearing a face—covering has become a part of everyday life for most of us. but from next week in england, you'll no longer legally be required to wear one. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been finding out how people in bristol feel about the change. banksy is yet to be unmasked, but in his home city of bristol, one of his best—known works can once again be seen without a face covering. and the rest of england is about to follow suit — as, one year on from their mandatory introduction, the law requiring face masks in public places is about to end. so, at mugshot restaurant in the city centre, they're preparing for yet another change in the rules. we'll encourage our staff to wear them — we'll make our staff wearthem, rather. the guests, we will encourage it to those who are happy to do so. it's... like you say, it's not something that we can enforce, but we're quite a small restaurant and so if we can make the space more comfortable for them in any way that we can, we will do. the government's urging people to cover up when it's busy, but it will be a personal decision. i think, out of politeness, i'll certainly carry on wearing masks —
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particularly in indoor places, or if it's even crowded in outdoor places, i would carry on wearing masks — yes, i think it's a necessity, to be honest. we're in two minds. i mean, obviously, we feel like they keep us safe because that's what they've been telling us. but i hate them. i can't hear in one! you go deaf? go deaf — yeah! so i'd like to get rid of them but it's a bit of a worry. you've got to wear i them in busy places. imean... yes — ooh, yes, definitely. the buses. can't not do it in public transport. you're really asking for it. yeah, that's right. on the city's harbour—side — in pre—covid days, a hub for bristol's nightlife — staff and customers will be given the choice to wear a mask or not. but robert says he'll be glad to see the back of them. it's been hard. trying to keep control has been very hard. obviously, we sell alcohol — we don't serve soft drinks only. so after a few drinks, they forget to wear a mask and we tell them off and tell them off again. it's just extra work for us.
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will it now be easier? are you looking forward to the rules changing? yes, i'm looking forward, yeah. can't wait. can't wait? yeah. hospitality has been one of the hardest—hit sectors since the pandemic arrived, and it continues to take its toll. wilsons restaurant has been forced to close its doors after a positive test. the owner — who's self—isolating — says ultimately it will be up to his customers to decide for themselves. i don't like wearing masks — they irritate my ears. some of my colleagues, who english is not theirfirst language — you know, it's really... they've been very difficult. but the bigger... the bigger question for us is, how does it make our guests feel? you know, someone's come into a restaurant, we want them to feel safe, welcome, loved. you know, that's why we do this. we look after people and welcome
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them to our little place. and if... you know, if i have to wear a mask to make someone feel ok, i'm more than willing to do that. obviously, i'm not going to force that on my colleagues but, personally, that's what i'm going to do. some calljuly the 19th freedom day, and in england, that will mean the freedom to decide — mask or no mask. the decision is yours. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. if you want to talk about that you know how to get in touch. you can find us on social media or e—mail us. we will speak to our regular gp, nighat, we will speak to her shortly. nighat, we will speak to her shortl . , nighat, we will speak to her shortl. , , shortly. yesterday was slightly... ! it seemed like _ shortly. yesterday was slightly... ! it seemed like a _ shortly. yesterday was slightly... ! it seemed like a long _ shortly. yesterday was slightly... ! it seemed like a long day. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm alison earle. some of london's streets were left underwater after heavy rain led to flash flooding. raynes park, barnes, and richmond in southwest london ss were among the areas worst affected, along with hampstead and golders green in northwest london. the london fire brigade said it received more than 1,000 related calls from people in homes and businesses or trapped in cars. a number of tube and train services are still affected. network rail said trains out of euston are suspended until the water recedes. a charity that supports people whose loved ones have gone missing is consulting families to understand how their race impacts on the treatment they receive. evidence joel, whose son richard okorogheye disappeared in march, is among those taking part. the police watchdog is investigating her claim that her initial concerns were dismissed by the met. the force says in all missing person cases risk level is assessed on the infomation it receives and denies bias plays a role.
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what we've seen is really concerning. some examples are families who are reporting their special loved one missing to the police and the police not taking the initial report. it's where families are being expected to do more than usual to try and find their missing loved one, or where their efforts so far are being dismissed. and you can see more on that story in a special report on bbc london tonight at 6.30 here on bbc one. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the circle line is suspended. the district, hammersmith and city, and northern are all part suspended due to the flooding. there's no service on the overground between stratford and richmond—clapham junction while damage to the track is repaired. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, some of us, but not all of us across the capital, saw some torrential downpours, along with plenty of thunder. but today is a lot less dramatic, weather—wise. a much quieter day of weather right across the board.
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it's a cloudy, mild start to the morning. temperatures in mid—teens in celsius. now, there is plenty of cloud around through the morning, but it will gradually break up. we will see some brightness, some spells of sunshine start to develop. the sunshine probably best through the afternoon out towards western home counties. here, temperatures will peak in the low 20s celsius. the winds more noticeable than they were yesterday, although fairly light. there is the small chance we could see showers break out, but they will be isolated and, for many of us, it will be a for many of us, it will be a dry day. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud will reform. there will be some clear spells — watch out for mist in those. it is a mild start to wednesday morning. on wednesday, we start with lots of cloud, but it should break up to give us some brightness and sunshine. a small chance of one or two showers. high pressure is set to build in and it is looking dry for the rest of the week, with increasing amounts of sunshine and climbing temperatures. that's it for the moment. do tune into bbc radio london this
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morning as riz lateef is standing in for vanessa feltz. she'll be taking your calls from seven until ten o'clock this morning. i'm back with your next update in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. coming up on breakfast this morning. formula one's most successful driver, lewis hamilton, speaks exclusively to this programme about his mission to make the sport more diverse. after 44 days in the air, we'll chat to 18—year—old travis ludlow, who's become the youngest person to fly solo around the world in a single—engine aircraft. and we meet stuart and charlotte, the couple hoping to complete all 96 olympic events in 17 days in memory of stuart's brother, who died of motor neurone disease ten years ago.
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i love a challenge but that challenge is huge. for you to say that is a big challenge means it is a really big challenge. as we've been hearing, borisjohnson has confirmed that covid restrictions will ease in england on monday. let's catch up now with one of our regular gps — dr nighat arif. good morning. lovely to see you on a tuesday. we have talked to you about facemasks. you will not legally have to wear them in england after the 19th ofjuly. tell us again your views on that.— 19th ofjuly. tell us again your views on that. �* , ., ., ., , , views on that. anyone who has been watchin: views on that. anyone who has been watching the — views on that. anyone who has been watching the gps _ views on that. anyone who has been watching the gps come _ views on that. anyone who has been watching the gps come on _ views on that. anyone who has been watching the gps come on around i watching the gps come on around 6:30am since lockdown will know we have all said the same thing. masks are important, they protect you from droplets. and other people's droplets. and other people's droplets. we know the virus spread
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through droplets. therefore wearing masks is important. now we will have to see. we do not know what it will be like if we allow the public to make the decision. yesterday i was on call and saw a patient and she was exempt from wearing a mask and came into my consulting room. my windows were open. the end of the day, the last patient i saw. i asked her if she found it a struggle not to wear a mask. she said i would like to keep mine on to protect you. i thought that the great british public will do the right thing. they will know in an enclosed space where the virus can spread more they will wear a mask. and if they are outdoors, socially distancing, there is no need to wear a mask. it will be a situation where we will have to hope and wait and see that people will make the right decision when it comes to wearing a mask because we
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know people do not like wearing masks. as a doctor, i have been wearing masks since i trained. it is no huge deal. one of those things we will have to wait and see. let’s will have to wait and see. let's talk about _ will have to wait and see. let's talk about the _ will have to wait and see. let's talk about the numbers - will have to wait and see. let's talk about the numbers government advisers talked about yesterday of what they predict could happen. saying there could be 200 deaths and “p saying there could be 200 deaths and up to to thousand people hospitalised every day by mid august. this will have an impact on gps like you. i august. this will have an impact on gps like you-— gps like you. iwill be honest. it is depressing — gps like you. iwill be honest. it is depressing to _ gps like you. iwill be honest. it is depressing to hear _ gps like you. iwill be honest. it is depressing to hear those - gps like you. i will be honest. it - is depressing to hear those numbers, to know there could be up to 100, 200 daily deaths. i can see what the government is trying to do. the rationale is it is summer, we will be outdoors and lets ease the restrictions. we have the vaccination programme going strong
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and we have the majority of vulnerable patients vaccinated. but we have new variants. we have the delta variant that is rife at the moment. we are living on hope we can control this so we have the capacity in hospitals, but those numbers, looking at numbers where we went into the first, second, third lockdown, that is where we were. to know we will be back there is heartbreaking because we have done so much work in the nhs to keep numbers down and keep patients protected. i think all of us are hoping let's see what it is like at the minute. i would not be surprised when it comes to winter we could be looking down the fourth time. i am saying it now but that is perhaps where we are heading. can i saying it now but that is perhaps where we are heading.— saying it now but that is perhaps where we are heading. can i ask you about london _ where we are heading. can i ask you about london covid. _ where we are heading. can i ask you about london covid. what _ where we are heading. can i ask you about london covid. what kinds - where we are heading. can i ask you about london covid. what kinds of l about london covid. what kinds of things are you seeing —— longer
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covid. things are you seeing -- longer covid. .,, ., things are you seeing -- longer covid. ., ., , covid. those who have been vaccinated _ covid. those who have been vaccinated are _ covid. those who have been vaccinated are brilliant - covid. those who have been i vaccinated are brilliant because they are getting protection. but those who are not, but italy children, i am seeing shortness of breath, chronic fatigue. i am seeing mental health impacted. and seeing patients getting headaches, loss of smell and taste has not come back. i am talking about months, and now we know we have 1 am talking about months, and now we know we have! million am talking about months, and now we know we have 1 million cases of long covid. this will impact general practice. this is why it is vital to get your vaccine. we know two doses will protect against variants as well and protect you against serious illness and hospitalisation. the idea of the programme is to keep the numbers low. under these circumstances with the easing of restrictions, the other concern is for patients in their shielded group and we are waiting for more guidance
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on that. i have not seen clear guidance from the government on that aspect. having conversations with patients, a lot were saying they did not know whether they would be able to go out. mothers who are pregnant. there is a lot of information and guidance we will need as doctors. i am always hopeful that it will be ok. i am always hopeful that it will be ok. ., y ., am always hopeful that it will be ok. ., , .,~ am always hopeful that it will be ok. ., , ., ok. i love your optimism. thank you for “oininr ok. i love your optimism. thank you forjoining us- _ the european championships are over but it is a busy time of the olympics two weeks away. the open championship. and sally has been talking to lewis hamilton. a lot of response to that abuse. you spent a lot of time with marcus rashford. how is he doing? i think if there was a word to sum up how he is
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feeling at the moment, it would be devastated. it has been so much. he came on in the final right at the very end just to take a penalty having barely kicked a ball. obviously it was a disaster for him. and the reaction since then and the racist abuse he has received online clearly upsetting. but he said he is boosted by messages of support he has received. as we've been hearing, england manager gareth southgate has hit out at the racist abuse suffered by some of his players after their defeat in the final. captain harry kane has simply said, "you are not fans — we do not want you." marcus rashford was among three black players, along with jadon sancho and bukayo saka, who were targeted online over missing penalties. in a lengthy social media post yesterday, he reflected on the game and racism suffered. this is what he had to say. he said he's sorry and that something didn't feel quite right as he stepped up to take the penalty. he says it's been playing
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in his head over and over since he struck the ball. but he said despite the miss, he will never apologise for who he is and where he came from. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad — you know, the people that track those things have been able to explain that...but not all of it. and it's just not what we stand for. we, i think, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together, in people being able to relate to the national team. and the national team stands for everybody. now, a couple of more positive stories to bring you from the game. and despite that crushing defeat, england's jack grealish made this boy's night. not only did oliver get to pose for a photo with jack, but he got to keep his football boots. his dad dan called it a moment
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i will cherish for ever. these moments are special. we saw mason mount giving his shirt to a little girl. and this england fan might be the only one who didn't tune in to watch the match on sunday night. he was interviewed about the result, but was actually on his way to buy a newspaper to find out the score. i'll have to go and buy a paper to find out what happened. would you like me to break it to you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early on. 0k. then the italians came back second half. they equalise. they equalised. it went to extra time. oh, i did wonder. then to penalties. and then england, sadly, lost on penalties. no, not again. are you joking? i'm notjoking. i'm so sorry to break the news to you. oh, fiddlesticks.
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isaid i said something similar myself on sunday night. more than 30 million people watching at the peak across both channels. you might have been wondering. what was he doing? the former open winner zach johnson is the latest player to pull out of this week's championship, after testing positive for covid—19. the american won the event in 2015. bubba watson also missed out after a close contact tested positive. the open begins this thursday at royal st george's in kent. after a day's rest, the tour de france resumes later today. there will be three tough mountain stages in the pyrenees for mark cavendish to get through if he's to get the chance to break the record for stage wins at the race. every opportunity there is for a sprint, i'd like to win, and every opportunity there is for a stage win elsewhere. this is still probably the hardest
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tour de france i've ever done. don't know whether i'm looking forward to the next three days, but, hopefully, we should be ok. he does not like the mountains. he's won seven world titles and is the most successful driver formula 1 has ever seen. now lewis hamilton has a new mission — to make the sport more diverse. i've been chatting to him about his plan to get more young black people to take up science and engineering subjects. lewis hamilton, good morning. good morning. you're making a very special announcement today, aren't you? something you have been working on for a really long time. it's a very nerve—racking moment. but super—exciting, as well. because it's the beginning of a journey for pushing for change within my industry. where it stemmed from is i thought
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that me being in this sport, and we thought as a family, making it in the sport, we would break the mould. and it would open up doors and pathways to other young black talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity within our industry, nobody has an answer for it. so that's my purpose, that's my reason for being here. i have two young people who are really excited to talk to you. hi. how are you? i'm fine. i like your hair. thank you. what i've noticed, what i watch in formula 1 is that there are actually very few black women in your team. and stephanie travers being one of the only black female fluid engineers. what would you say to black girls aspiring to be engineers in formula 1? stephanie is a hero. she is absolutely amazing. and what she has had to overcome in order to be in our sport is incredible. last year, i got to be on the podium
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with her for the first time. she was the first black woman to be on the podium in the 70 years of the sport. so it is really encouraging young girls to be following stem subjects. of course, the triple science, super—important. but itjust opens up so many great avenues within our industry. there's 40,000 jobs and currently there's only 1% of those are from black backgrounds. so that's what we need to change. so we need lots... more and more people like you, with great minds, to come, because, ultimately, a more diverse workforce is beneficial for everyone. this is lewis. how are you doing? i'm good. you look very smart. thank you. so you're good, yes? yeah, i'm fine. you've got a question for me? yeah, how did your family react when you told them that you wanted to become an f1 driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing
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driverfrom the age... i was already five, six years old, so i knew that was what i wanted to do, as we were watching grands prix. and, at the time, of course, it was just such a far—fetched dream, but it was a big dream. i started racing when i was eight years old. so that was then the beginning of thatjourney. keep working hard at school, ok? yes. work hard at trying to catch max verstappen, as well. trust me, i'm working hard. trust me, i will. bye, guys. bye! so, lewis, there you have it. two young people challenging you to come up with the goods now. because motorsport does not represent society, does it? it doesn't — at the moment. but that's what we're here to change. and i actually believe that it's possible. and, again, those lovely kids wejust met, you know,
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it's showing them and their families that this is actually a real route for them, a real opportunity, a careerfor them. what does your sport need to do now? do you think it's time to introduce may be a quota system when it comes to apprenticeships and employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations we have is for forumlai teams to take the lead, and in signing a diversity and inclusion charter it's about us coming together on this journey. i can't do it on my own. we just need to get all the teams on board, because that's the goal over this next 5—10 years. when i look back i don't want to look back and think, "lewis hamilton is a seven—time world champion." i want to look back and say that i was a part of something.
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those kids were amazing. brilliant. what lewis hamilton is doing, more about this after eight o'clock, but he is making recommendations that are constructive. more black children to study science and engineering from early ages, more black teachers working in schools doing those subjects, more community support. he wants to start at the beginning and see if it will work its way through. thank you. lovely to see them talking to him. kids ask the best questions. totally! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. where is that from? the south of england yesterday. where i was, barely a drop of rain yesterday but others, by word, a different story with about a month's of rain we said would fall in a short space of time. and it did. most of the rain fell in a couple of
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hours. it led to scenes like this. this is west london yesterday afternoon. the water coming up through the drains and flooding by one of the big shopping centres in white city. thankfully, these are scenes not to be repeated today. there will be showers but they will be lighter and fewer in number and we will see a good deal more in the way of sunshine starting to develop. at the moment we have plenty of cloud. showers in northern england will fade away. showers still in northern england and wales through the afternoon. much lighter than we have seen. most places dry with sunny spells. in the sunshine, temperatures around where they should be. 20—24. cloudy in north—east scotland in western scotland and north of northern ireland. tomorrow, it will be
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another night where temperatures stay in the mid—teens. more cloud which could lead to fog patches tomorrow morning. more breeze tomorrow. high pressure coming in from the west fighting low pressure to the east. breeze from the north. that will bring low cloud close to eastern coasts. later we will see cloud increasing in the west of scotland, northern ireland, and perhaps drizzle in the western isles. for most, wednesday will be dry, if it is a shower, it will be isolated. and temperatures remain at levels we should expect at this time of year. and it signals the return to something more like summer for the rest of the week and into the weekend with high pressure building. that will keep things dry and, as it settles in, we should start to see increasing amounts of sunshine. it depends where the centre of the high
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pressure is where the highest temperatures will be. the capital city forecasts at the end of the week and into the weekend, we could see temperatures in the mid to high 20s. and after that stormy start to the week, i think for some, that will be welcome. a teenager has become the youngest person to fly solo around the world, in a single—engine aircraft. travis ludlow travelled 25,000 miles through four continents and 16 countries, during his 44 day flight. let's take a look at his record—breaking journey. music plays.
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what a journey. travis joins us now from wycombe air park in buckinghamshire, where hisjourney began. good morning. what an extraordinary thing to do. tell us what you wanted to do it. ,., ., ., ,
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to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to _ to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to do _ to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to do this _ to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to do this trip - to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to do this trip to i to do it. good morning. yes, i wanted to do this trip to show| to do it. good morning. yes, i- wanted to do this trip to show and motivate young people to go, as long as they keep following their dreams, they can make it. i have had so many issues and things to overcome for this trip. coronavirus, engine problems, so many issues. because i try to motivate people to keep pushing and follow their dreams. as well as that i am also trying to raise money for the charity unicef. you mentioned engine worries. that does sound particular terrible when you are on your own. give us an idea of those scary moments. it you are on your own. give us an idea of those scary moments.— of those scary moments. it the enuine, of those scary moments. it the engine. i _ of those scary moments. it the engine. i have _ of those scary moments. it the engine, i have had _ of those scary moments. it the engine, i have had scary- of those scary moments. it the i engine, i have had scary moments flying over the rocky mountains at midnight. probably not a good idea. i encountered sinking air and
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dropped altitude quickly. luckily recovered it. i have had scary moments. i handled them well and i am a much better pilot now, i think. what strikes me is most 18—year—olds are hoping to get their driving licence, not fly around the world on their own. how many hours a day where you flying and what were the challenges you face to just doing that? i challenges you face to 'ust doing that? ., , ., challenges you face to 'ust doing that? ., ,., ., challenges you face to 'ust doing that? ., ., ., ., ., that? i also do not have a driving licence. i have _ that? i also do not have a driving licence. i have been _ that? i also do not have a driving licence. i have been flying - that? i also do not have a driving licence. i have been flying eightl licence. i have been flying eight hours a day on average, sometimes nine hours. some days i did 12 hours of flying. on average about eight hours. i was planning to do four hours. i was planning to do four hours a day but i found it too easy so pushed it to eight hours a day. some of the things you saw from that vantage point must have been incredible. you must have seen some
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amazing things. incredible. you must have seen some amazing things-— amazing things. absolutely. i flew over russia. _ amazing things. absolutely. i flew over russia, the _ amazing things. absolutely. i flew over russia, the sites _ amazing things. absolutely. i flew over russia, the sites in _ amazing things. absolutely. i flew over russia, the sites in russia i over russia, the sites in russia were amazing. undiscovered areas. flying over the grand —— the grand canyon was awesome. greenland. the ice cap, you have to climb it and go over it. i want to see the volcano in iceland but it was cloudy. landing in gibraltar, landing next to the rock. so many i could tell you about. to the rock. so many i could tell you about-— to the rock. so many i could tell ou about. ., ., ,, ., , ,, you about. you talked about sinking air. what you about. you talked about sinking air- what is — you about. you talked about sinking air. what is it? — you about. you talked about sinking air. what is it? i— you about. you talked about sinking air. what is it? i encountered i you about. you talked about sinking air. what is it? i encountered a i air. what is it? i encountered a mountain _ air. what is it? i encountered a mountain wave. _ air. what is it? i encountered a mountain wave. as _ air. what is it? i encountered a mountain wave. as i _ air. what is it? i encountered a mountain wave. as i flew i air. what is it? i encountered a mountain wave. as i flew over| air. what is it? i encountered a i mountain wave. as i flew over the rocky mountains, the air rises up one side of the mountain and as i fly to the other side, the air becomes turbulent. kicking up into the air and it starts to fall back
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down and as you fly into the air, it falls back down. in order to maintain being straight and level you have to counteract that. i was essentially unable to counteract sinking air and kept falling out of the sky, essentially. luckily i turned around and got out of it quickly and air traffic control help me to get out of this situation safely. me to get out of this situation safel . ~ ., , ., me to get out of this situation safel . ~ ., i. ., .,, me to get out of this situation safel . ~ ., ., ., safely. what will you do as a “ob? just safely. what will you do as a “ob? just briefly. i safely. what will you do as a “ob? iust briefly. i i safely. what will you do as a “ob? just briefly. i am i safely. what will you do as a “ob? just briefly. i am not i safely. what will you do as a “ob? just briefly. i am not sure! i i just briefly. i am not sure! i really do — just briefly. i am not sure! i really do not _ just briefly. i am not sure! i really do not know- just briefly. i am not sure! i really do not know yet. i i just briefly. i am not sure! i i really do not know yet. i have just briefly. i am not sure! i - really do not know yet. i have been planning this trip so long, i do not have an idea. planning this trip so long, i do not have an idea-— planning this trip so long, i do not have an idea. you are well qualified for lots of things, _ have an idea. you are well qualified for lots of things, i _ have an idea. you are well qualified for lots of things, i am _ have an idea. you are well qualified for lots of things, i am sure. - have an idea. you are well qualified for lots of things, i am sure. good i for lots of things, i am sure. good luck when you take your driving test, as well. what a remarkable journey to go on. still does not have his driving test but i think he
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is waiting to be officially verified as a world record. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. some of london's streets were left underwater after heavy rain led to flash flooding. raynes park, barnes, and richmond in southwest london were among the areas worst affected, along with hampstead and golders green in northwest london. the london fire brigade said it received more than a thousand related calls from people in homes and businesses or trapped in cars. a number of tube and train services are still affected. a charity that supports people whose loved ones have gone missing is consulting families to understand how their race impacts on the treatment they receive. evidencejoel — whose son richard okorogheye disappeared in march — is among those taking part. the police watchdog is investigating her claim that her initial concerns were dismissed by the met. the force says in all missing person cases risk level is assessed on the infomation it receives
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and denies bias plays a role. what we've seen is really concerning. some examples are families who are reporting their special loved one missing to the police and the police not taking the initial report. it's where families are being expected to do more than usual to try and find their missing loved one, or where their efforts so far are being dismissed. and you can see more on that story in a special report on bbc london tonight at 6.30 here on bbc one. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the circle line is suspended. the district and hammersmith & city are part suspended due to the flooding. there's no service on the overground between stratford and richmond / clapham junction while damage to the track is repaired. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, some of us, but not all of us across the capital, saw some torrential downpours,
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along with plenty of thunder. but today is a lot less dramatic, weather—wise. a much quieter day of weather right across the board. it's a cloudy, mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius. now, there is plenty of cloud around through the morning, but it will gradually break up. we will see some brightness, some spells of sunshine start to develop. the sunshine probably best through the afternoon out towards western home counties. here, temperatures will peak in the low 20s celsius. the winds more noticeable than they were yesterday, although fairly light. there is the small chance we could see showers break out, but they will be isolated and, for many of us, it will be a dry day. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud will reform. there will be some clear spells — watch out for mist in those. it is a mild start to wednesday morning. on wednesday, we start with lots of cloud, but it should break up to give us some brightness and sunshine. a small chance of one or two showers. high pressure is set to build in and it is looking dry for the rest of the week, with increasing amounts of sunshine and climbing temperatures.
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that's it for the moment. do tune into bbc radio london this morning, as riz lateef is standing in for vanessa feltz. she'll be taking your calls from 7.00 until 10.00 this morning. i'm back with your next update in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today. "irresponsible" — doctors leaders condemn borisjohnson's decision to press ahead with lockdown lifting, despite rising covid infections. racially abused online and his mural vandalised — but england striker marcus rashford says he'll never apologise for who he is. england defender tyrone mings accuses the home secretary of "pretending to be disgusted"
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by the abuse, after her criticism of players taking the knee. i have spoken exclusively to formula 1 champion lewis hamilton. he tells me he wants to change the way the sport looks forever, and help young black people into engineering and after a day of the storms and flooding for some yesterday, if you more sunshine and more of that through the week. it will turn warmer. i will have your full forecast here on breakfast. it's tuesday 13th july. senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". in england next week — borisjohnson has confirmed that most remaining measures — including social distancing — would be dropped from the 19th of july. but the british medical association has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. aru na iyengar reports.
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in under a week's time, life in england will look very different. no more social distancing, nightclubs will reopen, and masks will no longer be legally required. but doctors are angry. they say the message from the government is unclear, even irresponsible. borisjohnson warned yesterday that the pandemic is not over, but is still pressing ahead to ease restrictions next monday. what the scientists are saying is this is the right date, or as good as any other date, to do this. but it's got to be taken seriously. but the british medical association says there is a better time to do it, when more of the population has been fully vaccinated and when cases are not rising so rapidly. we cannot see any sense in why the government is removing the requirement for people to be protecting one another in a crowded underground train or a bus, or in a crowded shop. it makes no sense to be knowingly
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accepting increasing the infection at a time when in fact that infection rise is translating into increased hospitalisation. from the 19th, wearing a mask on public transport will be a matter of personal responsibility rather than the law in england. bus and rail industry groups have said they won't require passengers to wear them. the peak of the current wave of infections is not in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon will announce today whether its restrictions can be eased next monday, as is planned. wales is due to review its restrictions on thursday, and northern ireland is due to ease some covid measures on the 26th ofjuly. the peak of the current wave of infections is not expected before mid—august. this ward in middlesbrough is getting ready for a surge in patients. there is uncertainty about how the virus will spread in coming months. this will be a delicate balancing act.
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aruna iyengar, bbc news. we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. lots to talk about. good morning. took us through the first of all this change of tone from the government around that date, the 19th ofjuly next week. goad 19th ofjuly next week. good morning- — 19th ofjuly next week. good morning. really _ 19th ofjuly next week. good morning. really quite i 19th ofjuly next week. good i morning. really quite striking, 19th ofjuly next week. (13mg. morning. really quite striking, that change of tone. caution edged into every syllable, paragraph. what have not changed was the big plan, which is this handing back of power and responsibility from the state, the government, mandating us in terms of what to do in england, and handing it back to us as individuals. what has changed is they are now recommending rather than telling how we should go about behaving. for instance saying we should be wearing a facemask on the bus or in a crowded place indoors when we are with people we don't live with. if we have been working from the kitchen table for much of last year
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maybe we should not rush to going back to working in an office or at whatever our workplaces. there are the critics, as we have reported stop the doctors union, the bma, labour. they say this is irresponsible, not sensible given that case rates are climbing as high as they are. the government says, in essence, if not now, when? this is summer, the schools are about to break up, there is less pressure on the nhs. businesses have been crippled. there has to be a movement at some stage in a pandemic where we as individuals take responsibility. there is also extraordinary intervention from an england footballer, many will have seen tyrone mings, just one of those talking about the abuse directed at england players after the defeat in the final on social media, going toe to toe with one of the most senior politicians in the country. this to toe with one of the most senior politicians in the country.- politicians in the country. this is extraordinary — politicians in the country. this is extraordinary and _ politicians in the country. this is extraordinary and i _ politicians in the country. this is extraordinary and i cannot i politicians in the country. this is extraordinary and i cannot think| politicians in the country. this is l extraordinary and i cannot think of a precedent for a senior sporting
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figure, an england player, so directly unequivocally in a blistering way criticising the home secretary, one of the most senior figures in government, as you say, in such a direct way. let's look at the tweet from tyrone mings. he was responding to priti patel, the home secretary, tweeting her disgust at the vile racist abuse, as she put it, that some england players were subjected to. look at these words. the antiracism message is a reference to taking the knee. clearly tyrone mings is boiling with anger at priti patel�*s outlook on the whole business of taking the knee. what has she previously said? she has described it as gesture politics but also when she has been askedif politics but also when she has been asked if she would criticise those who booed the taking of the knee,
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she said that it does at the home office have said look at what priti patel said on twitter and in parliament on unequivocally condemning racist abuse. the big question this morning is, has the government, also in government, got themselves into the wrong place in being a quick pickle around the question of taking the knee when england footballers are explicitly saying this is our way of taking a stand against racism and you should stand against racism and you should stand behind us.— stand behind us. really interesting, thank ou. stand behind us. really interesting, thank you- we _ stand behind us. really interesting, thank you. we will _ stand behind us. really interesting, thank you. we will put _ stand behind us. really interesting, thank you. we will put some - stand behind us. really interesting, thank you. we will put some of- stand behind us. really interesting, l thank you. we will put some of those points to the chief secretary of the treasury, stephen barclay. you will be here in about 20 minutes. —— he will be here in about 20 minutes. marcus rashford says he will never apologise for who he is after being subjected to racist abuse online for missing a penalty in sunday's euro 2020 final. a mural of the 23—year—old in manchester was also defaced following the game.
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our reporter phil mccann is there for us this morning. it has been really something to see how many people have come out to show their support for marcus rashford. good morning. goad rashford. good morning. good mornini. rashford. good morning. good morning. look— rashford. good morning. good morning. look at _ rashford. good morning. good morning. look at this. - rashford. good morning. good morning. look at this. if i rashford. good morning. good morning. look at this. if you i rashford. good morning. good. morning. look at this. if you are rashford. good morning. (13mg. morning. look at this. if you are in any doubt of the esteem, that marcus rashford is held then in the streets in south manchester where he was brought up. this was a mural that was put here late last year after he shot to fame with his school meals campaign and these beanbags are covering up the racist abuse that appeared just hours before he missed that fateful penalty —— these bin bags. notjust on this war, but online. online what we saw was people piling in to offer support to try to drown out the abuse. we see this in physicalform here. we have seen it marcus rashford online saying that this brought him to two years and he said, i am marcus
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rashford, 23—year—old, a black man from willington in wythenshawe in south manchester. if i have nothing else, i have that. —— from willington in wythenshawe. this one says, keep going. this left by a police officer that we saw this morning. you are a hero, marcus, and an amazing person. love from a greater manchester police. there are post—its and sellotape so that people can come and add their own additions. rashford, you did an amazing job, well done, you have done so much for this country, this one says. this flag, hero, inspire, love not hate, we are proud of you, marcus, you are a true inspiration. i will leave you on this flag here. i will leave you on this flag here. i think this sums up so many of these messages stop you sure you're less than 1% of what has been left here in 24 hours. hero, idle, gent, manchester man on the england flag.
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are lovely to see that. we will be with you throughout the morning. thank you. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by £4 billion will be voted on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7% to 0.5% because of the pandemic, but was met with cross—party criticism. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has this report. britain has long led the way in helping some of the world's poorest and most vulnerable people with humanitarian assistance. but, last november, the government unexpectedly cut aid spending by £4 billion. sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of our national income on overseas aid is difficult to justify to the british people, especially when we are seeing the highest peacetime levels of borrowing on record. many mps were furious but the chancellor refused to give them a vote. now he has changed his mind and conceded one can't be avoided.
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when they come to westminster, mps will have two options. they can defeat the government and restore aid spending next year to its previous target of 0.7% of national income. or they can support the government and make any increase in aid dependent on the state of the public finances. the treasury wants two new tests to be met before aid spending rises — national debt has to be falling and the government budget has to be in surplus with no borrowing used for day—to—day spending. treasury sources said the new tests could mean uk aid spending rises again in a couple of years as the economy recovers. but mps and charities fear the aid cut would instead be locked in for the long—term. with a sizeable conservative rebellion expected, the vote may well be tight, and the result will matter for millions around the world who benefit from uk aid. james landale, bbc news.
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more than 50 people have died and dozens more injured in a fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in iraq. it's thought the blaze began after an oxygen cylinder exploded. iraq's prime minister has called for the arrest of the hospital's boss, following protests by the families of victims. water companies in england are falling short when it comes to protecting the environment — according to the industry regulator. the environment agency said rivers are still too polluted and warned that companies need to make "substantial" improvements. it comes after southern water was fined a record—breaking £90 million after pleading guilty to illegally dumping billions of litres of raw sewage into the sea. torrential downpours have caused flash flooding in towns and cities across the south of england. in london, train and tube stations were forced to close and there were more than 1,000 calls to the fire brigade in a few hours. and in some parts of dorset, cars were left stranded after attempting to drive through floodwater. the met office says the weather
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will brighten up from tomorrow. we will have details from matt shortly. for the first time in 400 years, a baby beaver has been born on exmoor. take a look at this. the youngster — known as a kit — was caught on camera by staff at the holnicote estate in somerset. the rodents were introduced into the wild there last year, as part of a national trust project to restore streams and reduce flooding. are you all right? sorry, i think so. do are you all right? sorry, i think so- do you _ are you all right? sorry, i think so. do you want _ are you all right? sorry, i think so. do you want a _ are you all right? sorry, i think so. do you want a cup - are you all right? sorry, i think so. do you want a cup of i are you all right? sorry, i think so. do you want a cup of tea? i are you all right? sorry, i thinkj so. do you want a cup of tea? , are you all right? sorry, i think i so. do you want a cup of tea? , she has one stop _ so. do you want a cup of tea? , she has one stop you — so. do you want a cup of tea? , she has one stop you carry _ so. do you want a cup of tea? , she has one stop you carry on. - so. do you want a cup of tea? , she has one stop you carry on. while i has one stop you carry on. while louise greases the wheels, less talk to matt. �* , ., , louise greases the wheels, less talk tomatt. �* ,., , ., been talking about yesterday, this is a promising sign from one of our weather— is a promising sign from one of our weather watchers in devon. you will see my— weather watchers in devon. you will see my blue — weather watchers in devon. you will see my blue skies and more of the strong _ see my blue skies and more of the strong sunshine overhead through the
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week _ strong sunshine overhead through the week it _ strong sunshine overhead through the week. it was an shy developing through— week. it was an shy developing through today and fewer showers around _ through today and fewer showers around. the show as we do see are nowhere _ around. the show as we do see are nowhere near as severe as those that affected _ nowhere near as severe as those that affected the south and east yesterday. a damp start, limited to parts _ yesterday. a damp start, limited to parts of _ yesterday. a damp start, limited to parts of northern england, borders of north—east wales, fairly light showers. — of north—east wales, fairly light showers, but wishing for now. one or two across— showers, but wishing for now. one or two across northern france, would -et two across northern france, would get close _ two across northern france, would get close to — two across northern france, would get close to the channel islands but a dry start— get close to the channel islands but a dry start of the most. a bit misty and foggy— a dry start of the most. a bit misty and foggy in— a dry start of the most. a bit misty and foggy in spots and around coasts it will— and foggy in spots and around coasts it will remain murky all day. if i had to— it will remain murky all day. if i had to break up inland some more sunshine _ had to break up inland some more sunshine developing as you go into tuesday— sunshine developing as you go into tuesday afternoon, lifting temperatures closer to levels they should _ temperatures closer to levels they should be — temperatures closer to levels they should be at this time of year. there — should be at this time of year. there will— should be at this time of year. there will be some showers stop focusing — there will be some showers stop focusing on those for the afternoon. you will _ focusing on those for the afternoon. you will notice they are well scattered meaning most will miss them _ scattered meaning most will miss them the — scattered meaning most will miss them. the odd shy put one past the likes of— them. the odd shy put one past the likes of the — them. the odd shy put one past the likes of the brecon beacons, a few li-ht likes of the brecon beacons, a few light ones— likes of the brecon beacons, a few light ones across the pennines and a few heavy— light ones across the pennines and a few heavy ones to watch the highlands. most places will be dry.
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could _ highlands. most places will be dry. could be _ highlands. most places will be dry. could be some drizzle across shetland at times from the thick cloud _ shetland at times from the thick cloud to — shetland at times from the thick cloud to the east. into the evening and overnight, showers we have will gradually— and overnight, showers we have will gradually fade and those places will become _ gradually fade and those places will become dry. clear skies tonight into tomorrow. _ become dry. clear skies tonight into tomorrow. if— become dry. clear skies tonight into tomorrow, if few mist and fog patches — tomorrow, if few mist and fog patches but another mile start, 11 to 15 degrees the hive. things turn sunnier— to 15 degrees the hive. things turn sunnier and — to 15 degrees the hive. things turn sunnier and warmer year for the rest of the _ sunnier and warmer year for the rest of the week — sunnier and warmer year for the rest of the week. details in around 30 minutes — of the week. details in around 30 minutes. . ~ of the week. details in around 30 minutes. ., ,, , ., , . of the week. details in around 30 minutes. ., ,, , . , minutes. thank you very much, see ou then. after 16 months of restrictions, life will look very different for people in england from next week. no more social distancing, and no need to wear a mask if you don't want to. but the prime minister is urging people to remain cautious as the rules ease. it comes as government scientists predict that the current wave of infections will reach a peak in august. they say there could be between 1,000 and 2,000 people admitted to hospital each day. and estimate that this could lead to between 100 and 200 deaths per day — far below the peak of the previous two waves.
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we're joined now by professor calum semple, a professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the university of liverpool. he is also a member of sage, but is speaking to us today in a personal capacity. first of all, good morning. it is striking because we have spoken to you so often over the last 18 months orso you so often over the last 18 months or so and this is the first time we have seen you in the studio. thank you. shall we start with the easing of restrictions and facemasks? language around what the government is saying is changing so we will not legally have to wear them, it will become our choice, what are your thoughts? become our choice, what are your thou:hts? , ., ., thoughts? there is no right time to unlock and it _ thoughts? there is no right time to unlock and it was _ thoughts? there is no right time to unlock and it was very _ thoughts? there is no right time to unlock and it was very interesting i unlock and it was very interesting that at the press conference last night the language was subtly different. ratherthan night the language was subtly different. rather than being totally irreversible there were a few caveats suggesting that, come winter time, some measures may have to come back. as far as facemasks go, i will personally be wearing them particularly in enclosed areas and the emphasis has to be on businesses
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and other places to say, is the quality good enough in here? is this a safe place to not wear a mask? hopi a safe place to not wear a mask? how do ou a safe place to not wear a mask? how do you feel — a safe place to not wear a mask? how do you feel about _ a safe place to not wear a mask? how do you feel about some of the numbers in the modelling? the health secretary talking about potentially 100,000 cases per day, looking at some of the models saying they could be 200 deaths per day. does that make you uncomfortable, concern you, is that near to your estimations? these are what are called reasonable worst—case scenarios. if we take it cautiously we will probably not see that. already in hospital we are seeing rising cases. but interestingly the proportion is greatest in those under 50. between 20 years old and 50 years old, we are seeing more people coming into hospital. they are nearly all unvaccinated. although they are not dying, they are suffering a lot of injuries, so we are seeing a lot of
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kidney and lung injuries in these younger people. my concern is now not so much about death, although every death is a tragedy. my concern is now about otherwise healthy people who would normally be economically important and working and going about their daily lives, they are going to get damaged, longer scarring and kidney disease. that is what some part of long covid stocking up this is different. this is a cute —— this is acute covid injury. is a cute -- this is acute covid in'u . ~ . , , is a cute -- this is acute covid in'u . ~ ., , , ., , injury. we are seeing better quality evidence of— injury. we are seeing better quality evidence of more _ injury. we are seeing better quality evidence of more harm _ injury. we are seeing better quality evidence of more harm occurring i injury. we are seeing better quality evidence of more harm occurring inj evidence of more harm occurring in those that survive covid. you evidence of more harm occurring in those that survive covid.— those that survive covid. you were sa in: those that survive covid. you were saying that — those that survive covid. you were saying that from — those that survive covid. you were saying that from what _ those that survive covid. you were saying that from what you - those that survive covid. you were saying that from what you are i those that survive covid. you were i saying that from what you are seen, the people suffering this and going into hospital are people who have not had the vaccination. the vaccine is making a difference? its, not had the vaccination. the vaccine is making a difference?— is making a difference? a huge difference- _ is making a difference? a huge difference. we _ is making a difference? a huge difference. we are _ is making a difference? a huge difference. we are still - is making a difference? a huge difference. we are still seeing | difference. we are still seeing people over the age of 50, up to 90, with a vaccine cannot help because
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they are older and their immune system does not protect them. that was always going to be the case. as a proportion, they are five you now and the majority of people are under 50, down to about 20. still hardly any children affected, which is the one bit of silver lining on this cloud. those who do come into hospital are suffering. about half the people coming into hospital are suffering some sort of insult. you talked about _ suffering some sort of insult. you talked about the _ suffering some sort of insult. you talked about the subtle change in language. do you think the way the prime minister particularly spoke about that yesterday, the edges were knocked off, is that because overwhelmingly the medical advice seems to have been you cannot remove all the brakes on that day and expect them not to be significant issues with numbers of cases and deaths? , ., , ., deaths? there is that, but also the government _ deaths? there is that, but also the government is _ deaths? there is that, but also the government is realising _ deaths? there is that, but also the government is realising we - deaths? there is that, but also the government is realising we are i deaths? there is that, but also the | government is realising we are now seeing the consequences of unlocking on the 17th of may and from my point of view that the changes were then,
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not what is happening next week. that is why we are seeing cases rising. there is no perfect time to do it, and we did slow down the last step of the road map as we saw cases rising, so the impacts on hospital and we needed the extra couple of weeks to get on top of vaccination. my weeks to get on top of vaccination. my big message to people now is, sure, we have weakened the link between community cases and hospital cases, but that link is not broken and it is the people who are not vaccinated who are still coming to harm. i vaccinated who are still coming to harm. ., . ., . harm. i noticed a new thing which i have not heard _ harm. i noticed a new thing which i have not heard before _ harm. i noticed a new thing which i have not heard before yesterday. i harm. i noticed a new thing which i l have not heard before yesterday. his reference to the exit wave. that makes it sound in some ways that thatis makes it sound in some ways that that is inevitable.— that is inevitable. people said we will not see _ that is inevitable. people said we will not see a _ that is inevitable. people said we will not see a second _ that is inevitable. people said we will not see a second wave i that is inevitable. people said we will not see a second wave and i that is inevitable. people said we | will not see a second wave and we said we absolutely will in the winter. we predicted a third wave forjuly, august, and we are already in that now. so i am not quite sure
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what they mean by an exit wave. we are at the start of wave three. if we want to call it an exit wave, thatis we want to call it an exit wave, that is optimistic. we will probably see another bump in wintertime. call it wave three or exit wave, it is semantics. it wave three or exit wave, it is semantics-— it wave three or exit wave, it is semantics. .,, , , ., semantics. those numbers that were mentioned. — semantics. those numbers that were mentioned, about _ semantics. those numbers that were mentioned, about how— semantics. those numbers that were mentioned, about how many - semantics. those numbers that were mentioned, about how many people | mentioned, about how many people might be in hospital, up to 2000... i those are the ones that you foresee happening?- ! those are the ones that you foresee happening?- i those are the ones that you foresee happening? i those are the ones that you foresee ha -ienin ? , ~ ., foresee happening? yes, i think that is iuite foresee happening? yes, i think that is quite realistic. _ foresee happening? yes, i think that is quite realistic. the _ foresee happening? yes, i think that is quite realistic. the other - foresee happening? yes, i think that is quite realistic. the other big i is quite realistic. the other big issue at what _ is quite realistic. the other big issue at what the _ is quite realistic. the other big issue at what the government | is quite realistic. the other big i issue at what the government are relying heavily upon is the vaccination programme but we are seeing that slowing down. we will be talking to our medical editor at about 8:30am about this. is that because people are still unwell link or thinking about whether they want to take it? that slowdown is understandable, do you think? it is. we are getting _ understandable, do you think? it is. we are getting to — understandable, do you think? it is. we are getting to the _ understandable, do you think? it 3 we are getting to the point where people are less invested because they do not see the benefit to their health. also there are pockets of
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our community that actually served by health services. there are particular areas where we just don't manage to penetrate. areas of poverty, ethnic diversity, where it health messages are harder to get into because we do not have the schools and tools to get into these communities. they are ultimately the most vulnerable parts of our society because typically these areas are aligned with poverty, as well. hopi aligned with poverty, as well. how do ou iet aligned with poverty, as well. how do you get to _ aligned with poverty, as well. how do you get to those _ aligned with poverty, as well. how do you get to those people? there are so many programmes and so many people standing up from various communities are saying, you know, we need to get vaccinated, and yet there is still a proportion of the population who have not had the jab. you learn the lessons from liverpool where we took the testing and the messages to the community level down to street level, and that involves local youth leaders, religious leaders, councillors, ratherthan leaders, councillors, rather than being leaders, councillors, ratherthan being seen to be a centralised top—down message, it has to be
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grassroots message. it is effective if we can do that. even pop—up vaccination clinics and mobile vaccination clinics and mobile vaccination clinics.— vaccination clinics and mobile vaccination clinics. you mentioned in an earlier _ vaccination clinics. you mentioned in an earlier answer _ vaccination clinics. you mentioned in an earlier answer about - vaccination clinics. you mentioned in an earlier answer about a i vaccination clinics. you mentioned | in an earlier answer about a bump, perhaps later on. did you say winter? what sort of figures are you talking about there, do you think? i cannot grasp figures out of the air at this stage but what we are expecting is that the winter but will be a mixture of covid and all the other respiratory viruses we did not experience in the last year. we will have a miserable lead to —— winter, i am sorry will have a miserable lead to -- winter, i am sorr- will have a miserable lead to -- winter, i am sorry does that mean perhaps- -- — winter, i am sorry does that mean perhaps- -- are — winter, i am sorry does that mean perhaps... are you _ winter, i am sorry does that mean perhaps... are you don't - winter, i am sorry does that mean perhaps... are you don't make i winter, i am sorry does that mean i perhaps... are you don't make these decisions but some sort of restrictions may have to come into place again?— restrictions may have to come into place again? possibly and it may be about reinforcing _ place again? possibly and it may be about reinforcing common - place again? possibly and it may be about reinforcing common sense. i place again? possibly and it may be i about reinforcing common sense. may be bringing back some mask wearing in certain environments. i do not foresee a lockdown is at the school suspensions we have seen. it is really interesting _
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suspensions we have seen. it is really interesting to _ suspensions we have seen. it is really interesting to see how things develop. thank you very much for your insight, notjust today, but lovely to see you in person. great to speak to you for many months. i know we have relied on your expert analysis of numerous cases in the programme and hopefully we will get you on again soon.— you on again soon. thank you very much. you on again soon. thank you very much- thank— you on again soon. thank you very much. thank you. _ the haulage industry is one of a number of sectors struggling to recruit enough staff as the economy reopens. with the shortage having an impact on the amount of produce that is being delivered, one firm is now working with the government to trial a fleet of super—sized lorries, in an attempt to tackle the problem. simon spark reports. at first, this looks like any kind of lorry. but if you saw it, you'd know about it, because this one just keeps coming around a corner. it's an eco—link combination trailer and it's over 25m long. it may look like something new, but this has been an idea that's been around for a long time.
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here it is 17 years ago, and four years ago. this better lorry, as it's being described, has been trying to get on uk roads since 2004 but, so far, with no luck. but is a driver crisis in the haulage industry giving super—sized vehicles like this another chance? firstly, i'd also welcome any more pay for professional drivers. earlier this month, the minister for transport, charlotte vere, announced a temporary extension of drivers' hours to help ease the driver shortage. but dick denby has also written to her and asked her to consider a trial of 3,000 of his lorries. its benefits are reducing the number of lorries by certainly a fifth, possibly a quarter, perhaps even a third. you can move 50% more freight, potentially, but still use one driver. and that's a very key thing for us at the moment, because of the driver shortage. i have to say that i was quite surprised with the announcement.
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they are safety rules, after all. and itjust demonstrates what a crisis the industry has, because the government has listened to representations and has relaxed these rules. it's a very welcome thing. but, yes, i'm surprised by it. the technology developed means this lorry can go anywhere a normal—sized articulated lorry can, even turn within the same turning circle. if i wanted to go to the left, these wheels would turn to the right to take the front end of this trailer out. this is terry, who's been at the forefront of all the trials so far. i've been to the netherlands. i took my driving test over there and they actually took us into towns and villages. so you've seen how it does perform? yeah, yeah. and we've actually been over with this. but, as it stands, a driver shortage continues and the ban for this kind of vehicle remains. simon spark, bbc news. coming up in the next half hour...
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after some england players were subjected to racist abuse following their defeat to italy, we speak to podcaster josh denzel and former footballer anton ferdinand about their experiences. we will also get their response from the government injust we will also get their response from the government in just a few minutes in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. some of london's streets were left under water after heavy rain led to flash flooding. raynes park, barnes, and richmond in southwest london were among the areas worst affected, along with hampstead and golders green in northwest london. the london fire brigade said it received more than 1,000 related calls from people in homes and businesses or trapped in cars. a number of tube and services are still affected. a charity that supports people whose loved ones have gone missing, is consulting families to understand how their race impacts
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on the treatment they receive. evidence joel, whose son richard okorogheye disappeared in march, is among those taking part. the police watchdog is investigating her claim that her initial concerns were dismissed by the met. the force says that in all missing person cases risk level is assessed on the infomation it receives and denies bias plays a role. what we've seen is really concerning. some examples are families who are reporting their special loved one missing to the police and the police not taking the initial report. it's where families are being expected to do more than usual to try and find their missing loved one, or where their efforts so far are being dismissed. and you can see more on that story in a special report on bbc london tonight at 6.30. an 18—year—old from buckinghamshire looks set to have landed a place in the record books, becoming the youngest pilot to fly solo around the world. travis ludlow touched down near high wycombe yesterday after a 25,000—mile journey that
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took him 44 days to complete. travel now. lots of problems caused by the flooding. the circle line is suspended. the district and hammersmith and city are part—suspended. there's no service on the overground — camden road to richmond—clapham junction, gospel oak to upper holloway and euston to kilburn high road while damage is repaired. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, some of us, but not all of us across the capital, saw some torrential downpours, along with plenty of thunder. but today is a lot less dramatic, weather—wise. a much quieter day of weather right across the board. it's a cloudy, mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius. now, there is plenty of cloud around through the morning, but it will gradually break up. we will see some brightness, some spells of sunshine start to develop. the sunshine probably best through the afternoon out towards western home counties. here, temperatures will peak in the low 20s celsius.
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the winds more noticeable than they were yesterday, although fairly light. there is the small chance we could see showers break out, but they will be isolated and, for many of us, it will be a dry day. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud will reform. there will be some clear spells — watch out for mist in those. it is a mild start to wednesday morning. there will be some clear spells — watch out for mist in those. it is a mild start to wednesday morning. on wednesday, we start with lots of cloud, but it should break up to give us some brightness and sunshine. a small chance of one or two showers. high pressure is set to build in and it is looking dry for the rest of the week, with increasing amounts of sunshine and climbing temperatures. that's it for now. plenty more on our website at the usual address. i'll be back in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. the decision to lift restrictions in england next week has been called irresponsible by the organisation representing doctors. the british medical
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association has warned that scrapping social distancing and face coverings could lead to devastating consequences. let's speak now to the chief secretary to the treasury stephen barclay. thank you for be in with us. a lot to get through. can we start with some of the changes people detected yesterday listening to the prime minister. less than a month ago, borisjohnson repeatedly use the phrase terminus dates with reference to the 19th ofjuly, suggesting those restrictions would come to an end. yesterday, we saw the phrase only if we proceed with caution come in. can you talk about how the government messaging has changed? the consistent point has been the legal position has changed so instead of things being the law, we shift to a point of guidance and we have delayed step four to allow an
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additional 7 million vaccines to be deployed and that is part of building the vaccine wall, the key to getting ourselves out of this situation. step four enables us to reopen and to move to the full opening of the economy that is important to some of the other consequences of the pandemic. the legal requirements will change as a result but there is a need for caution still so on things like facemask, the prime minister set out the legal requirement to wear them will come to an end. if viewers are in a crowded place with people they do not usually mixed with, they may want to continue wearing a facemask as part of that guidance. it is about getting the balance between the previous restrictions that had consequences and gradually easing that as we go to step four and get the economy fully open. you
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mentioned — the economy fully open. you mentioned the _ the economy fully open. you mentioned the vaccine i the economy fully open. you mentioned the vaccine wall. in terms of the subtle change of language, on the first of the month the prime minister told mps the vaccine had broken the link between infections and deaths. yesterday, he said they had not broken the link but weakened the link. it is a subtle change in language but an important one. how is the link been broken or merely weakened? the is the link been broken or merely weakened?— is the link been broken or merely weakened? ~' , , ., weakened? the key test of the prime minister applied _ weakened? the key test of the prime minister applied were _ weakened? the key test of the prime minister applied were the _ weakened? the key test of the prime minister applied were the four- weakened? the key test of the prime minister applied were the four tests i minister applied were the four tests we originally set out in terms of reaching step four. as the health secretary said, those tests have been met in terms of the deployment of the vaccine, hospitalisation, pressure on the tests have been met but it is about getting a balance. the point the chief medical officer said yesterday is we have to live with the virus. there is no perfect time in terms of the full lifting of restrictions. the risks, if we do so
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in the autumn. combined with the school summer holiday, and the summer, now is the right time to move to step four. through the delay we have deployed an extra 7 million vaccines, but the tests have been met, which is why we are able to open through step four. we will need to learn to live with the virus and thatis to learn to live with the virus and that is why the guys sets out the balance between what viewers may choose to do, which is different from the legal requirement. i am sure ou from the legal requirement. i am sure you have — from the legal requirement. i am sure you have heard _ from the legal requirement. i am sure you have heard the - from the legal requirement. i am sure you have heard the overwhelming medical advice. we spoke to a gp this morning concerned about the brakes coming off. we have the prime minister and health secretary urging us to wear masks in crowded indoor places and public transport. if that is the case, why not keep that law in place? we is the case, why not keep that law in lace? ~ ., .,
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in place? we are lifting the legal requirement— in place? we are lifting the legal requirement but _ in place? we are lifting the legal requirement but it _ in place? we are lifting the legal requirement but it is _ in place? we are lifting the legal requirement but it is a _ in place? we are lifting the legal requirement but it is a strong i requirement but it is a strong requirement but it is a strong requirement when it is the law people must do so. but we keep guidance in place so people will form a judgment and i trust the public to form a judgment as to what is appropriate. if you are on a train with few people around, people will not want to wear a mask. if you are on a crowded train, perhaps a commuter train, then people through the guidance will choose to do so and people will reach a judgment depending on circumstances. it is about learning to live with the virus. the key is the vaccine which is why we need to continue the roll—out. that is the best defence to transmission. but it is about striking a balance between what was previously a legal requirement and now trusting the british public to adhere to what is necessary depending on circumstances. in terms ofthe depending on circumstances. in terms of the issue of— depending on circumstances. in terms of the issue of trusting _ depending on circumstances. in terms of the issue of trusting the _ depending on circumstances. in terms of the issue of trusting the british i of the issue of trusting the british public, research from the university of warwick suggests that if we come
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out of restrictions slowly the number hospitalisation in august will peak at 600 versus 6000 if people start to act normally from the 19th ofjuly. how much of a gamble is it to trust the british public to act responsibly? there are consequences _ public to act responsibly? there are consequences either _ public to act responsibly? there are consequences either way. _ public to act responsibly? there are consequences either way. if - public to act responsibly? there are consequences either way. if we i public to act responsibly? there are consequences either way. if we did | consequences either way. if we did not move to step four till the autumn they would be serious economic consequences and also in terms of the virus in the autumn, trying to lift restrictions in the autumn would carry more risk, because the timing now aligns with the school summer holiday and the better weather in the summer. that is why the prime minister was clear. we still need to be cautious and attentive. that is why there will be guidance for though shielding, the clinically vulnerable. we are not saying rush back to the office on
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day one. have a conversation with employers, and there is guidance to shape that. it is learning to live with the virus and strike a balance and accepting the restrictions themselves have health consequences as well as economic. whichever way the government goes on this, there are consequences. the balance of the prime minister, the chief medical officer and chief scientific adviser is about a cautious approach. we can lift because of the tests that have been met but there is guidance so the british public can take a cautious approach and that is the balance the prime minister set out yesterday. balance the prime minister set out esterda . , ., ,, yesterday. something else making headhnes yesterday. something else making headlines is _ yesterday. something else making headlines is this _ yesterday. something else making headlines is this extraordinary i . headlines is this extraordinary i suppose you can call it a battle between a senior england footballer, tyrone mings, and health secretary —— home secretary. he accused the home secretary of stoking the fire,
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saying players taking the knee was gesture politics. this was back at the start of the euros. is he right? was priti patel stoking the fire? the euros has brought the country together. the euros has brought the country touether. ~ ., ., ., ., together. what we all agree on... i am sorry. — together. what we all agree on... i am sorry. i — together. what we all agree on. .. i am sorry. i will— together. what we all agree on... i am sorry, i willjump _ together. what we all agree on... i am sorry, i willjump in _ together. what we all agree on... i am sorry, i willjump in because . together. what we all agree on... i am sorry, i willjump in because i. am sorry, i willjump in because i do not want to be distracted by the general message. i do not want to be distracted by the general message. lam do not want to be distracted by the general message. i am asking you specifically about the words of priti patel and what tyrone mings has said about the home secretary. he said that when she talked about gesture politics at the start of the euros, she was stoking the fire. the players made it clear they were making a stand against racism. it is a serious allegation. he said the home secretary contributed to that. the home secretary herself has been the victim of the most appalling online abuse. she understands better than most the consequences of racism
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because she herself throughout her career as a senior politician has been subject herself to considerable online abuse. that is why the government is taking action. the culture secretary has met with the fa, senior black footballers, and thatis fa, senior black footballers, and that is why we are bringing legislation through so if social media platforms do not act we will legislate and punish them financially for failing to do so. what came out of the euros, the team represented the best of the country and brought the country together. what other footballers have been subject to in terms of abuse is not acceptable and something rightly the majority of the british public condemn completely. we need to ensure these social media platforms take action and if they don't, the government will legislate to ensure they are punished for failing to do so. ., . ~ they are punished for failing to do so. ., ., " ., they are punished for failing to do so. ., ., ~ ., , they are punished for failing to do so. ., ., «a, , ., so. you talk about the abuse home secretary has _
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so. you talk about the abuse home secretary has been _ so. you talk about the abuse home secretary has been subjected - so. you talk about the abuse home secretary has been subjected to, i secretary has been subjected to, which is awful. how is she seemingly on the wrong side of the debate? when it went back to the issue of taking the knee and she referring to it as gesture politics. people were booing that gesture by the players and she says it is a choice for them. i and she says it is a choice for them. ~ ., ., and she says it is a choice for them. ~' ., ., ., “ them. i know from working with the home secretary _ them. i know from working with the home secretary she _ them. i know from working with the home secretary she is _ them. i know from working with the home secretary she is taking - them. i know from working with the home secretary she is taking actionj home secretary she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. she has taken action against the extreme right—wing groups that foment many of these things and she is acting as home secretary to tackle this as is the culture secretary. and through the bill we are committed as a government to legislating to tackle social media platforms who should be doing more to clamp down on this racism and abuse online. it is part of a wider problem in terms of online abuse. we
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will legislate to punish those companies financially if they fail to act. i call on them to take more action to stop their platform is being abused in this way. you seem to be saying — being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it _ being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it is — being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it is ok _ being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it is ok to _ being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it is ok to say - being abused in this way. you seem to be saying it is ok to say you - to be saying it is ok to say you agree with what priti patel is saying but also agree with what tyrone mings is saying. it is directly and publicly —— he has gone toe to toe with the home secretary. he is saying the government have encouraged this. they are not on the same page. this is a prominent footballer calling out the home secretary. this is a serious allegation. secretary. this is a serious allegation-— secretary. this is a serious alleuation. ., ,, . . , secretary. this is a serious alleuation. ., , allegation. the home secretary is committed _ allegation. the home secretary is committed to _ allegation. the home secretary is committed to tackling _ allegation. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism - allegation. the home secretary is committed to tackling racism and | committed to tackling racism and taking action as home secretary to tackle extremist groups. that is what she is doing. the prime minister is clear the government will legislate to take action against those platforms that enable this filth to be peddled online. we
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are acting as a government. the culture secretary has worked closely with black footballers and the football authorities and sport organisations to work with them to tackle this. this is something pretty much all viewers agree with us on. we need to take action to tackle this. this brings the country together. i think we all condemn the abuse that has happened. it is something that unites us. the football team has been the best of england, bringing the country together and something we can unite around and in terms of this abuse, it is something we will work with the football authorities to clamp down on and ensure social media platforms are held to account. if platforms are held to account. if you read what tyrone mings has said and many have done that, he is not in agreement with the home secretary and not in agreement with the government. you talk about actions you are taking and attacking online
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abuse. what tyrone mings is saying surely the government should unequivocally stand with players in making a stance against racism. that is what he is saying. you are not doing and haven't done particularly the home secretary during the euros. the prime minister was asked yesterday at the press conference about this and was clear in the terms of the need to respect people in terms of however they want to convey their points on these things and the prime minister addressed it at the press conference yesterday. he has been clear, the government has been clear. what matters is we legislate to tackle this and clamp down on social media platforms. if we were not acting, i think you would say to me as a minister, why is the government not to legislating? the culture secretary is doing so. but that should not be in the social media platforms do not take action now. i call on them to take action now. i call on them to take action. we are clear as a
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government, if they fail to do so, we will legislate and punish them financially for their failure to act. ., ., , ~' financially for their failure to act. ., ., financially for their failure to act. ., ,,. financially for their failure to act. ., act. can i ask you specifically, was the home — act. can i ask you specifically, was the home secretary _ act. can i ask you specifically, was the home secretary priti - act. can i ask you specifically, was the home secretary priti patel- act. can i ask you specifically, was i the home secretary priti patel wrong to call taking the knee gesture politics when england players had said it was not about black lives matter, it was an antiracism stance? i think the prime minister addressed this yesterday and said we should respect people. i this yesterday and said we should respect pebble-— this yesterday and said we should respect peeple-— respect people. i asked you a secific respect people. i asked you a specific question _ respect people. i asked you a specific question about - respect people. i asked you a l specific question about whether respect people. i asked you a - specific question about whether the home secretary was wrong to say it was gesture politics. i am home secretary was wrong to say it was gesture politics. i am answering that and the — was gesture politics. i am answering that and the prime _ was gesture politics. i am answering that and the prime minister- was gesture politics. i am answering l that and the prime minister answered it yesterday and was clear we need to respect people making their points in different ways. the home secretary is making her point by legislating and taking action against extremist groups and using her office as home secretary. she has the opportunity to take action in that way. the footballers rightly made their point in their way.
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ultimately, what unites us is tackling the scourge of racism and thatis tackling the scourge of racism and that is what we agree on and what we should come together to tackle, that is what the government will do. if social media platforms do not act we will legislate to punish them for failure to do so.— here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. yesterday, there were dramatic pictures coming through. these were taken in lourdes, the home of cricket but more like the home of cricket but more like the home of cricket but more like the home of the 800 metres breaststroke yesterday. it is because we saw a phenomenal amount of rainfall for some. barely a drop in my garden but in yorkshire, london, dorset, seeing close to a month's of rainfall in
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the space of a few hours. if you were not hit —— if you were hit by the storms, better news today with fewer showers. there are downpours at the moment. a wet morning in parts of northern england. through the day, isolated showers will turn up the day, isolated showers will turn up in western scotland, west and south of england and wales but for the majority, a dry day. cloud will break up. more sunshine developing in the afternoon. temperatures close to where we should be. 20—21i stop showers into the evening. most go into tonight dry. with clear skies some fog patches tomorrow morning. a mild start with temperatures in the mid teens. through the rest of the week, summer returns. high—pressure moves in. it be largely dry stop and
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sunshine as we head to the end of the week and weekend. and this weekend we could see top temperatures of 26—28. a big change after the storms of yesterday. for some, a welcome change. we have been talking to stephen barclay about this. there's been widespread condemnation of the racial abuse aimed at marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka after england's euro 2020 final defeat to italy. footballers and celebrities have taken to social media to support the players. gary linekar wrote, "booing and racially abusing the fine young men that play for our country and have given us so much pleasure and joy over the last month is not being an england fan." fc barcelona tweeted, "losing a penalty shoot—out is a part of football, and a part of life. racism is not." and american rapper diddy took to instagram, posting a photo of the four players, with the words: "we stand with you kings. proud of all your efforts
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on and off the field and we will always support you." let's speak to former footballer anton ferdinand, who recently presented a programme about his experiences of racism and is an ambassador for the hope united campaign. and sports presenter josh denzel, who spent time with the england squad during the euros. good morning. josh, you spent a lot of time with the england camp. marcus rashford has spoken about he is feeling. how will this have impacted on them, do you think? it impacted on them, do you think? it is devastating because we spent a lot of time in camp with the players, about how their performances and the team had brought the country together. after the final, you get this reaction. it is devastating for the players. they connect with the fans and are amongst it from right now. the last
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thing they need after a game like thatis thing they need after a game like that is to be torn down by a minority of people. it that is to be torn down by a minority of people.- that is to be torn down by a minority of people. it hits them hard. minority of people. it hits them hard- anton. — minority of people. it hits them hard. anton, i— minority of people. it hits them hard. anton, i wondered - minority of people. it hits them hard. anton, i wondered your. hard. anton, i wondered your overwhelming reaction when you read that and the players' response. were you sad, did you think it was inevitable? it you sad, did you think it was inevitable?— you sad, did you think it was inevitable? , ., . ~ , inevitable? it brought back my experiences. _ inevitable? it brought back my experiences. i— inevitable? it brought back my experiences. i felt _ inevitable? it brought back my experiences. i felt for - inevitable? it brought back my experiences. i felt for the - inevitable? it brought back my i experiences. i felt for the players in question. the three players who have _ in question. the three players who have been— in question. the three players who have been racially abused on social media _ have been racially abused on social media i_ have been racially abused on social media. i was not surprised. that is the sad _ media. i was not surprised. that is the sad thing. especially after seeing — the sad thing. especially after seeing how united the country became, — seeing how united the country became, especially aftera seeing how united the country became, especially after a difficult 18 months with covid. it was good to see football and the players wearing the three _ see football and the players wearing the three lions brought unity to the country— the three lions brought unity to the country and — the three lions brought unity to the country and for it to turn sour in the way— country and for it to turn sour in the way it— country and for it to turn sour in the way it did was something i was
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not surprised. as someone of black origin, _ not surprised. as someone of black origin, i'm — not surprised. as someone of black origin, i'm sitting there hoping to not miss— origin, i'm sitting there hoping to not miss a — origin, i'm sitting there hoping to not miss a penalty but i was thinking _ not miss a penalty but i was thinking none of the black boys, don't _ thinking none of the black boys, don't miss— thinking none of the black boys, don't miss a penalty because if you don't miss a penalty because if you do you _ don't miss a penalty because if you do you could be in for serious abuse — do you could be in for serious abuse. that is howl do you could be in for serious abuse. that is how i was thinking. i do not _ abuse. that is how i was thinking. i do not want — abuse. that is how i was thinking. i do not want to think like that but the way— do not want to think like that but the way things are going has got me thinking _ the way things are going has got me thinking like that. it is the way things are going has got me thinking like that.— thinking like that. it is one thing havin: to thinking like that. it is one thing having to deal _ thinking like that. it is one thing having to deal with _ thinking like that. it is one thing having to deal with what - thinking like that. it is one thing i having to deal with what happened thinking like that. it is one thing - having to deal with what happened on the pitch, but quite another having to deal with what happens off it. what impact does it have on young men? it what impact does it have on young men? , ., , ., what impact does it have on young men? , men? it definitely has a massive im act. men? it definitely has a massive imact. i men? it definitely has a massive impact. i cannot _ men? it definitely has a massive impact. i cannot say _ men? it definitely has a massive impact. i cannot say for - men? it definitely has a massive impact. i cannot say for sure, i men? it definitely has a massive| impact. i cannot say for sure, but men? it definitely has a massive l impact. i cannot say for sure, but i know— impact. i cannot say for sure, but i know the _ impact. i cannot say for sure, but i know the pressure to take a penalty in a high _ know the pressure to take a penalty in a high pressure game. i missed a penalty— in a high pressure game. i missed a penalty in _ in a high pressure game. i missed a penalty in a — in a high pressure game. i missed a penalty in a final. i understand the magnitude — penalty in a final. i understand the magnitude and pressure of that. just that alone _ magnitude and pressure of that. just that alone is enough. whether any of
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the boys _ that alone is enough. whether any of the boys were thinking they could not miss— the boys were thinking they could not miss because of other reasons, i do not _ not miss because of other reasons, i do not know — not miss because of other reasons, i do not know. imagine having that pressure — do not know. imagine having that pressure on top of the actual pressure _ pressure on top of the actual pressure and hopes of the nation to try to _ pressure and hopes of the nation to try to win— pressure and hopes of the nation to try to win something after 55 years. i cannot— try to win something after 55 years. i cannot comprehend that. it is crazy— i cannot comprehend that. it is crazy that _ i cannot comprehend that. it is crazy that may have been a thought. josh, _ crazy that may have been a thought. josh, when— crazy that may have been a thought. josh, when footballers talk about these issues, as they seem willing to these days, you get the old stick to these days, you get the old stick to football thrown at them. i wonder about your thoughts on this extraordinary intervention from tyrone mings. one of england's senior professionals taking on the home secretary on her stance on this issue. ~ ., , ., , ., ., . ~ issue. what he is doing is attacking the fact is that — issue. what he is doing is attacking the fact is that you _ issue. what he is doing is attacking the fact is that you cannot - the fact is that you cannot flip—flop from one opinion to another when it suits a political
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agenda, or it is a publicity stunt. i am with tyrone mings all the way here. i cannot believe you can encourage people to boo a nonpolitical gesture and then condemn the fact people are on social media. and in real life, throwing abuse at these players. footballers are notjust throwing abuse at these players. footballers are not just footballers these days. they are people with a platform and with their own thoughts and independent views. i think the more footballers can come out and can really put forward their views is better for everyone. with can really put forward their views is betterfor everyone. with social media, these footballers have huge platforms and all credit to tyrone mings for saying what he said. you are art mings for saying what he said. you are part of — mings for saying what he said. you are part of hope united that deals with this. interesting to see the adverts in the programmes. let's
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look at what can be done. what do you think? look at what can be done. what do ou think? ~ .. ,., look at what can be done. what do ou think? ~ .., ,., .,, you think? with the campaign hope united that bt — you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have _ you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have put _ you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have put on, - you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have put on, it - you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have put on, it is - you think? with the campaign hope united that bt have put on, it is to | united that bt have put on, it is to try to _ united that bt have put on, it is to try to help— united that bt have put on, it is to try to help people notjust about the people with the blue tick and in the people with the blue tick and in the public— the people with the blue tick and in the public eye, it is about the wider— the public eye, it is about the wider society and giving them a safe place _ wider society and giving them a safe place of— wider society and giving them a safe place of social media. i think it is a great _ place of social media. i think it is a great campaign. something i am proud _ a great campaign. something i am proud to— a great campaign. something i am proud to be part of and an ambassador of. something needs to change _ ambassador of. something needs to change i_ ambassador of. something needs to change. i cannot speak highly enough of bt for— change. i cannot speak highly enough of bt for doing it but they should not have — of bt for doing it but they should not have to do it because social media — not have to do it because social media platform should deal with this _ media platform should deal with this i_ media platform should deal with this. i have been in conversation with— this. i have been in conversation with social— this. i have been in conversation with social media platform since my documentary in november last year.
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our message to them, my message and the people _ our message to them, my message and the people i_ our message to them, my message and the people i am in the group with, my message is change needs to happen and it needs _ my message is change needs to happen and it needs to happen now. at the moment, _ and it needs to happen now. at the moment, there is resistance and there _ moment, there is resistance and there should not be because this is about— there should not be because this is about human beings. let's take the human— about human beings. let's take the human being standpoint and deal with that. human being standpoint and deal with that let's _ human being standpoint and deal with that. let's not look at the company and monetary value. i believe it is the monetary value rather than people's— the monetary value rather than people's feelings.— the monetary value rather than people's feelings. josh, you talked about social _ people's feelings. josh, you talked about social media. _ people's feelings. josh, you talked about social media. you _ people's feelings. josh, you talked about social media. you have - people's feelings. josh, you talked about social media. you have a - people's feelings. josh, you talked j about social media. you have a big following on social media. what abuse do you receive and how do you deal with that? do you feel there is enough support from companies that run these? for enough support from companies that run these? ., ., ._ run these? for me, the other day, i came back — run these? for me, the other day, i came back home _ run these? for me, the other day, i came back home and _ run these? for me, the other day, i came back home and we _ run these? for me, the other day, i came back home and we were - run these? for me, the other day, i l came back home and we were talking about the racist abuse of the players. my housemate said what do you get? i get a huge amount of
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messages of support, but one in every 100 is a monkey emoji, derogatory terms. for me, it is easierfor your mind to remember negative comments. they stick with you. from my time before working in football, i got a lot of negative comments. these social media companies are not doing enough. if they can flag up misinformation on covid in ten seconds but they cannot stop people sending a monkey emoji to black footballers and black people online, there is something massively wrong. the base level, you need an id or proof of identity to start a social media account to stop these faceless trolls. people feel invincible behind the screen, especially when they think they cannot be found. that is what needs
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to happen. it cannot be found. that is what needs to ha en. .., cannot be found. that is what needs to ha en. , ., ., ~' ., to happen. it can be a dark well to to happen. it can be a dark well to to into. to happen. it can be a dark well to go into- if— to happen. it can be a dark well to go into- if you _ to happen. it can be a dark well to go into. if you look _ to happen. it can be a dark well to go into. if you look at _ to happen. it can be a dark well to go into. if you look at accounts - to happen. it can be a dark well to go into. if you look at accounts of| go into. if you look at accounts of people sending those monkey emojis, are they faceless? are they anonymous? sometimes you look at these accounts and it is a bloke with a child, somebody who has a normaljob. the with a child, somebody who has a normaljob— with a child, somebody who has a normal 'ob. .,, . , normal “0b. the most recent message i not normaljob. the most recent message i not was normaljob. the most recent message i got was this — normaljob. the most recent message i got was this morning. _ normaljob. the most recent message i got was this morning. a _ i got was this morning. a i7—year—old kid from portsmouth. i will not call his name out, but this is what is happening. people feel entitled now. we have a situation where ian wright forgave a guy who was racist to him and suddenly they feel they can do anything, they feel invincible. unless something changes, i do not think that will change. latte changes, i do not think that will chante.~ , ., ,, ,
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changes, i do not think that will chante.~ ., ,, , . change. we spoke to stephen barclay from the government. _ change. we spoke to stephen barclay from the government. you _ change. we spoke to stephen barclay from the government. you may - change. we spoke to stephen barclay from the government. you may have | from the government. you may have heard the interview. he talked about they are talking to social media platforms to take action, saying they will punish them financially. in your view, is the government doing enough?— in your view, is the government doing enough? no. just by their actions and _ doing enough? no. just by their actions and what _ doing enough? no. just by their actions and what they _ doing enough? no. just by their actions and what they are - doing enough? no. just by their. actions and what they are saying. you cannot— actions and what they are saying. you cannot come on this morning's show— you cannot come on this morning's show and _ you cannot come on this morning's show and say we are going to do this and that— show and say we are going to do this and that when the reality is their peers _ and that when the reality is their peers and — and that when the reality is their peers and the people who run this country— peers and the people who run this country are — peers and the people who run this country are coming out and saying booing _ country are coming out and saying booing a _ country are coming out and saying booing a gesture the players are taking. — booing a gesture the players are taking, they are not condemning that _ taking, they are not condemning that how— taking, they are not condemning that. how can you condemn that and then come _ that. how can you condemn that and then come out and say it is about then come out and say it is about the social— then come out and say it is about the social media? sort out your own house _ the social media? sort out your own house first _ the social media? sort out your own house first and then you can start talking _ house first and then you can start talking about other people and organisations. you cannot say one thing _ organisations. you cannot say one thing and — organisations. you cannot say one thing and not do the other. it
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screams— thing and not do the other. it screams hypocrisy. we thing and not do the other. it screams hypocrisy. we talked about the comment _ screams hypocrisy. we talked about the comment of— screams hypocrisy. we talked about the comment of tyrone _ screams hypocrisy. we talked about the comment of tyrone mings - screams hypocrisy. we talked about the comment of tyrone mings but i the comment of tyrone mings but harry kane was on social media yesterday saying if you are racist, we do not want you as a fan. will we see england players continuing this debate and continue to make a stand and to try and make a difference? absolutely. harry kane is totally right. the majority of the nation feel that. it is a multicultural team. a team that is made up of mixed race people. in general, people from all over the world. second generation guys. if you cannot support that, you go back to your club and you will boo these england players. people flip—flop every single day. football brings
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out the best and worst in people. i do not want to sit next to a fan who is going to boo players taking the knee. i do not want him immediately to revert to picking someone out because of the colour of their skin. this group of players, they are politically minded. they are aware and they know they have a platform they can speak on these issues. i do not think this will go away anytime soon. . , not think this will go away anytime soon. ., , ., ., ., not think this will go away anytime soon. ., , ., . ., ., ., soon. really good to chat to you and thank ou soon. really good to chat to you and thank you very _ soon. really good to chat to you and thank you very much. _ thank you very much. you talk about the best and worst. we saw that marcus rashford mural being defaced and what has happened in the wake of that, so many people have put messages support for him. we will look at that later. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today. "irresponsible" — doctors leaders condemn borisjohnson's decision to press ahead with lockdown lifting, despite rising covid infections. racially abused online and his mural vandalised, but england striker marcus rashford says he'll never apologise for who he is. england defender tyrone mings accuses the home secretary of "pretending to be disgusted" by the abuse, after her criticism of players taking the knee. i have spoken exclusively to formula
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i champion lewis hamilton. he tells me he wants to change the way the sport looks forever, and help young black people into engineering good morning from one of the uk's largest agricultural shows. it is a celebration of rural life. but there are also growing concerns about a shortage of farm workers and what that could mean for prices in the shops. and whilst it may be done at the great yorkshire show, could summitt be about to bounce back? at the storms yesterday, looking drier, sunnier and warmer i will have all the details later. senior doctors have criticised the prime minister's decision to relax coronavirus restrictions in england next week — calling the move "irresponsible". borisjohnson has confirmed that most remaining measures — including social distancing — would be dropped from the 19th of july. but the british medical association
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has warned it could have potentially devastating consequences. we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. just talk us through it, there is a change in the way that government is talking about the lifting of restrictions. aha, talking about the lifting of restrictions.— talking about the lifting of restrictions. �* ., . ., restrictions. a real change in their tone, restrictions. a real change in their tone. their _ restrictions. a real change in their tone, their emphasis. _ restrictions. a real change in their tone, their emphasis. next - restrictions. a real change in their. tone, their emphasis. next monday, in england, the last legal restrictions on social contact and distancing and masks will go stop nightclubs were reopened. that real sense of a big step towards normality as far as the law is concerned. but as far as our behaviour is concerned, and what the government would like us to do, well, they are encouraging us to behave pretty much as we have been. and that is the shift in tone in the last week or so. real emphasis that, yes, it is about personal responsibility, but that we should behave responsibly, and so the government is now explicitly
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advising that from next monday we should carry on wearing a mask on the bus or when we are in a crowded indoor space with people that we don't live with. if we are working from home at the moment we should perhaps continue to do so if we can and make the move back to the office and make the move back to the office a bit more gradual. the government's argument here is at some point in a pandemic you do have to hand responsibility back to people, and if not now, when? it is the summer, the vaccine programme means two thirds of adults have had two micro is now and there is less pressure on the nhs. the critics, the doctor's union, the bma, labour, to say this is irresponsible. what we certainly know if there is a lot of uncertainty because we don't know how collectively we will all behave when they are no longer told what to do. �* ., ., ~ when they are no longer told what to do. �* ., ., . ., , do. another thought. we have been talkint this do. another thought. we have been talking this morning _ do. another thought. we have been talking this morning about - do. another thought. we have been talking this morning about the - do. another thought. we have been | talking this morning about the home secretary being criticised by response to the racist abuse
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directed at several england players. took us through what is going on. this is extraordinary. it is unprecedented that we have an england footballer, tyrone mings, in a direct and public and unequivocal way taking on one of the most senior politicians in the country, the home secretary, priti patel. take a look at this tweet. he was responding to priti patel, who herself was tweeting her disgust at the racist abuse that some england players have been subjected to. look at the language from tyrone mings. the antiracism message is a reference to taking the knee. tyrone mings is clearly boiling with anger at what he sees at best the home secretary being equivocal around taking the knee and broadly
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speaking she is pretty critical of it. she is not sure it is worth doing, hence that description of gesture politics. no direct response from the home secretary. last night this morning. so the first chance we have to get the response from the government was when stephen barclay, priti patel�*s a colleague, was in this chair and breakfast. the priti patel's a colleague, was in this chair and breakfast. the home secretary herself _ this chair and breakfast. the home secretary herself has _ this chair and breakfast. the home secretary herself has been - this chair and breakfast. the home secretary herself has been the - secretary herself has been the victim — secretary herself has been the victim of— secretary herself has been the victim of the most appalling online abuse _ victim of the most appalling online abuse. she understands better than most _ abuse. she understands better than most the _ abuse. she understands better than most the consequences of racism because — most the consequences of racism because she herself throughout her career— because she herself throughout her career as— because she herself throughout her career as a — because she herself throughout her career as a senior politician has been _ career as a senior politician has been subject herself to considerable online _ been subject herself to considerable online abuse. and that is why the government is taking action. the culture _ government is taking action. the culture secretary has been meeting with the _ culture secretary has been meeting with the fa, senior black footballers, it is why we are bringing _ footballers, it is why we are bringing forward legislation through the online harm spill, so that if the online harm spill, so that if the social— the online harm spill, so that if the social media platforms don't act, we — the social media platforms don't act, we will register deliver for and punish them financially for
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failing — and punish them financially for failing to — and punish them financially for failing to do so. but crucially, stephen — failing to do so. but crucially, stephen barclay would not answer the direct question from dan about whether— direct question from dan about whether or not he would criticise his colleague priti patel for using that word — his colleague priti patel for using that word gesture politics. there is a distinction between— a distinction between condemning racist abuse. _ a distinction between condemning racist abuse, which _ a distinction between condemning racist abuse, which everyone - a distinction between condemning racist abuse, which everyone in i racist abuse, which everyone in government is doing, and the specifics around taking the knee, where some in government have been equivocal and tyrone mings and others are saying you should not be equivocal in condemning what we are doing trying to tackle the scourge of racism. . ~ doing trying to tackle the scourge of racism. ., ~ , ., doing trying to tackle the scourge of racism. . ~' , ., ., doing trying to tackle the scourge of racism. ., ~ , ., ., ., ~ , of racism. thank you for taking us throu:h of racism. thank you for taking us through that _ of racism. thank you for taking us through that with _ of racism. thank you for taking us through that with your _ of racism. thank you for taking us through that with your analysis. i through that with your analysis. thank you. scotland will hear today whether coronavirus restrictions there will be eased as planned next monday. the government had intended to move the whole country to the lowest level of restrictions from the 19th ofjuly, however it's since been hit by a record—breaking wave of infections. we're joined now by political correspondent david wallace—lockhart. speak to you this morning. what are
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we likely to hear from nicola sturgeon later?— we likely to hear from nicola sturgeon later? we likely to hear from nicola sturteon later? _, sturgeon later? some context there is. sturgeon later? some context there is- different — sturgeon later? some context there is. different council— sturgeon later? some context there is. different council areas _ sturgeon later? some context there is. different council areas in - is. different council areas in scotland are currently under different levels of restrictions. under the scottish government's plans to get back to normality, the 19th ofjuly is the date we are meant to all move, all councils, to level 0 restrictions. level 0 isn't quite as many freedoms as there are going to be on england aren't the same day, they are still quite a few rows but it will allow people to meet indoors in bigger numbers, allow bars and restaurants to get back to their normal opening hours. scottish parliament has been recalled to hear the decision of the first minister this afternoon. nicola sturgeon has previously spoken about the possibility of going forward with some aspects of level 0 but not all aspects. a sort of level 0 .5. she has the scottish conservatives on one hand saying she must go forward with all of level 0 as planned, she has the scottish greens on the other urging caution at the moment. as you said, there
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are high covid rates in scotland at this moment in time. one in 100 people are estimated to have the virus, that's the highest of all four of the uk nations. that being said, case numbers are not translating into hospitalisations the way that they were earlier in the way that they were earlier in the pandemic and that is of course because of the vaccine roll—out. the health service isn't under the same levels of stress but that's not to say it is plain sailing because they are trying to get back to more normal non—covid treatment they are experiencing high levels of staff having to self—isolate at the moment because they are close contacts of positive cases. these are all competing interests that the first minister will have to weigh up and we will hearfrom minister will have to weigh up and we will hear from her active vm. david, thank you. in wales, a review of their coronavirus restrictions will take place tomorrow. the infection rate there is lower than other uk nations and the country has come under pressure to follow england and scotland in announcing a date for lifting measures. the controversial decision to cut the uk's foreign aid budget by £4 billion will be voted
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on by mps today. spending was cut from 0.7% to 0.5% because of the pandemic, but was met with cross—party criticism. mps will be asked to choose whether overseas aid spending should return to its previous amount or tie aid spending to government borrowing and debt. more than 50 people have died and dozens more injured in a fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in iraq. it's thought the blaze began after an oxygen cylinder exploded. iraq's prime minister has called for the arrest of the hospital's boss, following protests by the families of victims. water companies in england are falling short when it comes to protecting the environment — according to the industry regulator. the environment agency said rivers are still too polluted and warned that companies need to make "substantial" improvements. it comes after southern water was fined a record—breaking £90 million after pleading guilty to illegally dumping billions of litres of raw sewage into the sea.
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torrential downpours have caused flash flooding in towns and cities across the south of england. in london, train and tube stations were forced to close and there were more than 1,000 calls to the fire brigade in a few hours. and in some parts of dorset, cars were left stranded after attempting to drive through floodwater. the met office says the weather will brighten up from tomorrow. the athletes' village has officially opened for the tokyo olympics, ten days before the games begin. 18,000 competitors will stay on the site, and will be subject to daily coronavirus testing. unlike in the past, organisers didn't hold a ceremony to welcome athletes and officials to the village, which is in tokyo's harumi waterfront district. i think we will get very much used to that site when the olympic coverage starts in about ten days it does, the news for you is that you will be going onto the tv earlier than 6am!
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bbc olympic coverage starts at 5am. it is on throughout the night. i am on with sam quek from 5am. an extra hour not in bed! i am looking forward to it. it will be fantastic. mass, did you have more sleep last night? mass, did you have more sleep last nitht? . , �* mass, did you have more sleep last nitht? ., , �* mass, did you have more sleep last nitht? ~ ., night? marginally. at least you have m ractice night? marginally. at least you have my practice for _ night? marginally. at least you have my practice for it — night? marginally. at least you have my practice for it on _ night? marginally. at least you have my practice for it on sunday. - my practice for it on sunday. exactly, i am my practice for it on sunday. exactly, iam in my practice for it on sunday. exactly, i am in the zone. he has been in training _ exactly, i am in the zone. he has been in training for— exactly, i am in the zone. he has been in training for years! - exactly, i am in the zone. he has been in training for years! you i exactly, i am in the zone. he has i been in training for years! you have the end of summer _ been in training for years! you have the end of summer to _ been in training for years! you have the end of summer to catch - been in training for years! you have the end of summer to catch up. - been in training for years! you have i the end of summer to catch up. good morning. hope you had a good night of sleep. a better day after the storms yesterday. sunshine already out in norwich and it is a sign of things to come. summat returns to our shores for the rest of the week. today, if you wish hours, but still some on the go and some sharp but not as intense as yesterday and a bit more sunshine to look forward to in the afternoon. after quite a mystery and make a start across parts of northern england, sara in
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harrogate, the great yorkshire show, some spots of rain coming and going and across other parts of northern england. that will fade a bit, still one or two showers in the afternoon, one or two showers in the afternoon, one or two close to the channel islands. lots of mist and make, great in a few spots. temperatures lead to between 19 and 24 degrees for the vast majority come around where we should be for this stage in july. there will be a few showers this afternoon. no where near as yesterday but fairly intense at times. south—west england, parts of wales, lighter showers across northern england and if few heavier ones over the hills in scotland. for most, you start the day dry, finish it dry and sunny. temperatures into the low 20s, rising to the high 20s for some towards the weekend. full forecast in around half an hour. i forecast in around half an hour. i can hardly wait. thank you very much. i feel we need a ifeel we need a drum roll!
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we've got another breakfast exclusive for you this morning. sally's been chatting to lewis hamilton about his plans to encourage more young black people to take up stem subjects. we have seen a bit of the interview. it's clearly clutching his height. isn't it interesting?— it's clearly clutching his height. isn't it interesting? today of all da s isn't it interesting? today of all days when _ isn't it interesting? today of all days when we _ isn't it interesting? today of all days when we are _ isn't it interesting? today of all days when we are talking - isn't it interesting? today of all days when we are talking about football is in the media using their voice, expressing their opinions, here we have another sportsman, lewis hamilton, who has started to do something very constructive about trying to change the way his sport looks. he has commissioned a report, the hamilton commission and in a sport that is full of data, driven by data, he was shocked to discover there is no data about the diversity of backgrounds within formula i. that is something he has really hoping to change. he is starting right at the very beginning with education for children, black children in particular, to encourage them, give them one confidence to take up science, technology and engineering subjects in school. is our exclusive chat.
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lewis hamilton, good morning. good morning. you're making a very special announcement today, aren't you? something you have been working on for a really long time. it's a very nerve—racking moment. but super exciting, as well. because it's the beginning of a journey for pushing for change within my industry. where it stems from is i thought that me being in this sport, and we thought as a family, us making it in the sport, we were breaking the mould. and it would open up doors and pathways to other young black talent. when i ask why there is such a lack of diversity within our industry, nobody has an answer for it. so that's my purpose, that's my reason for being here. i have two young people who are really excited to talk to you. natalie and elikem. hi. how are you?
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i'm fine. i like your hair. thank you. what i've noticed, what i watch in formula 1 is there are actually very few black women in your team. and stephanie travers being one of the only black female fluid engineers. what would you say to black girls aspiring to be engineers in formula 1? stephanie is a hero. she is absolutely amazing. and what she has had to overcome in order to be in our sport is incredible. last year, i got to be on the podium with her for the first time. she was the first black woman to be on the podium in 70 years of the sport. so it is really encouraging young girls to be following stem subjects. of course, the triple science, super important. but itjust opens up so many great avenues within our industry. there's 40,000 jobs and currently there's only i% of those are from black backgrounds. so that's what we need to change. so we need lots... more and more people like you,
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with great minds, to come, because, ultimately, a more diverse workforce is beneficial for everyone. this is lewis. how are you doing? i'm good. you look very smart. thank you. so you're good, yes? you look very smart. thank you. you've got a question for me? yeah, how did your family react when you told them that you wanted to become an f1 driver? good question. i wanted to be a racing driverfrom the age... i was already five, six years old, so i knew that was what i wanted to do, as we were watching grands prix. and, at the time, of course, it was just such a far—fetched dream, but it was a big dream. i started racing when i was eight years old. so that was then the beginning of thatjourney. did you feel like you were the odd
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one out being the only black person on the grid? i did, i did, and... i guess ultimately, when i walked into the room, i don't... for example, when you are the only person it doesn't... i don't go... i don't look at my skin and see the difference, naturally, because i don't see a difference. what we did is we just kept... we worked so hard on the go—kart and then we delivered with action. we would just win races. what do you want to be when you're older? er, i want to become in formula 1 driver, or a formula e driver. amazing — formula e's probably good because that's the future, right? keep working hard at school, ok? yes. work hard at trying to catch max verstappen, as well. trust me, i'm working hard. trust me, i will. bye, guys. bye! so, lewis, there you have it. two young people challenging
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you to come up with the goods now. because motorsport does not represent society, does it? it doesn't — at the moment. but that's what we're here to change. and i actually believe that it's possible. and, again, those lovely kids wejust met, you know, it's showing them and their families that this is actually a real route for them, a real opportunity, a careerfor them. lewis, you are in the middle of the busiest time. you've got silverstone coming up. what made you think that you have to do something about this now? obviously, last year with with what happened with george, me, personally, it brought up emotions that i was really not expecting, that i clearly suppressed over time. and i was like, you know what? i look at my niece and nephew, who are also biracial, and i think about other kids who are in my position when i was younger. and i'm like, i've got to speak out. i've got to do something with this platform, because everyone deserves an equal opportunity. you talk in the commission report
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about the challenges that young black people face at school. does that come from a place of personal experience for you? it does. one of the one of the findings is the expulsion rates being incredibly high. what really hit home for me was i was one of those. being expelled, i know what the impacts of that are. i remember walking home... i will never ever forget it. i remember walking home that day. i was like, i don't think i can face my parents. i don't know what i'm going to say. i thought my life was over. so one of the recommendations is to establish a new exclusions innovation fund and projects to support kids that are at risk of expulsion. because the knock—on effect of that is incredible. we realised through the research just how far—reaching and systemic these barriers are to getting young black people pursuing stem subjects. the research shows that, throughout the educational journey, students are treated differently to their white counterparts.
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you get students with caribbean heritage like myself that are less likely to take up triple science, which is often required to pursue stem subjects at a—level. what does your sport need to do now? do you think it's time to introduce maybe a quota system when it comes to apprenticeships and employment, perhaps? one of the recommendations we have is for formula i teams to take the lead in signing a diversity and inclusion charter. it's about us coming together on this journey. i can't do it on my own. we just need to get all the teams on board, because that's the goal over this next 5—10 years. when i look back, i don't want to look back and think, "lewis hamilton is a seven—time world champion." i want to look back and say that i was a part of something.
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kids always ask the very best questions, don't they? they were so, so good. really interesting to hear lewis hamilton talking about the time he was excluded from school. i time he was excluded from school. i didn't know that. all _ time he was excluded from school. i didn't know that. all of _ time he was excluded from school. i didn't know that. all of this - time he was excluded from school. i didn't know that. all of this is - didn't know that. all of this is from his personal _ didn't know that. all of this is from his personal experience | didn't know that. all of this is - from his personal experience and how he felt growing up. he said he was bullied, attacked, and he really feels he suppressed all the stuff that happened to him as a kid and now is the time to actually put something into action and do something into action and do something about it and supports children who may be in a similar position. it children who may be in a similar osition. , ., ., position. it is well thought through and i love those _ position. it is well thought through and i love those questions - position. it is well thought through and i love those questions from . position. it is well thought through | and i love those questions from the children. spot on. if and i love those questions from the children. spot on.— children. spot on. if we asked of those we would _ children. spot on. if we asked of those we would be _ children. spot on. if we asked of those we would be in _ children. spot on. if we asked of those we would be in all - children. spot on. if we asked of those we would be in all sorts i children. spot on. if we asked of those we would be in all sorts ofj those we would be in all sorts of bother _ those we would be in all sorts of bother but — those we would be in all sorts of bother but he just smiled when they asked! _ bother but he 'ust smiled when they asked! . ~ bother but he 'ust smiled when they asked! ., ~' , ., bother but he 'ust smiled when they asked! ., ~ i. ., , , asked! thank you for bringing us that. "i will never apologise for who i am, or where i came from." those are the words of footballer marcus rashford after he was subjected to racist abuse online, following his penalty miss in sunday's euro 2020 final. a mural of the 23—year—old in manchester was also defaced following the game. our reporter phil mccann
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is there for us this morning. the community has responded overwhelmingly with positive messages, some of which we can see there. good morning. . messages, some of which we can see there. good morning.— there. good morning. . this is what marcus rashford _ there. good morning. . this is what marcus rashford said _ there. good morning. . this is what marcus rashford said brought - there. good morning. . this is what marcus rashford said brought him l there. good morning. . this is whatl marcus rashford said brought him to tiers last night and you can see why. people have been turning up, we have been here since 6am, turning up on their way to work with their kids on their way to work with their kids on their way to work with their kids on the way to schooljust on their way to work with their kids on the way to school just to answer some of the post—its and messages. keep going, this was a. this was led by police officer. you are a hero, marcus, and an amazing person. hero, inspire, love not hate. we love marcus rashford, prosecco, his team—mates. people flooded in with positive messages of support which is kind of what we are seeing here, these bikes are covering up the abuse and they have now been plastered over with hundreds of these messages. this wall was put
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here, this artwork was commissioned by the artist down here. he will be coming on today, akse, to restore it to how it was before. the community street art project commissioned this. as we look at some of these messages, what do you think the outpouring says about markets in the area? it outpouring says about markets in the area? , , outpouring says about markets in the area? , area? it says something very significant — area? it says something very significant -- _ area? it says something very significant -- about - area? it says something very significant -- about marcus l area? it says something very i significant -- about marcus and area? it says something very - significant -- about marcus and the significant —— about marcus and the area? _ significant —— about marcus and the area? it— significant —— about marcus and the area? it is— significant —— about marcus and the area? it is a — significant —— about marcus and the area? it is a very diverse community and we _ area? it is a very diverse community and we are _ area? it is a very diverse community and we are fighting back against this and — and we are fighting back against this and what we have seen in social media _ this and what we have seen in social media and _ this and what we have seen in social media and with the vandalism of the wall. media and with the vandalism of the wall it _ media and with the vandalism of the wall. it feels like, between this and the — wall. it feels like, between this and the donations from the crowdfunding and the messages posted that something positive may come of it. i that something positive may come of it i love _ that something positive may come of it. i love that we are talking about the issue — it. i love that we are talking about the issue of— it. i love that we are talking about the issue of racism in this country, as well, _ the issue of racism in this country, as well, that — the issue of racism in this country, as well, that there are active discussions in the way to resolve these _ discussions in the way to resolve these issues. the door is open to have _ these issues. the door is open to have these — these issues. the door is open to have these discussions and i think it shows _
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have these discussions and i think it shows that there is a lot of solidarity _ it shows that there is a lot of solidarity by the players. they have been a _ solidarity by the players. they have been a fine — solidarity by the players. they have been a fine role model is on and off the pitch— been a fine role model is on and off the pitch so— been a fine role model is on and off the pitch so it is in their image that— the pitch so it is in their image that people are responding this way. a lot of— that people are responding this way. a lot of the — that people are responding this way. a lot of the discussion has revolved around marcus rashford. you commissioned this in november last year after he shot to political fame after his school meals campaign. i saw you yesterday saying this is depressing but predictable at some point that it will come to this, this would be defaced. it point that it will come to this, this would be defaced.- point that it will come to this, this would be defaced. it was sako sancho and _ this would be defaced. it was sako sancho and manager— this would be defaced. it was sako sancho and manager is _ this would be defaced. it was sako sancho and manager is rough - this would be defaced. it was sako sancho and manager is rough if. this would be defaced. it was sako| sancho and manager is rough if you missed _ sancho and manager is rough if you missed i_ sancho and manager is rough if you missed. i thought this would happen and sure _ missed. i thought this would happen and sure enough it happened. within 'ust a few and sure enough it happened. within just a few hours. _ and sure enough it happened. within just a few hours. more _ and sure enough it happened. within just a few hours. more or— and sure enough it happened. within just a few hours. more or less - just a few hours. more or less straiaht just a few hours. more or less straight after _ just a few hours. more or less straight after the _ just a few hours. more or less straight after the game. - just a few hours. more or less straight after the game. it i just a few hours. more or less straight after the game. it is i just a few hours. more or less| straight after the game. it is a funny— straight after the game. it is a funny one. _ straight after the game. it is a funny one, that somebody's response is to attack— funny one, that somebody's response is to attack a — funny one, that somebody's response is to attack a mural. about someone you think— is to attack a mural. about someone you think would have enough cash in
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the bank— you think would have enough cash in the bank to— you think would have enough cash in the bank to not be subject to this. the nrural— the bank to not be subject to this. the mural was very much about marcus demand _ the mural was very much about marcus demand rather than the footballer, so it is— demand rather than the footballer, so it is even more tragic —— marcus the man— so it is even more tragic —— marcus the man rather than a footballer. it is the _ the man rather than a footballer. it is the toss— the man rather than a footballer. it is the toss of a claim, scoring a penalty. — is the toss of a claim, scoring a penalty, and this is the abuse he is getting _ penalty, and this is the abuse he is ttettin. ~ . penalty, and this is the abuse he is ttettinr ., ., penalty, and this is the abuse he is ttettin.~ ., ., ,., , penalty, and this is the abuse he is getting. what are the plans for this mornint ? getting. what are the plans for this morning? you _ getting. what are the plans for this morning? you have _ getting. what are the plans for this morning? you have the _ getting. what are the plans for this morning? you have the artist - getting. what are the plans for this l morning? you have the artist coming back. so thankfully, akse is available to restore it to how it was before. after he has dropped his kits are a skill he is going to come and fix it. it kits are a skill he is going to come and fix it. , ., , and fix it. it is great news -- after he _ and fix it. it is great news -- after he has _ and fix it. it is great news -- after he has dropped - and fix it. it is great news -- after he has dropped his i and fix it. it is great news -- i after he has dropped his children off at— after he has dropped his children off at school. i don't know what we will do _ off at school. i don't know what we will do with — off at school. i don't know what we will do with the messages. you have a decision to — will do with the messages. you have a decision to make. _ will do with the messages. you have a decision to make. it _ will do with the messages. you have a decision to make. it is _ will do with the messages. you have a decision to make. it is a _ will do with the messages. you have a decision to make. it is a real- a decision to make. it is a real outpouring of feelings and emotion, less than 24 hours that these were put up. less than 24 hours that these were ut u -. ., , less than 24 hours that these were tut u i _ ., , ., less than 24 hours that these were tut ut, ., , ., , , put up. people are still turning up and hopefully _ put up. people are still turning up and hopefully it _ put up. people are still turning up and hopefully it will _ put up. people are still turning up and hopefully it will continue - put up. people are still turning up and hopefully it will continue and | and hopefully it will continue and lon- and hopefully it will continue and long may — and hopefully it will continue and long may it continue. we need to think— long may it continue. we need to think of— long may it continue. we need to think of something significant that
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we can— think of something significant that we can do— think of something significant that we can do with the messages so they don'tiust_ we can do with the messages so they don'tjust go in the bin.— don't 'ust go in the bin. thank you ve don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much- _ don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much- i _ don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much. i will— don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much. i will leave _ don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much. i will leave you - don'tjust go in the bin. thank you very much. i will leave you with i very much. i will leave you with these two flags. hero, inspire, love not hate, we are proud of you, marcus, you are a true inspiration. this here on the end, hero, idle, gent, a manchester man. streets when he grew up and that is why these messages brought him as he said of social media. messages brought him as he said of social media-— social media. they are going to tather it social media. they are going to gather it up _ social media. they are going to gather it up carefully, - social media. they are going to gather it up carefully, becausel social media. they are going to| gather it up carefully, because i social media. they are going to i gather it up carefully, because i am sure he would love to see those messages. thank you very much. coming up in the next half hour... we meet stuart and charlotte, the couple hoping to complete all 96 olympic events in 17 days, in memory of stuart's brother, who died of motor neurone disease ten years ago.
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the size of the challenge is really something. they have had to learn a new sports, they will be expended at they have to do 240 kilometre bike ride. �* .., a they have to do 240 kilometre bike ride.- a marathon, - ride. america. a marathon, triathlon- — ride. america. a marathon, triathlon. brilliant. - ride. america. a marathon, triathlon. brilliant. good i ride. america. a marathon, triathlon. brilliant. good on ride. america. a marathon, - triathlon. brilliant. good on them and we will speak to them c. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. some of london's streets were left underwater after heavy rain led to flash flooding. raynes park, barnes, and richmond in southwest london were among the areas worst affected, along with hampstead and golders green in northwest london. the london fire brigade said it received more than a thousand related calls from people in homes and businesses or trapped in cars. a number of tube and train services are still affected. a charity that supports people whose loved ones have gone missing, loved ones have gone missing
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is consulting families to understand how their race impacts on the treatment they receive. evidencejoel, whose son richard okorogheye disappeared in march, is among those taking part. the police watchdog is investigating her claim that her initial concerns were dismissed by the met. the force says that in all missing person cases risk level is assessed on the information it receives and denies bias plays a role. what we've seen is really concerning. some examples are families who are reporting their special loved one missing to the police and the police not taking the initial report. it's where families are being expected to do more than usual to try and find their missing loved one, or where their efforts so far are being dismissed. and you can see more on that story in a special report on bbc london tonight at 6.30. an 18—year—old from buckinghamshire looks set to have landed a place in the record books — becoming the youngest pilot to fly solo around the world. travis ludlow touched down
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near high wycombe yesterday after a 25,000—mile journey that took him 44 days to complete. travel now... lots of problems caused by the flooding. the circle line is suspended. the district and the hammersmith and city are part—suspended. there's no service on the overground camden road to richmond, shepherds bush and euston to kilburn high road, while damage is repaired. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, some of us, but not all of us across the capital, saw some torrential downpours, along with plenty of thunder. but today is a lot less dramatic, weather—wise. a much quieter day of weather right across the board. it's a cloudy, mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius. now, there is plenty of cloud around through the morning, but it will gradually break up. we will see some brightness, some spells of sunshine start to develop. the sunshine probably best through the afternoon out towards western home counties. here, temperatures will peak in the low 20s celsius. the winds more noticeable
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than they were yesterday, although fairly light. there is the small chance we could see showers break out, but they will be isolated and, for many of us, it will be a dry day. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud will reform. there will be some clear spells — watch out for mist in those. it is a mild start to wednesday morning. on wednesday, we start with lots of cloud, but it should break up to give us some brightness and sunshine. a small chance of one or two showers. high pressure is set to build in and it is looking dry for the rest of the week, with increasing amounts of sunshine and climbing temperatures. that's it for now. plenty more on our website at the usual address. i'll be back with another update in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's on today's programme with gethin and janette. thanks.
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coming up on today's morning live. with more than two—thirds of us — that's 36 million — targeted by scammers in the first six months of this year, and we hearfrom one woman who was tricked by one of the most common scams currently doing the rounds. find out what to do if it's you the fraudsters come after next. and rav�*s here with a warning about a new scam that could affect you if you're the tv licence fee payer in your house. plus, with news that the government has announced freedom day is happening on monday, but have given bus and train companies the power to decide on masks when travelling, dr punam's here with the latest. also today, anna haugh's off for a picnic at buckingham palace, as the gardens there are opened up to the public for the first time in nearly ten years. perfect timing for a cucumber sandwich _ and you might want to pack up a picnic for this adventure. we're joining radio 3 breakfast show host petroc trelawny on the banks of the river ure in yorkshire
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as he tells how we can all make the most of some of the stunning and spectacular waterways across the uk this summer. beautiful, that. plus, i'll be reunited with one of my favourite strictly dance partners. you say that about all of them. jls star aston merrygold will be here. we're talking about fame, family and why he tried to track down the troll who dared to pick on his young son. and talking of strictly, what have you got for today's strictly fitness? i have a good move today. it is twisty tuesday. i have a good move today. it is twisty tuesday-_ twisty tuesday. you have been buildin: twisty tuesday. you have been building that _ twisty tuesday. you have been building that up _ twisty tuesday. you have been building that up all _ twisty tuesday. you have been building that up all week. - twisty tuesday. you have been building that up all week. i i twisty tuesday. you have been building that up all week. i bet twisty tuesday. you have been i building that up all week. i bet you are excited about that, louise. i cannot wait for twisty tuesday. from doing your weekly shop to getting on the bus, wearing a face covering has become a part of everyday life for most of us. but, from next week in england, you'll no longer legally be required to wear one.
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john maguire has been finding out how people in bristol feel about the change. banksy is yet to be unmasked, but in his home city of bristol, one of his best—known works can once again be seen without a face covering. and the rest of england is about to follow suit — as, one year on from their mandatory introduction, the law requiring face masks in public places is about to end. so, at mugshot restaurant in the city centre, they're preparing for yet another change in the rules. we'll encourage our staff to wear them — we'll make our staff wearthem, rather. the guests, we will encourage it to those who are happy to do so. like you say, it's not something that we can enforce, but we're quite a small restaurant and so if we can make the space more comfortable for them in any way that we can, we will do. the government's urging people to cover up when it's busy, but it will be a personal decision. i think, out of politeness, i'll certainly carry on wearing masks — particularly in indoor places,
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or if it's even crowded in outdoor places, i would carry on wearing masks — yes, i think it's a necessity, to be honest. we're in two minds. i mean, obviously, we feel like they keep us safe because that's what they've been telling us. but i hate them. i can't hear in one! you go deaf? go deaf — yeah! so i'd like to get rid of them but it's a bit of a worry. you've got to wear i them in busy places. yes — ooh, yes, definitely. the buses. can't not do it in public transport. you're really asking for it. yeah, that's right. on the city's harbour—side — in pre—covid days, a hub for bristol's nightlife — staff and customers will be given the choice to wear a mask or not. but robert says he'll be glad to see the back of them. it's been hard. trying to keep control has been very hard. obviously, we sell alcohol — we don't serve soft drinks only. so after a few drinks, they forget to wear a mask and we tell them off and tell them off again.
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it's just extra work for us. will it now be easier? are you looking forward to the rules changing? yes, i'm looking forward, yeah. can't wait. can't wait? yeah. hospitality has been one of the hardest—hit sectors since the pandemic arrived, and it continues to take its toll. wilsons restaurant has been forced to close its doors after a positive test. the owner — who's self—isolating — says ultimately it will be up to his customers to decide for themselves. i don't like wearing masks — they irritate my ears. some of my colleagues, who english is not theirfirst language — you know, it's really... they've been very difficult. the bigger question for us is, how does it make our guests feel? you know, someone's come into a restaurant, we want them to feel safe, welcome, loved. you know, that's why we do this. we look after people and welcome them to our little place. you know, if i have to wear a mask to make someone feel ok, i'm more than willing to do that.
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obviously, i'm not going to force that on my colleagues but, personally, that's what i'm going to do. some calljuly the 19th freedom day, and in england, that will mean the freedom to decide — mask or no mask. the decision is yours. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. we're joined now by our medical editor fergus walsh. mask wearing in england at least will be personal choice but it seems to me the government is changing their language around it. the press briefin: their language around it. the press briefing yesterday _ their language around it. the press briefing yesterday was _ their language around it. the press briefing yesterday was full - their language around it. the press briefing yesterday was full of - briefing yesterday was full of caution. the fact is that from the 19th, in england, social distancing rules and mask wearing, they will go as a legal requirement. all the
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emphasis will be on personal responsibility. i have been looking through the modelling documents that were released yesterday. they make it clear the sort of interventions that have worked, such as social distancing, masks, and working from home, really do make a difference in terms of reducing the spread. the thing the government wants more than anything else is for people not to suddenly return to pre—pandemic activity, but to take things cautiously. they are leaving it in the hands of individuals to decide whether to wear masks and whether to return to work and for companies to do that. there is a huge element of uncertainty about what will happen in the coming weeks. you mentioned the modelling- _ in the coming weeks. you mentioned the modelling. take _ in the coming weeks. you mentioned the modelling. take us _ in the coming weeks. you mentioned the modelling. take us through - in the coming weeks. you mentioned the modelling. take us through the l the modelling. take us through the numbers. anybody who watched it will know. they expect a peak of infections to lead to between 1000
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and 2000 hospital admissions per day. and 2000 hospital admissions per da . , ., , ., ., day. there is a strong degree of confidence _ day. there is a strong degree of confidence that _ day. there is a strong degree of confidence that the _ day. there is a strong degree of confidence that the number i day. there is a strong degree of confidence that the number of l day. there is a strong degree of- confidence that the number of deaths will be much lower than in previous peaks, because the vaccine is so effective. i will give you one thing that will show the level of uncertainty. we know the vaccine is really effective at preventing severe illness. but if a vaccine is 94% effective, that would lead to three times the number of vaccinated infected people being admitted to hospital than if it was 98% effective. a 4% difference in the effectiveness of the vaccine preventing hospitalisation would lead to three times the number of patients being admitted. those modelling are unsure about how many
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hospital admissions we will have. we are currently running at about 500 per day. they are confident we will be heading to over 1000. whatever happens in the next couple of weeks in terms of hospitalisations is baked into the figures, because of the time lag. but it could go higher than that. ., ., , , than that. there are so many figures to look at. compare _ than that. there are so many figures to look at. compare what _ than that. there are so many figures to look at. compare what is - to look at. compare what is predicted to happen in the coming peak and what happened injanuary. the difference in the number of deaths is crucial?— the difference in the number of deaths is crucial? absolutely. to . ive deaths is crucial? absolutely. to tive ou deaths is crucial? absolutely. to give you a _ deaths is crucial? absolutely. to give you a figure. _ deaths is crucial? absolutely. to give you a figure. back - deaths is crucial? absolutely. to give you a figure. back in - give you a figure. back in mid—december, when we had roughly the same number of daily cases we have now, there were over 500 deaths a day. and now we are running at around an average of 30. we hit a
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peak injanuary, february, where there were over 1000, heading up to 1500 deaths a day. there is a strong expectation that because of the vaccine that we will not breach anything like that. we will have a rise in deaths and a significant rise in deaths and a significant rise in deaths and a significant rise in hospitalisation but it will not be anything like we have had in the peak injanuary and may be not even the first wave. other countries will be watching the uk extremely carefully, because we are the first country to have a really huge wave of delta, the delta variant that will become the dominant variant globally. that also has a significant proportion of its population vaccinated. at some point, the virus will have limited options and places to go, because so many people are immunised. but we do
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not know when that is going to be. what will be the thing we are looking for is when the rise in cases starts to bend. at the moment they are doubling i think every two weeks, ten days in terms of the number of cases. hospitalisations have doubled in the past nine days. people will have so many questions and personal questions about people choosing to wear a mask. and also whether there is a possibility restrictions may have to be reintroduced.— restrictions may have to be reintroduced. what are your thoughts? _ reintroduced. what are your thoughts? interesting - reintroduced. what are your thoughts? interesting that i reintroduced. what are your. thoughts? interesting that the netherlands reopened nightclubs recently and then had to close them again because of a massive sharp rise in cases in the netherlands. it has really shot up in the past weeks. we know that very crowded places with poor ventilation are the
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ideal situation for what we call superspreader events. there will be concern about people meeting in very crowded places with no facemasks, no social distancing. the government has said it wants nightclubs to follow the covid pass system whereby you can check whether someone has been immunised or has had a recent negative tests. but there will be concern about that. there is so much uncertainty, i think, concern about that. there is so much uncertainty, ithink, about concern about that. there is so much uncertainty, i think, about what we will see in the coming weeks. thank you. one of the uk's largest agricultural events — the great yorkshire show — is back for the first time since the pandemic. sarah is there for us this morning. it looks very busy. good morning. good morning. it is busy. 100,000
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people are expected in harrogate over the next four days. it was a virtual event last year but as you can see they are back for real. we are at the main grandstand and they are at the main grandstand and they are showing ponies and horses. they are showing ponies and horses. they arejudged on movement and manners. some are better behaved than others. there is showjumper later. one of the main talking points among farmers here is the shortage of workers this year. people who pick and pack fruit and vegetables. those jobs previously done by eu nationals, but brexit and the pandemic has had an impact on the supply of labour. to discuss this i am joined by the deputy president of the national farmers' union, stuart roberts. how significant is the labour shortage? roberts. how significant is the labourshortage? it is roberts. how significant is the labour shortage?— roberts. how significant is the labour shortage? it is a good point ou labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged _ labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged up- _ labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged up- we _ labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged up. we are _ labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged up. we are finding i labour shortage? it is a good point you flagged up. we are finding it i you flagged up. we are finding it challenging on farms, particularly
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in the fruit and veg sector. it is also downstream, in processing facilities. and we see it in transport, getting the product to the shell. we are working hard on this because otherwise we will end “p this because otherwise we will end up —— on the shelf. we will end up with fruit and veg rotting and not being used or off shoring production to somewhere else in the world where we have some of the best products in the world as you can see at events like this. ~ ., ., , ., ., like this. what does it mean for rices? like this. what does it mean for prices? could _ like this. what does it mean for prices? could we _ like this. what does it mean for prices? could we see _ like this. what does it mean for prices? could we see the - like this. what does it mean for prices? could we see the cost i like this. what does it mean for| prices? could we see the cost of soft fruit that needs to be harvested now going up? there are not enough workers and wages have to increase. i not enough workers and wages have to increase. ., , ., , ., increase. i hope that is not the case and _ increase. i hope that is not the case and l _ increase. i hope that is not the case and i think _ increase. i hope that is not the case and i think it _ increase. i hope that is not the case and i think it will - increase. i hope that is not the case and i think it will not - increase. i hope that is not the case and i think it will not be i case and i think it will not be because we are working on solutions. we are working with members, the department for work and pensions, businesses are trying to recruit. it is challenging but we are working on that and i see no issue in terms of getting fruit and veg to the shop
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for the consumer. one of the great positives in terms of food production in this country is fresh fruit and veg. we need to see more of it being grown here and we need to see farmers doing more and to see the technology. i think it is something we can get excited about. the government said it is encouraging employers to invest in domestic workers rather than relying on foreign labour as previously and that means employers need to provide training, wage increases, focus on skills to make that happen. the training, wage increases, focus on skills to make that happen. are you doin: skills to make that happen. are you doing that? — skills to make that happen. are you doing that? absolutely. _ skills to make that happen. are you doing that? absolutely. this - skills to make that happen. are you doing that? absolutely. this is - skills to make that happen. are you doing that? absolutely. this is not| doing that? absolutely. this is not a brexit issue. for a number of years we have been trying to recruit more staff. seasonal work does not suit everyone but we are working hard on that and other technology solutions. working conditions, etc. we will continue to work on that to
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find solutions, but we need government to make sure they play their part in the short—term solutions that we are suffering from right now. solutions that we are suffering from riaht now. ., , ., solutions that we are suffering from riaht now. .,, ., .. solutions that we are suffering from riaht now. ., , ., .. ., right now. there was a campaign to t to net right now. there was a campaign to try to get british — right now. there was a campaign to try to get british workers _ right now. there was a campaign to try to get british workers into - right now. there was a campaign to try to get british workers into the i try to get british workers into the fields and factories. it did not manage to recruit the numbers needed. . . , manage to recruit the numbers needed. . ., , ., ,., needed. the challenge is that point as to whether _ needed. the challenge is that point as to whether seasonal _ needed. the challenge is that point as to whether seasonal work - needed. the challenge is that point as to whether seasonal work suits i as to whether seasonal work suits our work force. we have a pilot at the moment on seasonal workers and we need that to be a solution permanently notjust we need that to be a solution permanently not just a we need that to be a solution permanently notjust a pilot. this is a great industry to work in. we have everything going for us, but we have everything going for us, but we have to get over this current problem. have to get over this current problem-— have to get over this current roblem. ~ ., ~ ., ., ., problem. walking around today, there is a celebration _ problem. walking around today, there is a celebration of _ problem. walking around today, there is a celebration of rural— problem. walking around today, there is a celebration of rural life. _ problem. walking around today, there is a celebration of rural life. lots - is a celebration of rural life. lots of amazing british food and drink on sale. how important are events like this in terms of the rural economy and for trade?—
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and for trade? really important in terms of trade _ and for trade? really important in terms of trade and _ and for trade? really important in terms of trade and the _ and for trade? really important in terms of trade and the economy i and for trade? really important in i terms of trade and the economy but it is the feel good, the opportunity to engage with the public. we note the public support british food and farming and this is a great opportunity for us to set out our stall and talk to consumers. thanks. i want to take _ stall and talk to consumers. thanks. i want to take you _ stall and talk to consumers. thanks. i want to take you back _ stall and talk to consumers. thanks. i want to take you back over- stall and talk to consumers. thanks. i want to take you back over here. i i want to take you back over here. over the course of the next four days, 8000 animals will take part in competitions. we can leave you with a view of the horses. magnificent. it is starting to get busy here. the gates opened at eight o'clock. what a great view. studio: back to the horses now. we briefly left them. thank you very much. the perils of being a live correspondence when you are not sure what pictures we are showing. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. there was some dramatic rain
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effects. yes what a start to the week with a deluge in places and these are some of the wettest spots yesterday. in yorkshire, dorset, lancashire and greater london. the first line is how much fell yesterday and the second is how much you would see in an entire month. a month of rainfall in some areas. kew gardens having its wettest day in almost 40 years. the impact was easy to be seen across much of west london as streets turn to rivers. including this one outside of major shopping centre in white city. good news for the rest of the week after that deluge. showers today. but much fewer around than yesterday. and more sunshine. that trend will continue the rest of the week. today, it is cloudy in northern england with showers dotted around.
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most starting the day drive. there has been fog in places but that will lift. we will see showers on the go into the afternoon. from south—west england, through wales and into the north. even those showers, fewer than we saw yesterday. more sunshine around and more dry weather. temperatures lifting to between 18-24, temperatures lifting to between 18—24, around average at this stage. overnight, showers fading. some low cloud around the coast and inland we could see fog patches to take us into tomorrow morning. temperatures into tomorrow morning. temperatures in double figures and for some a humid start. the picture on wednesday shows high pressure is starting to come in but it will bring weather fronts. starting to come in but it will bring weatherfronts. nothing starting to come in but it will bring weather fronts. nothing too much on them. this cloud will bring rain and drizzle potentially to the
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western isles later in the day. still cloud on eastern coasts with the breeze here. elsewhere, a dry day for the majority. showers few in number. most will stay dry and temperatures similar to today under what is pretty strong sunshine. through the latter stages of the week, high pressure starts to work its way in. it generally means dry weather. it is the exact position that will dictate the hot spots towards the end of the week. but the forecast into the weekend, not only drying, increasing sunshine and temperatures are rising further. widely this weekend we will see temperatures of 24—27, even 28 degrees. after the deluge of monday, summer returns the rest of the week. the monday deluge caught people out. was it expected to be so bad?
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yes, yesterday morning we warned a month of rain could fall in the space of hours. it is difficult to pinpoint the areas but we had it focused in the south and south—east. thanks. with the olympics just around the corner, do you think you could take on the pole vault, synchronised swimming or even trampolining? well, for one couple, they're having a go at notjust one, but all 96 olympic events injust 17 days. stuart bates and charlotte nichols are taking on the challenge to mark ten years since the death of stuart's brother to motor neurone disease, and to raise money for the mnd association. let's take a look at them in training. cheering
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yeah, lovely. 0k. come on. whoo! triple back. whoa! that was amazing. yay. i want to give them a round of applause. stuart and charlotte join us now. the challenges are immense. tell us exactly why. there are so many sports involved, how did you envisage this idea? can you hear me,
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stuart? it is louise from bbc breakfast. no. it is either the world's longest delay... we will try to re—establish that because you have been looking forward to this all morning. what strikes me about it, it is all very well taking on a few sports but this is 96 sports and they will do it in the 17 days that coincide with the olympics. it is a proper challenge. they have had to learn things. so i carry on? i could tell the whole story. the thing is about it is that they have had to learn things they have never done before. can you hear me now, stuart? no. they have had to learn things they have never done before, for example, showjumping. these are
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specific events that various athletes spend years learning. they are not expected to do it to olympic level but the physical and mental strain of going through that over the course of the olympic timeframe and fitting everything in. i also want to know how they fit it in when they have to do a marathon, for example. also a 240 kilometres cycle ride. a10 kilometres swim. all these questions that louise wants to ask. we will try to get back to them. if we do not get them on, i think you have given them enough coverage. they are raising money for an amazing cause. stuart's brother died from motor neurone disease a few years ago. and when attempting something like this with a good cause in mind makes the difference. the haulage industry is one
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of a number of sectors struggling to recruit enough staff as the economy reopens. with the shortage having an impact on the amount of produce that is being delivered, one firm is now working with the government to trial a fleet of super—sized lorries, in an attempt to tackle the problem. simon spark reports. at first, this looks like any kind of lorry. but if you saw it, you'd know about it, because this one just keeps coming around a corner. it's an eco—link combination trailer and it's over 25m long. it may look like something new, but this has been an idea that's been around for a long time. here it is 17 years ago, and four years ago. this better lorry, as it's being described, has been trying to get on uk roads since 2004 but, so far, with no luck. but is a driver crisis in the haulage industry giving super—sized vehicles like this another chance? firstly, i'd also welcome any more
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pay for professional drivers. earlier this month, the minister for transport, charlotte vere, announced a temporary extension of drivers' hours to help ease the driver shortage. but dick denby has also written to her and asked her to consider a trial of 3,000 of his lorries. its benefits are reducing the number of lorries by certainly a fifth, possibly a quarter, perhaps even a third. you can move 50% more freight, potentially, but still use one driver. and that's a very key thing for us at the moment, because of the driver shortage. i have to say that i was quite surprised with the announcement. they are safety rules, after all. and itjust demonstrates what a crisis the industry has, because the government has listened to representations and has relaxed these rules. it's a very welcome thing. but, yes, i'm surprised by it. the technology developed means this lorry can go anywhere a normal—sized articulated lorry can, even turn within the same turning circle.
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if i wanted to go to the left, these wheels would turn to the right to take the front end of this trailer out. this is terry, who's been at the forefront of all the trials so far. i've been to the netherlands. i took my driving test over there and they actually took us into towns and villages. so you've seen how it does perform? yeah, yeah. and we've actually been over with this. but, as it stands, a driver shortage continues and the ban for this kind of vehicle remains. simon spark, bbc news. a little update on the story i was excited to talk about. stewart and charlotte are doing this amazing event. 96 events over the 17 days of the olympics. we cannot make the technology worked, so very good luck to them. i will follow their journey. i am sure you can find them on
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social media. look up the spenny olympics. we are sorry. we do the show with a few technical issues but todayit show with a few technical issues but today it was not working. this morning we have been at the sight of a mural for marcus rashford. graffiti was put on it on sunday night after the penalty shoot—out at the euros. this has been the response from the community. so many people have come out to show support for marcus rashford. you can see the many messages, dozens of messages. we know, as we understand, they will be removed in order that it can be restored. the artist is due to be there in the next few minutes and we will go back there and find out what they will do with those messages of support. marcus rashford commented about that specifically on social media when he
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was talking about how he has felt after that penalty. the messages i have received today have been overwhelming and seeing the response had me on the verge of tears, he said. that is the impact it has on him.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines footballer tyrone mings criticises the home secretary for 'pretending' to be disgusted by racist abuse directed at england players following the euro 2020 final. the government has defended her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. we d like to hear your reaction to the tyrone mings' tweet. you can get in touch with me on twitter @annita?mcveigh the government confirms that all remaining covid restrictions in england will end on the 19th ofjuly. some senior doctors call it "irresponsible". and in scotland, the first minister nicola sturgeon will confirm whether covid restrictions there can be eased as planned.

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