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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  July 13, 2021 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. open for business — the uk prime minister confirms england's lockdown measures will be eased from the 19th of july. we assess how businesses will react and what it means for the economy. a big sigh of relief from tech giants, after the eu announces its plans for a digital services tax is put on ice. and fighting back from the pandemic blues! musicians offer tailored music to customers hoping the creative innovation will prove to be a big hit.
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let's start here in the uk, where prime minister boris johnson has confirmed the final stage of the coronavirus lockdown easing in england, will go ahead on the 19th ofjuly. it means the legal requirement to wear face coverings in some enclosed public places will be lifted in england, there will no longer be any limits on how many people can meet and the 1—metre—plus distancing rule will be removed. nightclubs will also be allowed to reopen and capacity limits will be removed for all venues and events. so how do companies navigate the new regulations, in which in many ways government is handing over responsibility for ensuring covid safety in the workplace to them?
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joining me now is suren thiru, who's the head of economics at the british chambers of commerce. how do businesses feel about the relaxation of virtually all restrictions? what should business leaders be doing, when it comes to making sure their staff are safe? well, of course, the news we had yesterday was really welcome to businesses across england, especially those that have not been open since march 2020. a challenge for the main for a lot of businesses in the next few days is for them to understand what they need to do afterjuly 19. there is a understand what they need to do afterjuly19. there is a lack of clarity what they need to do to keep the staff and customers safe. �* ., , , to keep the staff and customers safe. �* . , , , ., safe. and it really is up to businesses _ safe. and it really is up to businesses and _ safe. and it really is up to| businesses and companies safe. and it really is up to i businesses and companies to navigate this, and there is the worry that they could be at risk of legal liability? absolutely. because business leaders are not public health experts. that is why it is disappointing, the lack of clarity and guidance for what they need to do. as you say,
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businesses need more clarity on where they stand around liability, for example, if a covid outbreak is linked to their premises.— covid outbreak is linked to their premises. and also, the issue of self _ their premises. and also, the issue of self isolation, - their premises. and also, the issue of self isolation, but. issue of self isolation, but remains in place until august 16. how are your members navigating that? it is a real problem for some businesses, when many members of staffjust cannot be at work. when many members of staff 'ust cannot be at worki cannot be at work. yes, we are heafina cannot be at work. yes, we are hearing numerous _ cannot be at work. yes, we are hearing numerous cases - cannot be at work. yes, we are hearing numerous cases of - cannot be at work. yes, we are| hearing numerous cases of staff shortages caused by people who have to self isolate, but has only increased in the coming weeks. we need a clearer plan here of what businesses need to do and what supports are going to be in place going forward. what do you think should be the steps that businesses should take in terms of encouraging staff back into the office? because many are actually not that keen to return. £311" because many are actually not that keen to return.— that keen to return. our own research _ that keen to return. our own research shows _ that keen to return. our own research shows that - that keen to return. our own | research shows that actually, lots of businesses have taken quite a cautious approach, because of the increasing number of cases and also the increasing number of staff who
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need to self isolate. our own research shows that next year, businesses will at least keep some of their staff at home, adopt a more cautious approach to reopening. adopt a more cautious approach to rwinning-— to reopening. well, it is tricky times _ to reopening. well, it is tricky times to - to reopening. well, it is| tricky times to navigate, to reopening. well, it is- tricky times to navigate, that is for sure. thank you for joining us from the british chambers of commerce. let's now turn to france, where president emmanuel macron has announced all healthcare workers must be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by september, or risk not being paid. the requirement applies to doctors, nurses, office staff and volunteers. macron also said that from next month, health passes will need to be shown to access places like shops, bars, cinemas and long—distance train journeys in france. tomasz michalski is economics professor at hec paris. is there concern that the reopening of the economy in france is coming too soon?
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is the government having to become more vigilant about a vaccination uptake, because of hesitancy in france? to vaccination uptake, because of hesitancy in france?— hesitancy in france? to some extent, hesitancy in france? to some extent. yes. _ hesitancy in france? to some extent, yes, but _ hesitancy in france? to some extent, yes, but it— hesitancy in france? to some extent, yes, but it is- hesitancy in france? to some extent, yes, but it is a - hesitancy in france? to some extent, yes, but it is a bit- extent, yes, but it is a bit too late, if we are having a fourth wave already in two weeks, as the predictions are. the predictions of 20,000 cases at the beginning of august, but as an optimistic scenario. so, this is to actually ensure a longer term combat of the virus, but these measures that you mentioned are absolutely draconian, because for the nonvaccinated you have to either have a valid test or you cannot live a normal life, which imposes a de facto obligatory vaccination for large swathes of the
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population.- large swathes of the population. large swathes of the --oulation. ., , , ., population. how is this going down across _ population. how is this going down across france? - population. how is this going | down across france? because elections are not that far away. elections are not that far awa . , ., , elections are not that far awa _ , ., elections are not that far awa. , ., , away. so, people are absolutely stunned by _ away. so, people are absolutely stunned by yesterday's - stunned by yesterday's operation. first of all, there is a lot of confusion about the population, about businesses implementing and enforcing this, given that it is lacking, as of now, the current restrictions, for example at airports, also about the efficacy that i just airports, also about the efficacy that ijust mentioned, the equity, as well, because of course there are anti—vaxxers, but also poorer strata of the population who do not take up any public campaigns, including vaccination ones. the second part of this from emmanuel macron was the start of the presidential campaign, but factor, because he painted himself as a fearless leader who is going to settle a lot of french problems and build the
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great france for 2030. $5 french problems and build the great france for 2030.- great france for 2030. as we have seen — great france for 2030. as we have seen in _ great france for 2030. as we have seen in regional - great france for 2030. as we i have seen in regional elections in france so far, his party is not doing so well at all. but let's talk about how businesses are responding to this. because those restrictions are raised, certainly, could we see strike action, do you think, if workers do not feel they are safe? �* ., , ., workers do not feel they are safe? . , ., ., ., safe? already, a lot of the restrictions _ safe? already, a lot of the restrictions on _ safe? already, a lot of the restrictions on the - safe? already, a lot of the restrictions on the public. restrictions on the public sector, if you think about teachers administration, they left a while ago. in fact, schools remained open for most of the school year that has just ended. where i possibility of strikes coming from is if the measures that macron mentioned in the second part of the speech, for example, the reform of unemployment benefits that he said is going to come into force by october, or that
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he is going to try to ram through the pension reform, thatis through the pension reform, that is going to definitely lead to a backlash from the labour unions. the anti—vaxxers are pretty powerful as well among the former yellow jacket movement. if these two unite we might have a hot, hot fall this yearin might have a hot, hot fall this year in france. then again, those are not micron voters. yeah, it is going to be an interesting yearfor yeah, it is going to be an interesting year for france in the run—up to the elections in the run—up to the elections in the year ahead. if a fourth wave hits france hard, what impact will it have on the economy?— impact will it have on the economy? impact will it have on the econom ? ~' economy? so, if we think, we would probably _ economy? so, if we think, we would probably see _ economy? so, if we think, we would probably see more - would probably see more lockdowns of the places that were typically shut down, so you would have tourism venues, entertainment venues et cetera,
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these, if this fourth wave is going to be just like the third of a second, they do not weigh much, at the end of the day, in the entire economy. manufacturing, their services are generally moving strongly for france, and even despite the potential fourth wave, for france, and even despite the potentialfourth wave, the projected gdp growth for france for 2021, that was upgraded to 6% this year. which is amazing as well. it 696 this year. which is amazing as well. , ., 696 this year. which is amazing as well. , . ., ., 696 this year. which is amazing as well. , . . ., , ., as well. it is an amazing year. that is one — as well. it is an amazing year. that is one day _ as well. it is an amazing year. that is one day to _ as well. it is an amazing year. that is one day to describe . as well. it is an amazing year. that is one day to describe it, j that is one day to describe it, for most countries in the world. —— one way. thomas, thanks for speaking to us. let's get some of the day's other news. uk retail sales surged by record levels over the past three months as shoppers flocked back to stores following the easing of lockdown restrictions. the latest kpmg retail sales survey showed sales were up 28.4% from a year earlier, and were 10.4% percent higher than in 2019.
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virgin galactic has said it may sell up to $500 million of shares after completing a successful space trip on sunday. the company says it plans to use cash raised to develop its spaceship fleet and infrastructure. shares in virgin galactic tumbled 17% on the news. elon musk has revealed that he does not enjoy being the boss of tesla. he is quoted as saying "i rather hate it and i would much prefer to spend my time on design and engineering." musk made the annoncement at the start of a trial where he is accused of pressuring the firm's board members into a $2.6 billion deal to buy solarcity. big tech may be breathing a big sigh of relief after the eu announced it would be suspending its plans to tax online tech giants in the light of global efforts to agree a minimum corporate tax rate of 15%. the eu said putting its own
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plan on ice would make it easier to achieve "the last mile" of the international deal. but ireland declared it would stick to its lower tax level of just 12.5%. joining me now is marc 0stwald, who's the chief economist at adm isi. good morning. what do you think about this move _ good morning. what do you think about this move on _ good morning. what do you think about this move on the _ good morning. what do you think about this move on the part - good morning. what do you think about this move on the part of. about this move on the part of the eu, and is this a win win? will we finally get agreement on international corporation tax? i on international corporation tax? ~ , ., , tax? i think it shows good intentions, _ tax? i think it shows good intentions, but _ tax? i think it shows good intentions, but i - tax? i think it shows good intentions, but i still- tax? i think it shows good| intentions, but i still think the eu has a bit of a mountain to climb internally, because ireland, along with estonia, which is the internet security capital of the world, and hungary, are basically still
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objecting to this, and it has always been the internal divisions, regardless of the digital ones, corporate tax has always been a big problem. so it is a step in the right direction, it is definitely not something that is going to guarantee delivery. figs something that is going to guarantee delivery. as you say, there are _ guarantee delivery. as you say, there are some _ guarantee delivery. as you say, there are some serious - there are some serious stumbling box still in the way. finance leaders have supported this global effort for the 15% corporation tax, but there is also the problem in the us, the president biden supports it as well. ., , , ._ president biden supports it as well. ., ,, ., ., well. congress may not, and i think that _ well. congress may not, and i think that was _ well. congress may not, and i think that was effectively - well. congress may not, and i think that was effectively the | think that was effectively the question from the other members of the g 22 the eu, and the us, which is, are you actually going to deliver on this? many were not going to be implementing this unless they do, and we have serious doubts about that. this is a step in
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the right direction. for the tech sector, i think it is a matter of relief, because this is a tax which is a minimum on revenues rather than profits, which would have been a great impingement on them.- which would have been a great impingement on them. when you look at the _ impingement on them. when you look at the detail _ impingement on them. when you look at the detail on _ impingement on them. when you look at the detail on this, - impingement on them. when you look at the detail on this, on - look at the detail on this, on the proposal, i am trying to remember off the top of my head, when we covered the story last time, 10% profits, if you've got that margin, you will be taxed on that. many companies like amazon, so much of their business, the margins, you know, they are much lower than that. so they will not be paying tax. than that. so they will not be paying tart-— than that. so they will not be paying tax. precisely, exactly. so will it work? _ paying tax. precisely, exactly. so will it work? yes, - paying tax. precisely, exactly. so will it work? yes, the - so will it work? yes, the escape _ so will it work? yes, the escape clauses, - so will it work? yes, the escape clauses, i - so will it work? yes, the escape clauses, i think, | so will it work? yes, the - escape clauses, i think, they were aiming their digital tax and revenue. they will be a lot more evening this out in terms of getting the big tech companies to pay more tax.
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right now, the weight is being structured, but is not necessarily going to be the case. ., , necessarily going to be the case. ., , case. the devil, as always, is in the details. _ case. the devil, as always, is in the details. mark, - case. the devil, as always, is in the details. mark, thanks i in the details. mark, thanks for talking. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: as india continues to struggle with the delta variant, we take a look at what impact that's had on gender inequality as women struggle to find work. after months of talks and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the eurozone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the eurozone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally. called the great white way by americans but tonight. — it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans - of the problems that the energy crisisj
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has brought to them. leaders meet in paris for a summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoined the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on a huge shoal of their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: opponents of cuba's communist authorities say dozens of activists have been arrested since sunday's anti—government demonstrations on the island. france warns healthcare workers who refuse to be vaccinated against covid—19 they won't be paid. greece follows suit — after italy unveiled similar measures back in april.
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former uk prime minister, david cameron, was paid a salary of more than $1 million by greensill capital, according to the financial times. the finance company, which was owned by australia's lex greensill, collapsed in may due to financial difficulties. the ft says cameron received the large annual salary for his part—time advisory role. joining me now our asia business hub of singapore is katie silver. the plot thickens. it does indeed- — the plot thickens. it does indeed. so, _ the plot thickens. it does indeed. so, according - the plot thickens. it does indeed. so, according to| the plot thickens. it does i indeed. so, according to the financial times, when you say was a part—time advisory role, it was 25 days a year and for that, it works out to about $40,000 a day that david cameron was earning was not that makes him one of the highest paid employees of the company that it is more than double the amount that the head of the american division of greensill made and he was a
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anchor with 25 years experience will stop we also understand he got a number of shares but we are not sure how many. according to the ft, the role was about trying to secure government funds for the company was not to give you a little bit of a back story, mr cameron was accused of exploiting his private contact, as well as his former colleagues, by lobbying them with about 56 messages altogether via whatsapp, text and e—mail, including to a number of uk, like rishi sunak. he appeared before me —— mps in the uk investigating the work he did as well as the government response. at the time he was asked how much he earned and he said he earned far more than he did during his time as prime minister but he was cagey about the exact details was not as i say, it was about trying to secure government funds, particularly when it came to pandemic assistance schemes. 0ne when it came to pandemic assistance schemes. one of the schemes was about transactions of greensill being insured by the government was not mr cameron for his part said he didn't break any rules, although he doesn't say he should have used more formal
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means of medication. {lita should have used more formal means of medication. ok, thanks a lot, means of medication. ok, thanks a lot. katie. _ means of medication. ok, thanks a lot, katie, for— means of medication. ok, thanks a lot, katie, for clarifying - a lot, katie, for clarifying that story. a lot, katie, for clarifying that story-— a lot, katie, for clarifying that story. -- more formal means of— that story. -- more formal means of communication. | india has been struggling to ramp up its vaccination program to meet the government's ambitious plans of inoculating all adults by the end of the year. since january, the country has managed to inoculate only around 5% of its population. and that's not the only concern. the bbc�*s arunoday mukharji now reports on how india's women are falling behind in the vaccination drive. long lines at vaccination centres tell more than one story. notjust of the monumental task of giving covid shots to the country's nearly1 billion adults, but of a widening gender gap in who is receiving the vaccines. government data shows 14% fewer women are getting vaccinated. this woman, homemaker, reflects that distinctive —— statistic. despite living in mumbai, a
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city hit by the second wave, receiving a covid shot is not her priority. receiving a covid shot is not her priority-— receiving a covid shot is not her priority. translation: i encourage — her priority. translation: i encourage my _ her priority. translation: i encourage my husband - her priority. translation: i encourage my husband to i her priority. translation: || encourage my husband to take the vaccine because he has to go out for work well be stay—at—home, so he is more at risk. if he that's vaccinated then the whole family is safe. in rural india where two—thirds of the population lives, the gap is worse, with only one third of women able to access the internet, booking appointments online is not an option. while walkins have been allowed recently, social workers say women are still finding it difficult to break stereotypes and travel alone to vaccination centres from their villages. —— walk—ins. polities have been facing anxious questions. many of them about what the vaccine will do to a woman's reproduction system. what takes best is if we take a woman who has been vaccinated to go and explain and share her experience, answer their questions and explain to them
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that actually taking a vaccine is good for their children. giving more women the vaccine is also important for the economy. the number of women working in india has been falling rapidly over the past few years and covid—19's second wave made it worse. at its peak, female unemployment rose to nearly 19%. that is nearly double to that of men. to nearly 1996. that is nearly double to that of men.- double to that of men. they would automatically - double to that of men. they| would automatically because double to that of men. tia: would automatically because of lack of jobs. would automatically because of lack ofjobs. the vaccines in time, how are you able to get these women back in a healthier way into the workforce? when they are already slipping away. the international monetary fund says achieving gender parity in the economy could boost india's gdp by nearly 7%. ensuring women vaccinated would be an important first step in that direction. arunoday mukharji, bbc news, delhi. musicians around the world have been hit hard by the lockdowns, which have made it hard to tour
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or perform. according to uk music, musicians lost two—thirds of their income last year as a result of covid—19. so what other alternative revenue streams are out there for them? two musicians in brooklyn have decided to try to make a living by creating personalised songs and jingles for customers. so do people want to pay for a song that's specifically tailored to their tastes and interests? joining me now is omayya atout, who's the co—founder of songlorious. and this is what your company doesn't have you been busy? irate doesn't have you been busy? we been doesn't have you been busy? - been having tremendous success for the number of requests we get for personalised songs. there is a real want, a deep—seated want, for music to represent your own story. i’m represent your own story. i'm 'ust represent your own story. i'm just assuming — represent your own story. i'm just assuming people are using these customised songs on all of their social media outlets,
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all their twitter and facebook and everywhere else.- all their twitter and facebook and everywhere else. yes, use it on social _ and everywhere else. yes, use it on social media, _ and everywhere else. yes, use it on social media, sharing - and everywhere else. yes, use it on social media, sharing it . it on social media, sharing it with their friends it on social media, sharing it with theirfriends and it on social media, sharing it with their friends and mainly sharing it with their loved ones. a lot of times it is a very personalised so it is just a way to share your emotions in a way to share your emotions in a way to share your emotions in a way that you can feel it with the music. a way that you can feel it with the music-— the music. and what does it cost? it starts _ the music. and what does it cost? it starts at _ the music. and what does it cost? it starts at $45 - the music. and what does it cost? it starts at $45 for. the music. and what does it cost? it starts at $45 for a l cost? it starts at $45 for a 32nd song _ cost? it starts at $45 for a 32nd song and _ cost? it starts at $45 for a 32nd song and goes - cost? it starts at $45 for a 32nd song and goes up . cost? it starts at $45 for a 32nd song and goes up to| cost? it starts at $45 for a - 32nd song and goes up to about 200 us dollars for a three minute full production song, they mix and master it so it sounds like studio quality and we have professional musicians they work with and they do an amazing job. they work with and they do an amazing job-— amazing 'ob. what choices do the amazing job. what choices do they have _ amazing job. what choices do they have -- _ amazing job. what choices do they have -- do _ amazing job. what choices do they have -- do i _ amazing job. what choices do they have -- do i have. - amazing job. what choices do they have -- do i have. if- amazing job. what choices do they have -- do i have. if i i they have —— do i have. if i wanted a song put together for, i don't know, one of my children or something. can i choose the artist and pile of music and all that kind of thing, or? music and all that kind of thing. or?— music and all that kind of thin,or? , ., music and all that kind of thinr, or? , ., ., thing, or? basically we have a roster of artists, _ thing, or? basically we have a roster of artists, we _ thing, or? basically we have a roster of artists, we have i thing, or? basically we have aj roster of artists, we have over 100 musicians and you can choose the genre and you can also choose what artist you want to do the song if you like
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a certain style, and really just putting that information, about your son or whoever it is, and then the artist takes it and runs with it and they are pretty experienced at this so they do a really good job. telling your story in a song. and to what extent has this helped musicians? as we mentioned in the introduction, they have had a terrible 18 months. ., . , they have had a terrible 18 months. ., ., , , ., months. young, and this is one ofthe months. young, and this is one of the best _ months. young, and this is one of the best parts _ months. young, and this is one of the best parts for _ months. young, and this is one of the best parts for us - of the best parts for us because even before the pandemic, there are a lot of musicians in the market is kind of saturated. musicians all over the place, it is hard to make money as a musician. you are either at the top making a lot of you are at the bottom not making much, so this is a way for musicians, they can join the team and they, it has just helped tremendously. so many amazing stories are musicians not being able to pay the rent to now pack —— writing personalised songs and now making 11 so it has been amazing. —— making a living. has there been any issues with regards to rights?—
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regards to rights? there has not and the _ regards to rights? there has not and the reason - regards to rights? there has not and the reason is - regards to rights? there has. not and the reason is because of the way we wrote to the legal clause. we let the artist keep all the song rights. if they write a song, they own the copyrights. we only have a commercial license to give to the customers who have a personal use licence. the artist still owns the rights and if they want, if the song blows up, maybe, they can still use it. it blows up, maybe, they can still use it. ,., , , use it. it sounds interesting, thanks for — use it. it sounds interesting, thanks for being _ use it. it sounds interesting, thanks for being on - use it. it sounds interesting, thanks for being on the i thanks for being on the programme. good to talk to you. thanks for having me, appreciate it. we should get a song for this programme. mar; appreciate it. we should get a song for this programme. may be a personalised — song for this programme. may be a personalised song. _ song for this programme. may be a personalised song. send - song for this programme. may be a personalised song. send them l a personalised song. send them in, send them in. looking at financial markets, a strong session that this follows a record breaker the night before on wall street. there are gains across the board, as you can see, hong kong particularly strong. looking at the next one to see how things ended on wall street. we are seeing markets go street. we are seeing markets 9° up street. we are seeing markets go up and up and up, hitting record highs. have we got ahead? the earnings season
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kicks off in earnest to soon and also we have inflation data out in the us today as well. keep an eye out for that. now you are up—to—date and have a good day and i will see you soon. hello there. we had some pretty impressive downpours across different parts of the country on monday. the radar picture shows one of these bands of heavy rain working into north—east england, particularly north yorkshire, and then we had this second band of rain across the west london area. now in kew, in west london, we picked up 46 mm of rain from the shower band. that's pretty much smack bang on a whole month's worth of rain and the majority of that fell in just the space of two hours. if you're wondering what that looks like, it looks like this. three miles down the road in twickenham the roads flooded, and there were reports of flooding elsewhere as well. now, over the next few hours,
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those showers that we've seen by day will continue to very gradually fade away. the majority of us will eventually become drier over night with just an odd patch of rain still lingering into the east. temperatures around 12 to 14 celsius, feeling a little on the muggy side as well, particularly across parts of eastern england. now, for tuesday, we've got much more in the way of dry weather and sunshine with fewer showers, and for most of us, it's going to be a dry morning. the early morning cloud breaking, sunny spells developing widely and there should be quite a lot of that sunshine. but into the afternoon, we're likely to see some showers develop. look at this line of showers forming across parts of northwest england, the midlands and perhaps another one affecting wales down towards parts of dorset as well. now, those showers could be fairly heavy at times, but away from those shower bands, there should be a lot of dry weather to take us through the rest of the afternoon. temperatures pushing into the low 20s quite widely. it will feel warm in the sunshine. now, wednesday, we see a little weather front work into the far northwest of the uk. that's bringing some thicker cloud. might get a few patches of rain just skirting into the north and west of scotland. but otherwise, probably
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a bit more cloud around, but still some bright or sunny spells developing. the best of those towards the east of high ground and those temperatures still into the low 20s. it's going to be another day that will feel pleasantly warm where the sunshine breaks through the cloud. now, beyond that, at the end of the week, the weekend and next week — this area of high pressure is going to be dominating our weather picture, and that means we've got a lengthy spell of dry and sunny weather. temperatures on these charts pushing into the high 20s. well, it wouldn't be surprising to see temperatures into the low 30s in some places next week.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today. "irresponsible" — doctors leaders condemn borisjohnson's decision to press ahead with lockdown lifting, despite rising covid infections. marcus rashford says he'll never apologise for who he is after being racially abused online for his penalty miss against italy. england defender tyrone mings accuses the home secretary of "pretending to be disgusted" after her criticism of players taking the knee. i have spoken exclusively to formula 1 champion lewis hamilton. he tells me he wants to change the way the sport looks for ever, and help young black people into engineering.

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