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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 12, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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arrested since sunday, when thousands of people joined the biggest protests in decades against the island's communist government. president miguel diaz—canel blamed the united states for the unrest. south africa's governing anc party has warned that continuing violent demonstrations will have a devastating economic impact on the country. troops have been deployed to protect property, as protestors blocked roads, set buildings on fire and looted shops. the us general scott miller has been given a send—off at a ceremony in the afghan capital, kabul. nato's afghanistan operation is officially ending at the end of august, despite a deterioration in the security situation. wildfires are raging across western united states — where millions have been hit by another heatwave. firefighters say conditions are so harsh water is evaporating before it hits the ground.
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hello and welcome to our second look at what the papers will be bringing bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political strategist, jo tanner, and the journalist and broadcaster, daisy mcandrew. tomorrow's front pages starting with... the end of coronavirus restrictions takes the lead on the front page of the ft. it reports that the government is shifting the onus of enforcing rules onto companies as individuals as legal requirements are set to change on monday. and scrapping those laws could see vaccine passports introduced for the first time in the uk as the prime minister urgese �*extreme caution�* — that's according to the telegraph. also focusing on the lifting of covid restrictions — the guardian leads with reports that the lifting comes �*despite fears of �*exit wave�* and 200 deaths a day�*. and stay away — the i reports that while rules lift,
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almost four million clinically vulnerable people have been told to avoid people who haven�*t had both jabs. the front of the mail questions how long the freedoms given on july 19th will last for. it reports that the prime minister says restrictions could return in september if new freedoms are abused. and how the night turned ugly — the mirror depicts the aftermath of last night�*s european championship final and the racist abuse that followed. in the face of that racism — the sun says �*we�*ve got your back�* as it reports on the nation uniting against the onslaught of racism. and response from player tyrone mings takes the front of the metro. it writes that the england defender hit out at the home secretary on twitter — accusing her of �*stoking the fire�*. so let�*s begin... do you want to kick us off this time
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on that ugly face of football front page on the mirror? it�*s on that ugly face of football front page on the mirror?— page on the mirror? it's a very powerful _ page on the mirror? it's a very powerful image _ page on the mirror? it's a very powerful image that _ page on the mirror? it's a very powerful image that i - page on the mirror? it's a very powerful image that i think- page on the mirror? it's a very| powerful image that i think one page on the mirror? it's a very - powerful image that i think one that will utterly depress anybody who sees it — will utterly depress anybody who sees it. of course as the stories have _ sees it. of course as the stories have started to trickle out and really — have started to trickle out and really how out—of—control it got at wembley— really how out—of—control it got at wembley last night, many people very shocked _ wembley last night, many people very shocked and the mirrors summarised here, _ shocked and the mirrors summarised here, violence threatens world cup bid and _ here, violence threatens world cup bid and then racists target young england — bid and then racists target young england star so we had these two different— england star so we had these two different attacks if you like. in the real— different attacks if you like. in the real world just completely overrunning wembley and some of the stories_ overrunning wembley and some of the stories coming out from people who were there — stories coming out from people who were there are really shocking. hundreds — were there are really shocking. hundreds of fans storming the barricades enter for ignoring the stewards, — barricades enter for ignoring the stewards, getting past the police and taking other people's seeds, having _ and taking other people's seeds, having fights a really frightening people _ having fights a really frightening people who were in there. and thoroughly making a mockery of the security— thoroughly making a mockery of the security that should have been there — security that should have been there it's _ security that should have been there. it's me people saying that it
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is wembley's fault because the football— is wembley's fault because the football association owns wembley and responsible for the security or lack of— and responsible for the security or lack of security. and that's with the stewards were therefore. he they're _ the stewards were therefore. he they're saying stewards were completely out of their depth and could _ completely out of their depth and could not— completely out of their depth and could not have controlled the fans in a way _ could not have controlled the fans in a way that they were expected to partly _ in a way that they were expected to partly because of the way it had been _ partly because of the way it had been set — partly because of the way it had been setup. the place where they were _ been setup. the place where they were checking tickets was far too close _ were checking tickets was far too close to — were checking tickets was far too close to the actual ground. so it 'ust close to the actual ground. so it just took— close to the actual ground. so it just took one big push from these out—of—control drunken people and to overpower— out—of—control drunken people and to overpower the systems in place and push down — overpower the systems in place and push down the erected walls and go in and _ push down the erected walls and go in and run _ push down the erected walls and go in and run amok inside the stadium. so that— in and run amok inside the stadium. so that was— in and run amok inside the stadium. so that was one horror which of course — so that was one horror which of course is — so that was one horror which of course is notjust bad in itself. very— course is notjust bad in itself. very frightening for families who were _ very frightening for families who were there, but for anybody who was there _ were there, but for anybody who was there the _ were there, but for anybody who was there. the stories of people having to wipe _ there. the stories of people having to wipe the — there. the stories of people having to wipe the blood off the seats from when _ to wipe the blood off the seats from when they— to wipe the blood off the seats from when they got to their seats, and
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also was — when they got to their seats, and also was of— when they got to their seats, and also was of horrendous stories. it's sending _ also was of horrendous stories. it's sending a _ also was of horrendous stories. it's sending a message to the rest of the world _ sending a message to the rest of the world that _ sending a message to the rest of the world that we are not capable of hosting — world that we are not capable of hosting a — world that we are not capable of hosting a tournament which of course is the _ hosting a tournament which of course is the thing _ hosting a tournament which of course is the thing that boris johnson hosting a tournament which of course is the thing that borisjohnson has said we _ is the thing that borisjohnson has said we are — is the thing that borisjohnson has said we are bidding for the 2030, along _ said we are bidding for the 2030, along with — said we are bidding for the 2030, along with our lender, world cup and our chance _ along with our lender, world cup and our chance of getting that having been _ our chance of getting that having been temporarily getting a bit of a boost _ been temporarily getting a bit of a boost or— been temporarily getting a bit of a boost or borisjohnson been temporarily getting a bit of a boost or boris johnson looks to be firm on _ boost or boris johnson looks to be firm on the — boost or boris johnson looks to be firm on the super league idea and came _ firm on the super league idea and came down— firm on the super league idea and came down and squash that. got a lot of stuff— came down and squash that. got a lot of stuff around the rest of the world — of stuff around the rest of the world and the footballing community and these _ world and the footballing community and these events have blown that now _ and these events have blown that now. looks like spain and portugal are edging — now. looks like spain and portugal are edging ahead if this was an advert— are edging ahead if this was an advert of— are edging ahead if this was an advert of how he would do it. and then— advert of how he would do it. and then the — advert of how he would do it. and then the other side, the racists who were _ then the other side, the racists who were ontine~ — then the other side, the racists who were online. i'm not aware of racist chanting _ were online. i'm not aware of racist chanting within the game but there was a _ chanting within the game but there was a lot— chanting within the game but there was a lot of very, very unpleasant racism _ was a lot of very, very unpleasant racism pointed at the three players who missed their penalties. and that's— who missed their penalties. and that's also— who missed their penalties. and that's also obviously setting a terrible — that's also obviously setting a terrible message but also getting
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the tech — terrible message but also getting the tech companies particularly twitter— the tech companies particularly twitter and facebook and youtube who allowed _ twitter and facebook and youtube who allowed these racist slurs to go up so they— allowed these racist slurs to go up so they are — allowed these racist slurs to go up so they are getting a lot of heat as well _ so they are getting a lot of heat as well. , , ., ., ., ., well. just moving on from what ha--ened well. just moving on from what happened at — well. just moving on from what happened at wembley, - well. just moving on from what happened at wembley, let's i well. just moving on from what. happened at wembley, let's pick well. just moving on from what - happened at wembley, let's pick up happened at wembley, let�*s pick up on the online abuse side. and an interesting story about the pressure that�*s coming onto social media cubbies to do more on this. we have an online abuse or online hate filled it�*s going through parliament at the moment. there�*s been debate about how you would enforce that and distinguish between things that are hateful but legal and things that are illegal. which already obviously supposed to cover the things that are not currently illegal but how you police that is quite difficult. people saying according to this article that there�*s more that could be done in terms of the technology in some of the owners has to be on the social media companies themselves.— the social media companies themselves. , , ., themselves. the times is saying that themselves. the times is saying that the tech giants _ themselves. the times is saying that the tech giants are _ themselves. the times is saying that the tech giants are being _ themselves. the times is saying that the tech giants are being told - themselves. the times is saying that the tech giants are being told to - the tech giants are being told to hand over the details of those
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people that are behind some of the messages being put out. it becomes a bit of a minefield with not providing correct information or unverified e—mails and things. the system is really only as good as the system is really only as good as the system you set up to be. and the reality that the government have been grappling with these problems of various forms of online hate for some time, but the ferocity and the speed at which i think people went at the three players last night was so intense, so quickly and has caused such an outrage that it seems that the pressure, there�*s been a lot of pressure put back onto the tech companies as having to do something about this. but the reality actually is a very difficult arena for the government at the moment. they have relied a lot on
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these companies about how they�*re putting up messages about covid, and urging them to stamp out conspiracy theories and push out verify content. and it�*s a push and pull of use them for good and what their able to publish online and ifjust absolute outrageous and should not be allowed. in any form. so the times essentially saying that the government want to see more consequences but does this justice system, is is set up to deliver those consequences even if those people are identified? and that�*s the next big thing. titer? people are identified? and that's the next big thing.— people are identified? and that's the next big thing. very struck by the next big thing. very struck by the kick out _ the next big thing. very struck by the kick out racism _ the next big thing. very struck by the kick out racism campaign - the next big thing. very struck by| the kick out racism campaign were telling us from the football organisations earlier. the chief executive was saying we have to have very positive conversations with the representatives in this country of social media and the thing gets nixed back in california because the
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political culture there is very different and the freedom is awfully fundamental. you can�*t interfere with the freedom to express yourself online. f ., with the freedom to express yourself online. j . ,.,, online. they're all based in california _ online. they're all based in california and _ online. they're all based in california and they - online. they're all based in california and they don't i online. they're all based in . california and they don't really seem — california and they don't really seem to — california and they don't really seem to give a monkey about what we in the _ seem to give a monkey about what we in the uk _ seem to give a monkey about what we in the uk or— seem to give a monkey about what we in the uk or the rest of europe, because — in the uk or the rest of europe, because this is a problem that european _ because this is a problem that european politicians have been talking — european politicians have been talking about for years and years. even _ talking about for years and years. even on _ talking about for years and years. even on the other side, 500 million tweets _ even on the other side, 500 million tweets are — even on the other side, 500 million tweets are tweeted every single day and is _ tweets are tweeted every single day and is twitter really expected to police _ and is twitter really expected to police all — and is twitter really expected to police all of them and as joe was 'ust police all of them and as joe was just intimating we know that uk police _ just intimating we know that uk police forces are already having to spend _ police forces are already having to spend a _ police forces are already having to spend a huge amount of time on all sorts— spend a huge amount of time on all sorts of— spend a huge amount of time on all sorts of different cyber crime whether— sorts of different cyber crime whether it is hate speech, scamming, whatever— whether it is hate speech, scamming, whatever it _ whether it is hate speech, scamming, whatever it may be. more and more of the efforts _ whatever it may be. more and more of the efforts being spent on the source — the efforts being spent on the source of— the efforts being spent on the source of crime if you will say they would _ source of crime if you will say they would rather see a bobby on the beach _ would rather see a bobby on the beach. there's so many different ways _ beach. there's so many different ways that — beach. there's so many different ways that this story can commit we
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can all— ways that this story can commit we can all talk— ways that this story can commit we can all talk about it and say isn't it dreadful? but when you talk about practical— it dreadful? but when you talk about practical solutions of it it's not as easy— practical solutions of it it's not as easy as— practical solutions of it it's not as easy as blaming it on the text companies. i think, as easy as blaming it on the text companies. ithink, call as easy as blaming it on the text companies. i think, call me a pollyanna _ companies. i think, call me a pollyanna looking for the silver tining _ pollyanna looking for the silver tining in— pollyanna looking for the silver lining in this but i am hoping that this raising — lining in this but i am hoping that this raising of awareness of results of which _ this raising of awareness of results of which controversy about the players — of which controversy about the players taking the nicolau people saying _ players taking the nicolau people saying it'sjust politics, it's unnecessary, there's not that much racism _ unnecessary, there's not that much racism around any more, clearly there _ racism around any more, clearly there is — racism around any more, clearly there is. and so this story will hopefully— there is. and so this story will hopefully raise that awareness and make _ hopefully raise that awareness and make people think of more imaginative solutions to the problem. again, the kick racism out of football— problem. again, the kick racism out of football that makes the very valid _ of football that makes the very valid point that they have only been ei-ht valid point that they have only been eight black football players since the premier league was created in 1992 _ the premier league was created in 1992 and — the premier league was created in 1992. and that's out of hundreds and hundreds _ 1992. and that's out of hundreds and hundreds. those sorts of role models are really— hundreds. those sorts of role models are really needed. but would you want _ are really needed. but would you want to— are really needed. but would you want to be — are really needed. but would you want to be a football manager if you knew _ want to be a football manager if you knew you _ want to be a football manager if you knew you were going to get a lot of
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racist _ knew you were going to get a lot of racist abuse? so there's a real problem — racist abuse? so there's a real problem there and i think tackling it. problem there and i think tackling it all— problem there and i think tackling it. all within the football grounds, that's— it. all within the football grounds, that's part — it. all within the football grounds, that's part of it. and for shots and said they— that's part of it. and for shots and said they crawl under the rocks and into this _ said they crawl under the rocks and into this sphere of social media where — into this sphere of social media where they can have anonymity. let�*s where they can have anonymity. let's move on from — where they can have anonymity. let's move on from the _ where they can have anonymity. let�*s move on from the football to covid because we are being given some pretty serious and bleak sounding warnings about the summer ahead which had nothing to do with research and looking now, the consequences of an infection that�*s already red bend. the delta variant. the times is reporting that sage have done some modelling, the advisory group from the scientists that have been advising the government and have said essentially that admissions could rise above january levels with up to 200 deaths a day unless the public took a
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cautious approach to reopening and we have already seen the announcement that was made today at the government have started to temper the language. we had this big suggestion that freedom day was coming and that the removal of restrictions was going to be irreversible. and we have seen today that the message from only a few weeks ago went lots and lots of messages are being question, would you still wear a mask in certain situations, because there was a lot of confusion about what was coming, that actually the suggestion now, and we are still waiting to see the guidance published, but the government are suggesting that some of the restrictions are going to be kept under review and that there are going to be some particular environments where things like the covid passport is going to happen and businesses are going to be encouraged to use it. even tonight huffington post, the website has published apparently parliament
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until the end of term which is only a few days after freedom day for mp5, people working on parliamentary mps, people working on parliamentary states will have to wear their masks still. but mps want. so there�*s a them and us being created and some people already started to remark about it being one rule for them which has always been leveled at politicians and probably will not go down very well at all. there is a genuine concern about what is going to happen next. there�*s a lot of concern about those that are clinically vulnerable, those that feel they are going to be worried about whether they are mixing with people who may well be a threat or a risk to them and the government message seems to be around personal responsibility. we�*ve been talking about this now for 18 months and about this now for 18 months and about the fact that that does put people in very difficult positions. so you might be quite nervous about going back to work, for example you might see that you are in a
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workplace where colleagues are quite messy for example or not sure about their hygiene standards. and being asked to return to work in apparently this process. but businesses will be looking and saying well you could be back at the office now. come back. it probably set a date for their staff. a lot of variables here, a lot of question marks and i think still as we have seen every time rules have changed, a lot of grey areas. it certainly appears what�*s been announced today that the government are definitely concerned about what�*s going to happen to the numbers. they are hoping they have broken the link with vaccination levels between those people that get coronavirus in the numbers of people that get very sick. we also know there are several sections of the communities around the uk that still have not had their vaccinations or perhaps they�*re reluctant or not able to. perhaps they have got other health issues that are a problem for them. so
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still significant numbers of people that are vulnerable in this process. different but the number on some of those can effectively seems to be the message that if you are somebody that had to shield effectively should shield again. we are not telling you to shield but keep away from anyone else who has not been double vaccinated maybe. but! from anyone else who has not been double vaccinated maybe.— from anyone else who has not been double vaccinated maybe. and how are ou meant double vaccinated maybe. and how are you meant to — double vaccinated maybe. and how are you meant to know— double vaccinated maybe. and how are you meant to know unless _ double vaccinated maybe. and how are you meant to know unless you - double vaccinated maybe. and how are you meant to know unless you can - you meant to know unless you can walk— you meant to know unless you can walk around — you meant to know unless you can walk around without di on our lapel saying _ walk around without di on our lapel saying at— walk around without di on our lapel saying at been double of acts or i can't _ saying at been double of acts or i can't how— saying at been double of acts or i can't. how are these people meant to know? _ can't. how are these people meant to know? so— can't. how are these people meant to know? so it— can't. how are these people meant to know? so it is come in a way, lots of people — know? so it is come in a way, lots of people seek for us, for vulnerable and for people that cannot — vulnerable and for people that cannot have the vaccine or for those that are _ cannot have the vaccine or for those that are compromised, and is no freedom — that are compromised, and is no freedom day at all and it's worse than _ freedom day at all and it's worse than what — freedom day at all and it's worse than what they have experienced up till now— than what they have experienced up till now because they're going to be of all— till now because they're going to be of all the _ till now because they're going to be of all the onus is put on them to make _ of all the onus is put on them to make sure — of all the onus is put on them to make sure you don't catch it. freedom _ make sure you don't catch it. freedom date was not ever really about _ freedom date was not ever really about freedom. it was about the
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economy — about freedom. it was about the economy. it was about opening up the economy— economy. it was about opening up the economy and there was only so much of having _ economy and there was only so much of having a _ economy and there was only so much of having a large down economy that the treasury could stomach or could survivat~ _ the treasury could stomach or could survival. and so that's why a lot of these _ survival. and so that's why a lot of these responsibilities are now being put on _ these responsibilities are now being put on businesses because businesses of course _ put on businesses because businesses of course have been lobbying very hard, _ of course have been lobbying very hard, particularly hospitality and aviation. — hard, particularly hospitality and aviation, travel and so on. because they have _ aviation, travel and so on. because they have made no money at all over they have made no money at all over the previous— they have made no money at all over the previous 18 months. so there is some _ the previous 18 months. so there is some give — the previous 18 months. so there is some give and take here, and the government saying we are going to have to _ government saying we are going to have to open up to protect the economy— have to open up to protect the economy but meanwhile we are going to tell— economy but meanwhile we are going to tell vulnerable people, 3.8 million — to tell vulnerable people, 3.8 million as they say, that they are going _ million as they say, that they are going to — million as they say, that they are going to look after themselves now. not really— going to look after themselves now. not really criticising it because i can see — not really criticising it because i can see how it's notjust the economy— can see how it's notjust the economy it's also all of the hidden consequences of the lock it's people with cancer— consequences of the lock it's people with cancer and we all know the arguments. mental health. all of those _ arguments. mental health. all of those things that are having to be
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protected. but we are still in the midst— protected. but we are still in the midst of— protected. but we are still in the midst of a — protected. but we are still in the midst of a big surge in cases. and the other— midst of a big surge in cases. and the other thing that's going to impact — the other thing that's going to impact the economy very badly is having _ impact the economy very badly is having everybody being pinged every five minutes. even if you had to go to work— five minutes. even if you had to go to work you — five minutes. even if you had to go to work you could not. because you have _ to work you could not. because you have to _ to work you could not. because you have to isolate. the date that that changes _ have to isolate. the date that that changes is — have to isolate. the date that that changes is not until mid august. it seems _ changes is not until mid august. it seems to— changes is not until mid august. it seems to be some clear messaging and ithink— seems to be some clear messaging and i think this _ seems to be some clear messaging and i think this is _ seems to be some clear messaging and i think this is why we are being butted — i think this is why we are being butted up _ i think this is why we are being butted up with the idea that a vaccine — butted up with the idea that a vaccine passport is now part of our day-to-day— vaccine passport is now part of our day—to—day lives because that's the next stage — day—to—day lives because that's the next stage that if you have had both 'abs next stage that if you have had both jabs you _ next stage that if you have had both jabs you will not have to isolate if you are _ jabs you will not have to isolate if you are pinged. i'm sure there actively— you are pinged. i'm sure there actively tried to bring that forward because _ actively tried to bring that forward because that's going to really damage — because that's going to really damage the economy if the hundreds and thousands, millions of people have covid, millions of people isolating — have covid, millions of people isolating and able to make money and you were _ isolating and able to make money and you were just reporting earlier about— you were just reporting earlier about what happened in heathrow
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today— about what happened in heathrow today where 100 about what happened in heathrow today where100 security personnel were not— today where100 security personnel were not allowed to come in because allegedly— were not allowed to come in because allegedly they were pinged. happen to have _ allegedly they were pinged. happen to have a _ allegedly they were pinged. happen to have a friend that works there at terminat— to have a friend that works there at terminal five that was quite disbelieving that they had all been pinged _ disbelieving that they had all been pinged. he thought it had a lot more to do— pinged. he thought it had a lot more to do with _ pinged. he thought it had a lot more to do with the football last night. however— to do with the football last night. however it does not take away from this which— however it does not take away from this which is— however it does not take away from this which is that there are going to be _ this which is that there are going to be a _ this which is that there are going to be a lot — this which is that there are going to be a lot of people who are not going _ to be a lot of people who are not going to — to be a lot of people who are not going to earn money unless that rule is lifted _ going to earn money unless that rule is lifted. ~ �* ., , ., , is lifted. we've only got 'ust under a minute. related _ is lifted. we've only gotjust under a minute. related point, - is lifted. we've only gotjust under a minute. related point, front - is lifted. we've only gotjust under a minute. related point, front of. a minute. related point, front of the daily telegraph just last word if you could briefly. johnson urges use of vaccine passport. again not the message we had a few months ago. and it�*s essentiallyjust talking about the potential of larger venues, for example, where vaccine passport could be used. to help people with entering those sorts of venues. apparently businesses will be supported, whatever that means, in the use of covid passports. but as we talked about earlier but the
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chaos that wembley deftly some concern about how people will use the tech and whether it will be foolproof. the business organisations are already coming out and talking about their concerns and what is deemed a high risk setting and what is not and what in reality they can do if you will turn up and don�*t have a passport, will they not be allowed entry. it seems to many questions as answers but we seem to get used to this. thank you both very much. lovely to see you both. keep well and enjoy what good weather is coming up after the deluge that longed to experience this evening. i�*m glad it did not affect the internet links. that�*s it for the papers this tonight. there is support and weather coming up there is support and weather coming up and i will be back at midnight. good evening, i�*m tulsen tollett with your sports news —
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england manager gareth southgate has hit out at the racist abuse suffered by some of the england players after last night�*s defeat to italy, in the european championship final. southgate was speaking to the media this morning — after his side lost on penalties — three black players — marcus rashford, jadon sancho, and bukayo saka were targeted online over missing penalties. he said the players should hold their heads high — and the abuse cannot be tolerated. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, people that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it. it is just not what we stand for, we, i think, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together and people being able to relate to the national team, and the national teams stands for everybody. one of those who missed
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a penalty, marcus rashford, has taken to social media tonight to say he�*s "sorry" and that something "didn�*t feel quite right" as he stepped up to take the penalty. he says it�*s been playing in his head over and over since he struck the ball. but he said despite the miss, he will never apologise for who he is and where he came from. the fa will conduct a full review after a large number of people tried to force their way in to wembley without tickets ahead of the final. fans fought with stewards and police as they attempted to break through gates and downing street has criticised those who stormed the stadium without tickets. fa chief executive mark bullingham apologised to legitimate fans who were affected and said the security team had "never seen anything like it". it was sad and frustrating to see some of them trying to break into the stadium, unfortunately one or two succeeded, we do not know how many, we�*re still putting together all the evidence to find out what has happened. we will take action
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against people involved. when we step back and look at the matches we stage at wembley and the positive impact throughout the country, the buzz that has been created, we have had so much praise. i�*m sure that sets us up well for future tournaments. the england manager and players left their hotel earlier today — at the end of a memorable european championship campaign. gareth southgate also says that he hopes to guide the team to the 2022 world cup in qatar but admits he needs time to rest before considering contract talks. there will be new county cricket champions this season. holders essex have been forced to abandon their current match because one of the opposition — derbyshire — tested positive for covid. other squad members have been identified as close contacts and the players are now self—isolating. essex needed a victory in the match in derby to keep alive their hopes of finishing in the top two in their group and progressing in the competition. they had got themselves into a strong position after the first day, only for the positive case to force
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the abandonment before day two. british and irish lions head coach warren gatland has rejected calls from the springboks to play the south africa a team twice in a row. connor murray will captain the team against the a side on wednesday which shows 12 changes to the one that beat the sharks last time out as the tour continues to be hit by covid issues. the first test is due to be played in cape town on the 24thjuly. the former open winner — zachjohnson — is the latest player to pull out of this week�*s championship, after testing positive for covid—i9. johnson won the event in 2015 and follows south african louis de jager and masters champion hideki matsuyama in withdrawing because of a positive test. bubba watson is also missing out after a close contact tested positive. the open begins this thursday at royal st george�*s in kent. if you had told us this time last year that we would still be sitting here socially distanced,
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wearing masks and doing all of that stuff with not 100% capacity and living in a bubble, you would have kind of laughed at someone. but you just have to mind yourself. i�*m not saying zach did not mind himself, because he probably did and he probably got it somewhere stupid, but that�*s the nature of the world we live in at the minute. meanwhile the rest of the world�*s top golfers have arrived in kent ahead of the major championship which starts on thursday. it was a blustery day on the course for phil mickelson the current us pga champion who teamed up with bryson dechambeau and in front of plenty of fans ahead of the opening round. we were postponed last year which was a great disappointment, but we fully understand. we have all suffered in different ways. and we had 170 days of no golf last year. but the set up that they produced this year has been fantastic. and i think the spectators that will come
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on the championship days willjust think it is sensational. four wins in this year�*s tour de france have seen mark cavendish equal eddy merckx�*s long standing record of 34. today is a rest day, but the next few stages sees multiple climbs in the pyrenees. cavendish has struggled in recent mountain stages, butjust about made the time cuts. however, he already feels that the hardest work is behind him. he was speaking alongside his teammatejulian alaphillippe. every opportunity there is for a sprint i would like to win and every opportunity there is for a stage, i would like to do what i can. that�*s why we are here to commit to proper form. there no sentiment i think, it�*s just about wanting to win in the situations. this is still probably the hardest tournament i�*ve ever done and out looking forward to the next three days but hopefully we should be ok. and that�*s all the sport for now.
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hello there. we had some pretty impressive downpours across different parts of the country on monday. the radar picture shows one of these bands of heavy rain working into north east england, particularly north yorkshire. and then we have this second band of rain across the west london area. now in kew, in west london, we picked up 46 mm of rain from the shower band. that was pretty much smack bang on a whole month�*s of rain and the majority of that fell in just the space of two hours. if you were wondering what that looks like, it looks like this. three miles down the road in twickenham the roads flooded. and there were reports of flooding elsewhere as well. now, over the next few hours, those showers that we have seen by date will continue to very gradually fade away. the majority of us will eventually become drier over was just an odd patch of rain still lingering into the east. temperatures around i2to11i celsius, feeling a little on the muggy side as well,
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particularly across parts of eastern england. now, for tuesday we have got much more in the way of dry weather and sunshine with fewer showers, and for most of us it�*s going to be a dry morning. the early morning cloud breaking, sunny spells developing widely and there should be quite a lot of that sunshine. but into the afternoon we are likely to see some showers develop. look at this line of showers forming across parts of northwest england, the midlands and perhaps another one affecting wales down towards parts of dorset as well. now, those showers could be fairly heavy at times, but away from those shower bands there should be a lot of dry weather to take us through the rest of the afternoon. temperatures pushing into the low 20s. quite widely. it will feel warm in the sunshine. now, wednesday we see a little weather front working into the far northwest of the uk. that is bringing some thicker cloud. might get a few patches of rain just skirting into the north and west of scotland. but otherwise it�*s probably a bit more cloud around but still some bright or sunny spells developing.
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the best of those towards the east of high ground and those temperatures still into the low 20s. it�*s going to be another day that will feel pleasantly warm when the sunshine breaks through the cloud. now, beyond that, and was the end of the week, the weekend and next week. this area of high pressure is going to be dominating our weather picture. and that means we�*ve got a lengthy spell of dry and sunny weather. temperatures on these charts pushing into the high 20s. well, it would not be surprising to see temperatures into the low 30s in some places next week.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i�*m shaun ley. cuba sees the biggest demonstrations against the communist government in decades. president biden says the protests are a �*clarion call for freedom�*. the south african president appeals for an end to days of violence and looting sparked by the jailing of his predecessor, jacob zuma. the british prime minister confirms that almost all of england�*s coronavirus restrictions will be lifted next monday, despite a surge in cases. wildfires are raging across the western us as the latest heatwave dries out forests and millions struggle with soaring temperatures. the best way to describe it, which is actually the way my friend described it, is that moment when you open the oven and that gust of heat hits you in the face.

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