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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 12, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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grateful this is bbc news, the headlines at apm. widespread comfort remark condemnation of the torrent of abuse directed at england's liike player's on this sunday night. players who have missed the penalties bore the brunt of it. for some of penalties bore the brunt of it. pr?" some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, people that track those pit things have been able to explain that, but not all of it. , . ., , been able to explain that, but not allofit. , . ., , been able to explain that, but not all of it. , . ., , ., ., all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. _ all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. the _ all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. the prime - all of it. restrictions come to an i end in england. the prime minister confirms that many of the rules under which britain has operated under which britain has operated under covid—i9 will be scrapped from next monday. latest predictions so they could be up to 200 deaths a day
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across the uk and the third wave of infection. i across the uk and the third wave of infection. h, ., _ , infection. i cannot say this powerfully _ infection. i cannot say this powerfully or _ infection. i cannot say this powerfully or emphatically infection. i cannot say this - powerfully or emphatically enough. this pandemic is not over. passports for -a this pandemic is not over. passports for party nights- _ this pandemic is not over. passports for party nights. large _ this pandemic is not over. passports for party nights. large events - this pandemic is not over. passports for party nights. large events are . for party nights. large events are being advised to ask for boxing passports. flash floods caused travel chaos to large parts of london. because of been submerged, trains services were cancelled across much of the capital. from bucking sure all the way back to buckinghamshire, via russia and alaska, too. we are speaking to the world's youngest around the world pilot. hello, and if you havejustjoined
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us, a very good evening, welcome to bbc news. the spirit of optimism and unity felt by so many at last night's euros final has been followed by an onslaught of racial abuse. the prime minister, boris johnson, said those responsible should crawl back under the rock from which they came. the england manager gareth southgate has called it unforgivable. as players return to their homes, the manager reflected on the team's defeat, saying they felt as if their stomach and been ripped out. i was sports editor dan rowan reports. and it's damn sure! it all started so well. they suffered the cruelty of an all—too—familiar fate after. losing
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once again on penalties. a tournament which had lit up the summer ending in tears. as the team left their hotel this morning, to reflect on what might have been. the fact that we've had, you know, the first signs of summer consistency, semifinal, final, has to be a step in the right direction. it's not ultimately where we wanted to get to and when you are so close that is even more painful, of course. you know, it feels like your stomach has been ripped out this morning. but last night was excruciating for english football in other ways, too. chaotic scenes outside wembley as dozens of ticketless fans forced their way through security barriers and into the stadium. police making 49 arrests with 19 officers injured in the mayhem. today, the fa launched a review. we apologise to any fans who were affected by that and from our point of view as well we apologise to any of our staff and stewards who had to deal with that. it was clearly unacceptable. a massive occasion for wembley and for the fa. how on earth could
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this have happened? we will investigate fully. there was no evidence in advance anything like this was going to happen in this way. but clearly crowds started gathering on wembley way and there were lots of public order events there that spilled over into people trying to force their way into the stadium. one former premier league player inside wembley told us the situation was so serious, he decided to leave before the match began. there was fighting going on, there was arguments. and then we were basically in a position where i couldn't move. i was literally trapped like that. i was at the stage where, safety first here. i'm going to get myself out of here. because this is dangerous. but football's night of shame didn't stop there. rashford has missed! the three england players who missed penalties, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka, all targeted by online racist abuse. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. we've got to make sure that we are there and aligned with their clubs and making sure
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that we look after those boys, absolutely. this morning, the fa's president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened by what he called abhorrent behaviour. "it must stop now," he added. borisjohnson also condemned the abuse. but labour leader sir keir starmer today claimed the prime minister failed to show leadership by not initially condemning fans who booed england's taking of the knee before warm up matches. downing street insisting he always supported the players' right to protest and did criticise the building, asking fans to cheer. today, a mural dedicated to marcus rashford was defaced. the police are investigating what they called racially motivated vandalism. it's unacceptable. as long as they are performing and scoring and getting results, then of course, we are all england, we are all behind you. but the minute that doesn't happen, the abuse comes out. but the last month has still been overwhelmingly positive for england, who can look forward to the future with renewed confidence. football can be a cruel,
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cruel game at times. and i've been on the end of it, and unfortunately these boys will feel so hurt, so angry, so disappointed. and it will hurt them for a while. but when you look at the whole picture, they should feel very proud of what they've given us. how are you feeling today? upset. the euros dream over, the hurt continues for england. but the sense is that this is a generation of players heading in the right direction. fresh questions, then, tonight, for both the government and the tech giants over how players can be better protected from such abuse, and, i think, questions for the fa about how they can ensure the protection of fans coming here to wembley. over the last few weeks, they will have taken lots of credits, the governing body, for the way their reforms revitalise the england team over recent years, but, sadly for them, they are now facing tough questions about the security arrangements here at the stadium. tonight they said that the
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stewarding exceeded requirements, that they had more security officials here than at any other event in the past, but i think the fear will be that that mayhem of last night could have jeopardised england's chances of being part of a successful bid, a uk and irish bid, for the 2030 world cup. for all of the undoubted progress in the way that the england team galvanised the nation and proved a healing and uplifting force, it does feel like something of a return to the dark ages with the discussion tonight about hooliganism and racism, and a reminder that, for all that progress, those problems haven't gone away, but from a pure footballing perspective, england, i think, can look forward now with real optimism towards the next major event, the world cup next year, in qatar. reporting from wembley, there. just to bring you a bit of news that is broken in the last few minutes, this is social media contribution from a current england player and member of
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the squad. this is aimed very directly at priti patel, the home secretary, who on social media condemned the racist abuse has been heaped on line players. in particular the three black players who were unsuccessful with the penalties last night. he writes... i think that's a very pointed rebuke to the home secretary. she earlier said she was disgusted... you may remember that ms patel, the home secretary, condemned those taking the knee, she said she thought it was gesture politics, and something they shouldn't do, and that she doesn't share some of the
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sentiments that have been expected ljy sentiments that have been expected by black lives matter. those taking the knee have said they are not doing it to endorse black lives matter or any other particular organisation, they are doing it as a mark of respect to those who have died or been seriously injured or has been humiliated because of the colour of the skin, and for no other reason. we will have more on the racist abuse later in the programme, we are talking to kick out racism leader, and i have writer extensively on this subject. let's move on to covert restrictions, the prime ministers said that all restrictions will end one week today on july the restrictions will end one week today onjuly the 19th. restrictions will end one week today on july the 19th. it's restrictions will end one week today onjuly the 19th. it's is said that england could expect up to 200 deaths a day in 2000 hope to be back
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hospital admissions a day, with peking in august. it could be higher if people do not exercise caution. for example, wearing masks in indoor spaces, which people are no longer be required to do. people will no longer be legally required to wear face coverings, but ministers say they expect them to keep wearing them even though there will be no legal penalty if they fail to do so. limits on socialism will be lifted, restrictions on the numbers allowed to gather outside will also be abolished. my clubs and large events will be encouraged to use vaccine certificates to restrict entry of people, but that won't be legally enforceable. people are advised to work from home where possible will be ended, with people being encouraged to return gradually to their workplace. the changes come
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amid a sharp rise of coronavirus cases in the uk. for those in england wondering how things will be different from next monday, there was a change of tone from the government today. masks and face coverings will be expected in certain places, like crowded public transport, even as legal restrictions are lifted onjuly the 19th, with the key message being caution. this pandemic is not over. this disease, coronavirus, continues to carry risks for you and your family. we cannot simply revert instantly, from monday the 19th ofjuly, to life as it was before covid. can you spell out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example, to the nhs? there's no doubt that we are in a third wave of infection. infections are rising rapidly, and i expect them to continue to rise. and the more mixing we have, the more infection is going to spread, so there's no doubt that
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step four will bring increases in spread of infection. and although the relationship between infection and hospitalisation is different, it still exists. scientists and modellers predict that the current wave of infections will reach a peak in august. there could be between 1000—2000 daily hospital admissions and between 100—200 deaths each day, but all that depends on a certain amount of continued caution by the public — for example, mask—wearing in some crowded indoor spaces. those hospital numbers could be around half the peak seen injanuary, and covid patients now tend to be younger and need less time in hospital. but leading doctors are concerned about the mounting pressure. not only are we managingl the backlog from last year, we're also trying to do normal activity, but we're also seeing a rise in admissions- with patients with covid.
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so, as health care professionals, we are really worried _ about what's going to happen over the coming weeks. - labour had this response to the changes. well, look, we all want to ease restrictions. but with infection rates still going up the rate they're going up, this plan is still reckless, i'm afraid. we need a safe way of coming through this. there's now a push to get as many young adults as possible to come forward for their first doses. southampton city council ran a walk—in service over the weekend, billed "grab a jab". national and local officials feel they have to push the message more strongly. that's because take—up of first doses has fallen, and it's not down to supply issues. it was fairly consistent during june, but since the end of the month — measured by the seven—day rolling average — it's more than halved. government scientists have urged people to get vaccinated to reduce the chance of getting ill. they say there's no ideal date
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for easing restrictions and delaying wouldn't mean a different outcome. hugh pym, bbc news. winning is now, jerry brown, professor of respiratory infection, he is speaking today on a personal capacity. good to speak to you again. let's talk about the progress of the vaccination programme. 0ne again. let's talk about the progress of the vaccination programme. one of the points the prime minister made when he gave us a preview that they were likely to lift restrictions on the 19th was the value of the immunisation programme that, the progress they be made, and the progress they be made, and the progress they be made, and the progress they hope to make on that months. what you make of the progress that is being made? in particular, when you look at the graph, it is noticeable that the rate of progress on double vaccination has not been maintained. it is a any slower rate of doing that than had been the case may be a
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month or two ago. i that than had been the case may be a month or two ago.— month or two ago. i think that is robabl month or two ago. i think that is probably a _ month or two ago. i think that is probably a natural— month or two ago. i think that is probably a natural consequence | month or two ago. i think that is i probably a natural consequence of running out of people who are highly vulnerable and very motivated to get the vaccination, as you move down the vaccination, as you move down the age groups, the proportion that each age group gets vaccinated is lower, so the best uptake has been in older people, and the less good uptake is in younger population. it is sort of expected to a certain extent. ~ . . is sort of expected to a certain extent. ~ ., ., , ., , extent. what are the implications in terms of the — extent. what are the implications in terms of the fact _ extent. what are the implications in terms of the fact we _ extent. what are the implications in terms of the fact we are _ extent. what are the implications in terms of the fact we are now - extent. what are the implications in terms of the fact we are now lifting | terms of the fact we are now lifting all these restrictions? to people, look, you have tojudge all these restrictions? to people, look, you have to judge for yourself what is the best way to behave to behave to protect you from covid and make sure you don't give it to those around you. the make sure you don't give it to those around you-— around you. the vaccine has two ma'or around you. the vaccine has two major effects. — around you. the vaccine has two major effects, the _ around you. the vaccine has two major effects, the bit _ around you. the vaccine has two major effects, the bit that - around you. the vaccine has two i major effects, the bit that concerns me is people who are very vulnerable to disease, the elderly and those with underlying health conditions who have not been vaccinated, and other 95% have been, that leaves about 5% that have not, and that 5%
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is much higher in certain parts of the country. 15, 20% in some places. when the covid third wave gets really going, those people who have not been vaccinated, vulnerable to the disease being severe, will be the disease being severe, will be the ones they wind up in hospital, in intensive care, and are most likely to die. that is the bit that really worries me. the other thing about the vaccination in younger people as it does slow transmission, and it slows the sort of that wave all the ferocity of the wave, so it's important that as many people of the young get vaccinated as possible. in of the young get vaccinated as ossible. , ., , .,. .., possible. in terms of the practical flexible of this, _ possible. in terms of the practical flexible of this, we _ possible. in terms of the practical flexible of this, we offer - possible. in terms of the practical flexible of this, we offer the - flexible of this, we offer the reassurance that the delta variant is not dealing leading to as severe cases as, for example, the alpha variant, broadly, even though it is spreading very effectively, and as i understand that the effect of
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vaccination is to mitigate the impact of the virus on those who are vaccinated in most cases. when you have those factors... please clarify that i have that wrong. have those factors. .. please clarify that i have that wrong.— that i have that wrong. that's ri . ht, that i have that wrong. that's right. the _ that i have that wrong. that's right, the vaccine _ that i have that wrong. that's right, the vaccine has - that i have that wrong. that's right, the vaccine has very i that i have that wrong. that's i right, the vaccine has very good effect in preventing severe owners, so if you get vaccinated and you have two vaccines, even with the delta variant, the chances i having severe illness that leads to being in hospital dying is 95% or something like that, it's not clear what percentage, it is about 90%. the mild disease that most people get on my pass on to their colleagues and their friends and family, it does reduce that, as well, not quite as dramatically as severe disease, but it has an effect, that means controlling transmission.— effect, that means controlling transmission. does that give the government _ transmission. does that give the government confidence - transmission. does that give the government confidence because | transmission. does that give the i government confidence because of the less severe effects of the
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infections, the hospitals will be in a better position to cope with the numbers who are hospitalised in this current wave? it numbers who are hospitalised in this current wave?— numbers who are hospitalised in this current wave? it depends on how big waivers. current wave? it depends on how big waivers- so. — current wave? it depends on how big waivers. so, it's— current wave? it depends on how big waivers. so, it's very... _ current wave? it depends on how big waivers. so, it's very... i— current wave? it depends on how big waivers. so, it's very... i mean, i current wave? it depends on how big waivers. so, it's very... i mean, we. waivers. so, it's very... i mean, we are basically waiting to see. we hope the vaccine effectiveness has helped control infections in the community and will reduce the size of the wave, do people do persist in some of the social distancing measures, wearing masks when they go into crowded shops or when they are another transport, working from home and they can, will persist with that, the actual size of the infection will be reduced and it will lead to fewer people ending up in hospital. if everybody suddenly stopped wearing masks, goes to work all the time of the wave of infection will be particularly sharp, and that means people getting infections in a short period of time, the possibility that in certain places where people have not had a high vaccination uptake, the
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hospitals i was suffering.- had a high vaccination uptake, the hospitals i was suffering. thank you ve much hospitals i was suffering. thank you very much for— hospitals i was suffering. thank you very much for giving _ hospitals i was suffering. thank you very much for giving us _ hospitals i was suffering. thank you very much for giving us some i hospitals i was suffering. thank you j very much for giving us some clarity on all of that. and we will find out how the prime minister's announcement, that story and many others are covered on the front pages of tuesday's newspapers later this evening. a first edition of the papers, i will bejoined by daisy mcandrew and the political strategistjoe tanner. stay with us for that. strategistjoe tanner. stay with us forthat. now, before that, let's go to the bbc sports centre. good evening. as we've been hearing the news,. england manager gareth southgate has hit out at the racist abuse suffered by some of the england players after last night's defeat to italy, in the european championship final. southgate was speaking to the media this morning — after his side lost on penalties — three black players — marcus rashford, jadon sancho, and bukayo saka were targeted online over missing penalties. he said the players should hold their heads high — and the abuse cannot be tolerated.
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for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, people that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it. it is just not what we stand for, we, i think, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together and people being able to relate to the national team, and the national teams stands for everybody. the fa will conduct a full review after a large number of people tried to force their way in to wembley without tickets ahead of the final. fans fought with stewards and police as they attempted to break through gates and downing street has criticised those who stormed the stadium without tickets. fa chief executive mark bullingham apologised to legitimate fans who were affected and said the security team had "never seen anything like it". it was sad and frustrating
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to see some of them trying to break into the stadium, unfortunately one or two succeeded, we do not know how many, we're still putting together all the evidence to find out what has happened. we will take action against people involved. when we step back and look at the matches we stage at wembley and the positive impact throughout the country, the bliss that has been created, we have had so much praise. i'm sure that sets us up well for future tournaments. the england manager and players left their hotel earlier today — at the end of a memorable european championship campaign. gareth southgate also says that he hopes to guide the team to the 2022 world cup in qatar but admits he needs time to rest before considering contract talks. there will be new county cricket champions this season. holders essex have been forced to abandon their current match because one of the opposition — derbyshire — tested positive for covid. 0ther squad members have been identified as close contacts and the players
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are now self—isolating. essex needed a victory in the match in derby to keep alive their hopes of finishing in the top two in their group and progressing in the competition. they had got themselves into a strong position after the first day, only for the positive case to force the abandonment before day two. british and irish lions head coach warren gatland has rejected calls from the springboks to play the south africa a team twice in a row. connor murray will captain the team against the a side on wednesday which shows 12 changes to the one that beat the sharks last time out. the first test is due to be played in cape town on the 24thjuly. the former 0pen champion — zachjohnson — is the latest player to pull out of this week's tournament, after testing positive for covid—i9. johnson won the event in 2015 and follows south african louis de jager and masters champion hideki matsuyama in withdrawing because of a positive test. bubba watson is also missing out after a close contact tested positive.
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the open begins this thursday at royal st george's in kent. if you had told us this time last year, we would still be sitting here socially distance, with masks, doing all that stuff with not 100% capacity and living at a bubble, you kind of would have laughed at someone, so, but, like, youjust have to mind yourself. you know, i'm not saying he didn't mind himself, because he probably did, and he probably got it some stupid, but that's the nature of the world we live in at the minute.— live in at the minute. let's finish on a positive. — live in at the minute. let's finish on a positive, shall— live in at the minute. let's finish on a positive, shall we? - live in at the minute. let's finish on a positive, shall we? the i live in at the minute. let's finish | on a positive, shall we? the open championship golf is back, as we have a major tournament to look forward to. lots of good stuff happening in the sporting world, and thanks for ending on a positive note. there is a lot of good stuff, and the match
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last night was terrific, whatever you think of the outcome. great bit of football, but before that, heathrow airport say a number of staff working at terminal five event total isolate by the nhs covid app, causing major delays today. the rise of more than 100 security guards were affected. it had brought in extra staff to clear the queues. not too successfully, unfortunately, because of the effect of the app. facemasks, as we've been hearing, will no longer be compulsory, but the government is saying, please keep wearing them in suitable locations where it would help to protect them, or, more importantly, protect them, or, more importantly, protect people from you. some people think that will not be sufficient. a petition to the memory stick with case treatment facemasks until cases fullness been signed by amity in 2000 people.
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the rules may be changing next week, but here in clevedon, customers will still be asked to wear masks on this boutique. mt; still be asked to wear masks on this boutiaue. y . still be asked to wear masks on this boutiaue. g ., .,, still be asked to wear masks on this boutiaue. y ., ., boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia _ boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in _ boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2018 _ boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2018 entry - boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2018 entry to i boutique. my daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2018 entry to and l with leukaemia in 2018 entry to and i have years of treatment, and then, out of that treatment, came covid, so it's been hard. it's been tough. those people, like us, who have shielded that literally didn't leave their homes, you know, for months on end, and people wearing a mask to protect each other and make them feel safer. ., , ~ ., feel safer. people like martin, who has luna feel safer. people like martin, who has lung disease. _ feel safer. people like martin, who has lung disease. he _ feel safer. people like martin, who has lung disease. he shielded i feel safer. people like martin, who has lung disease. he shielded for i has lung disease. he shielded for the first three months of lockdown. i would feel terrified about going to the _ i would feel terrified about going to the shop next week, being flanked by people _ to the shop next week, being flanked by people not wearing masks and not socially _ by people not wearing masks and not socially distancing. i would have to id socially distancing. i would have to go back— socially distancing. i would have to go back to — socially distancing. i would have to go back to relying on friends and neighbours, like i did in the first
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lockdown — neighbours, like i did in the first lockdown. , ,., neighbours, like i did in the first lockdown. , ., ., lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask — lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask wearing _ lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask wearing his _ lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask wearing his set - lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask wearing his set up i lockdown. he is so worried about the end of mask wearing his set up a i end of mask wearing his set up a petition, and so for nearly 200 tonnes have signed it. research from -- 200,000 tonnes have signed it. research from —— 200,000 people have signed it. research has shown that infections are reduced if people were masks. in this shop people are being asked to continue wearing them. their welfare of m team continue wearing them. their welfare of my team is — continue wearing them. their welfare of my team is really _ continue wearing them. their welfare of my team is really my _ continue wearing them. their welfare of my team is really my priority, i of my team is really my priority, therefore we are doing everything we can to stop covid passing from my team and my clients.— can to stop covid passing from my team and my clients. masks may not be mandatory _ team and my clients. masks may not be mandatory next _ team and my clients. masks may not be mandatory next next _ team and my clients. masks may not be mandatory next next week, i team and my clients. masks may not be mandatory next next week, but . be mandatory next next week, but they should still be part of our lives. let's talk to a professor from oxford university. she is the author of the royal society report and face coverings. what do you make of the
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decision to go from legal requirement to advice, and how does abbas need to be communicated if it is not actually going to end up undermining the outcome the government wants, which is, for lots of us in certain situations to carry on mass? �* , , of us in certain situations to carry on mass? �*, , , on mass? it's been quite confusing for the public. _ on mass? it's been quite confusing for the public, because _ on mass? it's been quite confusing for the public, because the - on mass? it's been quite confusing for the public, because the prime l for the public, because the prime minister said that it would be personaljudgment personal responsibility, then this week the became slightly more kissed on a mac specific, and the statement was that it would be recommended on situations like public transport, so it is quite clear to people if it goes from mandatory to responsibility too, you know, recommendations, and people need something to hang on to, you know, if they have to make some sort of decisions, and i think other countries made a much clearer in
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terms of the messaging, so, if you think ofjapan, the discussion wasn't whether they would make it mandatory or not, they actually haven't, but people are compliant because people are very clear. if you're in a situation where it is close, rent is crowded, where it is close, rent is crowded, where it is close contact, so, the three seas, then you should wear one, because otherwise it's just personal judgment or recommended, when a crowd of situation is to me might be different to what it is for you, so i think there has to be tighter and clearer messaging. 1ng i think there has to be tighter and clearer messaging.— clearer messaging. as part of the roblem clearer messaging. as part of the problem here _ clearer messaging. as part of the problem here almost _ clearer messaging. as part of the problem here almost more i problem here almost more fundamental, that we are still not clear, many of us, what the actual definitive measurable benefits are of wearing facemasks? do they help us, to help other people? is a combination? is it dependent on other factors combination? is it dependent on otherfactors to do combination? is it dependent on other factors to do with the environment you are in? is this clarity problem almost going right back to the starter when we were
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told to wear a facemask? it deftly toes told to wear a facemask? it deftly aoes back told to wear a facemask? it deftly goes back to _ told to wear a facemask? it deftly goes back to the _ told to wear a facemask? it deftly goes back to the start, _ told to wear a facemask? it deftly goes back to the start, because . goes back to the start, because there was a lot of confusion from there was a lot of confusion from the world health organization that change its position to medical advisers, there was a lack of clarity in the beginning and changing regulations, but increasingly became clear as we understood, the virus is transmitted as aerosol, it's transmitted in the air, and then there is increasing evidence that makes it very clear that it protects yourself, but more importantly, it protects you from transmitting it to other people. so, if it's one properly, it's multilayered, then it is very clear that it provides protection. so, i just think you have to tell people where they should buy them, but also where they should buy them, but also where they should buy them, but also where they don't need to. so, countries such as the us, already, a few weeks ago, two weeks ago, said if you are in vaccinated or if you are vaccinated but you are immunocompromised, you should buy them, about those you don't need to
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wear them unless it is very crowded, but you do have to wear them on public transportation or public transportation hubs, is that clarity the people need, otherwise it will be the person in the restaurant or in the train carriage that is going to have to personally negotiate this, all the waitress, or communal, the train conductor, that is going to have to deal with this lack, or it will be very difficult and people have to make decisions based on that. i have to make decisions based on that. ., ., ., ., , that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you _ that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you for— that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you for being _ that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you for being with - that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you for being with us i that. i feel a lot of rows coming! thank you for being with us on i that. i feel a lot of rows coming! i thank you for being with us on bbc news. now, let's return to last nights euro 2020 final. there were 86 arrests by the police in the aftermath of yesterday pots match, 19 officers were injured during violent scenes outside wembley stadium itself and in other parts of central london. 0ne business group says it is going to ask the football association to foot the bill is experienced. let's talk to somebody
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who experienced some of the trouble last night, and as a result, despite the fact he had paid for a proper ticket for the match, was unable to watch it. thank you very much, first of all, really sorry to hear about the outcome of your trip to wembley yesterday. tell us what happened. basically, i got to wembley park about 6:15pm, the train was very crowded, the station is very crowded, the station is very crowded, took about ten minutes just to exit the cheap station. i think that's when i realise, you know, it's a lot of people. getting on to wembley way, again, very crowded, so i previously had been to some of the other europeans at wembley, the croatia game, and other games, its very simple, to get into the ground, but for this particular game, at the turnstiles, a lot of people who
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didn't have tickets, they were trying to push through the disabled entrance. people were trying to get through, basically using a screen shot of the ticket, because the tickets were all sent to our smartphones, to get the qr code to get in, what happened was a lot people taking screenshots of people's tickets and trying to get in. that was basically blocking the entrance the turnstile. 50. in. that was basically blocking the entrance the turnstile.— entrance the turnstile. so, a big backlo: entrance the turnstile. so, a big backlog was _ entrance the turnstile. so, a big backlog was building _ entrance the turnstile. so, a big backlog was building up. - entrance the turnstile. so, a big| backlog was building up. exactly. how are the _ backlog was building up. exactly. how are the stewards _ backlog was building up. exactly. how are the stewards dealing i backlog was building up. exactly. | how are the stewards dealing with this? it how are the stewards dealing with this? ., , . ., , , this? it was clear they were very overwhelmed. _ this? it was clear they were very overwhelmed. for _ this? it was clear they were very overwhelmed. for example, i this? it was clear they were very overwhelmed. for example, in l overwhelmed. for example, in previous games i've been to, at the bottom of the stairs wembley way, used to have a covert check, so you show them your double vaccinated or you show them your lateral flow test. forthis you show them your lateral flow test. for this particular game, because there are so many people, they didn't even check my covid status, so it's very clear that
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stewards, there wasn't enough of them. there are clearly very overworked.— them. there are clearly very overworked. ~ ., . ., overworked. was that much of the olice overworked. was that much of the police presence — overworked. was that much of the police presence outside? - overworked. was that much of the police presence outside? was i overworked. was that much of the | police presence outside? was there much actually around the turnstile, the actual entrances?— the actual entrances? there was a few, but deftly — the actual entrances? there was a few, but deftly not _ the actual entrances? there was a few, but deftly not enough. - the actual entrances? there was a few, but deftly not enough. for. the actual entrances? there was al few, but deftly not enough. for the behaviour that was seen. what few, but deftly not enough. for the behaviour that was seen. what about the other behaviour? _ behaviour that was seen. what about the other behaviour? we _ behaviour that was seen. what about the other behaviour? we heard - behaviour that was seen. what about | the other behaviour? we heard former england player so he left last night because you start to feel very unsafe. we are seeing any of that kind of behaviour as you are going in? . ~ kind of behaviour as you are going in? ., ~ ., in? yeah, like i said, for the previous— in? yeah, like i said, for the previous games _ in? yeah, like i said, for the previous games i _ in? yeah, like i said, for the previous games i went - in? yeah, like i said, for the previous games i went to, i in? yeah, like i said, for the l previous games i went to, and in? yeah, like i said, for the - previous games i went to, and a very source of atmosphere, people said, the games have brought the country together, for this game in particular, walking down wembley way, it felt very toxic. i go a lot of football games, international games, i'd say it was very to be met the most unsavoury, toxic atmosphere i've ever experienced.
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how come you didn't get in, what happened? i how come you didn't get in, what happened?— happened? i went through a turnstile. — happened? i went through a turnstile, the _ happened? i went through a turnstile, the lady _ happened? i went through a turnstile, the lady grabbed l happened? i went through a i turnstile, the lady grabbed me happened? i went through a - turnstile, the lady grabbed me and said i came in with a false ticket and before i knew it, there were four orfive and before i knew it, there were four or five security around me who did not give me an opportunity to show that i have an official ticket because i am part of the england supporters club so that is how we get all my tickets from my ticket is official but i was not even allowed to show that. they said you have a screenshot of a ticket. basically i was escorted out of the ground, tried to go to the ticket office to explain the situation, i showed them proof of my id, they gave me a paper ticket, came back up to the turnstile, even with a paper ticket, they did not let me end. the stewards outside because i got kicked out previously, they said you do not come back in. essen
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kicked out previously, they said you do not come back in.— kicked out previously, they said you do not come back in. even though you had already proven _ do not come back in. even though you had already proven they _ do not come back in. even though you had already proven they had _ do not come back in. even though you had already proven they had got - do not come back in. even though you had already proven they had got it - had already proven they had got it wrong, they were not going to deal with you. you did manage to get home to see the game? but you must have been never mind the money, the hassle, the embarrassment and all of that. it is very frustrating night by the sound of it?— that. it is very frustrating night by the sound of it? yeah, really frustrating- _ by the sound of it? yeah, really frustrating. i— by the sound of it? yeah, really frustrating. i felt _ by the sound of it? yeah, really frustrating. i felt very _ by the sound of it? yeah, really frustrating. i felt very fortunate | frustrating. i felt very fortunate to be one of the 60,000 people to have a ticket to come at the first major final in over 50 years. have a ticket to come at the first majorfinal in over 50 years. i have a ticket to come at the first major final in over 50 years. i felt very privileged and ijust feel like due to just very privileged and ijust feel like due tojust a very privileged and ijust feel like due to just a total lack of organisation around the stadium, i do not get to go inside the ground and experience. i do not get to go inside the ground and experience.— do not get to go inside the ground and experience. i hope you get some kind of recompense _ and experience. i hope you get some kind of recompense if _ and experience. i hope you get some kind of recompense if nothing - and experience. i hope you get some kind of recompense if nothing else i kind of recompense if nothing else from wimbley or the fa for another ticket to another good game. but at least i am very glad you're able to see the match your cell. ernest, thank you for talking us through your frustrating experience.
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thank you for talking us through yourfrustrating experience. far too many people shared this last night from the sound of it. now to other news and 30 million people across the western united states and canada have been enduring another heat way. las vegas has missions record 147 degrees west the appropriately named death valley is set to reach a high of 52. sophie long reports. wildfires in northern california grow in size and intensity destroying homes and multiple communities as increasing winds complicate the already of firefighting conditions. this fire is raging out of control in southern oregon as millions of people across the west united states are hit by another round of scorching temperatures. more than 60,000 acres are currently burning. california is no stranger to wildfires but scientists say they are becoming
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more frequent and more intense as global temperatures rise. the national weather service recorded temperatures of 130 degrees in california's death valley, some of the highest ever recorded on the planet. people in desert communities are being worn how quickly they can dehydrate or overheat. flat are being worn how quickly they can dehydrate or overheat. not realising how cuickl dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you _ dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you can _ dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you can run _ dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you can run into - dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you can run into trouble | how quickly you can run into trouble if dehydration and heat exhaustion over the body overheating. but even those following _ over the body overheating. but even those following the _ over the body overheating. but even those following the advice _ over the body overheating. but even those following the advice in - over the body overheating. but even those following the advice in palm . those following the advice in palm springs are struggling. it is those following the advice in palm springs are struggling.— springs are struggling. it is too hot. i springs are struggling. it is too hot- i am _ springs are struggling. it is too hot. i am drinking _ springs are struggling. it is too hot. i am drinking as _ springs are struggling. it is too hot. i am drinking as much - springs are struggling. it is too l hot. i am drinking as much water springs are struggling. it is too - hot. i am drinking as much water as i can. i am drinking my weight in water every day. i i can. i am drinking my weight in water every day.— water every day. i think the best water every day. i think the best wa to water every day. i think the best way to describe _ water every day. i think the best way to describe it _ water every day. i think the best way to describe it which - water every day. i think the best way to describe it which is - water every day. i think the best l way to describe it which is actually the way _ way to describe it which is actually the way my— way to describe it which is actually the way my friend described is that moment_ the way my friend described is that moment when you open the oven and that gust _ moment when you open the oven and that gust of— moment when you open the oven and that gust of heat hits you in the face _ that gust of heat hits you in the face he— that gust of heat hits you in the face. �* , , .,~ face. as the record-breaking temperatures _ face. as the record-breaking temperatures continue, - face. as the record-breaking i temperatures continue, people face. as the record-breaking - temperatures continue, people can only do their best to stay cool while also being urged to conserve
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water and energy. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. let's move to the other side of the world, us secretary of state anthony blinken is urging haiti project leaders to hold free and fair elections later in the following the assassination of their president last wednesday night. "we urge the countries to bring the communities together," said the secretary of state he told reporters that the us state department. the secretary of state department. the secretary of state has commented on the situation in cuba where thousands of people have during protests across the country taking a stand against the communist government. the cuban president argued the united states is to blame, calling them the support as they are concerned but mr blank and has just told reporters at the state department that it would
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be a grievous mistake to have the cuban government mystic what is happening on the ground as the result of anything the us has done. this report. chanting for freedom. not a cry often heard in havana. cubans took to the streets and what the opposition has called the biggest antigovernment protests in almost three decades. translation: state security beat me and my daughter. they beat us because we were walking down the street. we are here because — were walking down the street. we are here because of _ were walking down the street. we are here because of the _ were walking down the street. we are here because of the repression - here because of the repression against — here because of the repression against the people. they are starving _ against the people. they are starving us to death. havana is collapsing, we have no house, we have _ collapsing, we have no house, we have nothing, but they have money to build hotels _ have nothing, but they have money to build hotels and they have us starving _ build hotels and they have us starvinu. , ., , ., ., , build hotels and they have us starvin.. , ., , ., ., , ., starving. demonstrations were also held in florida, _ starving. demonstrations were also held in florida, the _ starving. demonstrations were also held in florida, the cuban - starving. demonstrations were also held in florida, the cuban exile - held in florida, the cuban exile community showed its solidarity. cuba pots our president has blamed the united states for the unrest waned on a thread for antigovernment
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protesters. we waned on a thread for antigovernment rotesters. ~ .., waned on a thread for antigovernment rotesters. ~ .. ., , ., protesters. we came here to show toaether protesters. we came here to show together with _ protesters. we came here to show together with the _ protesters. we came here to show together with the revolutionaries l protesters. we came here to show| together with the revolutionaries of this town that here the street belongs to revolutionaries. no worm or mercenary will claim the streets and if they provoke us without violating their constitutional rights, we will confront them. words s - rinr rights, we will confront them. words s-rrin on rights, we will confront them. words spring on supporters _ rights, we will confront them. words spring on supporters of _ rights, we will confront them. words spring on supporters of the - spring on supporters of the communist government, some taking it upon themselves to surround and detain those demonstrated. while others staged counter protests. brute others staged counter protests. we are defending what we did 60 years a-o are defending what we did 60 years ago that— are defending what we did 60 years ago that this is ours that it has cost _ ago that this is ours that it has cost many— ago that this is ours that it has cost many lives, that capitalism will never — cost many lives, that capitalism will never come back here again and that these _ will never come back here again and that these mercenaries paid by the empire _ that these mercenaries paid by the empire will never again take every streets _ empire will never again take every streets. they will have to kill us all first — streets. they will have to kill us allfirst. , ., , ., ., , streets. they will have to kill us allfirst. , ., , ., ., , all first. demonstrations of this
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kind are rare _ all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in _ all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in cuba _ all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in cuba but - all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in cuba but as - all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in cuba but as the j kind are rare in cuba but as the country reports a record number of coronavirus infections, tensions are burning oak —— blowing over with cries of democracy growing. returning to our top story, england manager's gareth southgate has described is unforgivable the racist abuse heaped online to three players who missed penalties during last night's european championship final defeat. marcus rashford and two others were targeted because of the penalties. let's talk more about this and what potentially can be done and should be done to try and deal with the abuse on life is up with me is the chair of kick it out, thanks forjoining us for some and also a journalist and author. chris can assert with you first of all equipment there is little argument among people on both sides of this that the abuse is wrong and it
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should stop. the debate is over how you can stop it and whether there are technical ways of dealing with that. do you want to address the first of all? is it possible for the online companies to do more than they currently do? it is online companies to do more than they currently do?— they currently do? it is possible than they are — they currently do? it is possible than they are doing _ they currently do? it is possible than they are doing currently. l they currently do? it is possible j than they are doing currently. it they currently do? it is possible i than they are doing currently. it is worth pointing out that nobody should be condoning any of this apparent behaviour. but social media platforms have more to do, they are allowing people to spread hate but other solutions have been proposed todayjust other solutions have been proposed today just as they were back other solutions have been proposed todayjust as they were back in february when marcus rashford six first had this sort of issue which do not get to the heart of the problem and because new ones in terms of the many people use their real names online. there are many reasons why people would want to stay anonymous on the internet and sadly racists are going to be racist whether or not they attach their name to it over the... that name to it over the. .. that argument. _ name to it over the. .. that argument, racists - name to it over the. .. that argument, racists will- name to it over the. .. that argument, racists will be l name to it over the. .. that - argument, racists will be racist name to it over the... that argument, racists will be racist is saying that it is not, social media
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did not create racism which is true but it has created an environment that can amplify a racist message. doesn't that therefore create the kind of obligation that rests on a broadcaster or a publisher? they are not allowed to use their technology to give somebody else the opportunity to amplify a message thatis opportunity to amplify a message that is socially unacceptable, why should online companies be able to do that? , , ., ., , do that? this is one of the big challenges — do that? this is one of the big challenges that _ do that? this is one of the big challenges that we _ do that? this is one of the big challenges that we have - do that? this is one of the big challenges that we have with l do that? this is one of the big - challenges that we have with social media was up i am a tech journalist who is a ticket sceptic and think they should absolutely be doing more about this. but these private platforms have become our public spaces which is one of the big challenges that we face and we have not seen enough from facebook, from twitter and from other platforms to try and tackle this. some of the abuse that the football players talked about this morning is absolutely terrible. but it isn't as easy as you think. one of the risks that we have here is that social
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media platforms have become so big and so unwieldy that it is difficult to put the genie back in the bottle. that is certainly not by way of excuse of excusing any of the behaviour because it's not been allowed to get to this point but we have had an absence of regulation and legislation and now we are at a point where we are going to be cracking down an awful lot and may be dragging people into the net that we did not mean to in order to tackle these systemic issues in our society. we tackle these systemic issues in our socie . ~ . ., ., tackle these systemic issues in our socie . ~ ., ., ., society. we will come to that in a minute because _ society. we will come to that in a minute because that _ society. we will come to that in a minute because that is _ society. we will come to that in a minute because that is the - minute because that is the legislation they're trying to get there in the moment. before we do that with scotus anze. sunday chair of kick it out, an organisation that has existed for some time and fighting more and more of the online site because this has become almost more of an issue than the abuse that was chanted on the terraces in terms of its impact and it's kind of cruelty. what did you make first of all of what happened as a result of last night pots or penalties? i think the saddest part of it and the
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most treacherous part is how grimly predictable it was. == most treacherous part is how grimly predictable it was.— predictable it was. -- the tragic art of predictable it was. -- the tragic part of it- _ predictable it was. -- the tragic part of it- i _ predictable it was. -- the tragic part of it. i was _ predictable it was. -- the tragic part of it. i was with _ predictable it was. -- the tragic part of it. i was with colleagues| part of it. i was with colleagues from _ part of it. i was with colleagues from the — part of it. i was with colleagues from the faa and fans and we were all praying — from the faa and fans and we were all praying a blackberry didn't miss all praying a blackberry didn't miss a penalty— all praying a blackberry didn't miss a penalty because we knew exactly what would happen and follow overnight and there would be a torrent— overnight and there would be a torrent of— overnight and there would be a torrent of racist abuse and that's exactly _ torrent of racist abuse and that's exactly what we got. and you are right, _ exactly what we got. and you are right, online is the biggest challenge we face in terms of racism in and _ challenge we face in terms of racism in and around football and society. -- praying — in and around football and society. -- praying a — in and around football and society. —— praying a black player did not miss _ -- praying a black player did not miss. ~ ., ., , -- praying a black player did not miss. ~ . . , ., -- praying a black player did not miss. ~ . ., , ., ., , ., miss. what are they doing that you are arguing — miss. what are they doing that you are arguing they — miss. what are they doing that you are arguing they can _ miss. what are they doing that you are arguing they can do _ miss. what are they doing that you are arguing they can do now- miss. what are they doing that you are arguing they can do now to - are arguing they can do now to control and reduce if not at this stage entirely eliminate these abusive messages? this stage entirely eliminate these abusive messages?— abusive messages? this is an industrial _ abusive messages? this is an industrial scale _ abusive messages? this is an industrial scale technology i abusive messages? this is an - industrial scale technology problem. if you _ industrial scale technology problem. if you took _ industrial scale technology problem. if you took one of the figures that one of— if you took one of the figures that one of the — if you took one of the figures that one of the social media companies as set out _ one of the social media companies as set out last— one of the social media companies as set out last yearjust on their figures, _ set out last yearjust on their figures, there is a pace that is taken —
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figures, there is a pace that is taken down and —— the pace of hate that is— taken down and —— the pace of hate that is taken— taken down and —— the pace of hate that is taken down that is taking down _ that is taken down that is taking down every minute of every hour of every _ down every minute of every hour of every day _ down every minute of every hour of every day 365 days a year. that is like what — every day 365 days a year. that is like what spam e—mail was ten years a-o, like what spam e—mail was ten years ago. you _ like what spam e—mail was ten years ago, you need to deal with this. what _ ago, you need to deal with this. what we — ago, you need to deal with this. what we want social media companies to do is— what we want social media companies to do is invest. the reality is they have _ to do is invest. the reality is they have invested in similar problems but problems that have money issues. they have _ but problems that have money issues. they have the technology to monitor copyright _ they have the technology to monitor copyright infringement because this hits the _ copyright infringement because this hits the bottom line this hits their reputation — hits the bottom line this hits their reputation and the need to focus on that _ reputation and the need to focus on that chris— reputation and the need to focus on that chris is— reputation and the need to focus on that. chris is right in the sense that— that. chris is right in the sense that there _ that. chris is right in the sense that there may be misplaced focus on anonymity— that there may be misplaced focus on anonymity but focus should be on identification. if someone does do something wrong, we need to be able to identify— something wrong, we need to be able to identify them quickly and we do not have _ to identify them quickly and we do not have systems available to do that and — not have systems available to do that and actually we have been working — that and actually we have been working with a technology company
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working _ working with a technology company working with a technology company working with some really high profile — working with some really high profile organisations, really good credentials with one of the social media _ credentials with one of the social media companies, some initial interest— media companies, some initial interest but then they go slow and what tends to happen is you have a useful— what tends to happen is you have a useful conversation with them in london — useful conversation with them in london and then click the little britain — london and then click the little britain sketch it's california says no and _ britain sketch it's california says no and this— britain sketch it's california says no and this the problem. it is actually— no and this the problem. it is actually to get england to engage in turn that— actually to get england to engage in turn that initial good intent into action— turn that initial good intent into action and — turn that initial good intent into action and that hits a problem with social— action and that hits a problem with social culture. let action and that hits a problem with social culture.— action and that hits a problem with social culture. let me end with you chris with the — social culture. let me end with you chris with the political _ social culture. let me end with you chris with the political culture - social culture. let me end with you chris with the political culture in i chris with the political culture in the united states with this absolute commitment to freedom of speech as a constitutional right not wanted to go there even though they are in a differentjurisdiction. chris let me ask you finally done. one specific example we have algorithms to do so many things now. why is not possible to spot combination of words that says a players name and that actually this message includes other words in conjunction with that name
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that we should block that message? sanjay hit on the issue here sean which is that it is not profitable for companies to do this. but even if they did and this is one of the keyissues if they did and this is one of the key issues which makes the point out that this is notjust tech, it is people that we need to deal with. if you managed to crack down that particular phrase or those words and sadly we can probably all think of them, people will use other ones, they always use other ones they use dog whistle phrases and things like that. we see this in our society. it is important that we take with this issue where it is now but it is also important that we tackle it at the root, needing better education and making it obvious that it is not ok to be racist here.— making it obvious that it is not ok to be racist here. chris and san'ay, chair of the — to be racist here. chris and san'ay, chair of the kick i to be racist here. chris and san'ay, chair of the kick it i to be racist here. chris and san'ay, chair of the kick it out, * to be racist here. chris and san'ay, chair of the kick it out, the i chair of the kick it out, the english football association attempt to boost equality and inclusion. thank you both for being with us on
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bbc news. let's return to our main story this hour. borisjohnson has outlined to lift all restrictions in england... he said in a briefing that wife will not go back to normal as we there will not be limits on how many people can meet, let's have a look at the latest covid restrictions across the other three nations of the uk. wales still has no date for ending covid restrictions. the welsh government is having a review on regulations on wednesday that is has a facemasks will remain mandatory in public settings. ministers are deciding whether they will be worn by law and deciding whether they will be worn bylaw and shops. scotland's government will confirm tomorrow whether the country can move to a level zero next monday. that would bring them broadly into line what is happening with england at the same time but further covid restrictions which will still exist on that level zero could be lifted on august the
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9th. some measures such as the wearing of facemasks will remain in place and in northern ireland some covid resorted to be relaxed from the 26th ofjuly, the monday after next meaning theatres and concert halls will be able to reopen. face coverings were not happy worn in places of worship and restrictions and social gatherings that people pounds mccombs will be eased. changes we need to be agreed by ministers at stormont on the 22nd of this month. now today because are knesset means quite a few significant changes for businesses in england changes for next monday mean pounds of restaurants will scrap limits and services and... nightclubs will be able to reopen but are being advised they should ask for proof that people have had theirjabs before writing them in front of many organisers will not be legally required to follow it and could be in legaljeopardy if they try to enforce a rule and someone decides to challenge them in court for some let's speak to james, a
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managing director of a nightclub in bristol for those few who do not know it but for those who do remember it, the home of many a happy night. sadly too many years ago that i care to remember probably even before you were born. thanks very much for being with us this evening on bbc news. congratulations you must be so relieved at that today has come and you have had the reassurance of the confirmation that it really is going to happen come next week. we it really is going to happen come next week-— it really is going to happen come next week. ~ . , ., next week. we really are thrilled. this is opening — next week. we really are thrilled. this is opening on _ next week. we really are thrilled. this is opening on the _ next week. we really are thrilled. this is opening on the 19th, - next week. we really are thrilled. this is opening on the 19th, one l this is opening on the 19th, one past midnight on monday, we have a festival in the 24th and 25th and july which would be the first uk dance festival post knocked on, so the lifting of the measures today for us is wonderful.— the lifting of the measures today for us is wonderful. james let me talk about — for us is wonderful. james let me talk about the _ for us is wonderful. james let me talk about the practicality - for us is wonderful. james let me talk about the practicality of - for us is wonderful. james let me talk about the practicality of this. j talk about the practicality of this. what are you still planning to do within the venue to try and minimise the risk of infection? there are huge kinds of issues with the close environment, it gets sweaty, people
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are close together by choice in a lot of cases. and you had to deal with all the practicalities of ventilation, people being able to get back and forth to the bar and all that kind of stuff.— all that kind of stuff. over the last ear all that kind of stuff. over the last year we — all that kind of stuff. over the last year we have _ all that kind of stuff. over the last year we have been - all that kind of stuff. over the | last year we have been running all that kind of stuff. over the i last year we have been running a social distance outdoor venue, this is quite different because we are looking at the nightclub, we have been waiting for this guidance to come up for months and it has finally come out today which makes things more difficult. we would prefer the government to be clear on what they want us to do. it will be difficult to enforce wearing a facemasks insight if it is no longer the law as of monday. share facemasks insight if it is no longer the law as of monday.— the law as of monday. are you worried you — the law as of monday. are you worried you may _ the law as of monday. are you worried you may have - the law as of monday. are you worried you may have people| the law as of monday. are you i worried you may have people get hassling with your staff and things like that? i hassling with your staff and things like that? ~ ., hassling with your staff and things like that? ~ . , ., like that? i think that will be an issue if we _ like that? i think that will be an issue if we are _ like that? i think that will be an issue if we are enforcing - like that? i think that will be an - issue if we are enforcing facemasks being worn inside, we would definitely encourage and same as with the lateral flow test before attendees arrived for some i don't think it is something that we can make mandatory but it is something we will advise and suggest people do
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before they come out to the venue. what about what has been described as a covid password which is not a physical thing, are you trying... it would be an issue for no other reason then each profile if you suddenly start saying to people you must be double vaccinated before you come in or you have to have a lateral flow tests, with a lot of your clients it will be the lateral flow test. ~ ., ., ~' your clients it will be the lateral flow test. ~ ., ., ~ ., ., your clients it will be the lateral flow test. ~ ., ., ., flow test. we looked into all of these options _ flow test. we looked into all of these options over— flow test. we looked into all of these options over the - flow test. we looked into all of these options over the last - flow test. we looked into all of these options over the last six | these options over the last six months of covid passports and i think what it is a test. we were quite surprised when it was leaked a week ago that none of that would be required. i suppose it does make it easier but also concerning because we don't want to be the virus that continues the spreading. {line we don't want to be the virus that continues the spreading. one brief west thought. _ continues the spreading. one brief west thought, the _ continues the spreading. one brief west thought, the first _ continues the spreading. one brief west thought, the first dance - west thought, the first dance festival taking place in the country how will that be? i festival taking place in the country how will that be?— how will that be? i think it will be fantastic. it _
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how will that be? i think it will be fantastic. it has _ how will that be? i think it will be fantastic. it has been _ how will that be? i think it will be fantastic. it has been 16 - how will that be? i think it will be fantastic. it has been 16 months i fantastic. it has been 16 months since we have danced together in the fields. ., . ~' since we have danced together in the fields. ., ., ,, fields. you make it sound so appealing. _ fields. you make it sound so appealing, james. _ fields. you make it sound so appealing, james. james - fields. you make it sound so - appealing, james. james haggart, managing director of lakota, good luck with the opening next week. while many of us have been trying to work out whether we can travel abroad this year, 180—year—old from buckinghamshire has touched down at it after becoming the youngest person to ——118—year—old... he comes back home after spending 44 daysin comes back home after spending 44 days in the air find comes back home after spending 44 days in the airfind us on 16 countries and i'm delighted to say that travis joins us there travis, congratulations, it is a fantastic achievement but i have to say why did you want to do it?— achievement but i have to say why did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted _ did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted to _ did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted to do _ did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted to do it _ did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted to do it to - did you want to do it? thank you so much. i wanted to do it to show - much. i wanted to do it to show people that no matter what happens that as long as you keep going and following your dreams, especially young people as well, you can make
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and achieve your goals for so that's what i want to do, inspire young people to go and follow their dreams. as well as that i'm trying to raise money for unicef as well, a great charity to try to support. i hope you have raised a lot and that people would dig deep and give you a bit more than they promise to give you because it is quite an achievement. you have beaten the previous youngest by 13 days i think you are right, so you were 18 years, 150 days when you landed. you were taking off and you said you were delayed by one year, you should have done this a year ago but obviously covid and all the rest of it. what was the highlight of yourjourney? the highlight was probably flying through russia, that was definitely an amazing experience, the different airspace and that was a very challenging to fly through as well as the people there are amazing, i had dinner with the british consulate in the third largest city in russia and it was amazing and i
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loved it so russia was one of the high points of the trip. but seeing many of the other sites as well. we have interrupted your on the way to get your dinner i think. yes. have interrupted your on the way to get your dinner i think.— get your dinner i think. yes, i am doinr get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this — get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this at _ get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this at a — get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this at a shopping - get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this at a shopping centre, | get your dinner i think. yes, i am doing this at a shopping centre, i | doing this at a shopping centre, i was off to grab my dinner but that neck as good as the takeaways are in high wycombe, i bet it doesn't beat the consulate fonseca dinner in russia. ., ., the consulate fonseca dinner in russia. . ., ., the consulate fonseca dinner in russia. . . ., the consulate fonseca dinner in russia. ., ., ., ., russia. have a great night, you are officially now _ russia. have a great night, you are officially now one _ russia. have a great night, you are officially now one of _ russia. have a great night, you are officially now one of those - officially now one of those magnificent men in the fine machines as the old song goes, congratulations and i hope you have a long career in the air ahead of you. travis thank you so much. terrific, travis ludlow there, many congratulations to him for some it is time tojoin congratulations to him for some it is time to join the much travelled had their willets foot —— alan willits. good evening. we have seen warm sunny spells, we have seen wet weather around, northern england and through the latter part of the afternoon come at this level card is moved into southeastern areas, they are circulating around this area of low
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pressure pulling out of the way but probably at the height of the moment so those of showers giving torrential downpours, localise flash funding and lots of standing water on the flat... they could rumble into the evening, the odd downpour elsewhere as well but on balance through the night they tend to ease down except perhaps in southern areas and instead we get mist and low cloud rolling in off the north sea and temperatures should hold between 12—14 celsius but there should still be a few showers run into to say but it looks on the whole we will have fewer of them and therefore longer dry and sunny spells. little bits of mist and fog to clear in the we should have some on the east coast, burning back the joy on the east coast, burning back the joy sunshine which could trigger sharp downpours, and the winds are light again so those showers when they come along will be slow moving but for most places there will be more dry weather than those showers and 23, 24 responding to the sun shine a little higher than we had
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the past couple of days but the pollen of us are up very high across many parts as you can see. the evening continues with a shower risk but then as you see they will tend to dampen down. as we move into wednesday we are starting to lose that influence of the area of low pressure pulling away and instead we had this atlantic high—pressure starting to move in. the difference is the week with her friends on thursday coming into the north—west of both the north in ireland and scotland so you will probably see cloudier skies than we have seen today with perhaps a bit of rain and drizzle in the west end northern isles, just the outside chance of showers in southern and eastern areas with low pressure and cloud onto the north sea coast but for most a good spell of sunshine and warm spells and that should translate for the rest of the week, those highs pushing the weather front out of the way and giving us we think a lot of dry and settled weather with light winds and therefore we will sue the temperature is rising above average
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and perhaps into the high 20s by the time to get to the end of the week and weekend.
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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. the call for freedom — communist cuba erupts with some of the largest demonstrations we've seen in decades. tens of thousands came onto the streets on sunday demanding food, medicines and basic rights. joe biden said the country's communist leaders needs to listen to their people, rather than enriching themselves. there's been widespread condemnation of the racial abuse levelled at england's black football players on social media, following last night's european championship final. boris johnson confirms all government mandated restrictions will be lifted in england from next monday, but he warns the country, the pandemic is farfrom over.
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are you joking? are youjoking? i'm not joking, i'm are you 'oking? i'm not 'oking, i'm so are youjoking? i'm not 'oking, i'm so sorry to — are youjoking? i'm not 'oking, i'm so sorry to break h are youjoking? i'm not 'oking, i'm so sorry to break the _ are youjoking? i'm not joking, i'm so sorry to break the news -

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