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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 12, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. italy are celebrating their euro 2020 victory after beating england in a penalty shoot—out at wembley. the triumphant team has now returned to rome, where they've been welcomed by italy's president and prime minister — it's their second european championship victory. but the last one was back in the 60s, so this one is a big deal. england's three players who missed penalties have been targeted with a torrent of racial abuse online. and there's widespread disgust. to those who have been directing racist abuse at some of the players, i say shame on you, and i hope you
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will crawl back under the rock from which you emerged. south africa's military is deployed to the streets, to stamp out violent protests against the jailing of former president jacob zuma. shops looted and buildings set on fire in the fourth day of unrest across two provinces — and police are blaming the violence on criminals and "opportunistic individuals". we will also turn to the us. wildfires are raging across western states, where millions have been hit by another heatwave. firefighters say conditions are so harsh, water is evaporating before it hits the ground. it was always going to be painful for england or italy. england's wait for for a follow—up to the 1966 world cup goes on. for italy... well, they're home and celebrating.
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here's the winning side, currently being paraded through the streets of rome to celebrate with their adoring fans. our correspondent mark lowen has been talking to some of the people out there. seeking refuge from the heat, giancarla and herfamily. generations witnessing history. i hope you don't mind me asking, but do you remember italy's last european victory in 1968? i remember, just because of my father, who was so happy. and i was a little kid then. and i thought, "oh, what a lovely thing it is!" so it was also a revival of that. well, i wasn't watching the match, i was sleeping. when i heard everybody shouting outside at midnight, i woke up and then my mum told me we were champions. your grandma says you go to the british school here, so what are you saying to your english friends? i don't know. i'm just going to say, "we won!" from italy's captain, a message dedicating the victory to the country's medics — both heroes of our times. the word italians are using
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about their team is redemption — both from italy's failure to qualify for the last world cup and its year of agony to this, champions of europe and bringers of unbridled joy. in case you weren't watching the match, here's a quick recap. it all started very well for england. they took the lead through luke shaw under two minutes in. spectacular goal, you can see him celebrate either his arms out. then italy's leonardo bonucci equalised halfway through the second half. then it was extra time. no more goals. then penalties. to cut a long story short... first marcus rashford missed, then jadon sancho missed, and then gianluigi donnarumma saved bakayo saka and italy had it. here's england's captain reacting to the loss. it hurts now, it is what you've
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heard for a long time, but the boys should be proud of themselves. let’s should be proud of themselves. let's hear from the — should be proud of themselves. let's hear from the team _ should be proud of themselves. let's hear from the team positing manager gareth southgate. the hear from the team positing manager gareth southgate.— gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has _ gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to _ gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to be _ gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to be a _ gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to be a step - gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to be a step in - gareth southgate. the semifinal, final, it has to be a step in right l final, it has to be a step in right direction — final, it has to be a step in right direction it_ final, it has to be a step in right direction. it is not ultimately where — direction. it is not ultimately where we _ direction. it is not ultimately where we wanted to get through, and when you _ where we wanted to get through, and when you worked so close, that is even _ when you worked so close, that is even more — when you worked so close, that is even more painful, course. if you like your— even more painful, course. if you like your stomach has been ripped out this_ like your stomach has been ripped out this morning. -- like your stomach has been ripped out this morning.— as you'd imagine, it was a different mood in rome. here are fans enjoying their first euros title since 1968. translation: it's incredible, it's incredible! _ you can't feel better than this. it is amazing. we won the final! translation: i'm so happy! we are euro champions! i'm going to celebrate all night, i'm going to celebrate all night! and the contrast continue. let's hear from an england and the contrast continue. let's hearfrom an england fan and the contrast continue. let's hear from an england fan after the game.
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the boys did well, we got to a final. if progress — semifinal, final. if progress — semifinal, final. if progress - semifinal, final. . , ., ., ., ., final. i have been through a lot of ain in final. i have been through a lot of pain in my _ final. i have been through a lot of pain in my life. — final. i have been through a lot of pain in my life, through _ final. i have been through a lot of pain in my life, through work, - final. i have been through a lot of. pain in my life, through work, their family. _ pain in my life, through work, their family, through situations. this punches — family, through situations. this punches me in the gut. it is not easy— punches me in the gut. it is not easy to — punches me in the gut. it is not easy to handle. it is a game, that it is more — easy to handle. it is a game, that it is more than a game in this country _ but certainly in england, this has become about far more than football. the day after the night centred on the fallout from racist attacks on social media directed at the penalty takers who missed. also focusing on the behaviour of some england fans who drank, fought and forced their way into the stadium. look at these two headlines from the new york times. one before sunday's match describes the jubilation surrounding england's progress in the tournament as a "microcosm of a nation seemingly enthusiastic about its evolving identity as a more tolerant, multiracial, and multiethnic society." then after the game, there's this...
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this is referring to marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka. all missed penalties, all are young black men and all have been racially abused online since the game — just as they have been during their careers. here's english player anita asante. what we have seen in my opinion is this kind of conditional love for our players. which shouldn't be there. you know what i mean? we should back them and support them no matter the outcomes. it's not only online that players have suffered racial abuse. a mural in the northern city of manchester honouring marcus rashford has been vandalised with graffiti following the final. and many people have been seeking to distance themselves from such behaviour.
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among those, the british author matt haig. he tweeted. .. he also said that... while many people have condemned the racist behaviour we've seen, a lot are not surprised. one of them is leroy rosenior, a former striker and football manager, who is an ambassador for show racism the red card. as soon as saka missed that penalty, i turned to a friend i was watching it with and said, "here it comes." because we are only one moment away from the sort of abuse. it hasn't gone away, it is there and it needs to be dealt with. this isn't the first time that racism towards english players has been a topic of conversation during this tournament. at the start of the competition, players were jeered at for taking the knee — a sign of unity against discrimination and racism — at two matches. borisjohnson the prime minister said three spokesperson that he wants to see everyone get behind the
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team, not boo. today, he has had this to say. to those who have been directing racist abuse at some of the players, i say shame on you, and i hope you will crawl back under the rock from which you emerged. and here's the home secretary, priti patel, in the house of commons today. it will take, mr speaker, determined effort— it will take, mr speaker, determined effort and _ it will take, mr speaker, determined effort and action by iran across society, — effort and action by iran across society, all institutions, to and the corrosive culture of racism. and on that_ the corrosive culture of racism. and on that point — the corrosive culture of racism. and on that point as well, the thuggish and violent behaviour we saw last night _ and violent behaviour we saw last night was — and violent behaviour we saw last night was utterly disgusting and there's— night was utterly disgusting and there's no place in our society for this _ there's no place in our society for this these — there's no place in our society for this. these people have no right to be this. these people have no right to he called _ this. these people have no right to be called fans. they will face serious — be called fans. they will face serious consequent as for their actions — the home secretary was referring there, in part, to the actions of some fans before the match had even started. this footage is of fans trying to get into wembley stadium, where the match was held, before kick—off without tickets. the football association, the sport's governing body
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in england, has said that it will conduct a full review. priti patel, who referred to the england team taking the knee early on in the competition as "gesture politics", has been criticised for now condeming acts of racism. the fellow conservative politician baroness sayeeda warsi has re—tweeted priti patel, saying... she went on to say that... borisjohnson has also been called a hypocrite. and i am afraid the prime minister has failed the test of leadership, because whatever he says today about
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racism, he had a simple choice at the beginning of this tournament in relation to the brewing at those that were taking the knee, the players that were taking the knee, and they made it clear why they were taking the knee. the prime minister failed to call that out. downing street denies labour's accusation, saying mrjohnson made clear it was not ok to boo england players. one conservative mp has had to apologise for comments she made about marcus rashford. in a private message to other mps, natalie elphicke said that... ..referring to marcus rashford's advocacy for free meals to be provided for children in families that are struggling financially. something that led to a government u—turn. natalie elphicke has now apologised for that. the wider issue
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is how to avoid players facing abuse online. the fa has turned to that today. they said... facebook has also commented, saying it's... but in practical terms, stopping all of this abuse is hard. the fa knows this, the government knows this, facebook knows this. here is our technology correspondent rory cellanjones. somebody complained about a comment made on one of the instagram pages of one of the footballers, which was just using an emoji of an orangutan. and they got a reply back
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from instagram, saying, "our technology has found this comment doesn't go against our community guidelines." and the reply made clear that they were struggling to cope with the sheer volume of complaints, and therefore they were leaving it to the machines in the first place rather than the human moderators. it went on, "our technology isn't perfect and we're continually trying to improve it." next on outside source, we to south africa. the army has been deployed in two provinces to quell escalating violence triggered by last week's jailing of former president jacob zuma. six people have died and over 200 arrested in four days of unrest. violence has been centred on kwazulu—natal, jacob zuma's home province. lots of pictures in the last 2a hours. some quite romantic. —— quite dramatic.
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this is a shopping centre that was set on fire in pietermaritzburg, the provincial capital. then this is another shopping mall being stormed by looters in umlazi township. we weren't short of pictures. here's some of the destruction to businesses in durban. we've also seen pictures of men beating people with sticks. the violence has spread beyond kwazulu—natal. here are police firing at protesters injohannesburg in gautang province, where there's been more looting, burglaries and arson attacks. troops are now on the streets in both provinces, a rare move in south africa. the bbc�*s nomsa maseko is in pietermaritzburg. in just the last few minutes, i saw them patrolling here on this main road here in pietermaritzburg. i'm sure you can also see and hear the peoplejust behind me now. they are chanting, "they must release jacob zuma, the government must release jacob zuma," and that is exactly the crux of the protests, the violent protests, that we have seen erupting since the former president's jailing. jacob zuma handed himself into the authorities just before midnight on wednesday, less than an hour before
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a court deadline for him to surrender expired. here he is being driven from his home in kwazulu—natal to prison, where he's serving 15 months for contempt of court. the move was unprecedented and hugely unpopular with his supporters. and these are the people who have turned onto the streets. the protests quickly turned violent. trucks and cars were set on fire. by sunday, protests spread from there to south africa's economic hub, johannesburg. these are pictures of the central business district. reuters journalists there saw protesters carrying sticks, golf clubs and branches. police are blaming the violence on criminals and "opportunistic individuals" who they say are taking advantage of the chaos. we have also heard a response from the president right now, cyril ramaphosa. let us be clear as a nation that we will not tolerate any
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acts of criminality. we will not tolerate any acts of vandalism. those who are involved in acts of violence will be arrested and prosecuted. jacob zuma was sentenced to jail last month for refusing a consitutional court order to answer claims of systemic corruption during his eight years in office. he denies wrongdoing, and his lawyers are pushing to have the ruling overturned. here they are making their case for his release in the constitutional court today. online, as you can see. they're arguing judges made "rescindable errors" and had treated him "unfairly". and the whole context here is that jacob zuma was once a few usually celebrate in figuring south africa. —— hugely celebrated figure. here's a quick timeline. in 1963, he was imprisoned in robben island for ten years forfighting apartheid — alongside nelson mandela.
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he went into exile in 1975 to become the spy master of the ruling african national congress. the party which is now in power. in 1990, he returned to south africa and rose to president in 2009. but his reputation has been damaged by numerous corruption allegations. nomsa maseko is in pietermaritzburg in kwazulu—natal. nomsa, what is the latest on the violence there? it nomsa, what is the latest on the violence there?— violence there? it is still very much volatile _ violence there? it is still very much volatile here _ violence there? it is still very much volatile here in - violence there? it is still very| much volatile here in because violence there? it is still very - much volatile here in because lynn is how and also in watching. —— because the towel. the army has been deployed on the streets and it is hoped that the address by the president of the country, cyril ramaphosa, in the next few minutes will actually help in quelling the detentions and the volatility we have been seeing on
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the streets. as expected that the president will declare a state of emergency now that the military has been deployed on the streets here in south africa. find been deployed on the streets here in south africa-— south africa. and can you help me understand _ south africa. and can you help me understand why _ south africa. and can you help me understand why supporters - south africa. and can you help me understand why supporters of- south africa. and can you help me| understand why supporters of jacob zuma take issue with this, given the entire process has been going through the higher echelons of south africa's justice system and after all he chose not to take part in this part of the process? and all he chose not to take part in this part of the process? and was not this part of the process? and was rrot exoeeted _ this part of the process? and was not expected that _ this part of the process? and was not expected that he _ this part of the process? and was not expected that he was - this part of the process? and was not expected that he was going . this part of the process? and was| not expected that he was going to this part of the process? and was - not expected that he was going to be jailed. in fact his supporters thought that he was at least going to be given a fine, but not a direct jail sentence, and that is like they are taking issue with it, even going as far as saying that he was jailed without trial, but the law in south africa is as is, people can be found in contempt of court without having gone one trial and this is exactly what has happened here with the former president. what is standing
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out is the fact that it is the first time the south african constitutional court is actually sentenced anyone to a jail sentence, and that is what they are taking issue with it, because they are saying that the judge in the constitutional court just did saying that the judge in the constitutional courtjust did not want to see the former president having the last laugh, because he has been saying that he will not take part in the corruption inquiry thatis take part in the corruption inquiry that is investing in corruption which allegedly took place in the nine years that he was in power. and nine years that he was in power. and hel me nine years that he was in power. and help me understand the politics of this. eversince help me understand the politics of this. ever since the end of apartheid, the anc has won each election in south africa very comfortably. could this be a moment where the unity within the party is put under intolerable pressure? well, currently, the anc does look set to win another election. in fact in the next few months, there will be local government elections here in south africa, and the covering
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party still set to win, but what is important to note here is the fact that what we are seeing now is the culmination of squabbles and infighting within the governing party which is led to many more divisions, and that is what south africa is currently going through now. south africa is currently going through now— south africa is currently going through now. south africa is currently going throu~h now. ., , through now. nomsa, live with us in pietermaritzburg, _ through now. nomsa, live with us in pietermaritzburg, thank _ through now. nomsa, live with us in pietermaritzburg, thank you - through now. nomsa, live with us in pietermaritzburg, thank you very - pietermaritzburg, thank you very much. next on outside source, we turn to the us. 30 million people across the western united states and canada have been enduring another blistering heatwave. las vegas recorded 47 degrees. death valley in california is predicted to reach over 52 degrees, and this extreme heat is having a range of them sitting consequences. —— devastating. wildfires have been burning in six states on the west coast.
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from los angeles, our correspondent sophie long reports. wildfires in northern california grow in size and intensity, destroying homes in multiple communities as increasing winds complicate already dangerous firefighting conditions. this fire is raging out of control in southern oregon, as millions of people across the western united states are hit by another round of scorching temperatures. i'm on the west side... more than 60,000 acres are currently burning. california is no stranger to wildfires, but scientists say they're becoming more frequent and more intense as global temperatures rise. the national weather service recorded temperatures of 130 degrees in california's death valley, some of the highest ever recorded on the planet. people in desert communities are being warned how quickly they can dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly you can run into trouble with dehydration and heat exhaustion or the body overheating. but even those following the advice
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in palm springs are struggling. it's too hot. i'm drinking as much water as i can. i'm drinking my weight in water every day. i think the best way to describe it, which is actually the way my friend described it, is that moment when you open the oven and that gust of heat hits you in the face. as the record—breaking temperatures continue, people can only do their best to stay cool while also being urged to conserve water and energy. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. scientists at imperial college london believe they've discovered the basis for what could be the first diagnostic test for long covid. researchers have told the bbc�*s panorama programme that they hope their study will help develop improved treatments for the condition, which involves one or more coronavirus symptoms persisting for at least 12 weeks.
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our correspondent lucy adams, who has been suffering from long covid, reports. it is 11 weeks since i started with a fever and some of the symptoms of coronavirus. i started recording a video diary when i first got covid in march last year, thinking it would just be a few weeks' illness. i have been ill for... she sobs i have been ill for eight months now. and i'm getting really fed up of it. it's really taking its toll on my family and my relationships. door bell rings hey, guys, how was school? i'm one ofi million people in the uk suffering from long covid,
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an illness with a huge range of symptoms including fatigue, breathlessness and brain fog. it has had a huge impact on me and my family. much about the illness is still unknown. i look fine on the outside, but, obviously, there is still a problem. i have been off work for almost a year. still unwell, fatigue and headaches and all sorts of other problems. some believe one of the causes may be the immune system is turning on itself. we know that in some people, when they get infected with coronavirus, the body, it can also generate antibodies against self—proteins or human proteins. normally, we create antibodies to fight disease. but sometimes, the body creates auto antibodies. these attack healthy cells. the pilot data we have says that you really can pick up different patterns of autoimmunity in people who have long covid. so it's the start of the road, but we are quite chuffed about it. professor danny altman
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at imperial college in london thinks he may have found unique autoantibodies in the blood of people with long covid. although more detailed research is needed, they hope a diagnostic test is possible. i'm famously optimistic. so i'd hope that within six months, we'd have a simple blood test that you could get from your gp. but professor altman adds a note of caution as social distancing ends and the country reopens. one thing we know for absolute certain is that long covid can ensue from any form of infection, asymptomatic, mild, severe. so if we are heading into a phase of 100,000 cases per day in the coming months, we are saying that ten to 20% of all infections can result in long covid, i can see no certainty that we are not brewing those long covid cases despite having a vaccinated population.
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16 months on, i am much improved, but i still worry about whether i will ever get back to being who i was before covid. lucy adams, bbc news. let's quickly talk about emmanuel macron, the french president. he is in us and will _ macron, the french president. he is in us and will be _ macron, the french president. he is in us and will be mandatory for all health workers to be vaccinated. he has announced covid passports will be required to access events with more than 50 people. that kicks in from july 21 and even to access restaurants from august, he says the changing rules is necessary because france is seeing a resurgence in coronavirus cases. as part of how france is addressing the pandemic in and in the second of outside source, we are going to talk about australia. they have been running an
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advertising campaign that has proved controversial. we will show you the advert and explain why. see you in a few minutes. good evening. whilst we've seen some warm, sunny spells today, we've also seen some rather wet weather around northern england notably, and through the latter part of the afternoon, this lump of cloud has moved its way into south—eastern areas. and all circulating around this area of low pressure, which is starting to pull out the way, but probably at the height at the moment, so those showers giving torrential downpours, localised flash flooding and lots of spray and standing water on the faster routes. and they will continue to rumble on well into the evening. could be the odd heavy downpour elsewhere as well. but on balance, as i say, through the night, they do tend to ease down except perhaps in southern areas. and instead we get some mist and some low cloud rolling in off the north sea, and temperatures should hold between 12—14 degrees celsius. but there'll still be a few showers around, even into tuesday, but on the whole, it looks as if we'll have fewer of them and therefore there'll be
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longer dry and sunny spells. little bits of mist and fog to clear in the morning. we'll have some sea haar and fret for the east coast, which takes its time to burn back with the strength of the july sunshine, which could still trigger some sharp downpours. the winds are light again, so those showers when they come along will be slow—moving, but for most places, there'll be more dry weather than those showers. and 23—24, responding to the sunshine, is a little higher than we've had for the past couple of days. but the pollen levels are back up again, high to very high across many parts as you can see. the evening continues with the shower risk, but then as we'll see, they will tend to dampen down. and as we move into wednesday, we're starting to lose that influence of the area of low pressure. it's pulling away, and instead we've got this atlantic high pressure starting to move in. the difference on wednesday is some weak weather fronts coming into the north west of both northern ireland and scotland, so here we'll probably see cloudier skies than we've seen today and indeed tomorrow, with perhaps a little bit of patchy rain and drizzle for the western
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and the northern isles, too. stilljust the outside chance of some showers in southern and eastern areas close to that low pressure, bit of low cloud onto the north sea coasts. but, for most, some good spells of sunshine, some warm spells of sunshine and that should translate for the rest of the week. that high pressure, the azores high, moves in, pushing the weather fronts and that low pressure out of the way and giving us, we think, a lot of dry and settled weather with light winds, and therefore we'll see the temperatures rising. above average, perhaps into the high 20s by the time we get to the end of the week and the weekend. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source — as you might imagine, italy are celebrating in rome after beating england in that penalty shoot—out. the team is back in rome with thousands of supporters turning out including the president and prime minister of italy. this is a second tournament that italy have one with the first since 1968 so it feels like the first. the english players who missed penalty seven targeted with a torrent of racist abuse today and there has been widespread condemnation. to and there has been widespread condemnation.— and there has been widespread condemnation. ., ., . , condemnation. to those who have been directin: condemnation. to those who have been directing racist — condemnation. to those who have been directing racist abuse _ condemnation. to those who have been directing racist abuse at _ condemnation. to those who have been directing racist abuse at some - condemnation. to those who have been directing racist abuse at some of- directing racist abuse at some of the players, i say shame on you and
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i hope you will crawl back under the rock from which you emerged. taste i hope you will crawl back under the rock from which you emerged. we are auoin to rock from which you emerged. we are going to report _ rock from which you emerged. we are going to report from _ rock from which you emerged. we are going to report from cuba _ rock from which you emerged. we are going to report from cuba because - going to report from cuba because opposition activist there's a dozens had been arrested since sunday's antigovernment demonstrations, the biggest against the island's communist government in 30 years. and we look at the debate in australia around this government vaccine advertisement with critics saying it unfairly targets young people who were not eligible for a covid—19 jab yet. the cuban president has blamed the us for the biggest anti—government protests on the communist—run island in decades. this is president miguel diaz—canel. you may remember he took over the leadership of the cuba communist party in 2018, ending six decades of rule by the castro family. in his televised address, he said the us embargo of cuba was part of a policy by washington to provoke social unrest. he was referring to this. protesters taking to the streets
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shouting "freedom". others shouted "down with communism". these chants can easily land you in jail in the tightly—controlled cuba. the fact that people are daring to do this shows the level of anger. there were also clashes like these, and some of the protesters were detained by police. many cubans livestreamed the protests. in this footage, you can see protesters parading the american flag, and this is making it hard for the government to hide the discontent. footage like this appearing to show security forces beating protesters was also posted on social media. let's hear from protesters. translation: state security beat me and my daughter. i they beat us because we were walking down the street! translation: we are here because of i the repression against the people. . they are starving us to death.
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our finance is collapsing. we have no house, we have nothing. but they have money to build hotels, and they have us starving. this map shows where the protests are happening. they started in the capital, havana, and quickly spread across the country. the protesters are unhappy with food shortages, high prices and the authorities�* handling of the pandemic. during 2020, the economy shrank by 11%, partly because of the new sanctions imposed during the trump administration. you may remember president obama's policy on cuba brought about a thaw in relations between the two countries, but president trump overturned this in 2017. dr stephen wilkinson, an expert on us—cuba relations, has more on this. massive amounts of investment went into cuba to develop tourism - for particularly american -
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visitors who were increasingly allowed to go there under obama. remember, obama had his famous normalisation policy. _ and then certainly donald trump reversed all of that. _ so, you heard in the clip— there a member of the public saying they've got money to build hotels but not to build houses for us. i well, that's an observation i on the street of seeing hotels being built which were supposed to accommodate a booming - tourism as a consequence - in the change in american policy. but actually under trump, i the policy was made many, many times worse than it ever- was even before obama took over. and as a consequence of that, - the economy's worsened even more than it would've done, | which is why the cuban government is blaming - the americans for this problem. at a time when we were expecting biden, who promised during his i election campaign to returned to the policies of obama, - hasn't done it. he's sat on his hands. for the last six months.
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and as a consequence, the conditions in cubal have got a lot worse. there's also increasing frustration at the restrictions on civil liberties. you heard those chants of freedom earlier. and anger at the slow pace of the vaccination programme. cuba reported a record of nearly 7000 daily covid infections and 47 deaths on sunday. here's more from dr williamson on that. there's been a massive spike in various places across cuba| of variants like the delta variant, which is causing a great- deal of concern. and the call for vaccines is really that they are anxious _ about the health consequences of an increasing _ epidemic in the island. there is a vaccination . programme under way, but it will take time for it - to reach the whole population. so, what you've heard is people being very. anxious about that, i feel. president miguel diaz—canel
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also took to the streets with his supporters on sunday. he had this message for the protesters. translation: we came here to show i together with the revolutionaries i of this town that here the street belongs to the revolutionaries. no worm or mercenary will claim the streets, and if they provoke us, without violating their constitutional rights, we will confront them. thousands of pro—government supporters came out to support the president. some of them surrounded and detained protesters. they also formed large counterprotests like this one. let's hear from a pro—government demonstrator. translation: we are defending what we did 60 years ago. - that this is ours, that it has cost many lives, that capitalism will never come back here again, and that these mercenaries paid by the empire will never again take our streets. they will have to kill us all first.
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the white house has responded with this statement from president biden. it says... our correspondent pascal fletcher joins me now from miami. first of all, help me understand what sparked this. what turned anger people are feeling into these kind of overt demonstrations? weill. people are feeling into these kind of overt demonstrations?- of overt demonstrations? well, i think it'sjust _ of overt demonstrations? well, i think it's just the _ of overt demonstrations? well, i think it's just the sheer - of overt demonstrations? well, i think it's just the sheer extent i of overt demonstrations? well, i think it's just the sheer extent of think it'sjust the sheer extent of the difficulties— think it'sjust the sheer extent of the difficulties that _ think it'sjust the sheer extent of the difficulties that people - think it'sjust the sheer extent of the difficulties that people are i the difficulties that people are facing — the difficulties that people are facing as— the difficulties that people are facing as professor— the difficulties that people are facing as professor wilkinsonl the difficulties that people are . facing as professor wilkinson said there _ facing as professor wilkinson said there that— facing as professor wilkinson said there. that really— facing as professor wilkinson said there. that really the _ facing as professor wilkinson said there. that really the situation, i there. that really the situation, there. that really the situation, the economic— there. that really the situation, the economic situation - there. that really the situation, the economic situation over - there. that really the situation, the economic situation over the there. that really the situation, - the economic situation over the last few years _ the economic situation over the last few years and — the economic situation over the last few years and months _ the economic situation over the last few years and months has - few years and months has deteriorated _ few years and months has deteriorated very- few years and months has - deteriorated very significantly. and also the _ deteriorated very significantly. and also the covid—19 _ deteriorated very significantly. and also the covid—19 situation - deteriorated very significantly. and also the covid—19 situation has - also the covid—19 situation has worsened _ also the covid—19 situation has worsened as _ also the covid—19 situation has worsened as well— also the covid—19 situation has worsened as well and - also the covid—19 situation has worsened as well and we - also the covid—19 situation has worsened as well and we have| also the covid—19 situation has - worsened as well and we have had reports _ worsened as well and we have had reports on — worsened as well and we have had reports on the _ worsened as well and we have had reports on the media _ worsened as well and we have had reports on the media of—
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worsened as well and we have had reports on the media of hospitalsl reports on the media of hospitals collapsed — reports on the media of hospitals collapsed and _ reports on the media of hospitals collapsed and people, _ reports on the media of hospitals collapsed and people, patients i collapsed and people, patients lining — collapsed and people, patients lining up— collapsed and people, patients lining up in— collapsed and people, patients lining up in hospital— collapsed and people, patients lining up in hospital corridor. lining up in hospital corridor worse~ _ lining up in hospital corridor worse~ so. _ lining up in hospital corridor worse. so, the— lining up in hospital corridor worse. so, the sheer- lining up in hospital corridorj worse. so, the sheer extent lining up in hospital corridor. worse. so, the sheer extent of difficulties— worse. so, the sheer extent of difficulties faced _ worse. so, the sheer extent of difficulties faced by _ worse. so, the sheer extent of difficulties faced by people - worse. so, the sheer extent ofj difficulties faced by people and worse. so, the sheer extent of- difficulties faced by people and the frustration — difficulties faced by people and the frustration that— difficulties faced by people and the frustration that the _ difficulties faced by people and the frustration that the government i difficulties faced by people and the frustration that the government is| frustration that the government is not doing — frustration that the government is not doing enough— frustration that the government is not doing enough to _ frustration that the government is not doing enough to address - frustration that the government is not doing enough to address it, i. not doing enough to address it, i think— not doing enough to address it, i think that — not doing enough to address it, i think thatjust_ not doing enough to address it, i think that just boiled _ not doing enough to address it, i think thatjust boiled over- not doing enough to address it, i think thatjust boiled over in- think thatjust boiled over in frustration _ think thatjust boiled over in frustration and _ think thatjust boiled over in frustration and anger. - think thatjust boiled over in frustration and anger. and l think thatjust boiled over ini frustration and anger. and of think thatjust boiled over in- frustration and anger. and of course this was— frustration and anger. and of course this was all— frustration and anger. and of course this was all projected _ frustration and anger. and of course this was all projected on _ frustration and anger. and of course this was all projected on social - this was all projected on social media — this was all projected on social media which— this was all projected on social media which cubans _ this was all projected on social media which cubans have - this was all projected on social i media which cubans have access this was all projected on social - media which cubans have access to or had access— media which cubans have access to or had access to, — media which cubans have access to or had access to, and _ media which cubans have access to or had access to, and i— media which cubans have access to or had access to, and i think— media which cubans have access to or had access to, and i think that's - had access to, and i think that's 'ust had access to, and i think that's just help — had access to, and i think that's just help to— had access to, and i think that's just help to light _ had access to, and i think that's just help to light the _ had access to, and i think that's just help to light the fire - had access to, and i think that's just help to light the fire and . just help to light the fire and create — just help to light the fire and create this— just help to light the fire and create this ripple _ just help to light the fire and create this ripple effect - just help to light the fire and i create this ripple effect across what _ create this ripple effect across what looks _ create this ripple effect across what looks like _ create this ripple effect across what looks like most - create this ripple effect across what looks like most of- create this ripple effect across what looks like most of the i create this ripple effect across - what looks like most of the island, from _ what looks like most of the island, from havana — what looks like most of the island, from havana in _ what looks like most of the island, from havana in the _ what looks like most of the island, from havana in the west _ what looks like most of the island, from havana in the west to - what looks like most of the island, i from havana in the west to santiago in the _ from havana in the west to santiago in the east — from havana in the west to santiago in the east is — from havana in the west to santiago in the east. , ., , in the east. is there any credibility _ in the east. is there any credibility to _ in the east. is there any credibility to the - in the east. is there any credibility to the claims | in the east. is there any - credibility to the claims from the president that much of this is down to the americans and how they have tried to exert pressure on his leadership?— tried to exert pressure on his leadershi - ? , ., , ., leadership? there is no question that under— leadership? there is no question that under the _ leadership? there is no question that under the administration i leadership? there is no question that under the administration of| that under the administration of repuhlican— that under the administration of republican donald _ that under the administration of republican donald trump, - that under the administration of republican donald trump, the i republican donald trump, the sanctions _ republican donald trump, the sanctions were _ republican donald trump, the sanctions were tightened - republican donald trump, the sanctions were tightened very| sanctions were tightened very sharply, — sanctions were tightened very sharply, i— sanctions were tightened very sharply. in1ean_ sanctions were tightened very sharply, i mean very- sanctions were tightened very sharply, i mean very sharply,| sanctions were tightened very- sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions— sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions on— sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions on travel— sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions on travel from - sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions on travel from the - sharply, i mean very sharply, with restrictions on travel from the usi restrictions on travel from the us to cuba. — restrictions on travel from the us to cuba, restrictions _ restrictions on travel from the us to cuba, restrictions on _ to cuba, restrictions on remittances, _
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to cuba, restrictions on remittances, obviouslyl to cuba, restrictions on i remittances, obviously on to cuba, restrictions on _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also — remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also just _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also just the _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also just the fact _ remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also just the fact of - remittances, obviously on tourism as well, and also just the fact of the - well, and also just the fact of the pandemic— well, and also just the fact of the pandemic also— well, and also just the fact of the pandemic also restricting - well, and also just the fact of the pandemic also restricting travel. i pandemic also restricting travel. although — pandemic also restricting travel. although -- _ pandemic also restricting travel. although " all— pandemic also restricting travel. although —— all this— pandemic also restricting travel. although —— all this basically- although —— all this basically removed _ although —— all this basically removed hard _ although —— all this basically removed hard currency- although —— all this basically. removed hard currency revenue although —— all this basically- removed hard currency revenue from the government— removed hard currency revenue from the government and _ removed hard currency revenue from the government and the _ removed hard currency revenue from the government and the situation . the government and the situation 'ust the government and the situation just became — the government and the situation just became progressively- the government and the situation just became progressively worse i the government and the situation i just became progressively worse and worse _ just became progressively worse and worse and _ just became progressively worse and worse and i— just became progressively worse and worse. and i think— just became progressively worse and worse. and i think that _ just became progressively worse and worse. and i think that in _ just became progressively worse and worse. and i think that in that- worse. and i think that in that respect, — worse. and i think that in that respect, there _ worse. and i think that in that respect, there has— worse. and i think that in that respect, there has certainly. worse. and i think that in that. respect, there has certainly been worse. and i think that in that- respect, there has certainly been an impact _ respect, there has certainly been an impact from — respect, there has certainly been an impact from the _ respect, there has certainly been an impact from the sanctions. - respect, there has certainly been anl impact from the sanctions. however, to say— impact from the sanctions. however, to say that _ impact from the sanctions. however, to say that all — impact from the sanctions. however, to say that all internal _ impact from the sanctions. however, to say that all internal protests - to say that all internal protests and discontent _ to say that all internal protests and discontent and _ to say that all internal protests and discontent and dissent - to say that all internal protests and discontent and dissent is. and discontent and dissent is actually— and discontent and dissent is actually sort _ and discontent and dissent is actually sort of _ and discontent and dissent is actually sort of engineered i and discontent and dissent is| actually sort of engineered by and discontent and dissent is- actually sort of engineered by the americans. — actually sort of engineered by the americans. i_ actually sort of engineered by the americans, i think— actually sort of engineered by the americans, i think this _ actually sort of engineered by the americans, i think this is- actually sort of engineered by the americans, i think this is the - actually sort of engineered by the l americans, i think this is the point where _ americans, i think this is the point where there — americans, i think this is the point where there is— americans, i think this is the point where there is a _ americans, i think this is the point where there is a lot _ americans, i think this is the point where there is a lot of— americans, i think this is the point where there is a lot of discontent i where there is a lot of discontent against _ where there is a lot of discontent against the — where there is a lot of discontent against the government - where there is a lot of discontent against the government and - where there is a lot of discontent against the government and thel against the government and the system — against the government and the system and _ against the government and the system and people _ against the government and the system and people seeking - against the government and thel system and people seeking more individual— system and people seeking more individual freedoms, _ system and people seeking more individual freedoms, more - system and people seeking more . individual freedoms, more economic freedoms _ individual freedoms, more economic freedoms to— individual freedoms, more economic freedoms to run _ individual freedoms, more economic freedoms to run their _ individual freedoms, more economic freedoms to run their own _ freedoms to run their own businesses. _ freedoms to run their own businesses, and - freedoms to run their own businesses, and i- freedoms to run their own businesses, and i think. freedoms to run their own . businesses, and i think that's definitely— businesses, and i think that's definitely part— businesses, and i think that's definitely part of— businesses, and i think that's definitely part of this - businesses, and i think that's definitely part of this what i businesses, and i think that's i definitely part of this what we've been _ definitely part of this what we've been seeing _ definitely part of this what we've been seeing as— definitely part of this what we've been seeing as well, _ definitely part of this what we've been seeing as well, no - definitely part of this what we've i been seeing as well, no question. and what— been seeing as well, no question. and what is— been seeing as well, no question. and what is your _ been seeing as well, no question. and what is your assessment - been seeing as well, no question. and what is your assessment of. been seeing as well, no question. i and what is your assessment of how the government is handling the pressure that's being exerted by these protests?— these protests? well, i feelthat these protests? well, i feelthat the are these protests? well, i feelthat they are doing — these protests? well, i feelthat they are doing what _ these protests? well, i feelthat they are doing what they - these protests? well, i feelthat they are doing what they usually these protests? well, i feel that - they are doing what they usually do. it's they are doing what they usually do. it's the _ they are doing what they usually do. it's the kind — they are doing what they usually do. it's the kind of— they are doing what they usually do. it's the kind of reflex _ they are doing what they usually do. it's the kind of reflex reaction - it's the kind of reflex reaction where — it's the kind of reflex reaction where it's— it's the kind of reflex reaction where it's an _ it's the kind of reflex reaction where it's an easy— it's the kind of reflex reaction where it's an easy to - it's the kind of reflex reaction where it's an easy to this - it's the kind of reflex reactionj where it's an easy to this kind it's the kind of reflex reaction i where it's an easy to this kind of protest. — where it's an easy to this kind of protest. there _ where it's an easy to this kind of
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protest, there is— where it's an easy to this kind of protest, there is a _ where it's an easy to this kind of protest, there is a bit— where it's an easy to this kind of protest, there is a bit of- where it's an easy to this kind of protest, there is a bit of a - protest, there is a bit of a revolutionaries _ protest, there is a bit of a revolutionaries out - protest, there is a bit of a revolutionaries out in - protest, there is a bit of a revolutionaries out in the | protest, there is a bit of a - revolutionaries out in the streets, revolutionary— revolutionaries out in the streets, revolutionary reformation - revolutionaries out in the streets, revolutionary reformation both i revolutionaries out in the streets, revolutionary reformation both inj revolutionary reformation both in the state — revolutionary reformation both in the state media, _ revolutionary reformation both in the state media, calling - revolutionary reformation both in the state media, calling out - revolutionary reformation both in the state media, calling out the l the state media, calling out the committees— the state media, calling out the committees for— the state media, calling out the committees for the _ the state media, calling out the committees for the defence - the state media, calling out the committees for the defence of. committees for the defence of revolution— committees for the defence of revolution to _ committees for the defence of revolution to keep _ committees for the defence of revolution to keep the - committees for the defence of revolution to keep the city- committees for the defence of. revolution to keep the city blocks in the _ revolution to keep the city blocks in the streets _ revolution to keep the city blocks in the streets in _ revolution to keep the city blocks in the streets in order— revolution to keep the city blocks in the streets in order for- revolution to keep the city blocks in the streets in order for them i revolution to keep the city blocks i in the streets in order for them and ithink— in the streets in order for them and i think that's — in the streets in order for them and i think that's what _ in the streets in order for them and i think that's what we _ in the streets in order for them and i think that's what we have - in the streets in order for them and i think that's what we have been i i think that's what we have been seeing _ i think that's what we have been seeing in — i think that's what we have been seeing in these _ i think that's what we have been seeing in these hours _ i think that's what we have been seeing in these hours after- i think that's what we have been seeing in these hours after the i seeing in these hours after the protest — seeing in these hours after the protest yesterday, _ seeing in these hours after the protest yesterday, and - seeing in these hours after the protest yesterday, and i- seeing in these hours after the protest yesterday, and i thinkl seeing in these hours after the - protest yesterday, and i think under those _ protest yesterday, and i think under those circumstances _ protest yesterday, and i think under those circumstances a _ protest yesterday, and i think under those circumstances a lot _ protest yesterday, and i think under those circumstances a lot of- protest yesterday, and i think under those circumstances a lot of the - those circumstances a lot of the protesters — those circumstances a lot of the protesters yesterday _ those circumstances a lot of the protesters yesterday are - those circumstances a lot of the protesters yesterday are going i those circumstances a lot of the. protesters yesterday are going to those circumstances a lot of the - protesters yesterday are going to be keeping _ protesters yesterday are going to be keeping their— protesters yesterday are going to be keeping their heads _ protesters yesterday are going to be keeping their heads down _ protesters yesterday are going to be keeping their heads down to - protesters yesterday are going to be keeping their heads down to where i keeping their heads down to where and it— keeping their heads down to where and it literally _ keeping their heads down to where and it literally we _ keeping their heads down to where and it literally we are _ keeping their heads down to where and it literally we are hearing - and it literally we are hearing reports — and it literally we are hearing reports of _ and it literally we are hearing reports of house _ and it literally we are hearing reports of house to _ and it literally we are hearing reports of house to house - and it literally we are hearing - reports of house to house searches and arrests — reports of house to house searches and arrests in— reports of house to house searches and arrests in some _ reports of house to house searches and arrests in some of— reports of house to house searches and arrests in some of the - reports of house to house searches and arrests in some of the town - and arrests in some of the town square — and arrests in some of the town square protest _ and arrests in some of the town square protest took _ and arrests in some of the town square protest took place. - and arrests in some of the town square protest took place. we i and arrests in some of the town - square protest took place. we have certainly— square protest took place. we have certainly seen — square protest took place. we have certainly seen and _ square protest took place. we have certainly seen and heard _ square protest took place. we have certainly seen and heard reports . square protest took place. we have certainly seen and heard reports of| certainly seen and heard reports of the tensions — certainly seen and heard reports of the tensions of— certainly seen and heard reports of the tensions of dissidents - certainly seen and heard reports of the tensions of dissidents and - the tensions of dissidents and antigovernment— the tensions of dissidents and antigovernment dissident - the tensions of dissidents and . antigovernment dissident artists, the tensions of dissidents and - antigovernment dissident artists, so ithink— antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we _ antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we are — antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we are finally _ antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we are finally in _ antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we are finally in sort - antigovernment dissident artists, so i think we are finally in sort of- i think we are finally in sort of crackdown _ i think we are finally in sort of crackdown or— i think we are finally in sort of crackdown or reaffirmation . i think we are finally in sort of- crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and ithink— crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that _ crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that will — crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that will sort _ crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that will sort of _ crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that will sort of bank _ crackdown or reaffirmation mode. and i think that will sort of bank —— - i think that will sort of bank —— napping — i think that will sort of bank —— napping things _ i think that will sort of bank —— napping things down _ i think that will sort of bank —— napping things down in- i think that will sort of bank —— napping things down in the - i think that will sort of bank —— - napping things down in the moment. it napping things down in the moment. it would _ napping things down in the moment. it would not — napping things down in the moment. it would not get _ napping things down in the moment. it would not get rid _ napping things down in the moment. it would not get rid of— napping things down in the moment. it would not get rid of the _ napping things down in the moment. it would not get rid of the problemsl it would not get rid of the problems affect— it would not get rid of the problems affect people. — it would not get rid of the problems affect people, very— it would not get rid of the problems affect people, very serious - it would not get rid of the problemsl affect people, very serious economic shortages, _ affect people, very serious economic shortages, and — affect people, very serious economic shortages, and also _ affect people, very serious economic shortages, and also their— affect people, very serious economic shortages, and also their concerns i shortages, and also their concerns about— shortages, and also their concerns about what— shortages, and also their concerns about what have _ shortages, and also their concerns about what have been _ shortages, and also their concerns about what have been spiking - about what have been spiking covid-19 _ about what have been spiking covid—19 cases— about what have been spiking covid—19 cases and _ about what have been spiking covid—19 cases and deaths, i about what have been spiking - covid—19 cases and deaths, which have _ covid—19 cases and deaths, which have people _ covid—19 cases and deaths, which have people extremely— covid—19 cases and deaths, which have people extremely worried. i covid—19 cases and deaths, which i have people extremely worried. and expressing _ have people extremely worried. and expressing that, _ have people extremely worried. and expressing that, even _ have people extremely worried. and expressing that, even on _ have people extremely worried. and expressing that, even on state - have people extremely worried. andl expressing that, even on state media reader— expressing that, even on state media reader comments _
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expressing that, even on state media reader comments pages— expressing that, even on state media reader comments pages with - expressing that, even on state media reader comments pages with lots - expressing that, even on state media reader comments pages with lots of i reader comments pages with lots of anguish _ reader comments pages with lots of anguish about— reader comments pages with lots of anguish about the _ reader comments pages with lots of anguish about the covenant - reader comments pages with lots of anguish about the covenant and - anguish about the covenant and situation~ — anguish about the covenant and situation~ so— anguish about the covenant and situation. so while _ anguish about the covenant and situation. so while they - anguish about the covenant and situation. so while they may. anguish about the covenant and l situation. so while they may have calmed _ situation. so while they may have calmed down _ situation. so while they may have calmed down and _ situation. so while they may have calmed down and stand _ situation. so while they may have calmed down and stand and - situation. so while they may have - calmed down and stand and dampened if you let _ calmed down and stand and dampened if you let the _ calmed down and stand and dampened if you let the protest _ calmed down and stand and dampened if you let the protest at _ calmed down and stand and dampened if you let the protest at the _ if you let the protest at the moment, _ if you let the protest at the moment, this _ if you let the protest at the moment, this content - if you let the protest at the i moment, this content behind if you let the protest at the - moment, this content behind it is not going — moment, this content behind it is not going to — moment, this content behind it is not going to go _ moment, this content behind it is not going to go away _ moment, this content behind it is not going to go away quickly. - not going to go away quickly. pascal. — not going to go away quickly. pascal, thank— not going to go away quickly. pascal, thank you _ not going to go away quickly. pascal, thank you very- not going to go away quickly. | pascal, thank you very much. if you speak spanish can be can get news through bbc mundo dot com. let's turn to australia now. its most populous city, sydney, has been in a lockdown for two weeks to try and containt an outbreak of the delta variant of coronavirus, but cases are still rising. on monday, the state of new south wales recorded 112 new cases. that's the highest daily increase in more than a year, bringing the total number of cases in the community to 678. and on sunday, for the first time this year, australia added to its death toll after a 90—year—old woman died after contracting the virus. here's the premier,
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gladys berejiklian, on restrictions. overwhelmingly we just want people to stay at home. the virus won't spread if people don't leave home. that's the bottom line. don't leave home unless you absolutely have to. we know where the risks are. we know how the virus is spreading, and we just need people to follow the information we're providing. so, restrictions look set to continue, which is one way of containing the spread of the outbreak. and as we've talked about many times on outside source, you also need vaccines, and that's something australia is struggling with. only 11% of the country's adult population has been fully vaccinated. that's partly due to vaccine hesitancy. a study injune by the melbourne institute found that 16% of adults don't want a vaccine and a further 13% are unsure whether they would take a vaccine, meaning that almost a third of australian adults are hesitant about getting vaccinated. so, to try and convince people to get vaccinated, the government released a graphic advertisement over the weekend
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showing a young woman in hospital with covid—19 struggling to breathe. and a warning, you may find the footage distressing. very strained breathing. the ad has already received a lot of criticism. leading australian political journalist hugh riminton tweeted... most people under the age of a0 won't be eligible to receive their vaccines for months. drjessica kaufman, who has been researching how to improve vaccine acceptance, told the guardian the ad... but the government has defended the advert. prime minister scott morrison told reporters...
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and this was the health minister, greg hunt, speaking on monday. it is saying no one is immune, and it's conscious and it's deliberate. it's challenging and it's confronting, but we know that young people can play a huge role in helping to prevent the spread of covid. so, we will see in due course if the ad campaign works. but in the meantime, there's still issues with the roll—out itself. this can be looked at a few different ways. we talked about hesitancy. there's the ongoing concerns about astrazeneca. as i'm sure you'll remember, there's long been concerns about the potential risk of rare blood clots in younger people. under current national guidelines, no—one under the age of 60 can receive the astrazeneca vaccine, a decision that was upheld on monday by the national panel of experts advising the government on vaccinations.
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but due to the outbreak in sydney, new south wales health has lowered its age limit. now local residents a0 and above can receive an astrazeneca jab if they are briefed on the risk of potential blood clots by their gp. those age limits have meant there's an over—reliance on pfizer to vaccinate the majority of the country. that is the other vaccine approved in australia. the distribution of pfizer vaccines has been sluggish. but there's hope the pace could soon improve. last week, the government and pfizer agreed to ramp up the delivery of vaccines, bringing millions of doses that were planned to arrive in september forward to august. latika bourke, london—based journalist for the sydney morning herald. we always appreciate you coming on the programme. was scott morrison right here that he was being true to
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size to a month ago about strengthening the message to get vaccinated and now he is done in the critics still are not happy? yes. critics still are not happy? yes, that's true _ critics still are not happy? yes, that's true can _ critics still are not happy? yes, that's true can but _ critics still are not happy? yes, that's true can but one - critics still are not happy? yes, that's true can but one thing i critics still are not happy? yes, that's true can but one thing about the ads _ that's true can but one thing about the ads you — that's true can but one thing about the ads you just _ that's true can but one thing about the ads you just featured - that's true can but one thing about the ads you just featured it - that's true can but one thing about the ads you just featured it as - that's true can but one thing about the ads you just featured it as it i the ads you just featured it as it was actually _ the ads you just featured it as it was actually designed _ the ads you just featured it as it was actually designed and - the ads you just featured it as it i was actually designed and created and failed — was actually designed and created and failed it— was actually designed and created and failed it last _ was actually designed and created and failed it last year— was actually designed and created and failed it last year when - and failed it last year when australia _ and failed it last year when australia did _ and failed it last year when australia did not— and failed it last year when australia did not have - and failed it last year when - australia did not have vaccines. in fact the _ australia did not have vaccines. in fact the world _ australia did not have vaccines. in fact the world did _ australia did not have vaccines. in fact the world did not _ australia did not have vaccines. in fact the world did not have - fact the world did not have vaccines _ fact the world did not have vaccines. the _ fact the world did not have vaccines. the ads - fact the world did not have vaccines. the ads you - fact the world did not have vaccines. the ads you are i fact the world did not have - vaccines. the ads you are being shown— vaccines. the ads you are being shown was— vaccines. the ads you are being shown was an _ vaccines. the ads you are being shown was an add _ vaccines. the ads you are being shown was an add created - shown was an add created specifically _ shown was an add created specifically to _ shown was an add created specifically to encourage i shown was an add created - specifically to encourage lockdown responses — specifically to encourage lockdown responses or— specifically to encourage lockdown responses or compliance - specifically to encourage lockdown responses or compliance around i specifically to encourage lockdown - responses or compliance around those sorts of— responses or compliance around those sorts of measures _ responses or compliance around those sorts of measures and _ responses or compliance around those sorts of measures and not _ sorts of measures and not vaccinations. _ sorts of measures and not vaccinations. another- sorts of measures and not vaccinations. another big i sorts of measures and not - vaccinations. another big problem with that — vaccinations. another big problem with that add _ vaccinations. another big problem with that add is — vaccinations. another big problem with that add is that _ vaccinations. another big problem with that add is that it _ vaccinations. another big problem with that add is that it does - vaccinations. another big problem with that add is that it does not i with that add is that it does not sell the — with that add is that it does not sell the austrian— with that add is that it does not sell the austrian people - with that add is that it does not sell the austrian people any - with that add is that it does notl sell the austrian people any sort with that add is that it does not - sell the austrian people any sort of hope _ sell the austrian people any sort of hope it— sell the austrian people any sort of hope itjust— sell the austrian people any sort of hope. it just continues _ sell the austrian people any sort of hope. it just continues to _ sell the austrian people any sort of hope. it just continues to sell - sell the austrian people any sort ofj hope. it just continues to sell them fear~ _ hope. it just continues to sell them fear~ and _ hope. it just continues to sell them fear~ and it's— hope. it just continues to sell them fear. and it's also _ hope. it just continues to sell them fear. and it's also unrealistic- fear. and it's also unrealistic because _ fear. and it's also unrealistic because there _ fear. and it's also unrealistic because there is _ fear. and it's also unrealistic because there is no - fear. and it's also unrealistic because there is no way - fear. and it's also unrealistic because there is no way the i fear. and it's also unrealistic. because there is no way the the australian— because there is no way the the australian health _ because there is no way the the australian health care _ because there is no way the the australian health care system i because there is no way the the - australian health care system would leave a _ australian health care system would leave a woman _ australian health care system would leave a woman like _ australian health care system would leave a woman like that _ australian health care system would leave a woman like that to - australian health care system would leave a woman like that to be - leave a woman like that to be gasping — leave a woman like that to be gasping for— leave a woman like that to be gasping for air— leave a woman like that to be gasping forairand_ leave a woman like that to be gasping for air and there - leave a woman like that to be gasping for air and there is i leave a woman like that to be | gasping for air and there is no leave a woman like that to be - gasping for air and there is no way a covid-19 — gasping for air and there is no way a covid—19 outbreak _ gasping for air and there is no way a covid—19 outbreak in _ gasping for air and there is no way a covid—19 outbreak in a _ gasping for air and there is no way a covid—19 outbreak in a strict - a covid—19 outbreak in a strict would — a covid—19 outbreak in a strict would get _ a covid—19 outbreak in a strict would get to— a covid—19 outbreak in a strict would get to that _ a covid—19 outbreak in a strict would get to that point - a covid—19 outbreak in a strict i would get to that point because a covid—19 outbreak in a strict - would get to that point because they have shown — would get to that point because they have shown a — would get to that point because they have shown a hugely— would get to that point because they have shown a hugely enough - would get to that point because they have shown a hugely enough to - would get to that point because they have shown a hugely enough to get. would get to that point because they. have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate _ have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate the — have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate the virus _ have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate the virus and _ have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate the virus and better - have shown a hugely enough to get to eliminate the virus and better what i eliminate the virus and better what it takes _ eliminate the virus and better what it takes. ~ ., eliminate the virus and better what it takes. ~ . , ., eliminate the virus and better what it takes. ~ ., i. ., , it takes. what you said about it is drivin: it takes. what you said about it is driving fear _ it takes. what you said about it is driving fear when _ it takes. what you said about it is
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driving fear when you _ it takes. what you said about it is driving fear when you take - it takes. what you said about it is i driving fear when you take warnings on cigarette packets saying they are bad for us but you will see adverts about cigarette smoking the encouraged to live a healthy life and sporty life and you can do both things, can you not? you and sporty life and you can do both things, can you not?— things, can you not? you can. i think australia _ things, can you not? you can. i think australia is _ things, can you not? you can. i think australia is quite - things, can you not? you can. i think australia is quite divided | things, can you not? you can. i. think australia is quite divided on this cult — think australia is quite divided on this cult of— think australia is quite divided on this cult of the _ think australia is quite divided on this cult of the deputy— think australia is quite divided on this cult of the deputy prime - this cult of the deputy prime minister— this cult of the deputy prime minister holds _ this cult of the deputy prime minister holds the _ this cult of the deputy prime minister holds the view - this cult of the deputy prime minister holds the view thatl this cult of the deputy prime. minister holds the view that it this cult of the deputy prime - minister holds the view that it is scare _ minister holds the view that it is scare people _ minister holds the view that it is scare people will— minister holds the view that it is scare people will listen - minister holds the view that it is scare people will listen and - scare people will listen and unnecessary— scare people will listen and unnecessary and _ scare people will listen and unnecessary and he - scare people will listen and i unnecessary and he described scare people will listen and - unnecessary and he described as a misfire~ _ unnecessary and he described as a misfire~ but— unnecessary and he described as a misfire. but other— unnecessary and he described as a misfire. but other senior- unnecessary and he described as a misfire. but other senior ministers in the _ misfire. but other senior ministers in the cabinet— misfire. but other senior ministers in the cabinet actually _ misfire. but other senior ministers in the cabinet actually say - misfire. but other senior ministers in the cabinet actually say this - misfire. but other senior ministers in the cabinet actually say this is l in the cabinet actually say this is what _ in the cabinet actually say this is what is _ in the cabinet actually say this is what is required _ in the cabinet actually say this is what is required to— in the cabinet actually say this is what is required to shock- in the cabinet actually say this is i what is required to shock australia out of— what is required to shock australia out of its _ what is required to shock australia out of its complacency. _ what is required to shock australia out of its complacency. because i what is required to shock australia i out of its complacency. because one of the _ out of its complacency. because one of the costs — out of its complacency. because one of the costs of— out of its complacency. because one of the costs of its _ out of its complacency. because one of the costs of its illumination - of the costs of its illumination method — of the costs of its illumination method has _ of the costs of its illumination method has been _ of the costs of its illumination method has been a _ of the costs of its illumination method has been a huge - of the costs of its illumination - method has been a huge increase in vaccine _ method has been a huge increase in vaccine hesitancy, _ method has been a huge increase in vaccine hesitancy, vaccine _ method has been a huge increase in vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shuntingl vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people _ vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are — vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are waiting _ vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are waiting for— vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are waiting for the - vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are waiting for the pfizer. vaccine hesitancy, vaccine shunting people are waiting for the pfizer or| people are waiting for the pfizer or whether— people are waiting for the pfizer or whether or— people are waiting for the pfizer or whether or not _ people are waiting for the pfizer or whether or not vaccines _ people are waiting for the pfizer or whether or not vaccines coming. whether or not vaccines coming online — whether or not vaccines coming online later _ whether or not vaccines coming online later rather— whether or not vaccines coming online later rather than - whether or not vaccines coming - online later rather than astrazeneca and also _ online later rather than astrazeneca and also widespread _ online later rather than astrazeneca and also widespread vaccine - and also widespread vaccine complacency, _ and also widespread vaccine complacency, come - and also widespread vaccine complacency, come over- and also widespread vaccine i complacency, come over there and also widespread vaccine - complacency, come over there is no coronavirus— complacency, come over there is no coronavirus in— complacency, come over there is no coronavirus in the _ complacency, come over there is no coronavirus in the community. - complacency, come over there is no coronavirus in the community. so. coronavirus in the community. so there _ coronavirus in the community. so there is— coronavirus in the community. so there is no— coronavirus in the community. so there is no incentive _ coronavirus in the community. so there is no incentive for- coronavirus in the community. so there is no incentive for them - coronavirus in the community. so there is no incentive for them toi there is no incentive for them to .et there is no incentive for them to get the — there is no incentive for them to get the vaccine. _ there is no incentive for them to get the vaccine. we _ there is no incentive for them to get the vaccine.— get the vaccine. we have talked before about _ get the vaccine. we have talked before about how— get the vaccine. we have talked before about how scott - get the vaccine. we have talked | before about how scott morrison get the vaccine. we have talked - before about how scott morrison has been criticised for not being upfront with australians and they are not going to be able to maintain the zero covid—19 policy forever.
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every noted a shift in language in the last few weeks?— the last few weeks? yes, the government _ the last few weeks? yes, the government so _ the last few weeks? yes, the government so that - the last few weeks? yes, the government so that a - the last few weeks? yes, the government so that a road i the last few weeks? yes, the i government so that a road map the last few weeks? yes, the - government so that a road map with four phases — government so that a road map with four phases of — government so that a road map with four phases of how— government so that a road map with four phases of how to _ government so that a road map with four phases of how to step _ government so that a road map with four phases of how to step itself- four phases of how to step itself out of _ four phases of how to step itself out of elimination. _ four phases of how to step itself out of elimination. notably - four phases of how to step itself out of elimination. notably that| out of elimination. notably that road _ out of elimination. notably that road plan — out of elimination. notably that road plan is _ out of elimination. notably that road plan isjust_ out of elimination. notably that road plan is just a _ out of elimination. notably that road plan isjust a skeleton. - out of elimination. notably that i road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no _ road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me _ road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me on— road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me on those _ road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me on those bones. - road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me on those bones. it- road plan isjust a skeleton. there is no me on those bones. it does. road plan isjust a skeleton. there i is no me on those bones. it does not say what _ is no me on those bones. it does not say what targets _ is no me on those bones. it does not say what targets for _ is no me on those bones. it does not say what targets for example - is no me on those bones. it does not say what targets for example of - say what targets for example of vaccinations _ say what targets for example of vaccinations would _ say what targets for example of vaccinations would be _ say what targets for example of vaccinations would be met - say what targets for example of vaccinations would be met and i say what targets for example ofi vaccinations would be met and it comes— vaccinations would be met and it comes at— vaccinations would be met and it comes at a — vaccinations would be met and it comes at a time _ vaccinations would be met and it comes at a time when _ vaccinations would be met and it comes at a time when the - vaccinations would be met and it - comes at a time when the community has been _ comes at a time when the community has been through— comes at a time when the community has been through several— comes at a time when the community has been through several lock - comes at a time when the community has been through several lock downsl has been through several lock downs and they— has been through several lock downs and they are — has been through several lock downs and they are starting _ has been through several lock downs and they are starting to _ has been through several lock downs and they are starting to become - has been through several lock downs and they are starting to become very frustrated _ and they are starting to become very frustrated and — and they are starting to become very frustrated and fatigued _ and they are starting to become very frustrated and fatigued with - and they are starting to become very frustrated and fatigued with the - frustrated and fatigued with the extreme — frustrated and fatigued with the extreme measures _ frustrated and fatigued with the extreme measures that - frustrated and fatigued with the i extreme measures that australia frustrated and fatigued with the - extreme measures that australia has pursued _ extreme measures that australia has pursued so— extreme measures that australia has pursued so it's _ extreme measures that australia has pursued. so it's very— extreme measures that australia has pursued. so it's very politically - pursued. so it's very politically rocky _ pursued. so it's very politically rocky territory _ pursued. so it's very politically rocky territory that _ pursued. so it's very politically rocky territory that the - pursued. so it's very politically rocky territory that the prime i rocky territory that the prime minister— rocky territory that the prime minister is _ rocky territory that the prime minister is in. _ rocky territory that the prime minister is in. but— rocky territory that the prime minister is in. but for- rocky territory that the prime minister is in. but for the - rocky territory that the prime i minister is in. but for the first half— minister is in. but for the first half of— minister is in. but for the first half of the _ minister is in. but for the first half of the pen _ minister is in. but for the first half of the pen and _ minister is in. but for the first half of the pen and began - minister is in. but for the first - half of the pen and began because overall— half of the pen and began because overall australians— half of the pen and began because overall australians have _ half of the pen and began because overall australians have really- overall australians have really gotten — overall australians have really gotten behind _ overall australians have really gotten behind their— overall australians have really gotten behind their political. gotten behind their political leaders _ gotten behind their political leaders throughout- gotten behind their political leaders throughout this - gotten behind their political- leaders throughout this pandemic. until now — leaders throughout this pandemic. until now. ., ~ leaders throughout this pandemic. until now. ., ,, , ., , leaders throughout this pandemic. until now. . ~' , ., , . leaders throughout this pandemic. until now. ., ,, , . ., until now. thank you very much for comint until now. thank you very much for coming on — until now. thank you very much for coming on as _ until now. thank you very much for coming on as ever. _ until now. thank you very much for coming on as ever. we _ until now. thank you very much for coming on as ever. we will- until now. thank you very much for coming on as ever. we will see - until now. thank you very much for coming on as ever. we will see youj coming on as ever. we will see you soon i'm sure. stay with us on outside source. still to come, england is moving to the final phase is next monday as it has been
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confirmed but some scientists are warning the peak of the current wave could lead to 200 deaths a day by mid august. businesses in england have money for government plans to open businesses next week. there is some complacency about keeping people safe. the doors here have been closed for 16 months. it was not possible for her to open under current rules but she is getting the shape —— place shipshape. you will not need an socially distance after next week. every time i walked in the door, my heart'sjust sank and the trepidation of not knowing if, next month, it would have to go. talking to my accountant, it's been a very close shave. so, how do things look for you as a business and financially over the next few months and years?
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from starting off with no debts, no loans for anything, we now have years of debts that we've got to pay back. it's my baby. and just to see it back to life again... and the atmosphere when a bands playing and everybody�*s enjoying the music, dancing, to have that back and to give that back to people again, i can't wait. now that the government are leaving it up to business owners and customers to decide whether or not to wear one of these, each venue and each shop is going to start to look very different on the inside, each applying slightly different rules. down the road in hebden bridge, this flower shop is hoping customers keep masks on. and it's for a simple reason. it's been quite difficult, obviously, with the boss being off with covid. i've had a lot of responsibility put onto my shoulders. if one of us gets covid now, we're another staff member down, and that's not what we need.
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in order not to lose any more money, some businesses are desperate to remove restrictions and others need them in place longer. customers will be navigating that divide. colletta smith, bbc news, in the calder valley. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is — the italian football team has returned home and received a hero's welcome as you might expect. these are fans in rome. italy is i'm sure you know beat england in the final of a euro 2020 in a penalty shoot—out. let's turn to the uk now. in the last few hours, the prime minister has confirmed that almost all of the coronavirus restrictions that have been in place in england throughout the pandemic will end a week today onjuly th 19th. here's our health editor hugh pym.
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for those in england wondering how things will be different from next monday, there was a change of tone from the government today. masks and face coverings will be expected in certain places, like crowded public transport, even as legal restrictions are lifted onjuly the 19th, with the key message being caution. this pandemic is not over. this disease, coronavirus, continues to carry risks for you and your family. we cannot simply revert instantly, from monday the 19th ofjuly, to life as it was before covid. can you spell out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example, to the nhs? there's no doubt that we are in a third wave of infection. infections are rising rapidly, and i expect them to continue to rise. and the more mixing we have, the more infection is going to spread, so there's no doubt that step four will bring increases
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in spread of infection. and although the relationship between infection and hospitalisation is different, it still exists. scientists and modellers predict that the current wave of infections will reach a peak in august. there could be between 1000—2000 daily hospital admissions and between 100—200 deaths each day, but all that depends on a certain amount of continued caution by the public — for example, mask—wearing in some crowded indoor spaces. those hospital numbers could be around half the peak seen injanuary and covid patients now tend to be younger and need less time in hospital. but leading doctors are concerned about the mounting pressure. not only are we managingl the backlog from last year, we're also trying to do normal activity, but we're also seeing a rise in admissions- with patients with covid. so, as health care professionals,
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we are really worried _ about what's going to happen over the coming weeks. - labour had this response to the changes. well, look, we all want to ease restrictions. but with infection rates still going up at this rate, this plan is still reckless, i'm afraid. we need a safe way of coming through this. there's now a push to get as many young adults as possible to come forward for their first doses. southampton city council ran a walk—in service over the weekend, billed "grab a jab". national and local officials feel they have to push the message more strongly. that's because take—up of first doses has fallen, and it's not down to supply issues. it was fairly consistent during june, but since the end of the month — measured by the seven—day rolling average — it's more than halved. government scientists have urged people to get vaccinated to reduce the chance of getting ill. they say there's no ideal date for easing restrictions and delaying wouldn't mean a different outcome. hugh pym, bbc news.
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remember you can find more reports from our team on the bbc. make a weekly report for the iplayer and also posted on the bbc website as well. and it is relevant to what news reports addressed. if you wonder what the government arguments are forward—looking restrictions and want the main criticisms of those decisions and the to and from there has been and we run it through in quite some detail on the iplayer and the website. and you can get it through the bbc news app as well and might put her feet. i'm @bbcrosatkins. if you want to find it, it is not at all hard to find it. you can find lots of videos there from the programme as well. that is it for us. if you want for the background information on the stories covered with today being cuba, austria, the
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us wildfires and others cannot get that to the bbc news website. i will see you tomorrow. good evening. whilst we've seen some warm, sunny spells today, we've also seen some rather wet weather around northern england notably, and through the latter part of the afternoon, this lump of cloud has moved its way into south—eastern areas. and all circulating around this area of low pressure, which is starting to pull out the way, but probably at the height at the moment, so those showers giving torrential downpours, localised flash flooding and lots of spray and standing water on the faster routes. and they will continue to rumble on well into the evening. could be the odd heavy downpour elsewhere as well. but on balance, as i say, through the night, they do tend to ease down except perhaps in southern areas. and instead we get some mist and some low cloud rolling in off the north sea, and temperatures should hold between 12—14 degrees celsius. but there'll still be a few showers around, even into tuesday, but on the whole, it looks as if we'll have fewer of them and therefore there'll be
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longer dry and sunny spells. little bits of mist and fog to clear in the morning. we'll have some sea haar and fret for the east coast, which takes its time to burn back with the strength of the july sunshine, which could still trigger some sharp downpours. the winds are light again, so those showers when they come along will be slow—moving, but for most places, there'll be more dry weather than those showers. and 23—24, responding to the sunshine, is a little higher than we've had for the past couple of days. but the pollen levels are back up again, high to very high across many parts as you can see. the evening continues with the shower risk, but then as we'll see, they will tend to dampen down. and as we move into wednesday, we're starting to lose that influence of the area of low pressure. it's pulling away, and instead we've got this atlantic high pressure starting to move in. the difference on wednesday is some weak weather fronts coming into the north west of both northern ireland and scotland, so here we'll probably see cloudier skies than we've seen today and indeed tomorrow, with perhaps a little bit of patchy rain and drizzle for the western and the northern isles, too. stilljust the outside chance
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of some showers in southern and eastern areas close to that low pressure, bit of low cloud onto the north sea coasts. but, for most, some good spells of sunshine, some warm spells of sunshine and that should translate for the rest of the week. that high pressure, the azores high, moves in, pushing the weather fronts and that low pressure out of the way and giving us, we think, a lot of dry and settled weather with light winds, and therefore we'll see the temperatures rising. above average, perhaps into the high 20s by the time we get to the end of the week and the weekend. bye— bye.
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grateful this is bbc news, the headlines at apm. widespread comfort remark condemnation of the torrent of abuse directed at england's liike player's on this sunday night. players who have missed the penalties bore the brunt of it. for some of penalties bore the brunt of it. iff?" some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, people that track those pit things have been able to explain that, but not all of it. , . ., , been able to explain that, but not allofit. , . ., , been able to explain that, but not all of it. , . ., , ., ., all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. _ all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. the _ all of it. restrictions come to an end in england. the prime - all of it. restrictions come to an i end in england. the prime minister confirms that many of the rules under which britain has operated under which britain has operated under covid—19 will be scrapped from next monday. latest predictions so they could be up to 200 deaths a day across the uk and the third wave of

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