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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  July 12, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm BST

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after the dream, the abuse. there's widespread condemnation of a torrent of racial abuse against england's black players on social media. the players that missed penalties have borne the brunt of it — the england manager expresses his disgust. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad. you know, the people that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it. on their way home, the players�* dejected faces telling the story of last night's crushing disappointment. amid the gloom for england fans, we'll look at what the last few weeks of football have meant for so many. also tonight... as the prime minister confirms most covid restrictions will be
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lifted in england from next monday, a warning to expect up to 200 deaths a day across the uk. i cannot say this powerfully or emphatically enough. this pandemic is not over. and another heatwave hits parts of the us and canada, temperatures are expected to peak at over 52 degrees. and coming up on the bbc news channel. instead of coming home, it's gone to rome. italy return triumphant with the european championship trophy after beating england on penalties. good evening and welcome
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to the bbc news at six. the spirit of optimism and unity felt by so many ahead of last night's euros final has been followed by an onslaught of racial abuse against some of england's defeated black players. the prime minister said those responsible should crawl back under the rock they came from. the police are conducting an investigation and the england manager gareth southgate has called it unforgiveable. as the england players returned to their homes, the manager reflected on their defeat saying he felt as if his stomach had been ripped out — but that the team will build on what they've learnt ahead of next year's world cup. our sports editor dan roan reports. and it's luke shaw! it had all started so well. having waited more than half a century for their first major final, england took the lead afterjust two minutes. but then suffered the cruelty of an all—too—familiar fate against italy. and it's italy who are the champions of europe! losing once again on penalties. a tournament that had lit up
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the summer, ending in tears. as the team left the hotel this morning the manager was left to reflect on what might have been. the fact that we've had, you know, the first signs of summer consistency, semi final, final, has to be a step in the right direction. it's not ultimately where we wanted to get to and when you are so close that is even more painful of course. you know, it feels like your stomach has been ripped out this morning. but last night was excruciating for english football in other ways. chaotic scenes outside wembley as dozens of ticketless fans forced their way through security barriers and into the stadium. police making 49 arrests with 19 officers injured in the mayhem. today the fa launched a review. we apologise to any fans who were affected by that and from our point of view as well we apologise to any of our staff and stewards who had to deal with that. it was clearly unacceptable. a massive occasion for wembley and for the fa.
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how on earth could this have happened? we will investigate fully. there was no evidence in advance anything like this was going to happen in this way. but clearly crowds started gathering on wembley way and there were lots of public order events there that spilled over into people trying to force their way into the stadium. one former premier league player inside wembley told us the situation was so serious he decided to leave before the match began. there was fighting going on, there was arguments. and then we were basically in a position where i couldn't move. i was literally trapped like that. i was at the stage where, safety first here. i'm going to get myself out of here. because this is dangerous. but football's night of shame didn't stop there. rashford has missed! the three england players who missed penalties, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka all targeted by online racist abuse. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. we've got to make sure that we are there and aligned with their clubs and making sure
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that we look after those boys, absolutely. this morning the fa's president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened by what he called abhorrent behaviour. it must stop now, he added. borisjohnson also condemned the abuse. but labour leader sir keir starmer today claimed the prime minister failed to show leadership by not initially condemning fans who booed england's taking of the knee before warm up matches. downing street insisting he always supported the players�* right to protest and did criticise the building, asking fans to cheer. today a mural dedicated to marcus rashford was defaced. the police are investigating what they called racially motivated vandalism. it's unacceptable. as long as they are performing and scoring and getting results, then of course, we are all england, we are all behind you. but the minute that doesn't happen, the abuse comes out. but the last month has still been overwhelmingly positive for england. who can look forward to the future with renewed confidence.
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football can be a cruel, cruel game at times. and i've been on the end of it and unfortunately these boys will feel so hurt, so angry, so disappointed. and it will hurt them for a while. but when you look at the whole picture they should feel very proud of what they've given us. how are you feeling today? upset. the euros dream over, the hurt continues for england. but the sense is that this is a generation of players heading in the right direction. fresh questions tonight than for both the government and the tech giants over how players can be better protected from such abuse and i think questions for the fa about how they can ensure the protection of fans coming to wembley. they will have taken a lot of credit in the past few weeks for the way that their reforms revitalise the england team in recent years but sadly they now face tough questions about the
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security arrangements at the stadium and tonight they said the stewarding exceeded requirements and they had more security officials than any other event in the past. i think the fair will be the mayhem of last night could have jeopardised the chances for england to be part of a successful bid for the 2030 woke up. for all the undoubted progress in the way the england team galvanised the way the england team galvanised the nation and proved an uplifting force it does feel like something of a return to the dark ages with a discussion tonight about hooliganism and racism and a reminder that those problems had not gone away. but england from a pure footballing perspective can look forward with optimism towards the world cup next year. well, the gloom felt by england fans today is in contrast to scenes in italy, of course, where fans were celebrating long into the night after seeing their team crowned champions of europe. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is in rome for us now. things must feel very
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different over there. along with the partying italians i think i still taking it in. their first european football title since 1968 and by the tightest of margins. headley felt confident going into the match last night with 33 previously unbeaten games. they also felt daunted by playing england with their home advantage. as it turns out they had nothing to fear. in the end, it's come to rome. cheering. 53 years, not quite of hurt, but of italy's wait for a european title. and now the mancini magic, with its greatest trick. back on home soil, and crowned champions of europe. who needed sleep after that win? you couldn't have got it, anyway. in every corner of this passionate country, victory tasted sweet. and it was savoured loudly, for hour after hour.
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morning brought sore heads and calm after the storm. the piazzas returned from football to food. seeking refuge from the heat, jan carla and herfamily. generations witnessing history. i hope you don't mind me asking, but do you remember italy's last european victory in 1968? i remember, just because of my father, who was so happy. and i was a little kid then. and i thought oh, what a lovely thing it is! so it was also a revival of that. i wasn't watching the match, i was sleeping. but i heard everybody shouting outside at midnight. i woke up and then my mum told me we were champions. your grandma says you go to the british school here. so what are you saying to your english friends? i don't know, i'm just going to say we won! from italy's captain, a message dedicating the victory to the country's medics. both heroes of our times.
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the word italians are using about their team as redemption. both from failure to qualify for the last the failure to qualify for the last cup the failure to qualify for the test cup europe for example wearing masks
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in crowded indoor spaces. from next monday in england, the requirement for social distancing, which has dominated life for over a year, will stop. people will no longer be legally required to wear face coverings — but ministers say they'll be expected to keep them on in crowded indoor public spaces like public transport. limits on socialising will be lifted — bringing an to end to the rule of six or two households indoors, restrictions on the number allowed to gather outside or in venues, including at weddings and funerals. nightclubs and large events will be encouraged to use vaccine certificates. people are being urged to meet outside where possible. and the advice to work from home where possible is ending — with people being encouraged to return gradually to their workplace. the changes come amid a sharp rise in coronavirus cases across much of the uk. here's our health editor, hugh pym. for those in england wondering how things will be different from next monday there was a change of tone
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from the government. masks and face coverings will be expected in certain places like crowded public transport even as legal restrictions are lifted onjuly transport even as legal restrictions are lifted on july the transport even as legal restrictions are lifted onjuly the 19th. the key message was caution. this are lifted on july the 19th. the key message was caution. this pandemic is not over- — message was caution. this pandemic is not over. this _ message was caution. this pandemic is not over. this disease, _ is not over. this disease, coronavirus, continues to carry risks for you and your family. we cannot simply revert instantly from monday the 19th ofjuly to life as it was before covid. can monday the 19th ofjuly to life as it was before covid.— monday the 19th ofjuly to life as it was before covid. can you spell out some of— it was before covid. can you spell out some of the _ it was before covid. can you spell out some of the risks _ it was before covid. can you spell out some of the risks involved - it was before covid. can you spell. out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example to the nhs? there is no doubt that we are in the third _ there is no doubt that we are in the third wave — there is no doubt that we are in the third wave of infection with infections rising rapidly. i expect that to _ infections rising rapidly. i expect that to continue to rise and the more _ that to continue to rise and the more mixing we have the more infection— more mixing we have the more infection is— more mixing we have the more infection is going to spread so there — infection is going to spread so there is— infection is going to spread so there is no doubt that step four will bring — there is no doubt that step four will bring an increase in the spread of infection — will bring an increase in the spread
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of infection. although the relationship between infection and hospitalisation is different it still exists.— still exists. scientists and modellers _ still exists. scientists and modellers predict - still exists. scientists and modellers predict the - still exists. scientists and - modellers predict the current wave of infection will reach a peak in august. there could be between 1000 and 2000 daily hospital admissions and 2000 daily hospital admissions and between 100 and 200 deaths each day. all that depends on a certain amount of continued caution by the public for example by squaring in some crowded indoor spaces. those hospital numbers could be around half the peak seen in january and covid patients now tend to be younger and need less time in hospital but leading doctors are concerned about the mounting pressure. concerned about the mounting ressure. ., ., y concerned about the mounting ressure. ., ., , ., concerned about the mounting ressure. ., ., ., ., pressure. not only are we managing the backlo: pressure. not only are we managing the backlog from _ pressure. not only are we managing the backlog from last _ pressure. not only are we managing the backlog from last year _ pressure. not only are we managing the backlog from last year we - pressure. not only are we managing the backlog from last year we are i the backlog from last year we are also trying to do normal activity and also seeing a rise in admissions with patients with covid. as health care professionals we are really worried about what is going to happen in the coming weeks. labour had this response _
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happen in the coming weeks. labour had this response to _ happen in the coming weeks. labour had this response to the _ happen in the coming weeks. labour had this response to the changes. i happen in the coming weeks. labour| had this response to the changes. we all want to ease restrictions. but with infection rate still going up at this— with infection rate still going up at this rate this plan is still reckless _ at this rate this plan is still reckless i'm afraid. we need a safeway— reckless i'm afraid. we need a safeway of coming through this. there's— safeway of coming through this. there's no— safeway of coming through this. there's no —— now push to get as many young adults as possible to come forward for the first dose. southampton city council at the weekend ran a walk—in service and national and local officials feel they have to push the message more strongly because take—up of the first dose has fallen and it is not down to supply issues. it was consistent during june but since the end of the month on a seven—day rolling average it is more than half. government scientists have urged people to get vaccinated to reduce the chance of getting ill and say there is no ideal date for easing restrictions and delaying it would not mean a different outcome. hugh pym, bbc news.
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let's take a brief look at the latest covid restrictions across the other three nations. wales still has no date for ending covid restrictions. the welsh government's next review on regulations is due on wednesday but it says face masks will remain mandatory in some settings including public transport, and in health and social care settings. ministers are still deciding whether masks will continue to be law in shops. the scottish government will confirm tomorrow whether the country can move to level zero on monday. further covid restrictions could be lifted on august 9th. but some measures, such as the wearing of face masks, will remain in place. in northern ireland, some covid rules are due to be relaxed from july 26th meaning theatres and concert halls can reopen, face coverings will not have to be worn in places of worship and restrictions on social gatherings at people's homes will be eased too. the changes will need to be agreed by ministers at stormont on the 22nd of this month. cu racy and from the latest official figures on the virus we can see another six deaths recorded in the last 2a hours and 34,471 new infections across the uk, excluding northern
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ireland for whom figures aren't available. it means on average there were 32,500 new cases per day in the past week. 42,000 people had a first dose of the vaccine in the last 24—hours. that means nearly 46 million people have had theirfirstjab — that's just over 87% of uk adults. more than 107,000 people have just had a second dose. which means well over 34.5 million — or 66% of all adults — are fully vaccinated. let's talk to our deputy political editor vicki young. we we re we were hearing the prime minister earlier on and it is certainly notable that he was striking a note of extreme caution in what he had to say. yes, and even compared to this time last week when he had spoken at a press conference, this was very different, the emphasis on the risks that are still there, rather than the freedoms we will all be able to
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enjoy next monday in england. the point of what we heard there is that certain behaviour will keep the infection rate lower. labour see a huge contradiction here. they have said today it is like putting us in a car without a seat belt, because if you know what will keep infections lower, why don't you make everyone carry on doing it? the government says this is now about personal responsibility, that we all know because we have lived through the last six months what it is that can keep people safe. whether it is meeting outdoors, wearing a mask in a crowded, indoor plays, thinking about others and the risk to others. but that means there is uncertainty about what will happen in the next few months because the government is relying on as behaving in a certain way and, crucially, more people coming forward to get vaccinated. vicki at westminster, thank you. heathrow airport says a number of staff working at terminal five have been told to isolate by the nhs
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covid app, causing major delays earlier today. the bbc understands that more than a hundred security guards were affected. the airport is gearing up for a surge in customers as travel restrictions end and brought in extra staff to clear the queues. businesses in england have been waiting for confirmation of the government's plans to lift restrictions next week. while keen to return to normal trading, there's some trepidation within the business community about their responibilities to keep staff and customers safe. our business correspondent colletta smith reports. i'm just really excited to get the atmosphere and the buzz. the doors of the blind pig have been closed for 16 months. it wasn't possible forjulie to open under the current rules. just to have people back in here again... but they're getting the place in shipshape again because, from next week, you won't need a mask in here and you won't need to socially distance. every time i walked in the door, my heart'sjust sank and the trepidation of not knowing if, next month, it would have to go.
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talking to my accountant, it's been a very close shave. so how do things look for you as a business and financially over the next few months and years? from starting off with no debts, no loans for anything, we now have years of debts that we've got to pay back. it's my baby. and just to see it back to life again... and the atmosphere when a bands playing and everybody�*s enjoying the music, dancing, to have that back and to give that back to people again, i can't wait. now that the government are leaving it up to business owners and customers to decide whether or not to wear one of these, each venue and each shop is going to start to look very different on the inside, each applying slightly different rules. down the road in hebden bridge, this flower shop is hoping customers keep masks on. and it's for a simple reason. it's been quite difficult,
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obviously, with the boss being off with covid. i've had a lot of responsibility put onto my shoulders. if one of us gets covid now, we are another staff member down and that is not what we need.— another staff member down and that is not what we need. college student asher has been _ is not what we need. college student asher has been brought _ is not what we need. college student asher has been brought in _ is not what we need. college student asher has been brought in to - is not what we need. college student asher has been brought in to help . asher has been brought in to help out for the next few weeks. it puts us in a vulnerable _ out for the next few weeks. it puts us in a vulnerable position. - out for the next few weeks. it puts us in a vulnerable position. we - out for the next few weeks. it puts us in a vulnerable position. we are susceptible — us in a vulnerable position. we are susceptible to covid—19, but through locked _ susceptible to covid—19, but through locked and _ susceptible to covid—19, but through locked and we have been the ones working _ locked and we have been the ones working irr— locked and we have been the ones working in cafe is. our locked and we have been the ones working in cafe is. 0urwedges locked and we have been the ones working in cafe is. our wedges are cheapest, — working in cafe is. our wedges are cheapest, so it is a way of keeping your family— cheapest, so it is a way of keeping your family safe and how much you want _ your family safe and how much you want that— your family safe and how much you want that income. in your family safe and how much you want that income.— want that income. in order not to lose any more — want that income. in order not to lose any more money _ want that income. in order not to lose any more money some - want that income. in order not to - lose any more money some businesses are desperate to remove restrictions and others need them in place longer. customers will be navigating that divide. customers will be navigating that divide. colletta smith, bbc news, in the calder valley. our top story this evening... there's widespread condemnation of a torrent of racial abuse against england's black players after yesterday's penalty shoot—out. coming up...
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the morning after the night before. england fans around the country remember a month of the beautiful game. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel... after his wimbledon triumph, novak djokovic is on track to take the golden slam — all the major tournaments plus the 0lyympics. we look at what the future holds for the serbian and just how successful djokovic can be. it's the world's biggest search engine and its boss says the model of a free and open internet is under attack. sundar pichai says many countries are restricting the flow of information and the western model, free from political censorship, is often taken for granted. google is under huge pressure from regulators around the world for its approach to privacy, data and tax. 0ur media editor, amol rajan, spoke to google's chief executive at the company headquarters in silicon valley, california. for the past two decades, one californian company more than any other has designed and built the internet with a dominance in digital advertising.
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now google is journeying into the unknown with two big bets — unimaginably powerful quantum computers and, above all, artificial intelligence. i view it as the most profound technology that humanity will ever develop and work on, and we have to make sure we do it in a way that we can harness it to society's benefit. sundar pichai is the man leading google into this new era. be it health care, be it education, be it how we manufacture things and how we consume information. if you think about fire or electricity or the internet, it's like that but i think even more profound. born of humble roots in tamil nadu in south—east india, sundar pichai trained as an engineer. he moved to the us to pursue his dream and joined google's founders, larry page and sergey brin, when the company was just six years old in 2004. now, he's the boss of both google
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and its parent company alphabet, which includes youtube. and he faces unrelenting scrutiny from us lawmakers to, most recently, at the g7 and g20 summit, where tax was in focus. historically, has google paid enough tax in the right places?
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you can see amol s interview with sundar pichai later on bbc two at 9pm, and listen to the full—length version as a podcast on bbc sounds. thirty million people across the western united states and canada have been enduring another blistering heatwave. las vegas has matched its record ofjust over 47 degrees, while death valley in california was expected to reach a high of over 52 degrees. wildfires are burning
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in several states. from los angeles, sophie long reports. wildfires in northern california grow in size and intensity, destroying homes in multiple communities as increasing winds complicate already dangerous firefighting conditions. this fire is raging out of control in southern 0regon, as millions of people across the western united states are hit by another round of scorching temperatures. i'm on the west side... more than 60,000 acres are currently burning. california is no stranger to wildfires, but scientists say they're becoming more frequent and more intense as global temperatures rise. the national weather service recorded temperatures of 130 degrees in california's death valley, some of the highest ever recorded on the planet. people in desert communities are being warned how quickly they can dehydrate or overheat. not realising how quickly
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you can run into trouble with dehydration and heat exhaustion or the body overheating. but even those following the advice in palm springs are struggling. it's too hot. i'm drinking as much water as i can. i'm drinking my weight in water every day. i think the best way to describe it, which is actually the way my friend described it, is that moment when you open the oven and that gust of heat hits you in the face. as the record—breaking temperatures continue, people can only do their best to stay cool while also being urged to conserve water and energy. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. back to our main story and reaction to england losing to italy in last night's euro 2020 final. a record audience watched the game, peaking at almost 31 million viewers, making it the most viewed television event since the funeral of princess diana. our special correspondent ed thomas
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has been speaking to a community in 0ldham in greater manchester about what the tournament has meant to them over the past four weeks. it was somejourney... ..with the absolute highs... england! ..and the lows. so what's left now the party's over? it were fun. it was a good day, it was a good night. it was enjoyable, weren't it? it was really enjoyable. all of the community spirit was from the football. - covid, we couldn't do anything. the football's lifted everyone's spirits. i so it doesn't feel like a loss? no, not at all. they played their hearts out and they're an inspiration to all these young kids. watching it out with all your friends and neighbours and enjoying the game together, like a community should do. this was lymeside in 0ldham last night. and imagine this
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repeated across england. moments ofjoy... how do you feel? good. ..that mean more than just football. very proud. very, very proud. we come from normal backgrounds, just like a lot of the players do. they do a lot more for our communities than some of the councils and governments to around here. they've fed the kids for the past year, with the school meal stuff, and they've kept their spirits high. it's brought us all to back together. when you hear that marcus rashford has woken up to racism and abuse on social media... it's horrible, isn't it? there's no place for racism in football, communities, anywhere. there's no place for it, ever. this was a time someone will never forget and now a new generation of fans. i am very proud.— fans. i am very proud. have been insired. fans. i am very proud. have been inspired. optimistic _ fans. i am very proud. have been inspired. optimistic now- fans. i am very proud. have been inspired. optimistic now about i fans. i am very proud. have been. inspired. optimistic now about this inspired. 0ptimistic now about this team. fin inspired. optimistic now about this team. �* . inspired. optimistic now about this team. . ., ., , inspired. optimistic now about this team. . ., ., .,, , we team. an england fan, optimistic? we have a young —
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team. an england fan, optimistic? we have a young team — team. an england fan, optimistic? we have a young team and _ team. an england fan, optimistic? we have a young team and quality - have a young team and quality players and hopefully now no more years of hurt which would be nice. toulouse is hard to take. but maybe something special has also been gained. something special has also been aained. ., , , ., something special has also been aained. ., ,, ., , , gained. three lions should be very roud for gained. three lions should be very proud for how— gained. three lions should be very proud for how far _ gained. three lions should be very proud for how far they _ gained. three lions should be very proud for how far they got - gained. three lions should be very proud for how far they got us. - gained. three lions should be very proud for how far they got us. not | proud for how far they got us. not everyone got to the final. we just didn't win. everyone got to the final. we 'ust didn't win. �* everyone got to the final. we 'ust didn't win. . ., ., , everyone got to the final. we 'ust didn't win. . ., .,, . . everyone got to the final. we 'ust didn't win. . ., .,, �* �* , time for a look at the weather, here's helen willetts. torrential rain in that last report. how is it looking? we had some flash flooding in places like dorset and london. the west of london in particular and more of those downpours in the next few hours and some mornings out. you can find those on the bbc website. we can show you those now on the radar
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picture. we have some heavy showers over the welsh marchers, the western side of scotland. so another few hours of quite intense rain for some before gradually they ease through the night. and we will see that replaced by some misty low cloud from the north sea. not a cold night with cloud and showers. 12, 14 degrees. we could have some fog in the morning but that will be gone in no time at all. some showers around tomorrow but generally the picture is low pressure that has brought this unsettled weather is moving out of the way. we will have some showers but most places will stay dry. and will feel warmer. by wednesday that low—pressure still close by. some weather fronts
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brushing into the north and west

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