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tv   Coronavirus Update  BBC News  July 12, 2021 4:30pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown, building up to the latest coronavirus briefing from the government. the government confirms the remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week. the health secretary says infections will rise but the nhs could cope because of the success of the vaccination programme. on the basis of the evidence in front of us, we do not believe that infection rates will put unsustainable pressure on the nhs. we'll be live at downing street at five o'clock as the prime minister prepares to hold a news briefing on the lifting of england's remaining restrictions. as england prepares to lift the remaining restrictions, we'll speak to our correspondents in
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scotland, wales and northern ireland to look at the restrictions in the rest of the united kingdom. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news, building up to the latest coronavirus briefing from the government, today led by the prime minister borisjohnson. it's been confirmed that the planned easing of restrictions in england will go ahead next monday on the 19th ofjuly. in the house of commons a short time ago, the health secretary sajid javid said that while cases could rise to as many as 100,000 a day, it isn't expected that infection rates will put unsustainable pressure on the nhs. so let's take a look at the restrictions which will end a week today.
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the rule—of—six rule for meeting indoors will be scrapped. pubs and restaurants will be able to let people queue at the barfor drinks. theatres and cinemas can return to a full capacity audience. sport and entertainment venues can also welcome back capacity crowds, but businesses and large events will be encouraged to use so—called vaccine passports. nightclubs will be allowed to reopen. and social distancing and face coverings will no longer be mandatory, but there's advice they should be worn in crowded places such as public transport. so let's have a listen to the health secretary sajid javid outlining the planned easing of restrictions in england. to those who say, "why take this step now," i say, "if not now, when?" there will never be a perfect time to take this step. because we simply cannot
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eradicate this virus. whether we like it or not, coronavirus is not going away. but moving forward next week, supported by the arrival of summer and the school holidays, it gives us the best possible chance of a return to normal life. if we wait longer, then we risk pushing the virus towards winter, when the virus will have an advantage, or worse still, we will not be opening up at all. we delayed step four by four weeks so we could build our vaccine wall even higher and we believe this wall means we can withstand a summer wave. and while the wall would be higher still if we waited until winter, we know the wave would be much more dangerous. so while we know there are risks with any decision,
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this is the most responsible decision that we can take. this step forward is about balancing the harms that are caused by covid with the undeniable harms that restrictions bring. these restrictions were vital to protect the nhs. but we must be upfront about the impact of keeping them, just as we are about removing them. the rise in domestic violence, the impact on mental health, the undiagnosed cancer, to name just a few. so we will ease the restrictions next week while at the same time we will be maintaining the defences we have built against this virus. that was the health secretary in the commons. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. there have been a further 34,471 new cases recorded
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in the past 2a hours. six people have died. that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. taking a look at the vaccination data. more than 45.9 million people in the uk have received a first dose of a covid vaccine — that's more than 87% of uk adults. more than 34.8 million people have now had both doses. that means more than 66% of uk adults are now fully vaccinated. our health correspondent nick triggle is with me. some people might say, the prime minister is about to confirm, as we heard in the house of commons from the health secretary, restrictions in england being lifted as expected next week, but why, when they are themselves talking of possibly 100,000 cases a day quite soon a. indeed. we are certainly in a worse position than many hoped we would be at this stage of the road map.
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that's largely because of the more infectious delta variant. but it was always a given that cases would rise as we unlocked, especially to step three, allowing indoor mixing, and now step four, lifting of virtually all the remaining restrictions. and cases are rising rapidly. we are seeing over 30,000 new infections a day and hospital admissions are now running at over 500 ambitions per day and by the end ofjuly we are on track to top 1000. and if, as the health secretary has warned we could reach 100,000 cases, that could mean 2000 hospital admissions per day, twice what the nhs would normally see in the depths of winter for all types of respiratory infections. but the hope is that the country at the peak will stop before it reaches that. that the infections, this wave of infections will hit the wall of
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immunity that has been built up by vaccination but also natural infection and the problem, as the health secretary was pointing out, you could wait until autumn, you might do a bit more vaccination, but we are coming to the end of the vaccination programme for adults and as yet there has been a green light for the vaccination of children. if you wait until the autumn you could then run into the flu season so there is more pressure on the nhs for more vulnerable groups. and with the summer, the break—up of schools in the coming weeks, that is seen as a bit of a fire break so we might well curb infections and stop them getting to 100000 and this could be the least worst time to open up. there has been a lot of talk about this being freedom day next week, the 19th ofjuly. borisjohnson has talked about wanting it to be irreversible but the tone of what the government has been saying on that sort of thing and on facemasks has changed a little bit. it
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that sort of thing and on facemasks has changed a little bit.— has changed a little bit. it has. i have talked _ has changed a little bit. it has. i have talked to _ has changed a little bit. it has. i have talked to a _ has changed a little bit. it has. i have talked to a few _ has changed a little bit. it has. i l have talked to a few government scientists in the last week and there was a frustration, i think, about the communication and messaging which is so important during a pandemic, just on the fact that freedom day suggests infection rates no longer matter. and the modelling that has been done shows, and it is very hard to model exactly what will happen, and even small changes in things such as behaviour can make a huge difference. i think the change of tone we are seeing is to reinforce the message that infections do matter and it's important we all try to look out for each other, trying to do our bit, even with society opening up, to slow this spread as much as possible. i think that's behind the change of tone we are seeing. you mentioned — change of tone we are seeing. you mentioned the _ change of tone we are seeing. you mentioned the vaccine roll—out. the problem is, because it is now younger people who are now eligible for vaccines and not so many of them are coming forward and the
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suggestion is that may be the vaccine roll—out is starting to peter out a little bit. vaccine roll-out is starting to peter out a little bit.- vaccine roll-out is starting to peter out a little bit. when we look at the numbers _ peter out a little bit. when we look at the numbers of— peter out a little bit. when we look at the numbers of first _ peter out a little bit. when we look at the numbers of first dose - peter out a little bit. when we look at the numbers of first dose is - at the numbers of first dose is being done dropping below 100,000 on some days, we are used to talking about the supply of vaccines being the limiting factor but it is now demand. we actually have plenty of pfizer and modernity vaccines being given to younger age groups. it was expected when we got to the younger age groups that uptake wouldn't be as high. the latest figures for people in their early 30s, around 75% of people have come forward for a first dose so it was always expected but we are reaching that demand ceiling it appears. —— pfizer and moderna. there will be a big push for people to come forward in the next couple of weeks. the government has said people who have vaccinated and had two doses can travel to and both countries and come back without isolating so there are incentives they are putting in their but there was always the
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concern they would trail off. —— can travel to amber countries. nick triggle, thank you. with restrictions in england set to be lifted, let's have a look at the restrictions in the rest of the united kingdom. with me, sarah smith in glasgow, danjohnson in belfast, but first he's hywel griffith in cardiff. we know whatever boris johnson we know whatever borisjohnson says that 5pm will not apply here in wales. it will be wednesday here at the senedd when the welsh government will set out its policies. we know facemasks will be remain mandatory in public transport in wales as well as in hospitals and health care settings and care homes. they will no longer be required in schools in september. we anticipate things will be eased next week, potentially moving to more people being allowed to mix within homes, may be the rule of six and other things being allowed to open, things like ice
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rinks in cardiff bay are still not open, have been closed since march of 2020 so there will be easing but we are not on course for freedom day in wales. the welsh government, as ever, wanting to do it slowly and cautiously. the case rates in wales are lower than the rest of the uk, and the vaccination rate is the best in the uk but there is always a big dose of caution. many in wales to support that but some feel the government is dragging its heels unnecessarily. the concern is that people live on the border and travel back and forth in particular during the busy summer season will get confused if the rules in wales remain very different to across the border in england.— border in england. things here in northern ireland _ border in england. things here in northern ireland are _ border in england. things here in northern ireland are moving - border in england. things here in | northern ireland are moving much more _ northern ireland are moving much more slowly, particularly than england~ _ more slowly, particularly than england. july 26 is the next important date in the calendar. that's— important date in the calendar. that's when there will be a drop in travel_ that's when there will be a drop in travel restrictions for people who are double vaccinated coming back from amber countries. that's when we
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can also— from amber countries. that's when we can also expect theatres and conference venues to reopen here, and for— conference venues to reopen here, and for live — conference venues to reopen here, and for live music to get back to normal— and for live music to get back to normal without restrictions. that could _ normal without restrictions. that could also — normal without restrictions. that could also be when face coverings are no— could also be when face coverings are no longer needed in certain settings — are no longer needed in certain settings like classrooms and places of worship — settings like classrooms and places of worship but there will be restrictions that continue even beyond — restrictions that continue even beyond that date. the limit on the number_ beyond that date. the limit on the number of— beyond that date. the limit on the number of people who can meet may increase _ number of people who can meet may increase lrul— number of people who can meet may increase but will still be in place. the executive in northern ireland is taking _ the executive in northern ireland is taking things more slowly and more cautiously— taking things more slowly and more cautiously and there will be a meeting _ cautiously and there will be a meeting in ten days to agree what the next _ meeting in ten days to agree what the next step should be. case numbers— the next step should be. case numbers here are very low, there was only one _ numbers here are very low, there was only one single covid death in the last 24—hour period but the caution comes— last 24—hour period but the caution comes because vaccination rates in norihern— comes because vaccination rates in northern ireland are lower than the rest of— northern ireland are lower than the rest of the — northern ireland are lower than the rest of the uk. northern ireland are lower than the rest of the uk-_ rest of the uk. scotland has been sufferin: rest of the uk. scotland has been suffering the _ rest of the uk. scotland has been suffering the highest _ rest of the uk. scotland has been suffering the highest infection - suffering the highest infection rates of anywhere in the uk.
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recently the worst in europe. although those numbers have been going down a bit and the government is confident we have passed the peak of the current wave the tone here is definitely different to that coming from the prime minister. the scottish government say they want to be cautious and not cavalier. nicola sturgeon, who has described boris johnson's plans for lifting restrictions as something of an exception has said she is also worried the message coming from the prime minister could confuse people in scotland about what the rules are here. the scottish parliament is being recalled from recess tomorrow to get an update on exactly how rules may change. the plan was never to lift all restrictions onjuly 19. to lift all restrictions onjuly19. the hope was, it was anticipated scotland would go down to level zero rules on july scotland would go down to level zero rules onjuly 19, scotland would go down to level zero rules onjuly19, meaning more people could meet up indoors and outdoors, some adult sports could continue and knew things like that. it's possible that because of concern about infection rates the rules will be relaxed a bit but not
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all level zero restrictions will be in place. it's very unlikely people returning from amber list countries abroad will be allowed to stop isolating when they come back to scotland and it seems certain that facemasks and social distancing will continue here for the foreseeable future. .. ., continue here for the foreseeable future. ,,., ., ., ~ continue here for the foreseeable future. ., ., ,, , ., ., continue here for the foreseeable future. ., ., ,, ., ., future. sarah, thank you, and also danjohnson _ future. sarah, thank you, and also dan johnson and _ future. sarah, thank you, and also dan johnson and hywel— future. sarah, thank you, and also dan johnson and hywel griffith. i i'm joined now by kirsten 0swald, deputy westminster leader for the scottish national party. thank you for being with us. what will be announced on the easing of restrictions? we were hearing from sarah smith about the possibilities so what do you expect? i sarah smith about the possibilities so what do you expect?— so what do you expect? i would exect so what do you expect? i would exnect the _ so what do you expect? i would expect the cautious _ so what do you expect? i would expect the cautious and - so what do you expect? i would expect the cautious and data i so what do you expect? i would - expect the cautious and data driven approach to continue as the first minister has been clear all the way through that it is important to focus on data and to be driven by the science in everything we do. you
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can see the differences in approach if you think about things like face coverings which i heard you talking about. i think that is something that people generally appreciate here. i think the cautious approach is something that chimes with people, they want to know they are doing what they can to keep themselves and those around them safe. ~ . . , themselves and those around them safe. ~ ., ., ,, themselves and those around them safe. . ., ., ,, ., ., safe. what has happened in scotland? we heard sarah _ safe. what has happened in scotland? we heard sarah saying _ safe. what has happened in scotland? we heard sarah saying the _ safe. what has happened in scotland? we heard sarah saying the infection i we heard sarah saying the infection rates, although they have come down a bit in scotland, have been the highest in the uk and in fact in europe but why? i highest in the uk and in fact in europe but why?— europe but why? i think this is something _ europe but why? i think this is something we _ europe but why? i think this is something we have _ europe but why? i think this is something we have seen - europe but why? i think this is - something we have seen throughout the whole pandemic the rate of infection ebbs and flows and have seen that across all the uk nations at various times. i think that is one of the reasons it's even more important we are driven by data and we take that cautious approach. we have heard before about the importance of data rather than updates... importance of data rather than undates- - -_ updates... i'm sorry, i'm 'ust askin: updates... i'm sorry, i'm 'ust asking mi updates... i'm sorry, i'm 'ust asking you why i updates... i'm sorry, i'm 'ust asking you why you i updates... i'm sorry, i'm 'ust asking you why you think“ updates... i'm sorry, i'mjust - asking you why you think infection rates in scotland in particular have been so high. i’m rates in scotland in particular have been so high-— rates in scotland in particular have been so high. i'm sure there will be a ranue been so high. i'm sure there will be a ranae of been so high. i'm sure there will be
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a range of things — been so high. i'm sure there will be a range of things that _ been so high. i'm sure there will be a range of things that will _ been so high. i'm sure there will be a range of things that will feed - a range of things that will feed into that and that's the kind of investigation that goes on on an ongoing basis to make sure we are aware of the data that underlies infection and i think we are familiar with how infectious the delta variant is. i think that it all the more reason for us to continue having that cautious and data and science —based approach. i have asked that question... i'm asking the question because scottish labour have said the snp have lost control of the pandemic and also of the exit from lockdown which now hangs in the balance. they are saying that any delay to the easing of restrictions in scotland will be the result of snp inaction and failure. ., ~' the result of snp inaction and failure. ., ,, . , failure. no, i think the pandemic is what we are _ failure. no, i think the pandemic is what we are dealing _ failure. no, i think the pandemic is what we are dealing with _ failure. no, i think the pandemic is what we are dealing with rather- failure. no, i think the pandemic is. what we are dealing with rather than anything else. that really doesn't stand up to scrutiny and i think that if you look at the situation across scotland and the situation throughout the period of the
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pandemic so far, it's very clear that the first minister and the scottish government have in fact been adopting that courses and data driven approach and we will continue to do that. because it is in the interest of everyone in scotland for us to emerge safely out of this pandemic period, for the people of scotland to emerge safely and also businesses. i think we will continue to have that focus, that is the correct approach. and i think that is one that will continue to be something that supports our recovery going forward. what something that supports our recovery going forward-— going forward. what scottish labour are also saying _ going forward. what scottish labour are also saying is — going forward. what scottish labour are also saying is that _ going forward. what scottish labour are also saying is that your - are also saying is that your government needs to show a urgency and ambition, particularly on vaccinations and contact tracing. and i think we have done. that has been the case throughout the whole of the pandemic period. the vaccination programme is a success by any measure and i think that is very reassuring for people, given the increased transmissibility of the increased transmissibility of the delta variant but although
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vaccinations are making such a difference to us, they don't do everything that is why we have to make sure we have other measures in place which we are continuing to do and the scottish government is continuing to put extra investment into the test and trace system. i think from all of these angles, this is a challenging situation and no one could deny that but making sure we are driven at all times by the data, which will be what keeps us ultimately safer, i think is the right thing to do and i welcome that approach from nicola sturgeon. i think it is a bit of a contrast to the more cavalier approach of boris johnson, we have seen already in the past couple of days the messaging on things like face coverings has been so changeable. i think that is unhelpful to people, we need clear information going forward and i think we need a clear narrative from government so that people understand what the restrictions are and why, which i think makes all the difference to people, if we are having to these challenges to deal with in our daily lives. the
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approach here is certainly the right one for people in scotland.- one for people in scotland. kirsten oswald, thank _ one for people in scotland. kirsten oswald, thank you _ one for people in scotland. kirsten oswald, thank you very _ one for people in scotland. kirsten oswald, thank you very much - one for people in scotland. kirsten i oswald, thank you very much indeed. let's speak now to adam finn, professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol, and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. and also a frequent guest on the programme so thank you for being with us again! let's get your take on what the prime minister is about to say, we have heard it from the health secretary already, confirming predictions will be lifted in england next monday. do you see this as freedom day? i england next monday. do you see this as freedom day?— as freedom day? i think i would start by saying _ as freedom day? i think i would start by saying that _ as freedom day? i think i would start by saying that if— as freedom day? i think i would start by saying that if you i as freedom day? i think i would start by saying that if you get i as freedom day? i think i would j start by saying that if you get an expert on the tv who tells you confidently they really know what will happen next and what should be done, you should probably ignore them! because the fact is, we are all in a state really quite considerable uncertainty at this point. and looking at the different scientific opinions around this,
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there is clearly not a clear consensus in one direction or another. i sympathise with the political message that this cannot go on for but on the other hand, we really don't want to get to a situation where things get so bad that we have to reverse back towards a position where we were in early in the year. it is a very delicate balancing act to get that right. the prime minister has said he wants this to be irreversible but are you saying it could be that it has to be and we might have to have restrictions imposed on us again? because cases are rising so much? the government themselves are talking about possibly 100,000 cases per day. talking about possibly 100,000 cases er da . ~ , ,., , talking about possibly 100,000 cases per day. absolutely. again, cannot be absolutely _ per day. absolutely. again, cannot be absolutely confident _ per day. absolutely. again, cannot be absolutely confident about i per day. absolutely. again, cannotj be absolutely confident about what will be happening a few months down the line and we have heard some rhetoric in the last few days about the possible need for private restrictions come winter but i don't think anyone should be making confident predictions at this point.
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and of course the more you let the genie out of the bottle, the harder it is to put it back in. i think the fact that people are being asked to continue to be cautious, there are certain things we can all do that will, to some extent, reduce the spread of the virus, using masks, working at home, lateral flow tests and so on, all this can go on without businesses being forced to shut down. i think the most important message of all that must not get lost, which was one that your health corresponding to said just now, is that we must not lose the message that the vaccine programme is the critical factor here. and if people start to feel there are problems are all over and they can relax and if they have not been fully vaccinated they didn't bother, that would be a disasterfor us. the whole modelling depends on there still being an increase in the
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number of immune people through vaccination and that remains critical. �* ., vaccination and that remains critical. . ., ., vaccination and that remains critical. ., ., ., �* critical. and on that, aren't you worried that _ critical. and on that, aren't you worried that people _ critical. and on that, aren't you worried that people in - critical. and on that, aren't you worried that people in their i critical. and on that, aren't you | worried that people in their 20s, especially men in their 20s, a lot of them seem to be not bothering with getting the vaccine, they don't seem to feel the need for it. i think we really do need to get the message across that firstly this is not always completely innocent infection in young people put it is obviously massively less of a problem than if you are an old chap like me or someone with an underlying illness. but young people also do come in contact with older people. they pose a risk to others as well as having some risk themselves point out the importance of getting immunised in order to get back to the normality that everybody wants is a really critical message to get across. and we have to work very hard on that in the coming weeks. �* . weeks. and we are getting the messaue weeks. and we are getting the message from _ weeks. and we are getting the message from the _ weeks. and we are getting the | message from the government, weeks. and we are getting the i message from the government, that weeks. and we are getting the - message from the government, that we have to learn to live with this virus and that seems to be their
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thinking behind the lifting of restrictions and also the timing, as borisjohnson has said, if not now, when? it is summer holidays and summer time, the weather is better, it's a good time to lift restrictions rather than doing it later in the year.— restrictions rather than doing it later in the year. there is some truth in that. _ later in the year. there is some truth in that. there _ later in the year. there is some truth in that. there obviously i later in the year. there is some l truth in that. there obviously are risks of having simultaneous epidemics of different viruses all happening at the same time and that tends to be in the winter. having said that, in paediatrics which is where i work, we are actually seeing epidemics of viral infections breaking out now when we don't normally see them because children are coming into contact with each other and with adults more, and those viruses which have been held back by the coronavirus restrictions are breaking out even in summer. just how this plays out is a really tricky thing to predict at this point. i would urge people on an individual basis to continue to be cautious and to notjust throw all
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caution to the wind. cautious and to not 'ust throw all caution to the windi cautious and to not 'ust throw all caution to the wind. adam, always aood to caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk _ caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk to _ caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk to you, _ caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk to you, thank- caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk to you, thank you i caution to the wind. adam, always good to talk to you, thank you so l good to talk to you, thank you so much, adam finn, a member of the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. 0ne joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. one of the impacts of coronavirus is long covid. scientists at imperial college london believe they've discovered the basis for what could be the first diagnostic test for long covid. researchers have told the bbc�*s panorama programme they hope their study will help develop improved treatments for the condition, which leaves sufferers unwell for months. 0ur correspondent lucy adams, who has been suffering from long covid herself, has this report. i started recording a video diary when i first got covid in march last year, thinking it would just be a few weeks illness. i've been ill for eight... i've been ill for eight months now. and i'm getting really fed up on it. doorbell rings.
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hi, guys. how was school? i'm one of a million people in the uk suffering from long covid, an illness with a huge range of symptoms including fatigue, breathlessness and brain fog. it's had a huge impact on me and my family. much about the illness is still unknown. i look fine on the outside, obviously, there's still a problem. i've been off work for almost a year, still unwell, i still have fatigue and headaches and all sorts of other problems. some believe one of the causes may be the immune system is turning on itself. we know that in some people, when they get infected with coronavirus, the body can also generate antibodies against self proteins or human proteins. normally, we create antibodies to fight disease but sometimes, the body creates auto antibodies, these attack healthy cells.
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the pilot data we have says you really can pick up different patterns of autoimmunity in people who have long covid so you know, start of the road but we are quite chuffed about it. professor danny altman at imperial college in london thinks he may have found unique auto antibodies in the blood of people with long covid. although more detailed research is needed, they hope a diagnostic test is possible. i'm famously optimistic so i'd hope that within six months we would have a simple blood test that you could get from your gp. but professor altman adds a note of caution as social distancing ends and the country reopens. one thing we know for absolute certain is that long covid can ensue from any form of infection, asymptomatic, mild, severe, so if we are heading into a phase
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of 100,000 cases per day in the coming months, and we are seeing 10—20% of all infections can result in long covid, i can see no certainty that we are not brewing those long covid cases despite having a vaccinated population. 16 months on, i am much improved but i still worry about whether i will ever get back to being who i was before covid. lucy adams, bbc news. we will be hearing from the prime minister in a couple of minutes. let's speak to our deputy political editor vicki young. we expect him to confirm the lifting of restriction in england next week as we heard from the health secretary in the house of commons but what about the government language and tone on this? has that changed? they were talking, saying the easing of restrictions should be cautious but irreversible but is that still the message? it’s
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cautious but irreversible but is that still the message? it's not a word ou that still the message? it's not a word you hear — that still the message? it's not a word you hear very _ that still the message? it's not a word you hear very often - that still the message? it's not a word you hear very often now i that still the message? it's not a l word you hear very often now from ministers because i think they realise that there is some uncertainty here. i think that uncertainty here. i think that uncertainty is what we're talking about going into autumn and winter. we have had warnings from chris whitty and others about how difficult that is going to be but there is the more immediate short—term issues, and really ministers are trying to explain why they are doing it now at a time when there are a rising case numbers. it's of course because of the vaccination programme which they think is very much weakening the link between getting infected and ending up in hospital and of course those who die. it is a new phase and thatis those who die. it is a new phase and that is what sajid javid called it today, talking about the caution around it. what we are also waiting for is guidance from the government about what will be expected of people and i think that is where there has been a slight shift on things like masks. we have heard a lot of ministers are sounding very excited about throwing away their mask potentially but now you're
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hearing more about you will still be expected to wear a mask in enclosed spaces where it is very crowded. similarly, on certification, asking people to show their covid status, if they been double vaccinated or had a negative test, have they been infected naturally with it? we thought that had all gone but actually we will get guidance on that and it will be up to businesses in what they call high risk situations about whether they still use those or not put it we presume they mean places like nightclubs, for example. put a lot of this is being put onto businesses and then having to make a judgment and again, on working from home, the government says they want to work return to the workplace gradually so it be up to certain employers to decide how they manage that. it's about people taking personal responsibility but of course then you have people like the extremely clinically vulnerable, there will be guidance from them as well. they will feel extremely worried at this situation where we have these rising cases, possibly sajid javid going up to 100,000 per
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day. i think what we're looking for in this press conference is some kind of guidance about how many hospitalisations there will be because we know the modelling has been done, it'll be interesting to see how many cases are expected per day going into next month or two. because they are opening up because they don't think there will be an unsustainable amount of pressure on the nhs. i think some of those working in hospitals and doctors surgeries might be very concerned about that and on that point as well, the prime minister i think at one stage. he well, the prime minister i think at one state. . , well, the prime minister i think at one state. .,, ., ~ well, the prime minister i think at one state. ., ,, ., one stage. he was talking about the link, the vaccine _ one stage. he was talking about the link, the vaccine had _ one stage. he was talking about the link, the vaccine had severed - one stage. he was talking about the link, the vaccine had severed the i link, the vaccine had severed the link, the vaccine had severed the link between the number of cases and the amount of hospitalisations and deaths. but that language again has changed to the link being severely weakened rather than severed? yes, because you can tell from the figures we are seeing that of course there are people still going into hospital and ministers do expect
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case numbers to go up and the number of people in hospital to continue to rise, but their point through all of this is if you don't open up now, when do you do it? do you stick with lockdown restrictions for months on end? they feel you will always have a wave of new cases once you start to relax restrictions, so is it better to have it now in the summer, coming to the end of the school term and all the disruption we have seen there, and i hope transmission will not be as high in the summer, people meeting outdoors, and there could well be guidance that if you are meeting up it's better to do it outside because transmission doesn't happen as easily. all of those things are guiding them towards doing it now. we had from chris whitty this time last week saying that the problem is if you were doing this in the autumn and winter could be a lot worse, but i think it'll be interesting to see the tone and there is obviously concern about the risks. we can listen to what they have to say.
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good afternoon thank you forjoining us. like of people across the country i woke up this morning sad and rueful but also filled with pride and hope and thanks to gareth southgate and the whole england squad for the best campaign by any england team in any tournament that i can remember. they made history, they lifted our spirits, they brought joy they lifted our spirits, they broughtjoy to this country they lifted our spirits, they brought joy to this country and they lifted our spirits, they broughtjoy to this country and i know that they will continue to do so. and to those who have been directing racist abuse at some of the players, i say, shame on you, and i hope you will crawl back under the rock from which emerged. because this entire team played like heroes, and i'm sure this isjust this entire team played like heroes, and i'm sure this is just the beginning of their achievements and i say, bring on qatar next year and let's also dare to start that to
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hope together with ireland in our united kingdom can host the world cup in 2030. turning now to step four of our road map. we have come to a stage in the pandemic where there is no easy answer and no obvious date for unlocking. we have cases rising significantly with more than 30,000 per day and we can see what is happening across europe as the delta variant takes hold among our friends. the delta variant takes hold among ourfriends. we know we the delta variant takes hold among our friends. we know we are going to see more hospitalisations and more deaths from covid, but we also know that this wave was clearly foreseen by our scientists when we first set out that road map in february. if anything, so far, we are in the middle range of their projections for infections and at the lower end of their projections for mortality. we also know that if we were now to delay this fourth step, for instance until september or later, then we
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would be reopening as the weather gets colder and as the virus acquires a greater natural advantage and when schools are back. so we think now is the right moment to proceed. when we have the natural firebreak of the school holidays in the next few days, and chris and patrick will set out in a minute how we are meeting the four tests for step four in england. but it's absolutely vital that we proceed now with caution. and i cannot say this powerfully or emphatically enough. this pandemic is not over. this disease, coronavirus, continues to carry risks for you and your family. we cannot simply revert instantly from monday the 19th ofjuly to life as it was before covid. we'll stick
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with our plan to lift legal restrictions and lift social distancing, but we expect and recommend that people wear a face covering in crowded enclosed spaces where you come into contact with those who don't normally meet, such as those on public transport. we are removing the government instruction to work from home where you can, but we don't expect that the whole country will return to their desks as one from monday. and we are setting out guidance for business for a gradual return to work over the summer. and as a matter of social responsibility, we are urging nightclubs and other venues with large crowds to make use of the nhs covid pass, which shows proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or natural immunity as a means of entry. we are updating our guidance
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for the clinically extremely vulnerable on how they can keep themselves safe and i generally urge everyone to keep thinking of others and to consider the risks. we will keep our tough border policy, including quarantine for those arriving from red list countries. and we'll keep the test, trace and isolate in place. every week that goes by we are getting hundreds of thousands more jabs into arms and our delay in the road map we announced last month has enabled us to get 7 million more jabs in the last four weeks alone. by next monday, two thirds of adults will have received a second dose and every adult will have been offered a first dose. and it's a single most crucial thing now that you get that jab. ajab that crucial thing now that you get that jab. a jab that can protect you and yourfamily and allow jab. a jab that can protect you and your family and allow you for instance to go on holiday. and it is
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of course only thanks to the vaccine programme that we are able to take these cautious steps now, but to take these steps we must be cautious and we must be vaccinated. so please get that jab. and we must be vaccinated. so please get thatjab. thanks very much, i will now pass to chris to do the slides. . ~ will now pass to chris to do the slides. ., ~' , ., will now pass to chris to do the slides. ., ,, , ., , , slides. thank you, first slide, - lease. slides. thank you, first slide, please- as — slides. thank you, first slide, please. as people _ slides. thank you, first slide, please. as people will - slides. thank you, first slide, please. as people will recall, | slides. thank you, first slide, i please. as people will recall, there were four road map tests and i will go through each of them in turn. the first of them was the vaccine deployment programme continuing successfully. i think people are very aware of the fact this is going very aware of the fact this is going very well and the nhs has ruled it out in a magnificent way supported by volunteers and people have been coming in very large numbers with the majority of every age group in aduu the majority of every age group in adult hood now having had their first vaccination and the great majority of the older age groups having both first and second
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vaccinations. next slide, please stop the second test was that evidence shows the vaccines are sufficiently effective in reducing hospitalisations and deaths in those vaccinated, and we have got real data from the uk, which actually shows that for the delta variant, the one that is currently dominant, we have considerable confidence that one dose reduces by a reasonable margin, roughly a third, the chance of getting asymptomatic infection, but two doses reduces that vary substantially further, to somewhere between 78 and 80% reduction, these are estimates. 0n the next slide, if we move people having hospitalisation and deaths, these vaccines are substantially more effective than they are even against symptomatic disease. one dose, a
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69-88% symptomatic disease. one dose, a 69—88% production and with two doses, over 91% reduction in the chance of hospitalisation. it's not 100% but these are highly effective vaccines. when it comes to the third test, infection rates do not risk a surge in hospitalisations which will put unsustainable pressure on the nhs, inevitably we have to be more cautious in our interpretation of the data. at this point in time, as you can see from this slide, the rates of hospitalisations, whilst not trivial and rising, over 2700 people are in hospital with covid at the moment, is way below both the first and second bits of the peaks in autumn last year and spring of last year. on the next slide, if we
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look at cases, admissions and deaths over time, we have to be aware of the fact that the way epidemics work is there a double. in the case of cases, the autumn wave, in orange, and the current wave, are going at very similar rates to what they did with the autumn rate last year. looking at admissions, and these are not on exactly the same scale, just a technical point, but you can see that whilst cases are following an almost identical track to the previous wave, the admissions are going significantly below that, but they are still rising at a slower exponential rate. the third thing is the mortality rate, the death rate. fortunately at this point in time it is much lower than previously, but again, this is rising. with all of these the key question is at what point does the epidemic curve come to an end and turn over and the
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rates start to go down? there cannot be certainty about this so we have inevitably, we can't be as confident on this test as the others. but at this point, modelling data and other data would imply that if we go slowly over the next stage of the road map, the expectation is that this will not reach the point where it is putting unsustainable pressure on the nhs, but to repeat the prime minister's points, there is an expectation that the number of cases and going into hospital will go up and going into hospital will go up and the number of deaths will go up in the current wave. the final test, the assessment, the risks are not fundamentally changed by a new variant of concern. the delta variant is now the dominant one in the uk, this is now the normal variant in the uk, so it is not a variant of concern any more, which is was when we first talked about it in one of these press
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conferences. looking at the other variants of concern in the uk, the numbers are low and not rises and in several cases they are in fact shrinking at this point in time. we do not think at this point there is any reason to think any current variants of concern will change the analysis that has been made, so therefore three tests have passed, fairly clearly and one test, with the caution i have put in, in terms of the data. before i finish i want to summarise where i think some of the scientific and medical opinion is, in order to come in a sense support what the prime minister hasjust come in a sense support what the prime minister has just said. there are three areas where there is really very overwhelming wide agreement between scientific and medical opinion and one area where opinions are more mixed. there is very wide agreement, and was very wide agreement that the four week delay we have just had to the road map was going to have a significant
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impact on reducing the amount of hospitalisations and deaths and that opinion has not changed, so very strong views that that particular period of delay was an important thing to do to reduce deaths, cases and pressure on the nhs. secondly, there is extremely wide agreement that whenever we go through the next step there is going to be what's called an exit wave, there will be a wave associated with that, and the slower we take it, the fewer the people who will have covid, the smaller the number of people who go into hospital and die. so going very slowly through this step is essential. this is an overwhelming view of the scientific people who have looked at this, and of the medical profession. there was a letter on this by all the royal colleges of medicine for example
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over the weekend. this is the overwhelming view, we should go slowly, steadily and cautiously, as the prime minister has laid out. there is less agreement about what is an ideal date to make a move. the reason for that is that there is no such thing as an ideal date. all possible dates have downsides and as the prime minister says, if we go at this point in time, we go at a point where there are still people being vaccinated but we are not going at a point when schools are just coming back and we are not going at a point where we are going to autumn and winter. the modelling studies that have been done on this largely show that all dates essentially tend to lead to broadly similar outcomes. different models come to slightly different conclusions, but there is no clear evidence, in comparison to previous conclusions where a delay would make a difference, there is no clear evidence that a delay now would make a difference. but going slowly will make a difference. the
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final thing, to reiterate what the prime minister said, where there is overwhelming agreement, is that vaccination reduces the chances that you will catch covid, that anyone who is vaccinated will have severe covid or go into hospital and it also reduces the chance that they will pass on covid so it protects themselves, protects all of us and other people as well. the evidence on vaccination is overwhelming. patrick, do you have anything to add before we go to the public? we can go to michael from manchester. this go to michael from manchester. as social interactions in return, what criteria _ social interactions in return, what criteria will— social interactions in return, what criteria will be used to determine ifany _ criteria will be used to determine if any restrictions should return in future, _ if any restrictions should return in future, for— if any restrictions should return in future, for example if death rates rose to _ future, for example if death rates rose to a — future, for example if death rates rose to a certain level or cases in hospitals — rose to a certain level or cases in hospitals or— rose to a certain level or cases in hospitals or waiting lists grow in a certain— hospitals or waiting lists grow in a certain area?— hospitals or waiting lists grow in a certain area? thank you, i can give ou a certain area? thank you, i can give you a straightforward _ certain area? thank you, i can give you a straightforward answer- certain area? thank you, i can give you a straightforward answer on i certain area? thank you, i can give i you a straightforward answer on that from the policy perspective. we will
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keep all the data under constant review throughout the rest of this year and probably i'm afraid into next year as well. and if we are seeing very exceptional circumstances that you describe or the arrival of some new variant that we had not bargained for, budgeted for, that really is because it is a problem, obviously we must rule out nothing and i have been very clear about that. we must protect the public and we will not hesitate to use the means that we have at our disposal. the way things are working at the moment, we do think that if we are cautious and we go slowly, as chris has said, that we can continue with the road map as it stands. that is our hope. i don't know if either of you want to add to that? i think that's right- _
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of you want to add to that? i think that's right. at — of you want to add to that? i think that's right. at the _ of you want to add to that? i think that's right. at the important i of you want to add to that? i think| that's right. at the important thing is that— that's right. at the important thing is that we — that's right. at the important thing is that we monitor this carefully, all the _ is that we monitor this carefully, all the parameters you talked about, hospitalisations, deaths and cases, and to— hospitalisations, deaths and cases, and to be _ hospitalisations, deaths and cases, and to be aware that of course because — and to be aware that of course because epidemics double, you have to make _ because epidemics double, you have to make the decision before you get to make the decision before you get to the _ to make the decision before you get to the stage that things look really bad. to the stage that things look really bad its— to the stage that things look really bad. it's important to monitor this in real— bad. it's important to monitor this in real time — bad. it's important to monitor this in realtime and bad. it's important to monitor this in real time and keep an eye on it and make— in real time and keep an eye on it and make sure that if things go in the wrong — and make sure that if things go in the wrong direction, decisions are made _ the wrong direction, decisions are made earty— the wrong direction, decisions are made early enough.— the wrong direction, decisions are made early enough. thank you very much sarah — made early enough. thank you very much sarah from _ made early enough. thank you very much sarah from brighton. - made early enough. thank you very much sarah from brighton. we i made early enough. thank you veryl much sarah from brighton. we know that two doses _ much sarah from brighton. we know that two doses are _ much sarah from brighton. we know that two doses are effective - much sarah from brighton. we know that two doses are effective at i that two doses are effective at reducing — that two doses are effective at reducing severe _ that two doses are effective at reducing severe cases - that two doses are effective at reducing severe cases of- that two doses are effective at i reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what — reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what is — reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what is the _ reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what is the evidence - reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what is the evidence that i reducing severe cases of covid—19 but what is the evidence that the i but what is the evidence that the vaccine _ but what is the evidence that the vaccine also _ but what is the evidence that the vaccine also prevents _ but what is the evidence that the vaccine also prevents you - but what is the evidence that the vaccine also prevents you from i vaccine also prevents you from unknowingly— vaccine also prevents you from unknowingly passing _ vaccine also prevents you from unknowingly passing on - vaccine also prevents you from unknowingly passing on the i vaccine also prevents you from i unknowingly passing on the virus vaccine also prevents you from - unknowingly passing on the virus and how does— unknowingly passing on the virus and how does the — unknowingly passing on the virus and how does the back _ unknowingly passing on the virus and how does the back seat _ unknowingly passing on the virus and how does the back seat remove i unknowingly passing on the virus and how does the back seat remove the i how does the back seat remove the need _ how does the back seat remove the need for— how does the back seat remove the need for self—isolation _ how does the back seat remove the need for self—isolation question i how does the back seat remove the need for self—isolation question ori need for self—isolation question or does _ need for self—isolation question or does having — need for self—isolation question or does having two— need for self—isolation question or does having two doses _ need for self—isolation question or does having two doses mean i need for self—isolation question or does having two doses mean you i need for self—isolation question or i does having two doses mean you are less likely— does having two doses mean you are less likely to — does having two doses mean you are less likely to infect _ does having two doses mean you are less likely to infect others? - does having two doses mean you are less likely to infect others? bier? i less likely to infect others? very aood less likely to infect others? very good question. _ less likely to infect others? very good question, i— less likely to infect others? very good question, i have _ less likely to infect others? very good question, i have a - less likely to infect others? good question, i have a figure less likely to infect others?“ good question, i have a figure in my head but a reduction in transmission about 67% but do you want to... chris might want to come in on this,
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but we _ chris might want to come in on this, but we don't — chris might want to come in on this, but we don't have absolute figures for delta _ but we don't have absolute figures for delta so it's important to recognise there is uncertainty around — recognise there is uncertainty around numbers on this. but if you took— around numbers on this. but if you took figures — around numbers on this. but if you took figures from alpha and a general— took figures from alpha and a general approach from the date we have, _ general approach from the date we have, roughly speaking the vaccinations are decreasing the chance — vaccinations are decreasing the chance of— vaccinations are decreasing the chance of somebody vaccinated from catching _ chance of somebody vaccinated from catching the virus by let's say 50% or so, _ catching the virus by let's say 50% or so, it _ catching the virus by let's say 50% or so, it may— catching the virus by let's say 50% or so, it may be a little higher after— or so, it may be a little higher after double vaccination. it looks like they— after double vaccination. it looks like they are decreasing the risk of transmission, if you have caught the virus, _ transmission, if you have caught the virus. to— transmission, if you have caught the virus, to somebody else, by about 50% _ virus, to somebody else, by about 50%. overall, that means, as a vaccinated _ 50%. overall, that means, as a vaccinated person, something like 70, 70 _ vaccinated person, something like 70, 70 5% — vaccinated person, something like 70, 70 5% less likely to be able to infect _ 70, 70 5% less likely to be able to infect somebody else —— 75%. because you are _ infect somebody else —— 75%. because you are less— infect somebody else —— 75%. because you are less likely to catch it and are less — you are less likely to catch it and are less likely to pass it on and those _ are less likely to pass it on and those figures will change as we get
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more _ those figures will change as we get more data — those figures will change as we get more data. chris might want to add. i completely agree with those numbers and to point out, that means roughly a quarter people can still pass it on and therefore it's not, someone being vaccinated substantially reduces the risk to people around the ba does not eliminate that risk which is why isolation is still important —— around them. isolation is still important -- around them.— isolation is still important -- around them. isolation is still important -- aroundthem. . . ., around them. and to be clear, the fiuures around them. and to be clear, the figures are — around them. and to be clear, the figures are about _ around them. and to be clear, the figures are about the _ around them. and to be clear, the figures are about the likelihood i around them. and to be clear, the figures are about the likelihood of| figures are about the likelihood of contracting the virus as chris said earlier, _ contracting the virus as chris said earlier, the — contracting the virus as chris said earlier, the protection of vaccines against _ earlier, the protection of vaccines against severe disease, hospitalisations and deaths, are very much— hospitalisations and deaths, are very much higher and after two doses, — very much higher and after two doses, they are right up in the 90 plus percent. doses, they are right up in the 90 plus percent-— doses, they are right up in the 90 plus percent._ hugh i doses, they are right up in the 90 i plus percent._ hugh pym, plus percent. thank you. hugh pym, bbc? thank — plus percent. thank you. hugh pym, bbc? thank you. _ plus percent. thank you. hugh pym, bbc? thank you, prime _ plus percent. thank you. hugh pym, bbc? thank you, prime minister. i bbc? thank you, prime minister. given— bbc? thank you, prime minister. given the — bbc? thank you, prime minister. given the pressure _ bbc? thank you, prime minister. given the pressure on _ bbc? thank you, prime minister. given the pressure on hospitals, i given the pressure on hospitals, will you — given the pressure on hospitals, will you end _ given the pressure on hospitals, will you end the _ given the pressure on hospitals, will you end the requirement- given the pressure on hospitals, will you end the requirement of| given the pressure on hospitals, i will you end the requirement of nhs staff who _ will you end the requirement of nhs staff who have — will you end the requirement of nhs staff who have come _ will you end the requirement of nhs staff who have come into _ will you end the requirement of nhs staff who have come into contact i staff who have come into contact with a _ staff who have come into contact with a positive _ staff who have come into contact with a positive case _ staff who have come into contact with a positive case to _ staff who have come into contact with a positive case to itself- with a positive case to itself isolate _ with a positive case to itself isolate even _ with a positive case to itself isolate even if— with a positive case to itself isolate even if they- with a positive case to itself isolate even if they have i with a positive case to itself. isolate even if they have been double — isolate even if they have been double jabbed _ isolate even if they have been double jabbed and _ isolate even if they have been double jabbed and if- isolate even if they have been double jabbed and if so - isolate even if they have beenl double jabbed and if so when? isolate even if they have been i double jabbed and if so when? will you bring _
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double jabbed and if so when? will you bring forward _ double jabbed and if so when? will you bring forward the _ double jabbed and if so when? will you bring forward the change - double jabbed and if so when? will you bring forward the change for. double jabbed and if so when? will. you bring forward the change for the general— you bring forward the change for the general public — you bring forward the change for the general public if _ you bring forward the change for the general public if they— you bring forward the change for the general public if they have _ you bring forward the change for the general public if they have been i general public if they have been double — general public if they have been double jabbed, _ general public if they have been double jabbed, not _ general public if they have been double jabbed, not to _ general public if they have been i double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring _ double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring it — double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring it forward _ double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring it forward from _ double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring it forward from the - double jabbed, not to self—isolate, to bring it forward from the middle of august? — to bring it forward from the middle of august? and _ to bring it forward from the middle of august? and for— to bring it forward from the middle of august? and for sir— to bring it forward from the middle of august? and for sir patrick- of august? and for sir patrick vallance _ of august? and for sir patrick vallance and _ of august? and for sir patrick vallance and chris _ of august? and for sir patrick vallance and chris whitty, i of august? and for sir patrick| vallance and chris whitty, can of august? and for sir patrick- vallance and chris whitty, can you spell— vallance and chris whitty, can you spell out _ vallance and chris whitty, can you spell out some _ vallance and chris whitty, can you spell out some of _ vallance and chris whitty, can you spell out some of the _ vallance and chris whitty, can you spell out some of the risks - vallance and chris whitty, can you i spell out some of the risks involved with opening — spell out some of the risks involved with opening up _ spell out some of the risks involved with opening up on _ spell out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly— spell out some of the risks involved with opening up on july the - spell out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly the 19th i spell out some of the risks involved with opening up onjuly the 19th in. with opening up onjuly the 19th in england. _ with opening up onjuly the 19th in england. for— with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example _ with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example to— with opening up onjuly the 19th in england, for example to the - with opening up onjuly the 19th inj england, for example to the nhs? very good — england, for example to the nhs? very good question _ england, for example to the nhs? very good question about - england, for example to the nhs? very good question about the i very good question about the restrictions on the nhs caused by the current measures. we will be looking at ways of trying to get the nhs back to operating in a pre—covid way, without the need for social distancing and isolation, contact isolation. but you will have to wait a little bit for the health secretary to send out exactly how we want to do that. plainly, as we reduce the times people had to wait for their care, we will want to get back to the nhs operating as much as
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possible as it was before. but that will be happening in the next few weeks we hope. patrick.- will be happening in the next few weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are _ weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are in _ weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are in a _ weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are in a third _ weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are in a third wave - weeks we hope. patrick. there is no doubt we are in a third wave of- doubt we are in a third wave of infection. _ doubt we are in a third wave of infection, infections are rising rapidly — infection, infections are rising rapidly. and i expect them to continue _ rapidly. and i expect them to continue to rise and the more mixing we have, _ continue to rise and the more mixing we have, the — continue to rise and the more mixing we have, the more infection is going to spread _ we have, the more infection is going to spread so— we have, the more infection is going to spread so no doubt step four will bring _ to spread so no doubt step four will bring increases in the spread of infection — bring increases in the spread of infection. and although the relationship between infections and hospitalisations is different, it still exists. the risk of hospitalisation is something like four fold — hospitalisation is something like four fold lower than it was, and the risk of— four fold lower than it was, and the risk of death is nine or ten times lower— risk of death is nine or ten times lower than— risk of death is nine or ten times lower than it was but it still exists _ lower than it was but it still exists. so the models which have been _ exists. so the models which have been released today clearly show an expectation that infections will continue — expectation that infections will continue to rise, if behaviour returns — continue to rise, if behaviour returns immediately to pre—pandemic levels. _ returns immediately to pre—pandemic levels. that— returns immediately to pre—pandemic levels, that would be a very big rice pud — levels, that would be a very big rice pud if— levels, that would be a very big rice pud if we go slowly and cautiously, it would be less of a
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rise -- — cautiously, it would be less of a rise -- a — cautiously, it would be less of a rise —— a very big rise. but we can't — rise —— a very big rise. but we can't escape _ rise —— a very big rise. but we can't escape the fact that any increase _ can't escape the fact that any increase would lead to an increase increase would lead to an increase in hospitalisations and sadly deaths as well— in hospitalisations and sadly deaths as well and that is the expectation that we _ as well and that is the expectation that we should have over the next period _ that we should have over the next period as — that we should have over the next period as we open up, and were already— period as we open up, and were already seeing the effect of increased mixing with the wave as it stands _ increased mixing with the wave as it stands already. just increased mixing with the wave as it stands already.— stands already. just to add two thin . s, stands already. just to add two things. the _ stands already. just to add two things, the point _ stands already. just to add two things, the point that - stands already. just to add two things, the point that it - stands already. just to add two things, the point that it would | stands already. just to add two l things, the point that it would be true irrespective of what the date was that this happens, that this exit wave will happen whenever a release happens pud what will mitigate it is going slowly. 0n the nhs staff site, this has been discussed by senior clinicians including the four uk chief medical officers and you're trying to balance two different things put up doctors and nurses and other medical and social care staff are dealing with more vulnerable people so the risk them having the disease and passing it on a greater but if there are can be a quick few staff in a hospital or wart or nursing home,
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that's potentially a danger also to patients that or in a ward pud you're trying to balance risks against one another and achieve that in the best way possible and that is very much something that as you know is a key part of medicine, a matter of balancing risks. isz�* is a key part of medicine, a matter of balancing risks.— is a key part of medicine, a matter. of balancing risks._ thank of balancing risks. itv news? thank ou, of balancing risks. itv news? thank you. prime — of balancing risks. itv news? thank you, prime minister, _ of balancing risks. itv news? thank you, prime minister, and _ of balancing risks. itv news? thank you, prime minister, and used i of balancing risks. itv news? thank you, prime minister, and used to i of balancing risks. itv news? thank| you, prime minister, and used to say that these _ you, prime minister, and used to say that these steps— you, prime minister, and used to say that these steps on _ you, prime minister, and used to say that these steps on the _ you, prime minister, and used to say that these steps on the road - you, prime minister, and used to say that these steps on the road map i that these steps on the road map would _ that these steps on the road map would be — that these steps on the road map would be irreversible. _ that these steps on the road map would be irreversible. do- that these steps on the road map would be irreversible. do you i that these steps on the road map| would be irreversible. do you still believe _ would be irreversible. do you still believe that? _ would be irreversible. do you still believe that? and _ would be irreversible. do you still believe that? and can— would be irreversible. do you still believe that? and can i— would be irreversible. do you still believe that? and can i ask- believe that? and can i ask professor— believe that? and can i ask professor whitty— believe that? and can i ask professor whitty about- believe that? and can i ask professor whitty about his i believe that? and can i ask- professor whitty about his tests, particularly — professor whitty about his tests, particularly number— professor whitty about his tests, particularly number three - professor whitty about his tests, particularly number three you i professor whitty about his tests, i particularly number three you talked us through — particularly number three you talked us through do— particularly number three you talked us through do you _ particularly number three you talked us through. do you have _ particularly number three you talked us through. do you have an - particularly number three you talked us through. do you have an idea i particularly number three you talked us through. do you have an idea of. us through. do you have an idea of what _ us through. do you have an idea of what level— us through. do you have an idea of what level of— us through. do you have an idea of what level of daily _ us through. do you have an idea of what level of daily admissions i us through. do you have an idea of. what level of daily admissions would be unsustainable _ what level of daily admissions would be unsustainable for— what level of daily admissions would be unsustainable for the _ what level of daily admissions would be unsustainable for the nhs? - be unsustainable for the nhs? because — be unsustainable for the nhs? because it _ be unsustainable for the nhs? because it was _ be unsustainable for the nhs? because it was said _ be unsustainable for the nhs? because it was said today i be unsustainable for the nhs? because it was said today that| be unsustainable for the nhs? i because it was said today that when you got— because it was said today that when you got halfway— because it was said today that when you got halfway to _ because it was said today that when you got halfway to that _ because it was said today that when you got halfway to that point - because it was said today that when you got halfway to that point wouldl you got halfway to that point would have to _ you got halfway to that point would have to take — you got halfway to that point would have to take action _ you got halfway to that point would have to take action and _ you got halfway to that point would have to take action and implement| have to take action and implement contingency— have to take action and implement contingency plans _ have to take action and implement contingency plans so _ have to take action and implement contingency plans so what - have to take action and implement contingency plans so what level i have to take action and implement contingency plans so what level of| contingency plans so what level of hospital— contingency plans so what level of hospital admissions— contingency plans so what level of hospital admissions would - contingency plans so what level of hospital admissions would be i hospital admissions would be unsustainable _ hospital admissions would be unsustainable and _ hospital admissions would be unsustainable and how - hospital admissions would be unsustainable and how closel hospital admissions would be . unsustainable and how close do hospital admissions would be - unsustainable and how close do you think we _ unsustainable and how close do you thinkwe might— unsustainable and how close do you think we might get _ unsustainable and how close do you
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think we might get to _ unsustainable and how close do you think we might get to that - unsustainable and how close do you think we might get to that level? i think we might get to that level? yes, _ think we might get to that level? yes. of— think we might get to that level? yes. of course _ think we might get to that level? yes, of course i— think we might get to that level? yes, of course i hope _ think we might get to that level? yes, of course i hope the - think we might get to that level? yes, of course i hope the road i think we might get to that level? . yes, of course i hope the road map is irreversible we have always said we hope it would be irreversible but in order to have an irreversible road map we also said it has to be a cautious approach and that is why we waited the extra weeks to get 7 million more jabs into peoples arms, white we took the step injune —— why we took it. and it is why we are saying now that people, we will proceed on monday 19th but we want people to remember that this thing, this pandemic is not over. we must proceed in a cautious way. and if we are cautious, and we get vaccinated, if everybody takes the opportunity that they have to get vaccinated, yes, we can make progress steadily and that is what we want to achieve.
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on the question you ask, there isn't a simple number where below it thinks are fine and above it there is a problem, things go up in stages. you start with the pressure on the general system, then you get to a point where there may be a need to a point where there may be a need to reduce elective care and there is a long waiting list so we want to try and avoid that, and then you get into things where you are reducing urgent care and start putting pressure on the wider emergency services. there is not cut—off point. what we would hope is that the peak that we will see if people go carefully, if we all go carefully over the next period, will be significantly lower than the peak we saw injanuary, for example, which put huge pressure on the nhs. but to think we will not have any pressure on the nhs is not fully realistic point of the other think different this time round is previously we had done an intervention which has led to the whole country having a peak at roughly the same time and that may not be the case here. we may have a situation where certain parts of the nhs are under pressure and
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that goes down but other bits goes up that goes down but other bits goes up so that might be pressure at different times around the country. ben kentish, lbc. you different times around the country. ben kentish, lbc._ different times around the country. ben kentish, lbc. you talked about --eole ben kentish, lbc. you talked about peeple needing _ ben kentish, lbc. you talked about peeple needing to _ ben kentish, lbc. you talked about people needing to wear— ben kentish, lbc. you talked about people needing to wear masks, - people needing to wear masks, expecting — people needing to wear masks, exriecting people _ people needing to wear masks, expecting people to _ people needing to wear masks, expecting people to wear - people needing to wear masks, i expecting people to wear masks people needing to wear masks, - expecting people to wear masks but our country— expecting people to wear masks but our country does _ expecting people to wear masks but our country does not _ expecting people to wear masks but our country does not run _ expecting people to wear masks but our country does not run on - our country does not run on expectations, _ our country does not run on expectations, it _ our country does not run on expectations, it runs- our country does not run on expectations, it runs on- our country does not run on . expectations, it runs on rules. our country does not run on - expectations, it runs on rules. when we have _ expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules — expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules in _ expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules in all— expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules in all areas _ expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules in all areas of- expectations, it runs on rules. when we have rules in all areas of public. we have rules in all areas of public life designed — we have rules in all areas of public life designed to _ we have rules in all areas of public life designed to protect— we have rules in all areas of public life designed to protect and - we have rules in all areas of publici life designed to protect and protect others, _ life designed to protect and protect others, speeding _ life designed to protect and protect others, speeding and _ life designed to protect and protect| others, speeding and drink—driving, facing _ others, speeding and drink—driving, facing fines — others, speeding and drink—driving, facing fines of— others, speeding and drink—driving, facing fines of thousands _ others, speeding and drink—driving, facing fines of thousands of - others, speeding and drink—driving, facing fines of thousands of pounds| facing fines of thousands of pounds even for— facing fines of thousands of pounds even for drapping _ facing fines of thousands of pounds even for dropping litter— facing fines of thousands of pounds even for dropping litter in - facing fines of thousands of pounds even for dropping litter in the - even for dropping litter in the street. — even for dropping litter in the street. why— even for dropping litter in the street. why in _ even for dropping litter in the street, why in the _ even for dropping litter in the street, why in the middle - even for dropping litter in the street, why in the middle of. even for dropping litter in the| street, why in the middle of a global— street, why in the middle of a global pandemic— street, why in the middle of a global pandemic do _ street, why in the middle of a global pandemic do you - street, why in the middle of a global pandemic do you think| street, why in the middle of a - global pandemic do you think that wearing _ global pandemic do you think that wearing a — global pandemic do you think that wearing a mask, _ global pandemic do you think that wearing a mask, covering - global pandemic do you think that wearing a mask, covering your- global pandemic do you think that. wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, — wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, should _ wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, should be _ wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, should be one - wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, should be one of- wearing a mask, covering your face and mouth, should be one of the l wearing a mask, covering your face l and mouth, should be one of the few areas _ and mouth, should be one of the few areas of— and mouth, should be one of the few areas of public — and mouth, should be one of the few areas of public life _ and mouth, should be one of the few areas of public life where _ and mouth, should be one of the few areas of public life where people - areas of public life where people areas of public life where people are expected _ areas of public life where people are expected to _ areas of public life where people are expected to behave - areas of public life where people are expected to behave in - areas of public life where people are expected to behave in a - areas of public life where people i are expected to behave in a certain way rather— are expected to behave in a certain way rather than _ are expected to behave in a certain way rather than told _ are expected to behave in a certain way rather than told to _ are expected to behave in a certain way rather than told to do - are expected to behave in a certain way rather than told to do so? - are expected to behave in a certain way rather than told to do so? andi way rather than told to do so? and if i way rather than told to do so? and if i could _ way rather than told to do so? and if i could ask— way rather than told to do so? and if i could ask sir— way rather than told to do so? and if i could ask sir patrick, _ way rather than told to do so? and if i could ask sir patrick, what - if i could ask sir patrick, what does — if i could ask sir patrick, what does the _ if i could ask sir patrick, what does the science _ if i could ask sir patrick, what does the science say- if i could ask sir patrick, what does the science say about i if i could ask sir patrick, whati does the science say about the if i could ask sir patrick, what - does the science say about the rate of herd _ does the science say about the rate of herd immunity— does the science say about the rate of herd immunity and _ does the science say about the rate of herd immunity and when - does the science say about the rate of herd immunity and when the - does the science say about the rate of herd immunity and when the uk| does the science say about the rate i of herd immunity and when the uk is likely— of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to _ of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to reach — of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to reach some _ of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to reach some degree - of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to reach some degree of- of herd immunity and when the uk is likely to reach some degree of that l likely to reach some degree of that and therefore — likely to reach some degree of that and therefore when _ likely to reach some degree of that and therefore when we _ likely to reach some degree of that and therefore when we should - likely to reach some degree of that and therefore when we should see | and therefore when we should see cases— and therefore when we should see cases starting _ and therefore when we should see cases starting to _ and therefore when we should see cases starting to come _ and therefore when we should see cases starting to come down -
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and therefore when we should see cases starting to come down after| cases starting to come down after the peak? — cases starting to come down after the peak? and _ cases starting to come down after the peak? and to _ cases starting to come down after the peak? and to professor- cases starting to come down after i the peak? and to professor whitty, keep in— the peak? and to professor whitty, keep in with — the peak? and to professor whitty, keep in with her— the peak? and to professor whitty, keep in with her to— the peak? and to professor whitty, keep in with her to professor- keep in with her to professor whitty, — keep in with her to professor whitty, given— keep in with her to professor whitty, given with _ keep in with her to professor whitty, given with third - keep in with her to professor. whitty, given with third figures about— whitty, given with third figures about the — whitty, given with third figures about the nhs _ whitty, given with third figures about the nhs backlog - whitty, given with third figures| about the nhs backlog possibly hitting — about the nhs backlog possibly hitting 13 — about the nhs backlog possibly hitting 13 million _ about the nhs backlog possibly hitting 13 million how— about the nhs backlog possibly| hitting 13 million how concerned about the nhs backlog possibly- hitting 13 million how concerned are you about _ hitting 13 million how concerned are you about the — hitting 13 million how concerned are you about the probability— hitting 13 million how concerned are you about the probability of- hitting 13 million how concerned are you about the probability of cases . you about the probability of cases rising _ you about the probability of cases rising as — you about the probability of cases rising as high _ you about the probability of cases rising as high as— you about the probability of cases rising as high as you _ you about the probability of cases rising as high as you have - you about the probability of cases| rising as high as you have outlined it's tikety— rising as high as you have outlined it's likely to — rising as high as you have outlined it's likely to be? _ rising as high as you have outlined it's likely to be?— it's likely to be? thank you, ben. on the issue _ it's likely to be? thank you, ben. on the issue of— it's likely to be? thank you, ben. on the issue of masks, _ it's likely to be? thank you, ben. on the issue of masks, we - it's likely to be? thank you, ben. on the issue of masks, we are i it's likely to be? thank you, ben. i on the issue of masks, we are really following the same principle that we were following up with all the legislation we have had in place. we are trying to move towards a personal responsibility, people thinking about others as well as about themselves. and that applies to the social distancing, it applies to the social distancing, it applies to how we think about the vulnerable, we make sure to continue to exercise extreme caution as we continue with the fight against a very dangerous disease and clearly, with masks, there is a world of difference as i said last week
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between sitting alone on an empty station platform or in a crowded tube train. and on a crowded train, as a government, we would expect and recommend that people wear masks and i've no doubt that is what people will do. in i've no doubt that is what people will do. , ., , will do. in terms of immunity, we now have — will do. in terms of immunity, we now have high — will do. in terms of immunity, we now have high levels _ will do. in terms of immunity, we now have high levels of _ will do. in terms of immunity, we| now have high levels of antibodies across— now have high levels of antibodies across the — now have high levels of antibodies across the country. and byjuly19, and two _ across the country. and byjuly19, and two thirds of adults should be double _ and two thirds of adults should be double vaccinated and every adult offered _ double vaccinated and every adult offered a — double vaccinated and every adult offered a single vaccine so we are getting _ offered a single vaccine so we are getting to — offered a single vaccine so we are getting to really quite decent tevets — getting to really quite decent levels of antibodies and it's worth thinking _ levels of antibodies and it's worth thinking of it is not in terms of absolute — thinking of it is not in terms of absolute cut—off but actually there is a continuum. and the more immunity— is a continuum. and the more immunity there is across the population, the harder it is for the virus _ population, the harder it is for the virus to— population, the harder it is for the virus to spread and certainly the more _ virus to spread and certainly the more difficult it is for thereby virus — more difficult it is for thereby virus to— more difficult it is for thereby virus to cause severe disease and hospitalisation. so every bit a build-up— hospitalisation. so every bit a build—up of that becomes beneficial. and with _
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build—up of that becomes beneficial. and with that you reach a stage when you get— and with that you reach a stage when you get to _ and with that you reach a stage when you get to true herd immunity i think— you get to true herd immunity i think it's — you get to true herd immunity i think it's a _ you get to true herd immunity i think it's a different issue and it depends— think it's a different issue and it depends on things like the virus reproductive rate, whether it is distributed across all the population, the immunity, whether there _ population, the immunity, whether there are _ population, the immunity, whether there are pockets with lower vaccination rates and so on. it is realty— vaccination rates and so on. it is really important we get to everybody and we _ really important we get to everybody and we get to particularly the young people _ and we get to particularly the young people who are now coming forward brittiantty— people who are now coming forward brilliantly for their vaccination to make _ brilliantly for their vaccination to make sure — brilliantly for their vaccination to make sure they come forward really to get _ make sure they come forward really to get the _ make sure they come forward really to get the vaccine that is offered, come _ to get the vaccine that is offered, come back— to get the vaccine that is offered, come back for the second dose, and we are _ come back for the second dose, and we are on— come back for the second dose, and we are on track to have significant levels _ we are on track to have significant levels of— we are on track to have significant levels of immunity that will merely impede _ levels of immunity that will merely impede the ability for this post to transmit— impede the ability for this post to transmit and cause damage. that will brin- transmit and cause damage. that will bring the _ transmit and cause damage. that will bring the possibility of future big waves _ bring the possibility of future big waves could go at that point. you might— waves could go at that point. you might get— waves could go at that point. you might get it if there was a vaccine escape _ might get it if there was a vaccine escape but — might get it if there was a vaccine escape but we would be a much better position— escape but we would be a much better position so— escape but we would be a much better position so this reaching high levels — position so this reaching high levels of— position so this reaching high levels of immunity is critically important.
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the nhs has been doing a remarkable job in trying to reduce waiting lists that have been built up over the time covid has put pressure on the time covid has put pressure on the nhs since march of last year. but there is both inevitably some quite significant degree of overhang from that period, and at the moment there is some pressure from covid and that is likely to go up in the next period. inevitably everyone who works in the nhs and anybody who might use it or has friends and relatives who wants to use it, will want to keep the numbers of cases right down, which is one of the many reasons we urge people to keep this steady, to keep pressure on the nhs down, keep the number is lower, and keep the possibility of clearing this number of cases much easier. chris smith from the times newspaper. chris smith from the times newspaper-_ chris smith from the times newsuaer. ~ f . newspaper. chief medical officer, ou said newspaper. chief medical officer, you said going — newspaper. chief medical officer, you said going slowly _ newspaper. chief medical officer, you said going slowly was - newspaper. chief medical officer, i you said going slowly was essential, so can—
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you said going slowly was essential, so can you _ you said going slowly was essential, so can you all — you said going slowly was essential, so can you all be _ you said going slowly was essential, so can you all be clear— you said going slowly was essential, so can you all be clear about - so can you all be clear about exactly — so can you all be clear about exactty what _ so can you all be clear about exactly what you _ so can you all be clear about exactly what you want - so can you all be clear about exactly what you want us - so can you all be clear about exactly what you want us all| so can you all be clear about . exactly what you want us all to so can you all be clear about - exactly what you want us all to do and not _ exactly what you want us all to do and not do — exactly what you want us all to do and not do next _ exactly what you want us all to do and not do next week. _ exactly what you want us all to do and not do next week. should - exactly what you want us all to do and not do next week. should we| and not do next week. should we change _ and not do next week. should we change current _ and not do next week. should we change current habits— and not do next week. should we change current habits or- and not do next week. should we change current habits or stick- and not do next week. should we change current habits or stick toi change current habits or stick to current— change current habits or stick to current levels _ change current habits or stick to current levels of— change current habits or stick to current levels of social - change current habits or stick to current levels of social contact? i current levels of social contact? should — current levels of social contact? should peopte _ current levels of social contact? should people not _ current levels of social contact? should people not go _ current levels of social contact? should people not go to - current levels of social contact? should people not go to some l current levels of social contact? - should people not go to some night clubs and _ should people not go to some night clubs and other— should people not go to some night clubs and other venues _ should people not go to some night clubs and other venues opening - should people not go to some nighti clubs and other venues opening next week and _ clubs and other venues opening next week and should _ clubs and other venues opening next week and should people _ clubs and other venues opening next week and should people avoid - clubs and other venues opening nexti week and should people avoid parties to celebrate _ week and should people avoid parties to celebrate the _ week and should people avoid parties to celebrate the end _ week and should people avoid parties to celebrate the end of _ week and should people avoid parties to celebrate the end of restrictions i to celebrate the end of restrictions question— to celebrate the end of restrictions question mark— to celebrate the end of restrictions question mark and _ to celebrate the end of restrictions question mark and prime - to celebrate the end of restrictionsi question mark and prime minister, picking _ question mark and prime minister, picking up— question mark and prime minister, picking up on— question mark and prime minister, picking up on your— question mark and prime minister, picking up on your answer- question mark and prime minister, picking up on your answer to - picking up on your answer to michael, _ picking up on your answer to michael, are _ picking up on your answer to michael, are you _ picking up on your answer to michael, are you making - picking up on your answer to michael, are you making a l picking up on your answer to - michael, are you making a direct link between _ michael, are you making a direct link between peoples _ michael, are you making a direct link between peoples behaviouri michael, are you making a direct. link between peoples behaviour and the risk— link between peoples behaviour and the risk of— link between peoples behaviour and the risk of restrictions _ link between peoples behaviour and the risk of restrictions returning, i the risk of restrictions returning, and what — the risk of restrictions returning, and what would _ the risk of restrictions returning, and what would the _ the risk of restrictions returning, and what would the first - the risk of restrictions returning, and what would the first thing i the risk of restrictions returning, i and what would the first thing you would _ and what would the first thing you would be — and what would the first thing you would be reaching _ and what would the first thing you would be reaching for— and what would the first thing you would be reaching for be - and what would the first thing you would be reaching for be in- and what would the first thing you would be reaching for be in that l would be reaching for be in that case? _ would be reaching for be in that case? i— would be reaching for be in that case? . ., ., ., ., case? i will have a go at that. i think what _ case? i will have a go at that. i think what we _ case? i will have a go at that. i think what we want _ case? i will have a go at that. i think what we want to - case? i will have a go at that. i think what we want to do - case? i will have a go at that. i think what we want to do is - case? i will have a go at that. i | think what we want to do is get people to think carefully about the ending of the restrictions that we are announcing today and to make sure, in the immortal words of jonathan van—tam, that they don't tear the pants out of it, is what he said ages ago. i said last week,
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don't be demob happy about this. this is not the end of covid. it requires constant vigilance. it means thinking about others as well as yourself. it means thinking about wearing a face covering in confined spaces where you meet other people you don't normally meet, as i have said earlier and we said last week. it means continuing to think about the risk of transmission to the shielded, the extremely vulnerable, how you behave with them in their presence. and obviously exercising common sense. because the legal restrictions have come off it should not be taken as an indication by everybody to have a greatjubilee and a freedom from any kind of caution or restraint. that's what we are saying. what the scientists are saying is that this is the right
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date, or as good as only other date to do this, but it has got to be taken seriously and we have got to go as slowly as we can given the constraints we are under. for me that makes a great deal of sense. if we held off until september, if we waited to go for the illegal unlocking is that we are, then we would be doing it in the context of a great deal more risk from the weather, plus we wouldn't have the advantage of the school holidays and so on. this is about as good a time as any, but to do it properly and sensibly, everyone has got to be cautious. i sensibly, everyone has got to be cautious. ., �* ~' sensibly, everyone has got to be cautious. ., �* ,, , cautious. i don't think the things which are going _ cautious. i don't think the things which are going to _ cautious. i don't think the things which are going to make - cautious. i don't think the things which are going to make a - cautious. i don't think the things - which are going to make a difference will come as any surprise to anyone in the uk over the next period. the things we have all been doing for a
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long time, and people have been incredibly good and patient in doing it, hands, face, space, wash your hands, cover yourface in crowded areas and avoid crowded areas where you can, avoid unnecessary meetings and be sensible. and the thing that is new, get yourself vaccinated, it protects you, your family and everyone around you. these are things people have done very steadily and as the prime minister has said, the fact we can move from working at home doesn't mean that we should rush at it. everything should be done steadily. it's a message about going steady. that's what people have been done incredibly well all the way through this. across the country, all four nations, that's all we are really saying, carry on being steady. and can i add to that, the absolute necessity to continue self isolating if you test positive. it’s necessity to continue self isolating if you test positive.— if you test positive. it's very important — if you test positive. it's very important to _ if you test positive. it's very important to stop _ if you test positive. it's very important to stop the - if you test positive. it's very | important to stop the spread if you test positive. it's very - important to stop the spread and if you are _ important to stop the spread and if you are symptomatic, get a test. and
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in reopening, make sure ventilation -ets in reopening, make sure ventilation gets priority. summer is a good time to do— gets priority. summer is a good time to do that, _ gets priority. summer is a good time to do that, you can make sure windows— to do that, you can make sure windows are opening and there is sufficient — windows are opening and there is sufficient ventilation in buildings. dan btum — sufficient ventilation in buildings. dan blum from the mirror newspaper. while there is a lot of uncertainty, of course, — while there is a lot of uncertainty, of course, we _ while there is a lot of uncertainty, of course, we understand - while there is a lot of uncertainty, of course, we understand the - of course, we understand the modelling _ of course, we understand the modelling from _ of course, we understand the modelling from the _ of course, we understand the . modelling from the government of course, we understand the - modelling from the government is predicting — modelling from the government is predicting approximately- modelling from the government is predicting approximately 100 - modelling from the government is predicting approximately 100 or. modelling from the government is. predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths _ predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per— predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day— predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day at _ predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day at the _ predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day at the peak - predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day at the peak of - predicting approximately 100 or 200 deaths per day at the peak of the . deaths per day at the peak of the third wave — deaths per day at the peak of the third wave is _ deaths per day at the peak of the third wave. is this _ deaths per day at the peak of the third wave. is this a _ deaths per day at the peak of the third wave. is this a price - deaths per day at the peak of the third wave. is this a price you - deaths per day at the peak of the third wave. is this a price you are willing _ third wave. is this a price you are willing to — third wave. is this a price you are willing to pay— third wave. is this a price you are willing to pay for— third wave. is this a price you are willing to pay for freedom, - third wave. is this a price you are willing to pay for freedom, or- third wave. is this a price you are willing to pay for freedom, or is i willing to pay for freedom, or is that sort— willing to pay for freedom, or is that sort of— willing to pay for freedom, or is that sort of range _ willing to pay for freedom, or is that sort of range inevitable - willing to pay for freedom, or isi that sort of range inevitable now whenever— that sort of range inevitable now whenever we _ that sort of range inevitable now whenever we unlock? _ that sort of range inevitable now whenever we unlock? and - that sort of range inevitable now whenever we unlock? and to - that sort of range inevitable nowi whenever we unlock? and to the scientist, — whenever we unlock? and to the scientist, under— whenever we unlock? and to the scientist, under what _ whenever we unlock? and to the i scientist, under what circumstances do you _ scientist, under what circumstances do you believe — scientist, under what circumstances do you believe restrictions - scientist, under what circumstances do you believe restrictions would i do you believe restrictions would need _ do you believe restrictions would need to— do you believe restrictions would need to come _ do you believe restrictions would need to come back _ do you believe restrictions would need to come back this - do you believe restrictions would need to come back this autumn i do you believe restrictions would i need to come back this autumn or winter— need to come back this autumn or winter and — need to come back this autumn or winter and how— need to come back this autumn or winter and how likely— need to come back this autumn or winter and how likely do - need to come back this autumn or winter and how likely do you - need to come back this autumn or winter and how likely do you think it is to _ winter and how likely do you think it is to happen? _ winter and how likely do you think it is to happen? and _ winter and how likely do you think it is to happen? and a _ winter and how likely do you think it is to happen? and a quick- winter and how likely do you think it is to happen? and a quick third| it is to happen? and a quick third want _ it is to happen? and a quick third want to— it is to happen? and a quick third want to the — it is to happen? and a quick third want to the prime _ it is to happen? and a quick third want to the prime minister, - it is to happen? and a quick third want to the prime minister, you i want to the prime minister, you condemned _ want to the prime minister, you condemned the _ want to the prime minister, you condemned the vile _ want to the prime minister, you condemned the vile racism - want to the prime minister, you i condemned the vile racism aimed want to the prime minister, you - condemned the vile racism aimed at england _ condemned the vile racism aimed at england players— condemned the vile racism aimed at england players overnight, - condemned the vile racism aimed at england players overnight, so - condemned the vile racism aimed at england players overnight, so doesi england players overnight, so does that mean— england players overnight, so does that mean they _ england players overnight, so does that mean they can _ england players overnight, so does that mean they can now _ england players overnight, so does that mean they can now take - england players overnight, so does that mean they can now take the l england players overnight, so does i that mean they can now take the knee as they— that mean they can now take the knee as they have _ that mean they can now take the knee as they have been— that mean they can now take the knee
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as they have been doing? _ that mean they can now take the knee as they have been doing? on - that mean they can now take the knee as they have been doing?— as they have been doing? on the timin: of as they have been doing? on the timing of the _ as they have been doing? on the timing of the third _ as they have been doing? on the timing of the third wave - as they have been doing? on the timing of the third wave and - as they have been doing? on the i timing of the third wave and where we are, i think chris put it very well, there isn't an optimal time, but i think the reality is that both deaths and hospitalisations are sadly going to rise whenever you go for an unlocking of the kind we are. we simply must, as chris puts it, there will be an exit wave, and we simply have to recognise that. on black lives matter, and the importance of that, i simply repeat what i have said many, many times, i think people should feel free to show their respect and show how much they condemn racism in this country, in any way that they choose. i
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thought it was... i was there last night and i noted that the whole crowd was respectful when our players took the knee, and i did not hear a single boo myself. taste players took the knee, and i did not hear a single boo myself.— hear a single boo myself. we have said from quite _ hear a single boo myself. we have said from quite a _ hear a single boo myself. we have said from quite a time _ hear a single boo myself. we have said from quite a time ago - hear a single boo myself. we have said from quite a time ago that. said from quite a time ago that there is likely to be an increase in both covid and other respiratory infections overwinter, and that is not a controversial statement, it happens every winter, but we now have covid on top. for a variety of reasons we might have a more difficult winter with respect to flu and other respiratory conditions. that will probably lead to people taking sensible precautions as they are at the moment and as they have done for a while. that's very different to issues around restrictions which are issues for ministers. but there is not an inevitability in any way that
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because we have a surge that may lead to people needing to be more careful that it leads to anything ministers have to do. that's the reality we will face in the coming winter and may well face in future winters. . ~ winter and may well face in future winters. ., ,, , ., , winter and may well face in future winters. ., ,, , . , , winters. thank you. esther webber from politico- _ winters. thank you. esther webber from politico. given _ winters. thank you. esther webber from politico. given everything - winters. thank you. esther webber from politico. given everything you have said today _ from politico. given everything you have said today about _ from politico. given everything you have said today about moving - from politico. given everything you l have said today about moving slowly and steadily, — have said today about moving slowly and steadily, how— have said today about moving slowly and steadily, how does _ have said today about moving slowly and steadily, how does that - have said today about moving slowly and steadily, how does that square i and steadily, how does that square with previous — and steadily, how does that square with previous references— and steadily, how does that square with previous references to - with previous references to reopening _ with previous references to reopening as _ with previous references to reopening as freedom - with previous references to reopening as freedom day, i with previous references to . reopening as freedom day, or with previous references to - reopening as freedom day, or the with previous references to _ reopening as freedom day, or the big bang, _ reopening as freedom day, or the big bang, and _ reopening as freedom day, or the big bang, and this— reopening as freedom day, or the big bang, and this being _ reopening as freedom day, or the big bang, and this being irreversible? - bang, and this being irreversible? do you _ bang, and this being irreversible? do you think— bang, and this being irreversible? do you think there _ bang, and this being irreversible? do you think there is _ bang, and this being irreversible? do you think there is a _ bang, and this being irreversible? do you think there is a danger- bang, and this being irreversible? do you think there is a danger of. do you think there is a danger of mixed _ do you think there is a danger of mixed messages, _ do you think there is a danger of mixed messages, and _ do you think there is a danger of mixed messages, and would - do you think there is a danger ofi mixed messages, and would you do you think there is a danger of- mixed messages, and would you like to take _ mixed messages, and would you like to take this— mixed messages, and would you like to take this opportunity— mixed messages, and would you like to take this opportunity to _ mixed messages, and would you like to take this opportunity to clarify- to take this opportunity to clarify to take this opportunity to clarify to people — to take this opportunity to clarify to peopte that— to take this opportunity to clarify to people that they _ to take this opportunity to clarify to people that they need - to take this opportunity to clarify to people that they need to - to take this opportunity to clarifyi to people that they need to hang onto their— to people that they need to hang onto their masks? _ to people that they need to hang onto their masks? and _ to people that they need to hang i onto their masks? and secondly, pa rticuta rty — onto their masks? and secondly, particularly for—
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onto their masks? and secondly, particularly for the _ onto their masks? and secondly, particularly for the prime - onto their masks? and secondly, i particularly for the prime minister, he said _ particularly for the prime minister, he said at— particularly for the prime minister, he said at the _ particularly for the prime minister, he said at the beginning _ particularly for the prime minister, he said at the beginning that- particularly for the prime minister, he said at the beginning that we i particularly for the prime minister, i he said at the beginning that we are still hoping — he said at the beginning that we are still hoping to — he said at the beginning that we are still hoping to go— he said at the beginning that we are still hoping to go ahead _ he said at the beginning that we are still hoping to go ahead with - he said at the beginning that we are still hoping to go ahead with the - still hoping to go ahead with the world _ still hoping to go ahead with the world cup— still hoping to go ahead with the world cup bid _ still hoping to go ahead with the world cup bid. i— still hoping to go ahead with the world cup bid. ijust _ still hoping to go ahead with the world cup bid. ijust wondered, | still hoping to go ahead with the - world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you _ world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you expect— world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you expect that _ world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you expect that to _ world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you expect that to go _ world cup bid. ijust wondered, how can you expect that to go ahead - can you expect that to go ahead after— can you expect that to go ahead after the — can you expect that to go ahead after the scenes— can you expect that to go ahead after the scenes of— can you expect that to go ahead after the scenes of disorder- can you expect that to go ahead after the scenes of disorder in l after the scenes of disorder in wembiey— after the scenes of disorder in wembley yesterday? - after the scenes of disorder in wembley yesterday?- after the scenes of disorder in wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first wembley yesterday? thank you very much- first of— wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first of all, _ wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first of all, on _ wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first of all, on this _ wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first of all, on this step, - wembley yesterday? thank you very much. first of all, on this step, i - much. first of all, on this step, i think it's crucialfor much. first of all, on this step, i think it's crucial for everyone to understand that, yes, this is a big package of measures that we are announcing, but it will only work as announcing, but it will only work as a fourth step if people are cautious in the way they go ahead with it. that's why i have said all the things i have said this afternoon about how to do it, and ijust underline everything chris and patrick have said. in order for this to be irreversible, it has to be
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cautious. the most important thing is for everyone who gets offered a vaccine to take it up. we have done outstandingly well in this country, a higher rate of vaccination in virtually any other country in the world now, that's a great achievement, but we still have a lot of people, particularly younger people, who have the chance to take it up, and i really hope they do over the next few days. on your point about the world cup bid. this is a long and difficult process. i am a veteran of the 2010 scenes in zurich, which you probably have forgotten about, when we tried to get it last time and which didn't go very well. but obviously i think the uk does have a very good case, together with ireland, and we will be making that case. i think it was a shame that a small minority
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yesterday tried to spoil it, or behaved badly. i don't think that they damage the atmosphere, certainly not in the stadium itself. but we will be looking at exactly what happened. i think there were particular difficulties in policing and enforcing an event in the context of the testing and social distancing rules. but irrespective of that, i do think that the uk has a very, very... and working together with ireland, has a very good case. i wouldn't want to let my hopes are away with me, because as i say, i remember what it was like ten years ago, but we will certainly give it our best shot. ok, everybody, thank you very much. studio: that's the end of the latest
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coronavirus briefing from downing street, with the prime minister, chris whitty and patrick vallance. let's take a look at some of the main points from today's downing street press conference led by the prime minister. borisjohnson said that he hopes the road out of lockdown will be irreversible. while confirming the lifting of remaining coronavirus restrictions in england on 19th ofjuly, borisjohnson said the country will still need to proceed with caution and that we "cannot simply go back to life before covid". he said the wearing of face coverings will continue to be recommended — especially in crowded, enclosed spaces such as on public transport. he also said when remaining venues open from 19thjuly — such as nightclubs — those venues should make full use of the covid pass, by which people can prove they are fully vaccinated against covid, or possess natural immunity to the virus. just highlighting some of what the
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prime minister said. our health correspondent nick triggle is with me. it was interesting they talked about new modelling, which underlines the fact they believe the current high case rate, that trajectory isn't going to prove a real significant problem and make life unsustainable for the nhs. . v problem and make life unsustainable for the nhs. . �*, ., for the nhs. that's right. that modelling _ for the nhs. that's right. that modelling has _ for the nhs. that's right. that modelling has just _ for the nhs. that's right. that modelling hasjust been - for the nhs. that's right. that - modelling hasjust been released, as they were speaking there. chris whitty, the chief medical officer, referred to it when he said he doesn't expect, or the modelling doesn't expect, or the modelling doesn't suggest there will be unsustainable pressure on the nhs during this wave in the summer. the modelling has huge uncertainties, levels of uncertainty. the modellers say it is very difficult to predict scenarios that may happen at the moment. their central estimate believes there could be between 1000 and 2000 admissions per day at the peak, which would come in the middle
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of august. that would mean between 100 and 200 deaths per day. but there is wide confidence intervals within those figures. one of the reasons for that, one of the big unknowns is how people will behave. in that modelling they have modelled two different scenarios. one is if peoples behaviour in terms of ditching masks and meeting up and getting back into the office, if that returns to normal within one month. and then they compared to what would happen if it was a gradual process that took five months. if it took five months it would halve the peak we would see in the summer so it could have a significant impact. that's why chris whitty talked about the importance of going slowly and why we have seen a slightly different tone from ministers in recent days about wearing masks and the steps we need to take. infections still do matter is the key message.—
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to take. infections still do matter is the key message. what about the idea of herd — is the key message. what about the idea of herd immunity, _ is the key message. what about the idea of herd immunity, which - is the key message. what about the idea of herd immunity, which we - idea of herd immunity, which we talked about a lot at the beginning of the pandemic, which seems a lifetime ago, but now that so many people have either had covid or have been vaccinated, are we heading out towards herd immunity?— towards herd immunity? people are beauinnin towards herd immunity? people are beginning to — towards herd immunity? people are beginning to talk _ towards herd immunity? people are beginning to talk about _ towards herd immunity? people are beginning to talk about that - beginning to talk about that immunity. herd immunity has become a bit of a dirty word, but after all immunity is our way out of the pandemic. chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance said we are on track to reach really significant levels of immunity and future big waves will go when we reach that point. with the delta variant, hugely more transmissible than the previous versions of the virus, we need about 85—90% of people immune, through vaccination and also natural exposure. we know from the studies the office for national statistics are doing, around 90% of adults have
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antibodies. we don't know about children. clearly we are not at that point yet because we are seeing infections rising quite rapidly, but the thinking is that a rising infection rates will hit that wall of immunity and by the end of summer we might be in a place where not so much herd immunity, but a place where the r is close to one, that's the average number, the rate at which the virus spreads, and if it isjust a which the virus spreads, and if it is just a little bit over one then it could lead to smaller peaks and immunity building and those rise in infections falling. the other thing, and it was mentioned at the end of the press briefing, that we will face this winter, even if we are controlling covid like that, is the return of flu. there was hardly a flu season last year. a return of the virus called rsv that particularly affects young children. a lack of exposure last winter means the immunity to those viruses will
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be lower and that will cause problems on top of covid sol be lower and that will cause problems on top of covid so i think we will be talking about a variety of viruses this winter.— we will be talking about a variety of viruses this winter. some people mi . ht of viruses this winter. some people miaht be of viruses this winter. some people might be confused _ of viruses this winter. some people might be confused on _ of viruses this winter. some people might be confused on the _ of viruses this winter. some people might be confused on the issue - of viruses this winter. some people might be confused on the issue of. might be confused on the issue of face coverings because there is advice that they should keep wearing them in crowded places, it's not monetary point of the confederation of passenger transport uk are saying in reaction to what the prime minister said, in reaction to what the prime ministersaid, "we in reaction to what the prime minister said, "we expect many people will follow the call to wear face coverings as a courtesy but passengers will find it difficult to understand why the government is singling out public transport as somewhere to wear a face covering when other places, other crowded places are not being singled out." i places are not being singled out." i think that's right. certainly people i have spoken to in the last week are concerned with the messaging about masks which has happened over the last week. masks are important not so much to protect yourself but to protect others. it reduces the
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chances of you passing on the virus. is also symbolic that the message it gives, that if you are being told to wear a mask, gives, that if you are being told to weara mask, it gives, that if you are being told to wear a mask, it is saying is that infections are still important but you are right, they have mentioned public transport but no mention of restaurants or pubs but of course it's very hard to wear masks and previous rules i do not wearing them at tables but then putting them on when you go to the toilet. it doesn't really help a great deal. i think public transport, because it is somewhere you do not choose to 90, is somewhere you do not choose to go, you might have to use it to get to work, i think that is why it has been singled out but i think there will be a big focus on that communication and messaging about masks which plenty of people are saying is still rather confusing. thank you very much. let's speak to our deputy political editor vicki young. you were watching the briefing,
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pretty much as expected. the government have said in the past, the end of restrictions should be cautious but irreversible and now the prime minister is saying he hopes it will be irreversible. that word has not _ hopes it will be irreversible. that word has not been _ hopes it will be irreversible. trisgt word has not been used as much by the prime minister in recent weeks and i think it was striking, the tone he was adopting, different even tone he was adopting, different even to this time a week ago where the emphasis is so much more on the risks that are still there rather than the freedoms we are going to be able to enjoy in a week's time. saying to people that you have to behave with extreme caution, so just because the law has changed, it doesn't mean that you have to behave differently. that is quite a big challenge for the government. they are relying on people behaving in a certain way and i think it was fascinating that the modelling changes a lot depending on how people behave so it still recommended and there are expectations on us, a lot of
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guidance, just guidance, but for businesses saying to places like night clubs, you can still use this covid certification where you check the status of people but the question is, they don't know how many will decide to do that. they don't know how we will all behave in the coming weeks. and how we behave will make a major difference here which is why some people are saying, why don't you keep the legal restrictions in place? i think the language from the prime minister was very different to some of the language we've heard before. taste very different to some of the language we've heard before. we have talked a lot this _ language we've heard before. we have talked a lot this afternoon _ language we've heard before. we have talked a lot this afternoon about - talked a lot this afternoon about the science behind this but what about the politics? many people have said this is a real gamble by boris johnson. �* . said this is a real gamble by boris johnson. . ., , said this is a real gamble by boris johnson. . . , , , said this is a real gamble by boris johnson. ~ . , , , , johnson. and that is because he 'ust doesnt know— johnson. and that is because he 'ust doesn't know how i johnson. and that is because he 'ust doesn't know how people i johnson. and that is because he 'ust doesn't know how people willfi johnson. and that is because he just i doesn't know how people will behave. of course he is relying to some extent on the modelling. we know there is a vast amount of range about what might happen but is listening to scientists who say that in the summer, if there is a better
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time, there is no perfect time to do this and lift restrictions but it would be better to do it in the summer than would be better to do it in the summerthan in the would be better to do it in the summer than in the winter when the nhs is under more pressure. but i think a lot of people who work in the nhs will look at this and they will hear about the large rise in the number of cases and even though it's not going as much as in the autumn wave, there are more people ending up in hospital. of course that will put pressure on workers who have had a 16 months dealing with an unprecedented pandemic and you are trying to get through a backlog of cases and other things they need to be doing and yet they are still of course going to be treating patients with covid. but the politics of four borisjohnson is that there is an awful lot of his own mps who want to see the back of these legal limits and restrictions. they think life should go back to normal because, crucially, the vaccination programme, that is the other thing, vaccination programme, that is the otherthing, notjust vaccination programme, that is the other thing, notjust our behaviour in the coming weeks in terms of if we follow the guidance to meet up
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outdoors, for example, if the weather is good, because we know thatis weather is good, because we know that is safer? there is also a big push about vaccinations particularly among younger people because you cant see the numbers of vaccinations have dropped dramatically in the last few weeks —— you can see. band last few weeks -- you can see. and talk about — last few weeks -- you can see. and talk about the _ last few weeks —— you can see. and talk about the politics, sajid javid is the new health secretary, replacing matt hancock, annie announced these measures in the house commons before the prime minister —— and he announced a point to a slightly different tone from him and a perception that perhaps matt hancock erred more on the side of caution when it came to lifting restrictions and generally handling the pandemic. find restrictions and generally handling the pandemic-— the pandemic. and a lot of people have spoken _ the pandemic. and a lot of people have spoken about _ the pandemic. and a lot of people have spoken about that _ the pandemic. and a lot of people have spoken about that but - the pandemic. and a lot of people| have spoken about that but others have spoken about that but others have also said you have to remember that we are in a different time. went matt hancock was health secretary, going through the darkest days of the pandemic, he probably understandably had a different approach to this whereas sajid javid is coming in at a time when the vaccination programme is doing really well and it is offering a
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certain amount of protection to people. it is a different time in that sense but there is no doubt that sense but there is no doubt that it sounds like he's taking a different approach and wants to do things differently. he has questioned things that have been talked about for months in whitehall and approaching it in a slightly different way. again, from him today, still talking about acting with caution because they all know and keep repeating that this pandemic is not over.- and keep repeating that this pandemic is not over. vicki young, many thanks _ pandemic is not over. vicki young, many thanks indeed, _ pandemic is not over. vicki young, many thanks indeed, our _ pandemic is not over. vicki young, many thanks indeed, our deputy i many thanks indeed, our deputy political editor with the latest from westminster. we have been getting a reaction to the downing street news conference from the labour leader, sir keir starmer. taste labour leader, sir keir starmer. we all want labour leader, sir keir starmer. - all want to ease restrictions. but with infection rates still going up at the rate they are going up, this plan is still reckless, i'm afraid. we need a safe way of coming through this. ifeel strongly we need a safe way of coming through this. i feel strongly at the moment that the government wants to put the
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country in a car without a seat belt to get as quickly as possible to the end of the road map. we need a safer way but this is still reckless. what way but this is still reckless. what would labour's _ way but this is still reckless. what would labour's safeway _ way but this is still reckless. what would labour's safeway look like? way but this is still reckless. what l would labour's safeway look like? i think lifting all protections at the same time is just wrong. if you look at the sage advice, they say that masks and making sure there is ventilation and people are still working from home would reduce the infection rates. so why on earth not keep that mandatory? the government says they will make a recommendation and guidance. if it keeps infection rates down, keep it in place, don't remove it and say to the individuals that it's up to you what to do. the government approach i'm afraid fail is the common sense approach. that was labour — is the common sense approach. that was labour leader _ is the common sense approach. that was labour leader sir keir starmer with his reaction to the downing street news conference. we can take a look and summarise some of the key points from the press conference led
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by the prime minister, boris johnson. while confirming the lifting of remaining coronavirus restrictions in england on 19th july, borisjohnson said the country will need to proceed with caution and that we "cannot simply go back to life before covid". he said the government will continue to recommend wearing face coverings — especially in crowded, enclosed spaces, such as on public transport. he also said when remaining venues open from 19thjuly — such as nightclubs — those venues should make full use of the covid pass — by which people can prove they are fully vaccinated against covid, or possess natural immunity to the virus. we can take a quick look at the existing rules which will end on the 19th ofjuly. the rule of six
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meeting indoors if scrapped, pubs and restaurants will be able to let people queue up at the bar for drinks. theatres and cinemas can return to capacity audience. sport and entertainment venues can also welcome back capacity crowds but businesses and large events will be encouraged to use so—called vaccine passports. nightclubs can reopen. and social distancing and face coverings will no longer be mandatory but there is a price that they should be worn in crowded places such as public transport. fiona has the news at six coming but first the latest weather. good afternoon. we've already seen some fairly wet weather this morning and that's because the same area of low pressure that brought showers and longer spells of rain yesterday has been meandering around since and it still extends its influence across most of the uk so, yes, there will be further torrential downpours to come, particularly close to the low pressure, so in southern parts
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of england, localised flash flooding, spray and standing water, but given the strength of the sun at this time of year, like recent days, we could see a few thunderstorms further north across scotland, northern ireland and into northern england as well. lots of cloud mulling around under that area of low pressure, just keeping those temperatures near the east coast a little down with more cloud here. 21 or 22 in the lengthier sunny spells, so it's still fairly pleasant in the sunshine. those showers will rumble on into the evening before gradually easing overnight, but notice all the low cloud comes back to the east. we'll have the odd pocket of mist and fog elsewhere, so as last night, still relatively warm at 12 to 1a degrees celsius. but tomorrow, on balance, looks drier. there will be fewer showers, lengthier spells of sunshine coming through, so can't rule out the odd shower, still a fair amount of instability in the atmosphere, as you can see here. we've gotjust one or two showers popping up but they will be fewer, as i say, than we've seen both today and, indeed, yesterday. as a result, with lengthier spells of sunshine, temperatures will respond a bit better — 23 or 2a in a few spots, but with some very high levels
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of pollen to be expected. as we go through the rest of the week, we still have our low pressure close by to southern and eastern areas. here it is on wednesday. but also, by that stage, we have this weather front brushing into the north—west, so we will see more cloud coming into northern and western parts of scotland, for the islands as well here, and there's still the chance of a northerly breeze close to that area of low pressure with one or two showers, but it is essentially a dry picture with long spells of sunshine, strong sunshine coming through and potentially some high levels of pollen once again. that sets the trend, really, for the rest of the week, this high—pressure moving in, pushing those weather fronts out of the way in the north and the low pressure out of the way further south and east, so bringing us more settled conditions. with more settled conditions, it should be dry for most, the sunny spells should be lengthier and the temperatures will respond as well, creeping a little higher by day. as ever, more on the website, including the warnings.
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after the dream, the abuse. there's widespread condemnation of a torrent of racial abuse against england's black players on social media. the players that missed penalties have borne the brunt of it — the england manager expresses his disgust. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad. you know, the people that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it. on their way home, the players�* dejected faces telling the story of last night's crushing disappointment. amid the gloom for england fans, we'll look at what the last few weeks of football have meant for so many. also tonight... as the prime minister confirms most covid restrictions will be
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lifted in england from next monday, a warning to expect up to 200

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