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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 12, 2021 2:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 2pm: the president of the football association, prince william, says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it's unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, you know, people who track those things have been able to explain that, but not all of it, and it's just not what we stand for. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. i'm annita mcveigh here at wembley. a massive 30.95 million people
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watched last night's euro final. that is the biggest peak audience since the funeral of diana, princess of wales. italy may have emerged victorious but the england team have many reasons to hold their head up high. i'll be reflecting on another historic day in english football. in other news this hour, the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged to keep wearing face coverings in crowded places. and america scorched by a record—breaking heatwave as california and nevada brace themselves for even higher temperatures. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news.
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prince william, who is president of the football association, says he's sickened by the racist abuse of players who missed penalites last night in england's defeat to italy in the final of the european championship. he called the online abuse abhorrent and unacceptable. meanwhile, the fa have ordered a review after fans without tickets forced their way into wembley stadium to watch the game. let'sjoin annita mcveigh at wembley. thank you very much, good afternoon everyone from wembley. it is sad that we are talking today notjust about any football, but about the abuse directed towards marcus rushford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka. and that we are notjust focusing purely on what happened on the pitch. we have heard gareth southgate say that abuse is absolutely unforgivable. clearly he and his team, those players, they
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gave their everything throughout this tournament and we know from what they have said that they desperately wanted to bring football home, bring it that european championship home here to england and at the feelings in the camp today, the england camp, really visceral in that regard. you could tell that when a gareth southgate said it felt as though his stomach had been ripped out, the fact they had been ripped out, the fact they had not been able to deliver on that great hope and expectation. let's hear a bit now about what gareth southgate had to say. saka has to score. it's saved by donnarumma, and it's italy who are the champions of europe! so near, yet so agonisingly far. england know all about the pain of penalty shoot—outs, but this one felt especially cruel — their tournament ending in tears. and as the players left their hotel
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this morning, their manager could only reflect on what might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs of some consistency, semifinal, final, has to be a step in the right direction. it is not ultimately where we wanted to get to and when you are so close, it's even more painful, of course. it feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion but also tension. outside wembley, some fans without tickets forced their way into the stadium. the fa are conducting a review. them ahead afterjust two minutes. on the pitch, england made the perfect start — luke shaw firing them ahead afterjust two minutes. it is luke shaw! but leonardo bonucci's second—half equaliser took the game into extra time and, ultimately,
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penalties, where it was an all too familiar story. three of england's brightest stars, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were the men to miss and it was all over. the three england players have since received racist abuse on social media. this morning the fa president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened. it is totally unacceptable that players have to endure this abundant behaviour. it must stop now and all those involved must be held accountable. england had hoped this would be a day of celebration, but the mood at wembley could not be more different. but the team can look back on what they have achieved at this tournament with huge pride. over a memorable month, they played with talent and togetherness, winning both matches and fans on their way to a first major final in 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and i have been on the end of it and unfortunately these boys will feel so hurt and so angry and so disappointed this morning and it will hurt them for a while.
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but when you look at the whole picture, they should feel very proud of what they have given us. italy are the champions... but ultimately, it was italy's triumph, was italy's triumph, another trophy for them. and while england can look to the future with hope, right now there is only more heartache. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. the metropolitan police says it's investigating the online racial abuse of england players and that "it will not be tolerated." england manager gareth southgate has called the abuse "unforgiveable" when his team have really given their all. and the prime minister has also condemned it. as has the labour leader sir keir starmer.
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but sir keir starmer has accused borisjohnson of a failure of leadership for not calling out the booing when players took the knee to protest against racism earlier in the tournament. nesta mcgregor reports. bukayo saka, aged 19, 12 yards out, millions watching. if there was a feeling of inevitability about england losing another penalty shoot—out, for some, the same could be said for what followed. the players are incredibly proud of what they've done. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. we've got to make sure that we're there and aligned with their clubs and making sure that we look after those boys, absolutely. as well as saka, england team—mates jadon sancho and marcus rashford, who also missed their spot kicks, were targets of racist abuse online. in a statement, the fa said it was appalled by such disgusting behaviour and urged social media companies to ban and help prosecute those responsible. the social media companies need to act. they need to stamp it out and they can do that and we are reiterating our call
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for the government to bring in the online harms bill as soon as they possibly can. we don't think it's acceptable in any walk of life for racist abuse to happen and we want it to stop. england exit euro 2020 with racism a topic of debate, but they also started the tournament the same way. in their first group game, some fans booed as players took the knee, an ongoing gesture against discrimination. at the time, borisjohnson did not condemn the boos, but last night, the prime minister said the squad should be lauded as heroes, not racially abused. i'm afraid the prime minister has failed the test of leadership because whatever he says today about racism, he had a simple choice at the beginning of this tournament in relation to the booing of those that were taking the knee, the players that were taking the knee, and they made it clear why they were taking the knee. the prime minister failed to call that out. what we have seen, in my opinion,
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is this kind of conditional love for our players which shouldn't be there. as long as they're performing and scoring and getting results, then of course we're all england, all behind you. the minute that doesn't happen, the abuse comes out. we should back them and support them no matter the outcome is. last night, after the game, this mural of marcus rashford defaced. football, once again, at the centre of a wider societal issue. with me is our sports correspondentjohn watson. he has followed the england team with throughout the tournament. if you have the england games have been here at wembley, but in every other sense of the word, it has been a journey, a journey for the players and the manager and for the fans. with hopes building all the way through. with hopes building all the way throu~h. , ., ., with hopes building all the way throuuh. , . ., , , , , with hopes building all the way throuuh. , . , , , . through. yes, and no surprises that ho -e through. yes, and no surprises that hepe turned —
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through. yes, and no surprises that hepe turned to _ through. yes, and no surprises that hope turned to belief, _ through. yes, and no surprises that hope turned to belief, especially i hope turned to belief, especially when you consider what england achieved at the world cup back in 2018 and gareth southgate laying the foundations there. signs, perhaps, that things were going in the right direction for england and some of the things they produced in this tournament, some of the barriers they overcome. they won their first group match a european championship, the first time they have done that. at that historic victory over the old rival germany as well. the first time they have won a knockout match against them in 55 years. the goals they scored against ukraine, they had not scored that many any knockout match at a major tournament for such a long time, so i think there are these barriers, these barriers, these hurdles they have overcome so indications are england are going in the right direction, yes, of course, disappointing that any fell just short here last yes, of course, disappointing that any felljust short here last night. but the world cup now, that belief will only grow. but the world cup now, that belief will only grom— but the world cup now, that belief will only grow-— but the world cup now, that belief will only grow. before we talk about that a little more, _ will only grow. before we talk about that a little more, let's _ will only grow. before we talk about that a little more, let's focus - will only grow. before we talk about that a little more, let's focus on - that a little more, let's focus on the fact, as i said the introduction, it is sad we are not just talking about the football today. we also talking about this
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abuse levelled at rasch, sancho and saka, there was a three young black players who had the nerve and bravely, frankly, to stand up —— rushford to stand up in this competition and have a go at scoring a penalty. it is at the same old story again. a penalty. it is at the same old story again-— story again. there is an inevitability _ story again. there is an inevitability about - story again. there is an inevitability about that| story again. there is an i inevitability about that and story again. there is an - inevitability about that and that has a very sad and tragic thing about this situation because it should not be normal, but the abuse increasingly against black players... marcus rashford, this is not the first time he has experience it and sadly it will not be the last time and it will only add to the calls to ask for greater action, some form of legislation to be brought in built up that is what the fa are pushing for the government, some sort of legislation so there are punishments to be handed out for this type of behaviour. it is just very sad. it should be a celebration, shouldn't it? in light of what england have achieved on and off the pitch. gareth southgate, the
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culture he has faded, but sadly, it is the worst side of that once again. is the worst side of that once aain. ., ., is the worst side of that once aaain. ., ., , again. social media companies will sa to the again. social media companies will say to the players. _ again. social media companies will say to the players, there _ again. social media companies will say to the players, there are - say to the players, there are controls that you can turn on so you do not see the messages built up that it does not deal with the root of the problem, does it? it should not be done _ of the problem, does it? it should not be done to _ of the problem, does it? it should not be done to the _ of the problem, does it? it should not be done to the players - of the problem, does it? it should not be done to the players having | of the problem, does it? it should l not be done to the players having to turn off messages from people. the messages that they do not want to receive. they should not be getting those messages in the first place and that is something that needs to be done. we have heard it, perhaps there needs to be social media accounts are linked to personal details so it is easier to track those responsible. marcus rashford, those responsible. marcus rashford, those players do not deserve that. they had a baby to step up and nobody deserves a —— the bravery. you hope this will bring about greater action because it seems as though this is a conversation we keep having and, as yet, the conversation goes on, doesn't it? let's finish our conversation this afternoon on a positive note because there are so many positives to take out of this. congratulations to the
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italian team, an amazing effort and they had a lot to prove as well after not qualifying for the world cup last time. if you look at the england team, sack at 19 and then you think of all of the other players who are just in the early 20s —— saka at 19, forwarding, rice, rushford of course, there is so much promise going forward because these are players who could be in this squad —— marcus rashford. and they could be building with him very long time to come. he could be building with him very long time to come-— time to come. he knows he has the bod of time to come. he knows he has the body of either _ time to come. he knows he has the body of either in _ time to come. he knows he has the body of either in squad _ time to come. he knows he has the body of either in squad there. - time to come. he knows he has the body of either in squad there. and | body of either in squad there. and any players he has added to that squad sensibly run to the world cup last temples of england has a very bright future, there is no doubt about that and they will have players competing on a bigger stage. the likes of those who won the champions league for chelsea this season. so success at domestic level and those champions league finals and those champions league finals and that step on the international
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stage, competing a majorfinals. they had done that, that experience will serve them well. of course, bukayo saka and those who miss those penalties lessen it, they will be disappointed and that will live with them very long time, but it is those experiences that equip them for moments on the bigger stage and gareth southgate said that was a pet is a shame it was penalties once again that cost england because gareth southgate said we won a penalty shoot—out at the last world cup, perhaps aims we were already worth of it, but it will stand them in good stead in the future and we look to qatar next year, the world cup to come. and the women's championship here on home soil next year. so a reason to feel hopeful that perhaps success on the bigger stage of all is not too far away now. , . ., , , stage of all is not too far away now. , . .,, , ., stage of all is not too far away now. , . .,,, ., ., now. everything crossed for that. gareth southgate _ now. everything crossed for that. gareth southgate said _ now. everything crossed for that. gareth southgate said at - now. everything crossed for that. gareth southgate said at those . gareth southgate said at those players will be better for what they have gone through in this championship. john, lovely to talk to you, thank you very much for that. so much discussion of gareth southgate, so much discussion around
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the italy manager roberto mancini has well and what he has done with this team. last�*s when means they have gone for a 3k matches undefeated. —— last night's win. it was i was going to be tough for england going into this match last night. let's get some more reaction from italy after the result last night, filippo conticello is a italian football journalist for the gazzetta dello sport newspaper. good to have you with us today. you along with other italians must be celebrating a win that was all the sweeter because, as i mentioned a moment ago, italy did not qualify for the last world cup and it was 1968 the last won the european championships a victory last night all the betterfor it. championships a victory last night all the better for it.— all the better for it. thank you for havin: all the better for it. thank you for having me- _ all the better for it. thank you for having me. this _ all the better for it. thank you for having me. this yes, _ all the better for it. thank you for having me. this yes, it _ all the better for it. thank you for having me. this yes, it has - all the better for it. thank you for having me. this yes, it has been l all the better for it. thank you for | having me. this yes, it has been a special and unforgettable night, well deserved after one year of
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doubt and suffering because now the pandemic situation is going well here, but the battle is not over and italy will be the first european nation to face this problem so it was at the first who suffered for this problem. yesterday, millions of people moved out of their homes and celebrated on the streets. now the covid restrictions are less a straight so they were able to celebrate and there is a fantastic atmosphere because, of course, just two years ago we failed to qualify for the world cup. if you told us any very strange night... i remember i was in the san siro stadium and it was likea i was in the san siro stadium and it was like a national tragedy because for the first time we failed qualification in 60 years. after two
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years, we are champions of europe and this is a big achievement, something emotional and i think we have two thank you mr roberto mancini, who created an unbelievable squad without superstars. we do not have people like cristiano ronaldo, kevin de bruyne are harry kane, we have normal players, good players, but today love each other, playing for each other, fighting for each other and today they won and they deserve this victory. essen other and today they won and they deserve this victory.— deserve this victory. even though there has been _ deserve this victory. even though there has been much _ deserve this victory. even though there has been much analysis - deserve this victory. even though there has been much analysis of| there has been much analysis of gareth southgate and —— you will know. and what he had done in terms of work with this england team and what has mancini done with the italian team that is working so
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well? . ., ., well? he changed our mind, 0k. he used to attack _ well? he changed our mind, 0k. he used to attack more, _ well? he changed our mind, 0k. he used to attack more, more - well? he changed our mind, 0k. he used to attack more, more than - well? he changed our mind, 0k. he used to attack more, more than our| used to attack more, more than our tradition and he created a very offensive system. for example, yesterday, i appreciate southgate come i think he is a great coach, a gentleman, but perhaps yesterday they still did not play well. after they still did not play well. after the goal, decided to use very defensive system, a very defensive technique. italy did not change. italy played an offensive way and finally, i think italy deserve the victory. as i mentioned, we have to thank roberto mancini because there's offensive mentality depends on him. ., ., there's offensive mentality depends on him. ., ,, i. there's offensive mentality depends on him. ., ,, . ., on him. thank you so much for talkin:
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on him. thank you so much for talking to _ on him. thank you so much for talking to us. _ on him. thank you so much for talking to us. a _ on him. thank you so much forj talking to us. a photojournalist therefore expert newspaper in milan. let's leave you with this thought listening to gareth i skipper�*s my news conference earlier, you could tell it was higher, emotionally drained. he had all the team. he said these opportunities are so rare —— he was tired. he said they were closer. but underline that tiredness, you could tell there was fighting talk as well because he said, this group of players, they will want more. because of this experience, they will want more and they have the belief. for the moment, from wembley, it is back to you, reeta. thank you very much. the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted a week today. but borisjohnson will also empasise that caution is vital in the face of rising case numbers which he said
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will continue to increase as england unlocks. and people will be urged to continue to wear face coverings in crowded places. our health correspondent jim reed reports. this could be reality again next week. this pilot event in may saw 3000 clubbers back on the dance floor, from next monday, all nightclubs will be able to open across england as the last remaining social—distancing rules are scrapped. when we move to step four, we will see the falling away of legal obligations and legal restrictions and a move towards personal and corporate responsibility based on clear and strong guidance and people will make their own judgments. under the plans, the legal requirement to wear a mask will go although ministers have said there will still be an expectation to wear a covering on transport and in some indoor spaces. in hospitality venues, the one metre plus rule will be lifted, for example allowing pubs to serve at the bar again. the main business lobby group is supportive of the move but says
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some protection may still be needed. i would urge companies to put in place measures, be that covid—safe environments, culture of mass working in the office and public spaces, ventilation systems and i think communication to employees and consumers about what you as a business are doing. but the change to the rules in england has already been delayed a month because of sharply rising covid infections. both ministers and some scientists say caution is still needed as more restrictions are lifted. we are at a really tricky phase, actually, at the moment because cases are going up in quite in the 30,000s of course, but on the other side of the coin we are seeing still very low numbers of deaths and very low numbers of hospital admissions, though they are creeping up a little bit. wales will also review its restrictions on thursday, northern ireland is due to ease some measures later in the month, while in scotland, most remaining rules are due to be lifted
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by august 9th. jim reed, bbc news. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. borisjohnson has said in the past the lifting of restrictions should be "irreversible" — has there been a change of tone on that? yes, i think there has, not least because we can hear no from the ministers and are certainly over the weekend them being very, very cautious and downing street in what it has told us prior to this press conference at 5pm emphasising caution and vigilance. what has changed and what is seeing the same will... well, what is doing the same is as far as england is concerned as the government were singing we go, we would get to the day and a judgment would be taking on whether next monday could be the unlocking point. that is happening as was predicted a week ago. the datable stack up any prime minister will see later to justify stack up any prime minister will see later tojustify taking stack up any prime minister will see later to justify taking that final step next week. but what has
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changed, that is the language and it will be peppered with caution, vigilance and a recognition that the pandemic is not over. and also an emphasis that what is happening now is a yes, the lack of legal restrictions any weak�*s time on social contact, but instead an emphasis on personal responsibility. of course, the context is one where case rates, frankly, are going through the rest. with that there is this pingdemic of people being told to self—isolate from the app because they have come into case with a dash in contact with a case. the government calibrating its message to ensure by people's individual actions, chosen by themselves rather than enforced by the law, people are still sufficiently careful that the predicted spike in cases is not even considerably worse than some of the
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current projections suggest. {lilia current pro'ections suggest. 0k, chris, current projections suggest. 0k, chris, thank— current projections suggest. 0k, chris, thank you _ current projections suggest. ok, chris, thank you very much. chris mason, a correspondent there at westminster. and the prime minister boris johnson will be leading the coronavirus downing street briefing later today. this coverage of that starts here on bbc one and on the bbc news channel from a.30pm. the army is being deployed in south africa to help the police deal with the violence and looting that was triggered by the jailing of former president jacob zuma. there have been more than 200 arrests and the police said six deaths were being investigated. the constitutional court has begun reviewing mr zuma's is—month sentence for contempt of court in connection with a corruption trial. his legal team wants the sentence overturned. thousands of cubans have joined the biggest protests for decades against the island's
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communist government. the demonstrations come after cuba's economy saw its worst fall in almost three decades. protesters are also calling for better handling of the coronavirus pandemic and for the vaccination programme to be increased. the cuban authorities have confronted thousands of people who marched through the streets of major cities in the biggest anti—government protests in three decades. the police used pepper spray and beat some protesters, who were demonstrating against food shortages, high prices and the authorities�* handling of the pandemic. the protesters are taking a stand against cuba s communist government. it's the biggest demonstration in over three decades. the president argues the united states is to blame 7 calling supporters to confront the protestors. let's bring in dr parvathi kumaraswami in aberystwyth, wales. she's the director of cuba research at the university of nottingham.
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good afternoon to you doctor reeta. this is a very rare sight, big demonstrations in cuba against the government. how significant is this? as it has a very rare sight in cuba, the last demonstrations of this kind, not on the scale, but of this kind, not on the scale, but of this kind were in 1994 as a response to the economic collapse. after the fall of communism. it is not very often you see this kind of protest, it is not as to say there is not internal critique and protest of the system but this is really an expression of a pepper —— pressure cooker of lots of different practice. cooker of lots of different practice-— cooker of lots of different ractice. ~ . , , . , practice. we are seeing pictures as ou are practice. we are seeing pictures as you are speaking — practice. we are seeing pictures as you are speaking of _ practice. we are seeing pictures as you are speaking of the _ you are speaking of the demonstrators. these demonstrations are going on across the country. what sort of risk early protesters taking? what sort of risk early protesters takin: ? , ., ., ., what sort of risk early protesters
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taking? they are taking risks in the sense of- -- — taking? they are taking risks in the sense of... there _ taking? they are taking risks in the sense of... there are _ taking? they are taking risks in the sense of. .. there are other- taking? they are taking risks in the sense of... there are other ways i taking? they are taking risks in the l sense of... there are other ways are protesting in cuba, it is relatively rare people come out onto the streets. i do not think we should think this is some sort of communist rule where every protester will be beaten or in prison, but it does challenge the authorities because cubais challenge the authorities because cuba is a nation that provides itself —— prides itself on its order. if we think about all of the various fighters that come together now, they include the pandemic, the fact that he had a can pass through, did not dojudgments of fact that he had a can pass through, did not do judgments of damage, fact that he had a can pass through, did not dojudgments of damage, but it was a natural disaster waiting to happen, and of course the effects of the embargo, the change of currency making price is very difficult to control, people having to queue for food as you have said. there are a whole range of factors coming together and fear over the pandemic increasing. it means that the lid has been taking off the pressure
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cooker in terms of these protests. what should the international response be?— what should the international resonse be? ~ ., ., ., response be? well, the international res - onse response be? well, the international response should _ response be? well, the international response should be _ response be? well, the international response should be to _ response be? well, the international response should be to support - response be? well, the international response should be to support cuba l response should be to support cuba to find its own solutions to its own problems. unfortunately, you may see in the international news that for example, the us administration has set up a campaign, as it sets up many other campaigns, which is saying we need to help cuba, we need to offer humanitarian aid. now, i do not think you have to be too cynical to see the irony in the fact that the longest embargo in world history has been imposed and strengthened by donald trump and not removed or changed by president biden is so a little ironic to be continuing with that embargo, which affects the daily lives of cubans in the most inhumane way, and at the same time offering humanitarian aid. it is a very complex national and international environment in which this is happening. {lilia international environment in which this is happening.— this is happening. 0k, we have to leave it there. _ this is happening. 0k, we have to leave it there. professor - leave it there. professor kumaraswami from nottingham university, thank you so much.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello, it's another day of sunny spells and showers out and about. some lively downpours again — you can see the brighter colours — just indicating the risk of some hail and some thunder and there is very little wind around so they will be slow moving. you can see that there is also quite a lot of cloud clinging to the east coast. but in the sunshine, pleasantly warm — 21, 22 celsius. and the sunshine continues into the evening, as do those heavy downpours, before starting to ease away through the night. many places should become dry overnight but notice, again, the thickening of the cloud for eastern parts of both england and scotland. with all of that cloud around, it will be relatively warm again. some bits of mist and fog inland, i think, come tuesday morning, which will quickly clear given the strength of the july sunshine, but it might take longer for that low cloud to clear away from eastern coasts. but on balance, tuesday looks drier with lengthier spells of sunshine, fewer of those downpours around and so, as a consequence, temperatures will rise a little higher again.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the president of the football association, prince william, says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. it's also been condemned by england's manager, gareth southgate. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair but celebrations in rome where the victorious italian team arrived back this morning to a heroes welcome. in other news this hour — the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged to keep wearing face coverings in crowded places. and america scorched by a record breaking heatwave
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as california and nevada brace themselves for even higher temperatures. sport now. and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. england manager gareth southgate has hit out at the racist abuse suffered by at some of the england players after last night's defeat to italy, in the european championship final. southgate was speaking to the media this morning after the side lost on penalties. three black players — marcus rashford, jadon sancho, and bukayo saka — were targeted online over missing penalties. he said the players should hold their heads high and the abuse cannot be tolerated. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad. people that track those things have been able to explain that, but not all of
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it and it's just not what we stand for. we, ithink, have been it and it's just not what we stand for. we, i think, have been a it and it's just not what we stand for. we, ithink, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together, in people being able to relate to the national team and the national team stands for everybody. the fa will conduct a full review after a large number of people tried to force their way in to wembley without tickets ahead of the final. fans fought with stewards and police as they attempted to break through gates. downing street has criticised those who stormed the stadium without tickets. fa chief executive mark bullingham apologised to legitimate fans who were affected and said the security team had "never seen anything like it". it was sad and frustrating to see some drunken yobs trying to break into the stadium and, unfortunately, one or two of them succeeded, we do not know quite how many yet, we are pulling together the evidence to see what has happened. we will take
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action against the people involved. i think when we step back and look at the eight matches we have staged at the eight matches we have staged at wembley and the impact around the country from the tenements and the buzz it has created, we have had so much praise and i'm sure that stands us in good stead for future tournaments. here are the england players leaving their hotel today at the end of a memorable european championship campaign. manager gareth southgate also says that he hopes to guide the team to the 2022 world cup in qatar but admits he needs time to rest before considering contract talks. and a few of the players have taken to social media as well today. in response to being criticised for not stepping up for taking a penalty, jack grealish said this meanwhile, captain harry kane has also had this to say on england's campaign:
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and away from football — conor murray will lead the british and irish lions for the first time when they take on south africa �*a' in cape town on wednesday. warren gatland will make 12 changes to the side that beat the sharks 71—31 on saturday. the match is to go ahead despite a covid outbreak in the springboks camp — the first lions test is on the 24thjuly. the masters champion hideki matsuyama has withdrawn from the open championship at royal st george's after returning a positive coronavirus test. the japanese world number 18 tested positive ahead of the second round of the rocket mortgage classic on the 2nd ofjuly and has been self—isolating ever since. the 29—year—old has been replaced in the year's final major — which begins on thursday — by the american harold varner iii. that's all the sport for now. we will see you soon.
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thanks very much. passengers at heathrow�*s terminal 5 have been facing long queues due to more than 100 security staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. let's speak to our transport correspondent caroline davies. caroline, we keep hearing that many people have been pinged by the app and now security staff are a casualty. and now security staff are a casualty-— and now security staff are a casualty. yes, some people speculated _ casualty. yes, some people speculated that _ casualty. yes, some people speculated that the - casualty. yes, some people speculated that the security casualty. yes, some people - speculated that the security guards had not turned up due to the match last night but that is not correct according to heathrow, it is due to the test and trace out and that they were pinged. there were queues of up to an hour this morning at terminal five going through security, so these are staff at security as you go into the departure lounge, not borderforce go into the departure lounge, not border force control. this go into the departure lounge, not borderforce control. this isjust another element that we have seen of disruption that can happen with travel, not necessarily the ones we have been talking about over the last few weeks about how disruption might happen at the uk's borders as more paperwork is added in, but it just shows how at this time, during the course of the pandemic,
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international travel council be disrupted. international travel council be disrupted-— international travel council be disruted. �* , international travel council be disruted. , disrupted. and it comes, as you say, --eole disrupted. and it comes, as you say, people were — disrupted. and it comes, as you say, people were anticipating _ disrupted. and it comes, as you say, people were anticipating potentiallyl people were anticipating potentially long queues once travel opens up. we will get more detail later this afternoon from the prime minister, butjust afternoon from the prime minister, but just talk us afternoon from the prime minister, butjust talk us through the sort of problems that people might face from next week, should they be able to travel more freely?— next week, should they be able to travel more freely? yes, last week, we heard from _ travel more freely? yes, last week, we heard from the _ travel more freely? yes, last week, we heard from the government - travel more freely? yes, last week, we heard from the government that they are planning to allow people who have been fully vaccinated to travel to amber list countries and coming back from amber list countries, they will not have to quarantine but they will still need to have tests. that was a major step for international travel, but there is concern that there will be a surge in the number of people travellers potentially meaning there are queues at the border because as we have seen over the course of this year, as that paperwork for the pandemic and for covid and covid checks have increased, queues have also increased, queues of up to six hours earlier in the year. things
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have sped up quite dramatically since then and the government has said it is taking steps to make things more automated and bringing in more border force officials, but they actually warned that the queues could be at the other side, when you are departing because it will be so much paperwork and the airlines will be checking it before you travel, so not a normal summer of travel this year. not a normal summer of travel this ear. a , not a normal summer of travel this ear. , ., ., ., , year. many thanks, caroline davies there, transport _ year. many thanks, caroline davies there, transport correspondent. . year. many thanks, caroline davies l there, transport correspondent. back now to our top story. social media platforms including facebook and twitter have condemned the online abuse towardss england players, saying they have taken steps to remove the posts. let's speak to our technology correspondent rory cellanjones. imean, i mean, social media companies say they have taken steps to remove these posts, but many are querying why these comments can go up in the first place. this why these comments can go up in the first lace. , .,, , why these comments can go up in the first lace. , ., , ., first place. this has been a long-running _ first place. this has been a long-running issue - first place. this has been a long-running issue for- first place. this has been a. long-running issue for them first place. this has been a - long-running issue for them and i long—running issue for them and i think this is their biggest test so far and they have probably, certainly in the court of public
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opinion, are feeling. they are using more and more automation to try to do this. twitter, in fact, says it has used a combination of machine learning —based automation and human reviews to remove over 1000 tweets and facebook says it has acted swiftly against a number of pulse and taken them down. but actually removing this stuff before it goes up, obviously, involves machines. and machines are faulty, they do not have brilliantjudgment necessarily. have brilliant judgment necessarily. we have brilliantjudgment necessarily. we have had one example here, a complaint about an instagram post using the orangutan emojied directed at an england footballer and the reply came back when someone complained that our technology has found this comment does not go against our community guidelines. the message went on, the technology is not perfect and we are seeking to improve it. but the company, instagram, and facebook which owns instagram, and facebook which owns instagram, made it clear that it had such a volume of complaints to deal
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with that the humans were not able to look at them all instantly so they were relying on machines, and as i said, the machines are not perfect. as i said, the machines are not erfect. , , perfect. the government is bringing in an online — perfect. the government is bringing in an online harm _ perfect. the government is bringing in an online harm is— perfect. the government is bringing in an online harm is built. _ perfect. the government is bringing in an online harm is built. what - in an online harm is built. what difference will that make to the sort of situation? we difference will that make to the sort of situation?— sort of situation? we have a situation — sort of situation? we have a situation right _ sort of situation? we have a situation right now - sort of situation? we have a situation right now where i sort of situation? we have a - situation right now where mainstream media platforms like the bbc, newspapers, can get into severe trouble if they allow this kind of comment on their stories, whereas internet companies have been historically not responsible for that. this new online harm spill, online safety bill, is going to shift the goalposts somewhat. there is a big debate about how that will work. ofcom will be given powers of regulation. it will be tricky because what they will have to do, the social media platforms, is decide on material which is not illegal, and legal and illegal is
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always pretty clear, but what is harmful which is more difficult to decide and there is concern that censorship will then be put in the hands of these big corporations based in america which may not be a good thing. but definitely the tide is running in favour of more regulation. is running in favour of more regulation-— is running in favour of more reuulation. ., ~ , ., , is running in favour of more reuulation. ., ~ i. , . regulation. 0k. thank you very much for that stop- — daniele stellini is an italian football fan who was at wembley stadium last night. hejoins us now. good he joins us now. good afternoon to you. he joins us now. good afternoon to 0“. , ., ., he joins us now. good afternoon to ou. , ., he joins us now. good afternoon to ou. ., you he joins us now. good afternoon to you-_ you look- he joins us now. good afternoon to| you._ you look cool, you. good afternoon. you look cool, calm and collected, _ you. good afternoon. you look cool, calm and collected, but _ you. good afternoon. you look cool, calm and collected, but you - you. good afternoon. you look cool, calm and collected, but you must i calm and collected, but you must have had a fantastic night. i calm and collected, but you must have had a fantastic night.- calm and collected, but you must have had a fantastic night. i did, i did indeed- _ have had a fantastic night. i did, i did indeed. it — have had a fantastic night. i did, i did indeed. it was _ have had a fantastic night. i did, i did indeed. it was a _ have had a fantastic night. i did, i did indeed. it was a magical - did indeed. it was a magical atmosphere. i cannot believe i was there and when i was going there, i was scared because i could see just british fans and then just a few italians, so outside, i was a bit
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scared. in fact, italians, so outside, i was a bit scared. infact, i did not italians, so outside, i was a bit scared. in fact, i did not wear anything about italy outside. i had everything inside myjacket and then when i was inside, with other italians, i took it off and it became magical because once i was there, i realised how luckyi became magical because once i was there, i realised how lucky i was because it was the final and i am 19 years old and this is not going to happen to me again anytime soon, so it is crazy to be there and if you ask me a month ago, what do you think is going to happen? i would not say that this was the end. you look slightly _ not say that this was the end. you look slightly dazed by it. you say you were a little bit worried when you were a little bit worried when you went in. what was the atmosphere like inside when you got there? was its good—natured? i like inside when you got there? was its good-natured?— its good-natured? i went by underground _ its good-natured? i went by underground and _ its good-natured? i went by underground and the - its good-natured? i went by - underground and the underground its good-natured? i went by _ underground and the underground was just british fans. i could not move, the only one in silence, everyone was singing british songs and when i
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was singing british songs and when i was with some italians walking to the stadium, people were screaming at us and some of them were having a good time and saying good luck for the game, so i was scared but at the same time it was really crazy because you have a bit of each of these emotions and you see people screaming and beers flying everywhere and then when i was inside, i could just see wembley, all the stadium pretty much full as it could be due to covid restrictions and it was just amazing because i went by myself because i am here in london by myself and i said, i need to go, because people cannot come because of covid and diameter alien, cannot come because of covid and diameteralien, i cannot come because of covid and diameter alien, i am cannot come because of covid and diameteralien, iam here cannot come because of covid and diameter alien, i am here in london, notjust i want to go but i have to go i have to support italy and i am glad i did because all the people i know are just so happy for me. find
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know are 'ust so happy for me. and so know are just so happy for me. and so envious. — know are just so happy for me. and so envious. i— know are just so happy for me. and so envious, i imagine, as well. yeah, actually, because i went to see spain against italy and i became viral on social media after the game and i received also a lot of hate from different motives, so i realise that in the end, i should say to people that i you should be happy for me and happy for italy. i went there to support our nation. so i do not care that much about anything. i was happy. i cried so much after and during the game because i realised what it meant for pickford to play that game and also for donnarumma, so i was there. i don't even realise what was happening and it's just crazy emotions and i'm also a bit sad for what happened afterwards because i saw their videos of the fighting between some fans
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unfortunately did not see any of that. i unfortunately did not see any of that. . . unfortunately did not see any of that. , ., ., , , , that. i 'ust want to “ump in because it is that. i just want to “ump in because it is sad to _ that. i just want to “ump in because it is sad to hear — that. i just want to jump in because it is sad to hear that _ that. i just want to jump in because it is sad to hear that you _ that. i just want to jump in because it is sad to hear that you got - that. i just want to jump in because it is sad to hear that you got some l it is sad to hear that you got some negative comments on social media and you must also be watching and seeing the racist abuse being levelled at the three england players who missed their penalties. what do you think of that? i players who missed their penalties. what do you think of that?- what do you think of that? i think that social media _ what do you think of that? i think that social media and _ what do you think of that? i think that social media and haters - what do you think of that? i think that social media and haters is i what do you think of that? i thinkl that social media and haters is one of the biggest problems we face right now as a society and i think that also these companies are working to be better, but from my point of view, we should increase their knowing, the learning on this because people do not know how much this effects the other side, so we need to teach this in schools, what does it use to use the internet, to use social media, because we cannot stop people using it, but we can teach people to use it and i think this is what should happen and i do not care because i am self secure, i
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am happy with myself and i was happy to be there, so i do not even care if people said something about me, but i know that for other people, it could be a problem and i also saw what happened for the british players and i think that is horrible and, i mean, iamjust happy players and i think that is horrible and, i mean, i am just happy for the sport because i saw an amazing game that i am going to rememberfor my entire life and this, for me, is the end line. i cannot face too much the rest. i know this problem and this stuff happens and the only thing i can say is that i am trying to say to people do not hate me because i was at the game. be happy for me and be happy for italy. that's me. ellen; be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk — be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk to _ be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk to you _ be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk to you and _ be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk to you and so - be happy for italy. that's me. very nice to talk to you and so nice to see that you will treasure your memories. italian football fan there
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at wembley last night. thank you so much. the headlines on bbc news... prince william says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. he's called the online abuse of these three stars abhorrent and unacceptable. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair parts of the united states are struggling to contain wildfires, after a record breaking heatwave. forecasters are warning that some places including california and nevada will remain dangerously hot, with fears that more fires will break out. firefighters say the air is so dry that much of the water dropped by aircraft to tackle the flames evaporates before it even reaches the ground. our north america correspondent, peter bowes has this report.
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wildfires are burning with a ferocity that has rarely been seen before. in oregon, firefighters on the front line of this inferno had to be pulled back for their own safety. after almost a week, it's spread to more than 600 square kilometres. in arizona, two firefighters died when their aircraft crashed while responding to another blaze. dozens are burning in california, including this enormous fire, spreading rapidly close to the border with nevada. the beckwourth complex fire, the state's biggest, was started by lightning. a vast area of forest has been closed and people have been evacuated from their homes. in the california desert, they're used to extreme heat but nothing like this. this isjoshua tree national park — a tourist destination close to the resort of palm springs, where temperatures reached a record for the time of year — 48.9 degrees celsius.
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it's the hottest place on earth. like, this is hot. it's never been hotter. it feels like we're in an oven, yeah. i came from the caribbean, i came from dominican republic, from a really hot country, and it's still hot for me so i'm trying my best. officials have warned tourists and residents here that these baking temperatures can be lethal. las vegas has also matched its all—time high temperature — the entertainment city reached 47.2 celsius. the authorities said several people were taken to hospital over the weekend with heat—related conditions. scientists say there is growing evidence that climate change is fuelling extreme weather patterns, and they are likely to become more common. last month was the hottestjune on record in north america. the high temperatures of the past few days are expected to ease off by the middle of the week but the heatwaves this summer have been relentless and the months that are usually
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the hottest are still to come. more than 50 people have died in lightning strikes across several states in india. among the victims were young people taking selfies in the rain while standing on top of a watchtower at a popular tourist spot in the city of jaipur. the chief ministers of uttar pradesh and rajasthan and india's prime minister narendra modi have announced compensation for the families of those who died. a jordanian court has ajordanian court has found
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two men google is massive — its parent company alphabet is one of the top five most valuable companies in the world —— worth well over 1.6 trillion dollars. there's google search, google maps, google chrome and android —— and in the same company there's youtube, waze, fitbitz and the artificial intelligence pioneers, deepmind. the man in charge of all this for the last six years is sundar pichai. born in india and an engineer by training, with a love of cricket. this is the man who took over from the founders. our media editor amol rajan — also a big cricket fan — has been to talk to him at google's hq in silicon valley in california. more than what your mind says, you need to kind of figure out what your heart is excited by. sundar pichai is ceo of google and its parent company alphabet which owns youtube. he was born in 1972 in south india and studied at the indian institute of technology before moving to the us and stanford university. in 2004, hejoined larry page at google.
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the company was just six years old. it is so good to see you. very, very good to see you. how are you? let's get used to this new elbow bump. historically, has google paid enough tax in the right places? we are not the world's largest taxpayers. you know, if you look at, on an average, over the past decade, we have paid more than 20% in taxes. we do pay the majority of our share of taxes in the us where we originate and where our parts are developed. i think there are good conversations and we support the global oecd conversations, figuring out what is the right way to allocate taxes and this is beyond a single company to solve. people always want to know about the personal technology habits of people who run big technology firms. do you let your children go on youtube? you have got two teenagers, i understand. yes, i do. what is your personal screen time for kids? i think this generation needs to learn to adapt to technology, it is going to be a big part of their lives, so i have encouraged them
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to develop boundaries on their own, but, you know, it's a journey of personal responsibility. a lot of people worry that the tendency on technology is destroying kids' creativity and really inhibits their ability to build relationships in the world. i think we should worry and i am glad there are experts looking at mental health, but i would also say that throughout history, we have always been worried about technology. i am going to do some quickfire questions. these are vaguely fun. is your google home speaker always switched on at home? yes, it is. yes. but, you know, it only listens when i address it, so i know that. how often do you change your password? you know, i encourage everyone, i use two factors of identification. i make sure, so i don't need to change my passwords that often because i have multiple productions in place. how many phones do you have? i imagine you have 20. no, it's more...
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not that i have as many phones, i'm constantly changing and trying out every new phone and i am testing it out all the time. are you indian or american? well, i am an american citizen, but, you know, india is deeply within me. so it is a big part of who i am. do you eat meat? i don't. republican or democrat? i keep my politics to myself. how often do you speak to mark zuckerberg? you know, as and when. there is no priority to it. as and when i need it. jeff bezos is going into space — would you? well, i'm jealous. a bit. i would love to look at earth from space. when did you last cry? oh, you know, seeing the morgue trucks parked around the world from covid—19. and seeing what is happening in india. my final question, what advice would you give to someone from humble beginnings who wants to run a great company? you just need to, more than what your mind says, you need to kind of
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figure out what your heart is excited by. and it's a journey. and you will know it when you find it. and if you find that, things tend to work out. our media editor amol rajan with google ceo, sundar pichai there. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. good afternoon. we've already seen some fairly wet weather this morning and that's because the same area of low pressure that brought showers and long spells of rain yesterday has been meandering around since and it still it's against its insolence across much of the uk, so there will be further torrential downpours to come particular close to the low pressure, so in southern parts of england, localflash pressure, so in southern parts of england, local flash flooding, pressure, so in southern parts of england, localflash flooding, spray and standing water, but given the strength of the sun at this time of year, like recent days, we could see some thunderstorms further north across scotland, northern ireland and into northern england and well. lots of cloud mulling around keeping the temperatures on the east coast a little down with more cloud here. 21
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or 22 in length your sunny spells, so still fairly pleasant in the sunshine. those showers will rumble on into the evening before gradually fading overnight but the cloud comes back to the east, the odd pocket of mist and fog elsewhere, so as last night, relatively warm at 12 or 14 degrees celsius, but on balance tomorrow looks drier, fewer showers, lengthy spells of sunshine coming through, so cannot rule out the odd shower, still a fair amount of instability in the atmosphere, as you can see here, one or a few showers popping up but fewer, as i say, both today and, indeed, yesterday. as a result, with lengthier spells of sunshine, temperatures responding, 23 or 24 in some spots but with some very high levels of pollen to be expected. as we go through the rest of the week, we go through the rest of the week, we still have our low pressure close by to southern and eastern areas, here on wednesday, but also by that stage we have a weather front rushing into the north—west, so we will see more cloud coming into northern and western parts of
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scotland for the islands as well here and stilled the chance of an northerly breeze close to that area of low pressure with one or two showers, but essentially a dry picture with long spells of sunshine, strong sunshine coming through and potentially some high levels of pollen once again. that sets the trend really for the rest of the week, this high—pressure moving in, pushing weatherfronts out of the way in the north and the low pressure out the way further south and east, so bringing us more settled conditions and with those more settled conditions, should be dry for most, sunny spells are lengthier and with temperatures responding as well, creeping a little higher by day. as ever, more on the website including the warnings.
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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 3pm: the government is expected to confirm in the next half hour —— in the next hour that are remaining— —— in the next hour that are remaining covid _ —— in the next hour that arej remaining covid restrictions —— in the next hour that are . remaining covid restrictions in england — remaining covid restrictions in england will— remaining covid restrictions in england will be _ remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted - remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next - remaining covid restrictions in. england will be lifted next week, but people — england will be lifted next week, but people will— england will be lifted next week, but people will be _ england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged - england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged to - england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged to keep| but people will be urged to keep waiting — but people will be urged to keep waiting face _ but people will be urged to keep waiting face coverings _ but people will be urged to keep waiting face coverings in - but people will be urged to keep| waiting face coverings in crowded places _ waiting face coverings in crowded places -- — waiting face coverings in crowded laces. . the president of the football association, prince william, says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it's unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, you know, people track those things have been able to explain that, but not all of it and it's just not what we stand for. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes
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and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. i'm annita mcveigh here at wembley. a massive 30.95 million people watched last night's euro final — the biggest peak audience since the funeral of diana, princess of wales. italy may have emerged victorious but england team have many reasons to hold their head up high. i'll be reflecting on another historic day in english football. and america scorched by a record—breaking heatwave, as california and nevada brace themselves for even higher temperatures. thousands of people take to the streets to join cuba's biggest anti—government protests for decades, demanding freedom, democracy and more covid vaccines.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the government is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted a week today. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. we'll hear live from the health secretary in the commons at 3.30pm. but at news conference later borisjohnson will also empasise that caution is vital in the face of rising case numbers which he said will continue to increase as england unlocks. and people will be urged to continue to wear face coverings in crowded places. our health correspondent jim reed reports. dance music plays this could be reality again next week. this pilot event in may saw 3000 clubbers back on the dance floor. from next monday, all nightclubs will be able to open across england as the last remaining social—distancing rules are scrapped. when we move to step four, we will see the falling away
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of legal obligations and legal restrictions and a move towards personal and corporate responsibility based on clear and strong guidance and people will make their own judgments. under the plans, the legal requirement to wear a mask will go, although ministers have said there will still be an expectation to wear a covering on transport and in some indoor spaces. in hospitality venues, the one metre plus rule will be lifted, for example allowing pubs to serve at the bar again. the main business lobby group is supportive of the move but says some protection may still be needed. i would urge companies to put in place measures, be that covid—safe environments, culture of mass working in the office and public spaces, ventilation systems and i think communication to employees and consumers about what you as a business are doing. but the change to the rules in england has already been delayed a month because of sharply rising covid infections. both ministers and some scientists
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say caution is still needed as more restrictions are lifted. we are at a really tricky phase, actually, at the moment because cases are going up in quite a concerning way. we are seeing daily cases in the 30,000s of course, but on the other side of the coin we are seeing still very low numbers of deaths and very low numbers of hospital admissions, though they are creeping up a little bit. wales will also review its restrictions on thursday, northern ireland is due to ease some measures later in the month, while in scotland, most remaining rules are due to be lifted by august 9th. jim reed, bbc news. and ahead of borisjohnson's news conference at 5pm, where he's expected to confirm almost all coronavirus restrictions in england will be lifted from the 19th ofjuly, we're expecting a statement from the health secretary sajid javid in the house of commons in around half an hour's time. we'll bring that to you live just as soon as he gets to his feet. prince william, who is president of the football association, says he's sickened by the racist
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abuse of players who missed penalites last night in england's defeat to italy in the final of the european championship. he called the online abuse abhorrent and unacceptable. meanwhile, the fa have ordered a review after fans without tickets forced their way into wembley stadium to watch the game. let'sjoin annita mcveigh at wembley. thank you very much. a welcome back to wembley. let's begin with what happened on the pitch. it was a dream start for england, that cross to luke shaw leading to a goal after just two minutes, but it was always going to be a really tough game, wasn't it against italy who at that point, had been unbeaten for 33 matches. we know how much it meant to the england team and gareth southgate to bring football home, to deliver on hope and expectation that had been building up through the
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tournament. you got a real sense of that at the news conference earlier today where gareth southgate said any defeat left him feeling as though his stomach had been ripped out. —— the defeat. andy swiss reports. commentator: saka has to score. it's saved by donnarumma, and it's italy who are - the champions of europe! so near, yet so agonisingly far. england know all about the pain of penalty shoot—outs, but this one felt especially cruel — their tournament ending in tears. and as the players left their hotel this morning, their manager could only reflect on what might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs of some consistency — semifinal, final — has to be a step in the right direction. it is not, ultimately, where we wanted to get to and when you are so close, it's even more painful, of course. it feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning.
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it had been a night of passion but also tension. outside wembley, some ticketless fans forced their way into the stadium. the fa are conducting a review. on the pitch, england made the perfect start — luke shaw firing them ahead afterjust two minutes. and it's luke shaw! but leonardo bonucci's second—half equaliser took the game into extra time and, ultimately, penalties, where it was an all—too—familiar story. three of england's brightest stars, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were the men to miss, and it was all over. the three england players have since received racist abuse on social media. this morning, the fa's president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened. "it is totally unacceptable that players have to endure this
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abhorrent behaviour". he added, "it must stop now and all those involved must be held accountable". well, england had hoped this would be a day of celebration, but the mood at wembley could not be more different. but the team can look back on what they have achieved at this tournament with huge pride. over a memorable month, they played with talent and togetherness, winning both matches and fans on their way to a first major final in 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and i have been on the end of it and, unfortunately, these boys will feel so hurt, so angry, so disappointed this morning and it'll hurt them for a while. but when you look at the whole picture, they should feel very proud of what they've given us. italy are the champions... but ultimately, it was italy's triumph, another trophy for them. and while england can look to the future with hope, right now there's only more heartache.
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andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. and it is sad today that we are not able to focus purely on the football, but we are talking again about racism, about the abuse directed at sacco, rushworth, and —— saka, rashford and sancho, those players who have the bravery to take a penalty at the biggest moment of their lives and gareth southgate has been talking about that at a news conference today. the players have had an incredible togetherness and spirit, which i think has brought so many parts of our country together, so they should be, and i think they are, incredibly proud of what they've done. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that
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has come from abroad. you know, the people that track those things have been able to explain that, but not all of it, and it's just not what we stand for. we, i think, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together, in people being able to relate to the national team and the national team stands for everybody, and so that togetherness has to continue. and we've shown the power our country has when it does come together and has that energy and positivity together. gareth southgate talking a little bit earlier today. and borisjohnson tweeted "this england team deserve to be lauded as heroes, not racially abused on social media. those responsible for this appalling abuse should be ashamed of themselves."
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but the labour leader, sir keir starmer, accused the prime minister for not doing enough to tackle online abuse. i'm afraid the prime minister has failed the test of leadership because whatever he says today about racism, he had a simple choice at the beginning of this tournament in relation to the booing of those who are taking in the knee, the players who are taking the knee, and they made it clear why they were taking the knee. the prime ministerfailed to call that out. the knee. the prime minister failed to call that out.— to call that out. away from the abuse, there _ to call that out. away from the abuse, there is _ to call that out. away from the abuse, there is much - to call that out. away from the abuse, there is much to - to call that out. away from the abuse, there is much to be - to call that out. away from the - abuse, there is much to be positive in this tournament. many of these players are very young, great, great promise for the future, great belief after this tournament in what they can do. eight games were played here at wembley, several of those by england, including, of course, the final. while that may not have been much of a journey for the players to
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play here, it was a big journey in many other ways, including for the fans. and we heard the team, gareth southgate talking throughout the tournament how the energy of the fans meant so much to them and help them to deliver on the pitch. well, those hopes were high going into last night because my game, but sadly it all ended in that dreaded penalty shoot—out. here is tim muffet. blue monday. i'm really gutted, really, really gutted. i thought we was going to do it — we didn't. come into work this morning, the whole day, we are all in a downer, we are devastated. how are you feeling? gutted, absolutely gutted. penalties, normally we get four out of five. we only got two last night. devastating. how about you ? gutted. the clean—up operation started early in london this morning.
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the fan zone in trafalgar square was dismantled, rubbish swept away — rubbish which summed up the nation's mood. this is something no one has ever experienced before — the day after an england defeat in the final of a major football tournament. dejected, slightly flat. you know, people had built up that team so much, so much, they really wanted it. we should all be very proud of what they did achieve. as the penalty shoot—out reached its conclusion last night, so a new generation of fans learned about england heartbreak the hard way. are we going to win the world cup? we're going to win the world cup! it's heartbreaking. honestly, i've never been more heartbroken in my life. blue monday for some, but oh, what a bellissimo morning for others. ifeel elated because italy beat a very, very good team, make no mistake about it, england is a top—class team. and for italy to beat them at wembley in front of 60,000 people makes me extremely proud. keeping things in perspective
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remains a priority for many. how are you feeling? listen, it's only a game of football, mate. it don't pay my bills! i'm really not bothered about it! i'm just glad all the fuss is over and we are back to actual real. life and death stuff. i'm really proud of our guys, i'm proud to be english. it's sad but it's also a life lesson. sore heads, broken hearts, and a phrase we've heard before — maybe next time. tim muffett, bbc news. when i was mentioning a few moments ago about the labour leader sir keir starmer saying the pain boris johnson had not done enough to tackle abuse. downing street has responded to that —— the prime minister. downing street saying the prime minister had made it extremely clear that he wanted people to be cheating the england players, not booing them before the team played
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their first game of the year as —— he wanted people to be cheering the england players, not booing them before they played their first game in the tournament. that is in response to those accusations from a labour that boris johnson failed to call it are those who had booed the players are for taking the knee. we saw them do that again last night, as i did at the italy team as well. and of course, after that game, the abuse levelled towards several players, young black players to on the england team, get southgate culling that are unacceptable, the police investigating that, social media companies doing what they can to try to tackle this, but a lot of big questions for the social media companies. we heard from facebook with regards to abuse on instagram, that there were controls that players could switch on to avoid
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seeing abuse, but that is just dealing with the symptoms, isn't it? many people saying, look, they have to deal with the source of this abuse. in response all of that, gareth southgate said, this is what the vast majority of people who have supported england or got on board with england during this term and believe, we have been a beacon of light in bringing people together, the national team stands for everybody. and it is that a sort of voice way over and above the racists and the people doling out the abuse, that has any sort of message that i think will be carried through. picking up on the promise of this tournament and are looking forward, which they will do. once they recover from this and the pain and disappointment, the physical tiredness, the emotional tiredness, looking forward to the next big tournament, which has come of course, the world cup. back to you, reeta.
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many thanks, my colleague annita mcveigh in wembley. passengers at heathrow�*s terminal 5 have been facing long queues due to more than a hundred security staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. our transport correspondent caroline davies gave me the latest. so some people were speculating on twitter this morning that the security guards hadn't turned up because of the match last night, but that is not correct according to heathrow airport. it is because of the test and trace app, and the fact that they were pinged. we know that there were queues of up to about an hour this morning at terminal 5 going through security, so these are staff, the security as you go into heathrow airport, going into the departures lounge. it's not border force control. this is just another element we've seen of disruption that can happen with travel. it's not necessarily the ones we've been talking about over the course of the last few weeks, about how disruption might happen at uk borders as there's more paperwork added in,
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but it just shows how at this time, during the course of the pandemic, international travel can still be disrupted. and it comes, as you say, as people were anticipating potentially long queues once travel opens up. we will, of course, get more detail this afternoon from the prime minister, butjust talk us through the kind of problems that people might face from next week, should they be able to travel more freely? yes, so last week, we heard from the government that they are planning to allow people who have been fully vaccinated to travel to amber list countries, coming back from amber list countries they will not to quarantine. they will still need to have test. but that could mean there are longer queues at the border, more people travelling. covid checks will increase, queues will increase, we saw queues of up to six hours earlier this year. things have sped up earlier this year. things have sped up quite dramatically since then and
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any government is taking steps to make things more automated and bring in more border force officials, but they want the queues are to be at they want the queues are to be at the other side when you're departing, the airlines will be checking as you're travelling to so not a normal summer of travelling to. ., _, , to. our travel correspondent, caroline davies _ to. our travel correspondent, caroline davies there. - as we've been hearing, borisjohnson is expected to confirm this afternoon that all legal restrictions on social contact will be lifted in england a week today. it's thought ministers will lift the legal requirement to wear face coverings in enclosed public spaces, although they've emphasised that people should still do so. well, health leaders in the north east of england are concerned about infection hotspots in the region, particularly among the largely unvaccinated under—25s. let's speak now to alice wiseman, director of public health for gateshead. good afternoon. just tell us a bit more about the situation in gateshead in terms of the number of cases and the number of
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vaccinations. fist cases and the number of vaccinations.— cases and the number of vaccinations. �* . , ., ., vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeinr a vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeing a rapid _ vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeing a rapid virus _ vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeing a rapid virus cases, _ vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeing a rapid virus cases, a - vaccinations. at any moment, we are seeing a rapid virus cases, a case - seeing a rapid virus cases, a case rate of about 65 per 100,000 injune and this morning it is a 913 per 100,000. that has really been the rapid rise we have seen over recent weeks. the number of them are younger people, as you would expect. the vaccine programme seems to be holding up fairly well in terms of preventing and weakening the link between antivirus and severe illness, but what it is not yet able to do is prevent onward transmission in those people who remain unvaccinated or, indeed, those people who have only had a single dose of vaccine. we are working hard locally to try to make sure that all of eighteens are offered their vaccine by next monday —— over ratings and encouraging people to come back for the second vaccine, eight weeks now after their second dose. . . . eight weeks now after their second dose. . , , . ,
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eight weeks now after their second dose. , ., , , , dose. cases have risen pretty steel , dose. cases have risen pretty steeply. her— dose. cases have risen pretty steeply, her hospitals - dose. cases have risen pretty| steeply, her hospitals coping? dose. cases have risen pretty - steeply, her hospitals coping? what are your numbers and hospital? there is ressure are your numbers and hospital? there is pressure growing. _ are your numbers and hospital? there is pressure growing. to _ are your numbers and hospital? there is pressure growing. to put _ are your numbers and hospital? tues is pressure growing. to put it in context we had 14 inpatients this time last weekend this morning we over 40. time last weekend this morning we over40. again, a time last weekend this morning we over 40. again, a significant rise. when i have chatted with the hospital staff, actually, some of those people are in hospitalfor other things, those people are in hospitalfor otherthings, but those people are in hospitalfor other things, but because we have got widespread community transmission testing positive for covid and others are in at the hospital because of covid, because they are severely unwell as a result of the virus, the majority of people who are in her unwell from covid are those who have either only had one vaccine or have not been vaccinated at all. we are starting to see an increase in numbers of older people where we have reduced the risk of severe illness, but we have not eliminate it completely. this is the something we always knew we would say, so there is a increasing number of people aged over 65 who are testing positive. interesting, when
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we have looked at those who have tested positive over the age of 65, half of them have had to vaccinations so just because you have had the vaccinations does not mean you cannot transmit the virus to other people. it may protect you from being severely ill mile, but you still believe is get a transmitter —— severely unwell. you still believe is get a transmitter -- severely unwell. what do ou transmitter -- severely unwell. what do you think — transmitter -- severely unwell. what do you think about _ transmitter -- severely unwell. what do you think about the _ transmitter —— severely unwell. what do you think about the lifting of restrictions which we think is going to be announced for this time next week? ~ . �* , ., ., , week? what we're trying to do is encourage _ week? what we're trying to do is encourage our — week? what we're trying to do is encourage our community - week? what we're trying to do is encourage our community to - week? what we're trying to do is - encourage our community to continue doing all the things that have become almost second nature over the last 15 to 17 months. we might not have the legislation setting behind butjust because you're able to do something does not mean it is the right thing to do and certainly, i will be continuing to wear my facemask in public. we know a wedding that does not provide you with much protection, but it provides other people for protection from me if i'm one those people who are one in three people who do not know they are infected with covid. i
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will be continuing to do that and i will be continuing to do that and i will be continuing to do that and i will be continuing to encourage people to limit social contact where possible, think about if you want to have a big night out, maybe had a couple of smaller nights that you do not do it in advance of that so that you can really make sure you enjoy that when you do. i think the other thing we need to think about is how we protect those people who are in these businesses. businesses have been really damaged over the last 12-17 been really damaged over the last 12—17 months and what i want to make sure i do is when i am out and about that i am protecting staff who work there because it feels unfair to me that supermarket staff, for example, are going to be exposed a very frequent basis to lots and lots of people and potentially have a greater risk of being infected if everybody does not take the measures they have been taking. so easily over the last 17 months now. fiiq over the last 17 months now. 0k, aood to over the last 17 months now. 0k, good to talk _ over the last 17 months now. 0k, good to talk to — over the last 17 months now. 0k, good to talk to you. _ over the last 17 months now. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you so much. the directorfor good to talk to you. thank you so much. the director for public health in gateshead, alice weisman.
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parts of the united states are suffering wealth has. firefighters how to it is so dry that much of the water dropped by aircraft evaporates before it reaches the ground. our north america correspondent has this report. wildfires are burning with a ferocity that has rarely been seen before. in oregon, firefighters on the front line of this inferno had to be pulled back for their own safety. after almost a week, it's spread to more than 600 square kilometres. in arizona, two firefighters died when their aircraft crashed while responding to another blaze. dozens are burning in california, including this enormous fire, spreading rapidly close to the border with nevada. the beckwourth complex fire, the state's biggest, was started by lightning.
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a vast area of forest has been closed and people have been evacuated from their homes. in the california desert, they're used to extreme heat but nothing like this. this isjoshua tree national park — a tourist destination close to the resort of palm springs, where temperatures reached a record for the time of year — 48.9 degrees celsius. it's the hottest place on earth. like, this is hot. it's never been hotter. it feels like we're in an oven, yeah. i came from the caribbean, i came from dominican republic, from a really hot country, and it's still hot for me so i'm trying my best. officials have warned tourists and residents here that these baking temperatures can be lethal. las vegas has also matched its all—time high temperature — the entertainment city reached 47.2 celsius. the authorities said several people were taken to hospital over the weekend with heat—related conditions.
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scientists say there is growing evidence that climate change is fuelling extreme weather patterns, and they are likely to become more common. last month was the hottestjune on record in north america. the high temperatures of the past few days are expected to ease off by the middle of the week but the heatwaves this summer have been relentless and the months that are usually the hottest are still to come. peter bowes, bbc news, washington. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello, it's another day of sunny spells and showers out and about. some lively downpours again — you can see the brighter colours — some lively downpours again — you can see the brighter colours here just indicating the risk of some hail and some thunder and there is very little wind around so they will be slow moving. you can see that there is also quite a lot of cloud clinging to the east coast. but in the sunshine, pleasantly warm — 21, 22 celsius. and the sunshine continues
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into the evening, as do those heavy downpours, before starting to ease away through the night. many places should become dry overnight but notice, again, the thickening of the cloud for eastern parts of both england and scotland. with all of that cloud around, it will be relatively warm again. some bits of mist and fog inland, i think, come tuesday morning, which will quickly clear given the strength of the july sunshine, but it might take longer for that low cloud to clear away from eastern coasts. but on balance, tuesday looks drier with lengthier spells of sunshine, fewer of those downpours around and so, as a consequence, temperatures will rise a little higher again. hello, this is bbc news with me reeta chakrabarti, the headlines. the president of the football association, prince william, says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last
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night's defeat to italy. it's also been condemned by england's manager, gareth southgate. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. but celebrations in rome where the victorious italian team arrived back this morning to a hero's welcome. in other news this hour — the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week, but people will be urged to keep wearing face coverings in crowded places. and america scorched by a record breaking heatwave as california and nevada brace themselves for even higher temperatures. to cuba now where thousands of people have joined protests across the country, taking a stand against cuba's communist government. the president argues the united states is to blame — calling supporters to confront those demonstrating. tanya dendrinos reports. chanting for freedom....
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all chant: libertad! ..not a cry often heard in havana. cubans took to the streets in what the opposition has called the biggest anti—government protests in almost three decades. translation: state security beat me and my daughter. i they beat us because we were walking down the street. translation: we are here because of the repression l against the people. they are starving us to death. havana is collapsing. we have no house, we have nothing. but they have money to build hotels and they have us starving. all chant: libertad! demonstrations were also held in florida, where the cuban exile community showed its solidarity. cuba's president has blamed the united states for the unrest, laying down a threat for anti—government protesters. translation: we came here to show, together. with the revolutionaries of this town, that here, the street belongs to the revolutionaries. no worm or mercenary will claim the streets.
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and if they provoke us, without violating their constitutional rights, we will confront them. words spurring on supporters of the communist government, some taking it upon themselves to surround and detain those demonstrating... man: viva la revolucion! ..while others staged counter protests. translation: we are defending what we did 60 years ago. - that this is ours. that it has cost many lives. that capitalism will never come back here again. and that these mercenaries, paid by the empire, will never again take our streets. they will have to kill us all first. demonstrations of this kind are rare in cuba. but, as the country reports a record number of coronavirus infections, tensions are boiling over and cries for democracy are growing. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
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we're shortly expecting a statement from the health secretary sajid javid on whether conditions have been met to relax almost all legal restrictions on social contact in england next monday. let's get more from our deputy political editor vicki young. what are we expecting from him? you will be what are we expecting from him? gm. will be laying out mps how the government sees this. we heard from borisjohnson a week ago giving a very clear indication that all those legal restrictions would be lifted next monday and i do not think there is any reason to think anything has changed in the last week. it is this move really from lots of enforced, legally enforced restrictions, talking more about personal responsibility. now, of course, that makes it more nuanced in many ways and i think what we will be looking out forfrom and i think what we will be looking out for from the health secretary and from borisjohnson later is really how they calibrate that, the tone of all of this, because if they
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are lifting all the restrictions on one hand, plenty of people will be thinking that is the end of all this and it is a free for all, but on the other hand, we will hear from ministers saying we have to still be very cautious, so i think that is going to be the line they have to tread quite carefully and there will be lots of people wanting to know what it really means, so some of the areas we will be listening for our around, for example, working from home, be encouragement to go back to the office, for example, or will it be the opposite? what kind of guidance for their b4 businesses? it is all going to be in the of guidance. when it comes to wearing facemask, there are lots of discussions over the last few weeks with several cabinet ministers really sounding very enthusiastic about throwing away facemasks and then saying they would use it in some circumstances, is that still going to be the case or will there be more caution and more guidance around all of that? also, those who are clinically vulnerable who will
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be feeling, i think, particularly that this is a difficult time because we have cases rising and rising rapidly. brute because we have cases rising and rising rapidly-— rising rapidly. we heard the arguments _ rising rapidly. we heard the arguments for _ rising rapidly. we heard the arguments for opening - rising rapidly. we heard the arguments for opening up l rising rapidly. we heard the i arguments for opening up this rising rapidly. we heard the - arguments for opening up this time last week from the prime minister who were saying, if not now, when, essentially, because it is summer, school holidays. soon, there will be less social contacts and we are outside more, but it is still a big risk, isn't it? outside more, but it is still a big risk. isn't it?— outside more, but it is still a big risk, isn't it? yes, because in the end, they — risk, isn't it? yes, because in the end, they do _ risk, isn't it? yes, because in the end, they do not _ risk, isn't it? yes, because in the end, they do not exactly - risk, isn't it? yes, because in the end, they do not exactly know. risk, isn't it? yes, because in the i end, they do not exactly know which way this will go. we may get more guidance around that, too, because we will get some scientific papers from the science, the advisory group, sage, they will be looking and have looked at modelling and this is mathematical modelling, looking at previous waves and looking at previous waves and looking at previous waves and looking at what they think will happen this time. we have already heard sajid javid talk about up to 100,000 cases a day in england alone, so there is some guidance there about all of this and where they know it is going to go and i think we all from the number of people who are isolating because
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they have covid, plus those who are coming into contact with them, that is the disruption that you can see is the disruption that you can see is going to happen in the next few weeks, disruption very much in schools at the moment, but that is likely to go broader and into the workplace, i think, likely to go broader and into the workplace, ithink, with likely to go broader and into the workplace, i think, with those numbers of cases. the key thing the government's message is that the vaccine programme means there are fewer hospitalisations and deaths compared to when cases were rising backin compared to when cases were rising back in the winter and that is the point about really that link between the two. it has not been severed completely, but it does mean it has been weakened and offer lots, so what they are hoping, of course, is that they will not have the future of people in hospital, but that will be key to looking at those modelling charts today, i think. how many people per day today think will go into hospital next month? because that will still inevitably put a strain on the nhs.— that will still inevitably put a strain on the nhs. . ~ ., strain on the nhs. thank you and we will no strain on the nhs. thank you and we will go back— strain on the nhs. thank you and we will go back to _ strain on the nhs. thank you and we will go back to westminster - strain on the nhs. thank you and we will go back to westminster as i will go back to westminster as souness the health secretary gets on his feet in the commons.
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ajordanian court has found two men guilty of plotting with a former—crown prince to destabilise the kingdom. an ex—chief of the royal court, bassem awadullah, and a minor member of royal family have been sentenced to fifteen years in prison. the prince allegedly involved in the plot, prince hamza, was not on trial. after the conspiracy emerged he re—affirmed his allegiance to king abdullah. frank gardner has more on the background to the case. first of all, it is important _ background to the case. first of all, it is important to _ background to the case. first of all, it is important to say i background to the case. first of all, it is important to say that l background to the case. first of| all, it is important to say that all three people involved are denying the charges. they are denying these allegations that they were trying to destabilise the monarchy and what they are accused of, they are accused of essentially trying to promote the king's half prince hamza in exchange for king abdullah, in other words to put him on the throne instead. they deny this, but what actually happened was that on april the 3rd, a video was smuggled out of
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prince hamza's palace by him which had him speaking to the camera, accusing the government of the gross ineptitude and corruption and he is very popular, prince hamza, because he was the eldest son of his father, king hussein, who is still revered injordan and also the son of the king's favourite wife, so he has quite a following and he had been reportedly attending some rallies and tribal gatherings in which a lot of people were voicing discontent. jordan is not in a good place at the moment because it was never a rich country in the first place, it is in difficult neighbourhoods, sandwiched between israel and iran, and the covid—19 pandemic has absolutely ravaged through the country's economy, which is already burdened with a large number of syrian refugees, so there is a lot of unemployment, poverty and a fair bit of discontent, but the one unifying
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factor injordan has always been the monarchy, the hashemite kingdom rulers, so this has been a shock for jordanians and very embarrassing for the monarchy who have tried to close it down, they have held this trial in secret, they did not put prince hamza on trial and it was resolved privately within the court and he pledged his allegiance to the king, so these are tough sentences. prince hamza, we do not know what his condition is at the moment, but he did not stand trial. £311" condition is at the moment, but he did not stand trial.— did not stand trial. our security correspondence, _ did not stand trial. our security correspondence, frank- did not stand trial. our security| correspondence, frank gardner. did not stand trial. our security i correspondence, frank gardner. we are waiting at the moment for the health secretary, sajid javid, to get on his feet in the commons where he is expected to be making a statement about relaxing almost all legal restrictions on social contact in england from next monday. i think we can... here we go, here he comes. thank you, mr speaker. before i update the house on the pandemic, i
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would like to take a moment to congratulate the england football team for making history. and for the way they have brought us all together with their skill and spirit over the past few weeks. last night's result may not have been the one many of us were hoping for, but they played like heroes and the nation is proud of each and every one of them. mr speaker, i also want to take this opportunity to condemn the shameful racism experienced by several members of the england team after the match. racism has no place in football, it has no place in our society, and i know the whole house will agree that we must always show zero tolerance to this appalling behaviour. mr speaker, with permission, i would like to turn to our path out of this pandemic. all the way through our fight against the way through our fight against the virus, we have looked forward to the virus, we have looked forward to the day when we can roll back the legal restrictions and get closer to normal life. now, thanks to the shared sacrifices of the british people and the protective wall of
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our vaccination programme, we have made huge advances. today, i would like to update the house on the next decision that is in front of us, whether to proceed to step four of our road map next monday. as i set out to this house last week, this will be a major milestone for this country, taking us another step closer to the life that we all used to live. it means carefully removing more of the restrictions that have governed our daily lives, like how many people you can meet, how many people can attend weddings and how many visitors you can see in care homes and bring them together with their loved ones. we have all been yearning to get there and we all want this to be a one—wayjourney, so we have acted in a measured way, taking one step at a time and looking at the very latest data and at our four tests before deciding whether to proceed. mr speaker, the
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first test is the success of our vaccination programme. ever since the 8th of december last year, when the 8th of december last year, when the world's first clinically authorised vaccine was given right here in the uk, we have been putting jabs in the arms of people at a phenomenal pace, giving over 80 million doses injust phenomenal pace, giving over 80 million doses in just seven phenomenal pace, giving over 80 million doses injust seven months. we have given more doses per capita than any other large nation, and as a result, around nine in ten adults in the uk now have covid—19 antibodies, which are so important in helping us and our bodies to fight this virus. to bolster this protective wall even further, we made the tough but necessary decision to take a four week pause to step four so we could protect even more people before easing restrictions and since making the decision, we have been able to give seven millions extra doses across the uk. we have pledged that by the
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19th ofjuly, that we would have offered every adult a first dose of the vaccine and have given two doses to two thirds of all adults and i and pleased to inform the house today that we are on track to beat both of these targets. so, as we make this crucial decision, we are in a stronger position than ever before. mr speaker, we have looked notjust before. mr speaker, we have looked not just at how before. mr speaker, we have looked notjust at how manyjabs we have put in arms, but what impact they are having on hospitalisations and the loss of loved ones. and this is our second test. there is increasing evidence that the vaccine has severely weakened this link, the link that was once a grim inevitability. data from public health england estimates that two doses of a covid—19 vaccine offers protection of around 96% against hospitalisation, meaning fewer covid
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patients in hospital beds and fewer mourning the loss of a loved one. and they also estimate that the vaccination programme in england has prevented between 7.5 million and 8.9 million infections. it has prevented some 46,000 hospitalisations and around 30,000 people losing their lives. all because of the protection, that the vaccines can bring. mr speaker, our third test is a roundwhether infection rates would put unsustainable pressure on the nhs. and i want to be open about what the data is telling us and why we have reached the decision that we have. cases are rising, propelled by the new more transmissible delta variant. the average number of daily cases is over 26000 and this has doubled over the past 11 days.
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sadly, the case numbers will get a lot worse before they get better. we could reach 100,000 cases a day later in the summer. hospitalisations are also rising with sustained growth over the past month and, once again, they will rise, too. but we should be encouraged that hospitalisations are far lower than they were at the point —— this point during the previous wave, just as we should be encouraged that people over the age of 65, who were most likely to have had both doses of the vaccines, make up had both doses of the vaccines, make up 31% of covid admissions last week compared to 61% injanuary. this is further evidence that our vaccination programme is doing its job and protecting the nhs and, as more people get the jab, our protective wall is getting stronger still. we will stay vigilant and
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keep a very close eye on the data, as well as the impact of long covid where we are investing £50 million into new research. but on the basis of the evidence in front of us, we do not believe that infection rates will be putting unsustainable pressure on the nhs. it is so important that everyone still does their bit in helping the nhs to stand strong and the best thing that each and every one of us can do if we have not done so already is get the jab and, crucially, get both doses. now, ourfinaltest is the jab and, crucially, get both doses. now, ourfinal test is that the risks are not fundamentally changed by new variants of concern. we have seen from the growth of the delta variant, which now makes up 99% of new cases in this country, just how quickly a new variants can take hold. however, although the delta variant is more transmissible than the alpha variant, the evidence showing two doses of the vaccine
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appears to be just as effective against hospitalisation. but we know the greatest risk to the progress we have made is the possibility of another new variant, especially one that can escape immunity and puncture the protective wall of our vaccination programme. so, even as we look to ease restrictions, we will maintain our tough measures at the borders and we will expand our capacity for genomics sequencing which is already that one of the largest in the world so we can come down hard if we detect a new variant. now, mr speaker, we have looked closely at the data against these four tests and we firmly believe that this is the right time to get our nation closer to normal life, so we will move to the next stage of our road map onjuly the 19th. now, to those who say, why
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take this step now? i say, if not now, when? there will never be a perfect time to take this step because we simply cannot eradicate this virus. whether we like it or not, coronavirus is not going away, but moving forward next week, supported by the arrival of summer and the school holidays, it gives us the best possible chance of a return to normal life. if we wait longer, then we risk pushing the virus towards winter, when the virus will have an advantage or, worse still, we will not be opening up at all. we delayed step 4x4 week so we could build our vaccine wall even higher and we believe this wall means that
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we can withstand a summer wave and while the wall would be higher still if we waited till winter, we know the wave would be much more dangerous, so while we know there are risks with any decision, this is the most responsible decision that we can take. this step forward is about balancing the harms that are caused by covid with the undeniable harms that restrictions bring. these restrictions were vital to protect the nhs, but we must be upfront about the impact of keeping them. just as we are about removing them. the rise in domestic violence, the impact on mental health, the undiagnosed cancer to namejust a few. so we will ease the restrictions next week while at the same time we will be maintaining the defences we have taken against this
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virus, like our vaccination programme where we still need more young people to come forward, our work to support the most vulnerable and the contingency plans that we have put in place to stay one step ahead of this virus. but this is not the end of the road. it is the start of a new phase of continued caution while we live with this virus and we manage the risks. and we are publishing a plan today, showing this safe and gradual approach that we will be taking throughout the summer. it includes details of how we will be encouraging businesses and large events to use a certification in high—risk settings to limitless risk of spreading infection, how we will use guidance for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable and details of a review that we will be conducting in september to assess our preparedness for autumn and winter. mr speaker, as we make these changes, it is so important that people act with caution and with
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personal responsibility, for example, everyone should return to work gradually if they are currently working from home. they should try to meet people outside where that is possible and, as expected and recommended, people should wear face coverings unless they are exempt in crowded indoor settings such as public transport. mr speaker, i also want to take this opportunity to update the house on our policies for self isolation. last week, i announced to the house that from the 16th of august, double jabbed adults and under 18 is will no longer need to self—isolate if they are a close contact of someone with covid—19. until then, with case rates expected to rise, it is vital that we make sure our systems for self isolation are proportionate and that they reflect both the protection given by our vaccination programme. as part of this approach, we will work with clinicians and the nhs to explore what more can be done for our
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colleagues in patient—facing roles. this would only be used in exceptional circumstances where the self isolation fully vaccinated close contacts could directly impact the safety of patients, so we can keep our vital services going as we safely and gradually get to a closer to normal life. mr speaker, the 19th ofjuly will mark another step forward in our road to recovery getting here has been hard—fought and it has been long—awaited, but this battle is not over yet. let's move forward in a confident but measured way so that we can get closer to normal life and protect the progress that we have already made. i commend this statement to the house. i made. i commend this statement to the house. .., made. i commend this statement to the house. , ., ., the house. i call the shadow secretary — the house. i call the shadow secretary of _ the house. i call the shadow secretary of state. - the house. i call the shadow secretary of state. i - the house. i call the shadow secretary of state. i come i the house. i call the shadowj secretary of state. i come of course, thank _ secretary of state. i come of course, thank the _ secretary of state. i come of course, thank the secretary | secretary of state. i come of i course, thank the secretary of state for advanced site of his statement and i want tojoin him and others, across the house, in paying tribute
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to the england side. they did, indeed, unite the country and we are proud of each and every one of them. those players did, of course, take the need to show they were taking a stand against racism and we, again, offer them our solidarity and join with others in condemning utterly the racist, vile abuse we have seen in the last 24 hours. mr speaker, we want to see the economy reopen in a balanced, safe and sustainable way. that means maintaining certain mitigations to both contain the speed at which infections are rising and help reduce transmission and help limit the number is exposed to the virus before they, themselves, are fully vaccinated. instead, the secretary of state has taken a high risk, indeed, fatalistic approach, trying to gain what might happen in
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the winter, deciding that infections are going up anyway and, instead of caution, he is putting his foot down on the accelerator while throwing the seat belt. he admits that could mean 100,000 infections a day. that means potentially thousands suffering debilitating long covid. it means, as more cases arise, potentially more escape and the threat of a new, more transmissible variant emerging. now, two weeks ago, hejustified unlocking and suggested it could make us healthier. today, hospital admissions are running at over 480. there are now 393 people in intensive care, up over 100 since the start ofjuly and significant increases in admissions knocks onto the nhs's ability to provide wider care. he says the infection rates will not put unsustainable pressure on the nhs, but last week at leeds,
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cancer patients were having their surgery cancelled. last week, ambulance trusts across the country were reporting some of their busiest days ever. 111 is under intense pressure and, at the weekend, he warned that the elective waiting list could rise as high as 13 million, so perhaps he could define what he means by unsustainable pressure and could he tell us what is his prediction that hospital admissions will peak at? he has told us he expects 100,000 infections, can he tells how many hospital admissions he thinks? does his confidence mean there will be no extra resources for the nhs this summer to get through this summer wave? he highlights vaccination, but why are vaccination rates are slowing down? and what will he do to drive up racks and nation rates amongst younger people where it is still only around 68% of 18—24
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—year—olds? when will we begin vaccination of adolescents? other countries are doing it, why are not we? butjust to rely only on vaccination as infections climb is the approach of the one club golfer. there needs to be other measures in place as well, so labour would continue with mandatory mask wearing. i notice his tone has shifted, actually, from the last week or so, and shifted, actually, from the last week orso, and it shifted, actually, from the last week or so, and it is now his view that it would be irresponsible not to wear a mask in a crowded room. surely, then, it is equally irresponsible for the government to abandon mandatory mask wearing? secondly, yesterday, working from home, susan hopkins from ph.d suggested that for the next four to six weeks at least, people should try their best to work from home, so will he guarantee that anyone who want to continue working from home will have the right to do so?
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thirdly, we know how important fresh air is. germany has funded systems in public buildings and last week he referred to the infection—control funding given to social care but that was not for ventilation. there are british firms that manufacture air filtration and ventilation units, so let's support those firms and britishjobs units, so let's support those firms and british jobs and units, so let's support those firms and britishjobs and offer grants units, so let's support those firms and british jobs and offer grants to premises to install air and filtration units and will he use the summer to install airfiltration summer to install air filtration units in summer to install airfiltration units in every school? fourthly, as more virus circulates, more people will be exposed and more people will become ill and more will have to isolate, but some people still cannot isolate because of finances and those with caring responsibilities for someone who has had to isolate can also be financially penalised. furlough is beginning to be withdrawn, so financial support for isolation will become even more urgent. will he ensure that those who need to isolate can access adequate sick pay
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and support? fitfully, to get through this third wave and flatten the curve, we will need ongoing testing and contact tracing will need extra capacity. will he give local authorities resources to lead the enhanced retrospective and forward contact tracing they need to do and will he know abandon his proposed charges for lateral flow tests which he said introduce? finally, when he was appointed, he said any easing onjuly 19 would be, in his words, irreversible. other countries have thought the same with their road maps, yet israel has reintroduced masks, the netherlands reopened nightclubs and had to close them again after two weeks. is it still his view that the 19th is terminus day and that everything he has announced today is irreversible? or does he agree that it would be more sensible to have regular review dates in place through the summer as
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we deal with this third wave and rising infections?— rising infections? secretary of state. rising infections? secretary of state- the — rising infections? secretary of state. the right _ rising infections? secretary of state. the right honourable l state. the right honourable gentleman _ state. the right honourable gentleman started - state. the right honourable gentleman started by i state. the right honourable j gentleman started by saying state. the right honourable i gentleman started by saying that state. the right honourable - gentleman started by saying that he supports a balanced approach in a sustainable way and that is exactly what i have set out today from this dispatch box. that is the government's approach, so i agree with him, it isjust government's approach, so i agree with him, it is just that we have set out the detail. i am still not sure what his plan actually is and so given he set out the objectives, i hope eakin support this plan. he talks about the risks that are involved and i have been very upfront about that, the government have been upfront, there is no risk—free way forward and while opening up is not without risk, ongoing restrictions are not without cost. i hope the right honourable gentleman would appreciate that. he has raised a number of questions, mr speaker, around hospitalisations
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and, as i have said, case numbers are going up and we expect them to continue going up, but the most important difference today versus the last wave is the vaccination, that wall of defence that our country has built which has meant that hospitalisations, although they are rising as case numbers rise, they are rising at a much slower rate than before, as i have set out specifically regarding tester three in our road map that we believe the pressure with all the data that we are seeing at this point is not unsustainable for the nhs. the right honourable gentleman talked about vaccinations and i am pleased he is highlighting that, especially for more young people to come forward. as i mentioned in my statement, we are ahead of the plans that we set out for when step four was temporarily pushed out by four weeks
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and he has also asked about the vaccination of children and he knows that we had a group of expert advisors, the jcvi, that we had a group of expert advisors, thejcvi, and this is something they are actively looking at and, at some point, we will reach at and, at some point, we will reach a final decision but i hope you will agree with me that we should take the scientific advice on that and consider it very carefully before making such a move. on—air ventilation units or some of the 90 plus billion pounds extra the government has provided to the health and care system during the course of that pandemic, some of it has been used on—air ventilation units and we should continue to support that and a lot of extra funding has also gone to people to support them financially if they are asked to isolate and it is important that that is something that is both kept under review and something that is continued to be taken seriously. he mentioned lateral flow testing and something about charging for them. it might be his policy, but it
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is not government policy. i do not know where he has got that from, but we have no plans to charge for lateral flow tests. lastly, we have no plans to charge for lateralflow tests. lastly, on we have no plans to charge for lateral flow tests. lastly, onjuly the 19th, lateralflow tests. lastly, onjuly the 19th, what lateral flow tests. lastly, onjuly the 19th, what that is is a step forwards on our road map as we have clearly set out. the pandemic is not over. it is a significant step forward and he talked about reviews and i havejust set forward and he talked about reviews and i have just set out in september that we will have a review to make sure we are properly set up for autumn and for winter. the virus toda is autumn and for winter. the virus today is a _ autumn and for winter. the virus today is a totally _ autumn and for winter. the virus today is a totally different i today is a totally different creature to a year ago with only one in 40 new cases being hospitalised and at the average case of new cases —— age of cases being 25. the government's approach is entirely reasonable, but does the health secretary agree that
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there remain, to paraphrase the late donald rumsfeld, a number of unknown unknowns and known unknowns, not least the impact of long covid, the potential for vaccine escape and the potential for vaccine escape and the potential for vaccine escape and the potential for a radiance. potential for vaccine escape and the potentialfor a radiance. will he reassure the house —— for new variants. will he say he will not hesitate to take decisive action to save lives and head of the need for a further lot then that will be see so enormously damaging for ourjobs and businesses. i’m so enormously damaging for our “obs and businesses.i and businesses. i'm very happy to cive m and businesses. i'm very happy to give my right _ and businesses. i'm very happy to give my right honourable - and businesses. i'm very happy to give my right honourable friend i and businesses. i'm very happy to l give my right honourable friend that assurance. he made some excellent points there and i thank him for his support for the government has make action, but also he is right to point out that there is still uncertainty for us, for countries across the world in dealing with this pandemic and i am very pleased to assure him that if that risk
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matrix changes, for example with variants of concern, we will not hesitate to take the appropriate action. ., .. hesitate to take the appropriate action. ., ~' ,, , hesitate to take the appropriate action. ., .. ,, , . hesitate to take the appropriate action. ., ,, , . ~ action. thank you very much, mr seaker. action. thank you very much, mr speaker- i _ action. thank you very much, mr speaker. i would _ action. thank you very much, mr speaker. i would like _ action. thank you very much, mr speaker. i would like to - action. thank you very much, mr| speaker. i would like to associate myself with the colleagues and health secretary's condemnation of racism based by members of the england football team after their impressive performance to the euros. turning to covid, the secretary of state himself has suggested covid cases could soar to 100,000 a day once all restrictions are removed next monday. while research shows hospitalisation rates have, thankfully, dropped to 3% of cases due to vaccination, this would still mean up to 3000 admissions, the same as during the first wave. can he explain how he will avoid such a surge putting pressure on health
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services which would further delay credence of the backlog of patients waiting with other conditions? with the likelihood of such high transmission rates, how does he hope to prevent the generation of yet more new variants within the uk, perhaps with significant vaccine resistance. evidence is growing over the debilitating impact of post—covid post morbidity and at the office of national statistics estimate it could affect 10% of those who have had the virus. how does he plan to avoid an acceptably high risk of long covid in young adults and children who are not fully vaccinated? and finally, why is he ending the mandatory wearing of masks in indoor spaces and public transport? when they reduce a viral spread and cause are no economic detriment? does he not recognise that as a vulnerable people can't
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count on others wearing masks, for them, the 19th ofjuly will not be freedom day, but the exact opposite. thank you, mr speaker. i notice the honourable lady and thanks for what she said about the england football team, but i noted she did not say how she supported so i hope it was england. turning to hospitalisations, she is right to raise theirs. of course, as cases rise, which sadly they will for the reasons i have set out, hospitalisations will rise to. the rates of hospitalisation will be far, far lower than anything we have seen before due to vaccination and she will know, given her experience, that also the treatments that are available are a lot, lot better and more effective than what we had at the start of this pandemic and
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during the last wave, which is also helping, should people sadly find themselves in hospital. it is something, as part of the three test, test number three, that we have looked at very carefully, we have looked at very carefully, we have looked at the data, of course, we have worked very closely with our colleagues in an almost minute by minute basis on the nhs to make sure that the increased pressure, and i accept there will be increased pressure, i have been very open that it will be something that can be met and sustained and is important, though, to understand because she mentioned the backlogs. the backlog has built up over the pandemic because people stayed away from the nhs for perfectly understandable reasons, but we do need to start getting back to normal as quickly and reasonably as we can so we can start looking at more and more people at the longer term in the nhs and improve the backlog more quickly than otherwise. on masks, i believe
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i have answered that question. the most important thing is our guidelines will be very clear on masks and they will be published later today as well. mr masks and they will be published later today as well.— later today as well. mr speaker, enterprises _ later today as well. mr speaker, enterprises are _ later today as well. mr speaker, enterprises are having _ later today as well. mr speaker, enterprises are having to i later today as well. mr speaker, enterprises are having to shut i enterprises are having to shut because key members of staff, notwithstanding having been vaccinated twice, are having to isolate as contacts. as infections increase, so we'll contacts. there is every possibility of the economy grinding to a halt will stop will he review the need to self—isolate if twice vaccinated and showing negative test. mr twice vaccinated and showing negative test.— twice vaccinated and showing negative test. mr speaker, it is recisel negative test. mr speaker, it is precisely for — negative test. mr speaker, it is precisely for the _ negative test. mr speaker, it is precisely for the reasons i negative test. mr speaker, it is precisely for the reasons and i negative test. mr speaker, it is i precisely for the reasons and other reasons that my right honourable friend sets out that we have already reviewed there was a rules around self—isolation and that is why we have announced that there will be a change from august 16 and we will keep their was under review. ==
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keep their was under review. -- those keep their was under review. —— those under review. for the 3.8 million clinically extremely vulnerable people, the prospect of a so—called freedom day next week is actually anything but. they, and many clinically vulnerable people such as pregnant women are living in fear of what living with covid means for them. fear of what living with covid means forthem. last fear of what living with covid means for them. last monday, the secretary of state promised me guidance was forthcoming. last wednesday, members and other place and charities met with his ministerial colleague lord bethel and officials who admitted this was not good enough and are something more had to be done. could it the secretary of state confirmed today what support and what guidance will be forthcoming and when, or is he purse being a survival of the fittest policy where the most vulnerable will be thrown to the wolves? . . vulnerable will be thrown to the wolves? , , ., ., wolves? this is one of the most important _ wolves? this is one of the most important issues _ wolves? this is one of the most important issues and _ wolves? this is one of the most important issues and as - wolves? this is one of the most important issues and as the i important issues and as the honourable lady says, there are many people that are immunosuppressed or severely clinically vulnerable and it is important that every stage of
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dealing with this pandemic that we are thinking of them and having in front of mind. that is what i believe we have done. of course, where people in that category are able to take the vaccine, they should. but she asked about advice and we are publishing this advice today. i’m and we are publishing this advice toda . �* ., . and we are publishing this advice toda . �* . , ., today. i'm grateful. it is worth thin i today. i'm grateful. it is worth thing i welcome, _ today. i'm grateful. it is worth thing i welcome, strongly- today. i'm grateful. it is worth i thing i welcome, strongly welcome the statement from the secretary of state. when he is back at that dispatch box in the autumn, as i fear he may be, announcing further restrictions, guidance or another lockdown even, one of the things that will have driven that is hospitalisation data. there is a big club with that date at the moment and that it includes anyone who test positive for covid who goes into hospital, not whether they have gone into hospital because they have gone into hospital because they have gone into hospital because they have gone into hospital with covid. that will drive per decision—making. it is
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vital it is fixed urgently. we cannot have hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and well—being is sacrificed on the altar of dodgy detail. —— that will drive poor decision—making. it detail. -- that will drive poor decision-making.— detail. -- that will drive poor decision-making. it is an important oint b decision-making. it is an important point by my — decision-making. it is an important point by my right — decision-making. it is an important point by my right honourable i decision-making. it is an important point by my right honourable friend and he will now, because ijudge this is why he has asked the question, that at the moment the data that is available is the figures with covid, which does not make a distinction between what is causing that individual to be in hospital. so it is not precise and detailed enough and i think that is what he is getting at, it is a very good point. i have asked for advice on this and i hope we can start getting collator data on this precisely for the reason he said. —— clearer data. precisely for the reason he said. -- clearer data-— precisely for the reason he said. -- clearer data. next withdrawn, so we will now go — clearer data. next withdrawn, so we will now go to _ clearer data. next withdrawn, so we will now go to andrew _ clearer data. next withdrawn, so we will now go to andrew sando. i clearer data. next withdrawn, so we i will now go to andrew sando. primary care is not only _ will now go to andrew sando. primary care is not only the _ will now go to andrew sando. primary care is not only the front _ will now go to andrew sando. primary care is not only the front line - will now go to andrew sando. primary care is not only the front line of i care is not only the front line of the fight against covid, but also the fight against covid, but also the front door of the nhs. many staff are on their knees at the
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moment. can i ask the secretary of state to help more medical students to help general practice and to help them stay in it as that absolutely fundamental to helping more people getting to see a gp easily. yes, mr speaker i agree with my honourable friend. my parents wanted me to be a doctor, a gp, and that they were a bit disappointed, but i think my mum did say she thinks my current role might make up for it. my honourable friend is absolutely right about this and he knows our commitment to 50 million more appointments, to having more gps and that remains a huge priority and i think this pandemic has made it even more important than before. thank you, mr speaker. ijoin the secretary of state and other colleagues in deploring the appalling racism shown against a football team that has shown the absolute best of our country. the secretary of state says
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that caution is absolutely vital given the soaring infection rates. i agree with him, but if caution is absolutely vital, why is he weakening the measures to deliver it? the message around facemasks on public transport, for example, has been downgraded from being a clear legal requirement to to being an optional personal choice. as over 100 scientists and medics said last week any letter to the lancet, that is reckless and risks of driving infections. he asks if we do not open up now, when? well, the answer has to be that when a far higher percentage of any total population is vaccinated, when basic public health protections are like test, trace and isolate a properly functioning, when people can afford to self—isolate, when measures are like air filtration systems are in our classrooms. frankly, the government seems to be pursuing a darwinian strategy relying on immunity by natural infection. does he realise how dangerous this is? i am afraid of the honourable lady is
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just not being i think i have set out very clearly in my statement at theissues out very clearly in my statement at the issues around timing. no one is pretending that there is a perfect time to start lifting some of these restrictions. it is, therefore, something that requires a measured approach, which is what we are doing. approach, which is what we are doinu. . ., approach, which is what we are doinu. ,, ., ., , ., approach, which is what we are doinu. ,, ., ., i, doing. steroid inhalers of the type used by millions _ doing. steroid inhalers of the type used by millions of— doing. steroid inhalers of the type used by millions of asthma i doing. steroid inhalers of the type i used by millions of asthma sufferers worldwide are known to be safe, cheap and a trials show they are also very effective in reducing the severity and time for which covid symptoms are suffered. will my right honourable friend take rapid steps to revise the guidance to make sure this becomes an immediate part of the armoury of a gp is dealing with people presenting with covid symptoms. people presenting with covid symptoms-— people presenting with covid s mtoms. ~ , ., ., symptoms. when my right honourable friend want something _ symptoms. when my right honourable
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friend want something done _ symptoms. when my right honourable friend want something done rapidly, l friend want something done rapidly, i listen very carefully to him so i am pleased to tell him that in the clinical guidelines have been published today. they allow the central alerting system to recommend clinicians prescribe inhaled steroids for the purpose hejust clinicians prescribe inhaled steroids for the purpose he just set out. steroids for the purpose he 'ust set out. �* , ., ., ., ., out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! _ out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i— out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i hope _ out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i hope i— out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i hope i will- out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i hope i will get- out. anyone would have thought it was lined up! i hope i will get an l was lined up! i hope i will get an euuall was lined up! i hope i will get an equally happy _ was lined up! i hope i will get an equally happy response - was lined up! i hope i will get an equally happy response to i was lined up! i hope i will get an equally happy response to my i equally happy response to my question. the secretary of state is said he is anticipating as many as 100,000 covid infection are daily. if that were actually to happen, can he tell the house how many people he and his figures would expect that we would see hospitalised and how many people he would expect to see develop along covid as a result. —— along covid. mr develop along covid as a result. --
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along covid-— develop along covid as a result. -- along covid. mr mr speaker, what i can tell the — along covid. mr mr speaker, what i can tell the light _ along covid. mr mr speaker, what i can tell the light honourable i along covid. mr mr speaker, what i can tell the light honourable brady| can tell the light honourable brady is that there are currently around 30,000 infections and a day —— rate honourable lady. we have seen in england around 400 people being hospitalised in the last day. the last ten infections were in the same level at 30,000, it was, i believe over 2000 people a day being hospitalised so that is what i mean about the link has been severely weakened and for that, we have got the vaccines to thank. i weakened and for that, we have got the vaccines to thank.— the vaccines to thank. i look forward to — the vaccines to thank. i look forward to having _ the vaccines to thank. i look forward to having a - the vaccines to thank. i look forward to having a look i the vaccines to thank. i lookj forward to having a look and the vaccines to thank. i look- forward to having a look and are scrutinising the new road map when it is published this afternoon. further to the point of his my my right honourable friend, i'm trying to get clear the state on hospitalisation i was told today a lady admitted this weekend to a hospital in my region to give birth, she was, of course, tested on admission and was positive so she has a covid positive person in hospital, but when does the secretary of state think any advice he has just confirmed to the house,
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he has just confirmed to the house, he will be able to advise us by the figures for those admitted with covid, versus those admitted for covid? i covid, versus those admitted for covid? ~' ., covid, versus those admitted for covid? ~ ., , covid, versus those admitted for covid? ~' ., , ., ., covid? i know my honourable friend seaks covid? i know my honourable friend speaks with — covid? i know my honourable friend speaks with experience _ covid? i know my honourable friend speaks with experience and - covid? i know my honourable friend speaks with experience and i'm i covid? i know my honourable friend | speaks with experience and i'm glad he has raised this point again, so i have asked for this advice because it is important that we try to better analyse the primary diagnosis of anyone coming into hospital. i can understand why in the early days of this pandemic why that was not easily possible, but i do think nowhere at this stage to provide better date and i hope we can get that done as quickly as possible. let's the recent health committee on any chester burnett says low pay has particular —— on nhs burnett. chester burnett says low pay has particular -- on nhs burnett. there are errors that _ particular -- on nhs burnett. there are errors that they _ particular -- on nhs burnett. there are errors that they could _ particular -- on nhs burnett. there are errors that they could spend i are errors that they could spend with family, like the billing student i met this morning like brendan who's dad works for the nhs.
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how does the secretary of state plan to clear the backlog and fill the 40,000 nursing and 112,000 care worker vacancies if this government continues saying no, to the pay rise nhs heroes like brendan's dad deserved? i nhs heroes like brendan's dad deserved? ., nhs heroes like brendan's dad deserved?— deserved? i agree with the honourable _ deserved? i agree with the honourable lady. _ deserved? i agree with the honourable lady. workers l deserved? i agree with the l honourable lady. workers in deserved? i agree with the i honourable lady. workers in the deserved? i agree with the _ honourable lady. workers in the nhs, no matter what their role, they have been heroes of this crisis, as have co—workers. i think we agree on that. and making sure that is recognised is also requires us to make sure they are paid properly and she is a right to link this to the backlog and huge amount of work that lies ahead. i hope she will bear with me and, in due course, we will set out our response to the pay review recommendations. i set out our response to the pay review recommendations. i welcome my riaht review recommendations. i welcome my right honourable — review recommendations. i welcome my right honourable friend's _ review recommendations. i welcome my right honourable friend's statement. - right honourable friend's statement. he will know that on the 29th of april, a pilot scheme to test and release people was introduced to avoid any disruption of people who
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were contacts of some with covid having to isolate. for ten days. he will know that our right honourable friend, the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster, was a beneficiary of that skin. will he say what the results of that pilot had been —— over that scheme. and when it might be available to the rest of us, hopefully before the third week in august. i hopefully before the third week in auuust. . ~ , hopefully before the third week in auuust. ., ~ , ., august. i thank my right friend for his support _ august. i thank my right friend for his support for _ august. i thank my right friend for his support for the _ august. i thank my right friend for his support for the statement - his support for the statement and turning to his question, it is a very important pilot. i have not yet seen the final results of that, but they are results starting to come through to the department. he will know that whilst that pilot has been going on, the government has not made this announcement around double vaccinated people and more flexibilities for those people from august 16 onwards, but i will endeavour to say more about this and publish more details as i can. fill
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publish more details as i can. all riaht, publish more details as i can. all right, we're going to leave that session in the house of commons. the health secretary sajid javid confirming that covid restrictions in england will be elected this time next week, july 19 —— will be lifted. that will mean at the end of the rule of six people indoors, it will mean people can queue at the barfor drinks. it will mean entertainment venues can return to capacity audiences so cinemas, theatres, sporting venues. it will also mean social distancing and face coverings are no longer mandatory, although sajid javid did recommend that masks and face coverings be worn in crowded places. he also said that we all want this to be a one—way journey. that we all want this to be a one—wayjourney. we have heard government ministers talking about these measures being irreversible. but one question from a former health secretary, jeremy hunt, who said he quoted donald rumsfeld, the
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former us defence secretary about unknown unknowns and is said that given that there were things about any pandemic that brown known, for example long covid and a variants, —— that were unknown, with the health secretary take decisive action if the data required it. sajid javid said he would not hesitate to take the appropriate action if that was necessary, so we had, perhaps, that this may, possibly, if the data requires it, not to be the one—wayjourney that ministers are so desire. 0k, not to be the one—wayjourney that ministers are so desire. ok, so we have some of the cases and data coming in on a daily basis that came in while the health secretary was speaking there. we are told that at the latest data is there were six deaths across the uk within 28 days of a positive test and that compares to five deaths recorded last monday. in terms of cases, they have gone up. you can see the figures on any
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screen. at the daily cases today have come in at 34,101. that compares to 27,334 cases have come in at 34,471. that compares to 27,334 cases this time last week. that is an increase of about 7000 cases on it last week. the the number of deaths has gone down. by one. let's move on now. prince william has said he's sickened by the racist abuse of players who missed penalites last night in england's defeat to italy in the final of the european championship. he called the online abuse abhorrent and unacceptable. meanwhile the fa have ordered a review after fans without tickets forced their way into wembley stadium to watch the game. england manager gareth southgate says his team's defeat has left him feeling as if his "stomach has been ripped out". andy swiss reports. commentator: saka has to score. it's saved by donnarumma, and it's italy who are - the champions of europe!
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50 near, yet so agonisingly far. england know all about the pain of penalty shoot—outs, but this one felt especially cruel — their tournament ending in tears. and as the players left their hotel this morning, their manager could only reflect on what might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs of some consistency — semifinal, final — has to be a step in the right direction. it is not, ultimately, where we wanted to get to and when you are so close, it's even more painful, of course. it feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion but also tension. outside wembley, some ticketless fans forced their way into the stadium. the fa are conducting a review. 0n the pitch, england made the perfect start — luke shaw firing them ahead afterjust two minutes. and it's luke shaw!
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but leonardo bonucci's second—half equaliser took the game into extra time and, ultimately, penalties, where it was an all—too—familiar story. three of england's brightest stars, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were the men to miss, and it was all over. the three england players have since received racist abuse on social media. this morning, the fa's president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened. "it is totally unacceptable that players have to endure this abhorrent behaviour". he added, "it must stop now and all those involved must be held accountable". well, england had hoped this would be a day of celebration, but the mood at wembley could not be more different. but the team can look back on what they have achieved at this tournament with huge pride. over a memorable month, they played with talent and togetherness, winning both matches and fans on their way to a first
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major final in 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and i have been on the end of it and, unfortunately, these boys will feel so hurt, so angry, so disappointed this morning and it'll hurt them for a while. but when you look at the whole picture, they should feel very proud of what they've given us. italy are the champions... but ultimately, it was italy's triumph, another trophy for them. and while england can look to the future with hope, right now there's only more heartache. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. on the streets across the country today. and you might think you'd have to have been on mars to avoid the football in recent weeks. but in nottingham, bbc east midlands today found one fan who somehow managed to avoid the result, until our reporter navtej johal broke the news to him.
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reflections on last night. another oh so near, but one that made us proud. oh so near, but one that made us roud. �* , , ., ., proud. i'm still behind them and at the nation should _ proud. i'm still behind them and at the nation should be, _ proud. i'm still behind them and at the nation should be, you - proud. i'm still behind them and at the nation should be, you made i proud. i'm still behind them and at the nation should be, you made us} the nation should be, you made us incredibly proud. still the nation should be, you made us incredibly proud.— incredibly proud. still proud of them, incredibly proud. still proud of them. they — incredibly proud. still proud of them. they did _ incredibly proud. still proud of them, they did a _ incredibly proud. still proud of them, they did a good - incredibly proud. still proud of them, they did a good job. - incredibly proud. still proud of them, they did a good job. i l incredibly proud. still proud of - them, they did a good job. i thought them, they did a good job. i thought the italians— them, they did a good job. i thought the italians played a bit dirty, to be quite — the italians played a bit dirty, to be quite honest. so the italians played a bit dirty, to be quite honest.— the italians played a bit dirty, to be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. be quite honest. so your fiance is italian- yes. _ be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. yes, so _ be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. yes, so in _ be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. yes, so in our— be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. yes, so in our house - be quite honest. so your fiance is italian. yes, so in our house it i be quite honest. so your fiance is i italian. yes, so in our house it was a bit tense — italian. yes, so in our house it was a bit tense because _ italian. yes, so in our house it was a bit tense because we _ italian. yes, so in our house it was a bit tense because we were - a bit tense because we were supporting different side, our wedding was nearly off. some pretend it did not happen. _ wedding was nearly off. some pretend it did not happen. nothing _ wedding was nearly off. some pretend it did not happen. nothing happened l it did not happen. nothing happened last niuht. it did not happen. nothing happened last night. whereas _ it did not happen. nothing happened last night. whereas one _ it did not happen. nothing happened last night. whereas one man, - it did not happen. nothing happened last night. whereas one man, alone| last night. whereas one man, alone in his house — last night. whereas one man, alone in his house but _ last night. whereas one man, alone in his house but went _ last night. whereas one man, alone in his house but went to _ last night. whereas one man, alone in his house but went to bed - last night. whereas one man, alone in his house but went to bed early i in his house but went to bed early last night and did not know the result is money. whether you are right now? i result is money. whether you are right now?— right now? i have to go and buy a -a er. right now? i have to go and buy a paper- to — right now? i have to go and buy a paper- to find — right now? i have to go and buy a paper. to find out _ right now? i have to go and buy a paper. to find out what _ right now? i have to go and buy al paper. to find out what happened. would you like me to break it to you? go would you like me to break it to
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ou? , ., ., . ~' , would you like me to break it to ou? ., , would you like me to break it to you?_ so. i would you like me to break it to ou? ., ., ~ , so, encland you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early _ you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early on. — you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early on, and _ you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early on, and then _ you? go on, make my day. so, england scored early on, and then the _ scored early on, and then the italians came back second half, the equaliser. it went to extra time... oh, i did wonder!— equaliser. it went to extra time... oh, i did wonder! then to penalties. and then, england _ oh, i did wonder! then to penalties. and then, england are _ oh, i did wonder! then to penalties. and then, england are sadly - oh, i did wonder! then to penalties. and then, england are sadly lost - oh, i did wonder! then to penalties. and then, england are sadly lost on| and then, england are sadly lost on penalties. and then, england are sadly lost on enalties. ., ., ., and then, england are sadly lost on penalties-_ are - and then, england are sadly lost on penalties._ are you i penalties. 0h, not again! are you 'okina ? penalties. 0h, not again! are you joking? i'm _ penalties. 0h, not again! are you joking? i'm not — penalties. 0h, not again! are you joking? i'm not joking, _ penalties. 0h, not again! are you joking? i'm not joking, i'm - penalties. 0h, not again! are you joking? i'm not joking, i'm so - penalties. 0h, not again! are you i joking? i'm not joking, i'm so sorry joking? i'm notjoking, i'm so sorry to break the news to you. fih. to break the news to you. oh, fiddlesticks! — to break the news to you. oh, fiddlesticks! you're _ to break the news to you. oi fiddlesticks! you're not to break the news to you. oi, fiddlesticks! you're not kidding to break the news to you. (iii fiddlesticks! you're not kidding me? no, you're not kidding either? i’m no, you're not kidding either? i'm not kidding you, i promise. it - no, you're not kidding either? i'm| not kidding you, i promise. it went to penalties? _ not kidding you, i promise. it went to penalties? there _ not kidding you, i promise. it went to penalties? there are _ not kidding you, i promise. it went to penalties? there are actual - not kidding you, i promise. it went| to penalties? there are actual tiers may have but... and the other one, but the result is just devastating. so, the three lions can do it but among the pain, there is still plenty of pride here today and there are only 497 days to go until the
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world cup. navtej are only 497 days to go until the world cup. navteonhal, bbc is midlands today, nottingham. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willett. good afternoon. we've already seen some fairly wet weather this morning and that's because the same area of low pressure that brought showers and long spells of rain yesterday has been meandering around since and it still extends its influence across most of the uk so, yes, there will be further torrential downpours to come, particular close to the low pressure, so in southern parts of england, localised flash flooding, spray and standing water, but given the strength of the sun at this time of year, like recent days, we could see a few thunderstorms further north across scotland, northern ireland and into northern england as well. lots of cloud mulling around under that area of low pressure, just keeping those temperatures near the east coast a little down with more cloud here. 21 or 22 in the lengthier sunny spells, so it's still fairly pleasant in the sunshine. those showers will rumble on into the evening before gradually easing overnight, but notice all the low cloud comes back to the east. we'll have the odd pocket of mist
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and fog elsewhere, so as last night, relatively warm at 12 to 14 degrees celsius. but tomorrow, on balance, looks drier. there will be fewer showers, lengthier spells of sunshine coming through, so can't rule out the odd showers, still a fair amount of instability in the atmosphere, as you can see here. we've gotjust one or two showers popping up but they will be fewer, as i say, than we've seen both today and, indeed, yesterday. as a result, with lengthier spells of sunshine, temperatures will respond a bit better — 23 or 24 in a few spots, but with some very high levels of pollen to be expected. as we go through the rest of the week, we still have our low pressure close by to southern and eastern areas. here it is on wednesday. but also, by that stage, we have this weather front rushing into the north—west, so we will see more cloud coming into northern and western parts of scotland, for the islands as well here, and there's still the chance of a northerly breeze close to that area of low pressure with one or two showers, but it is essentially a dry picture with long spells of sunshine, strong sunshine coming through and potentially some high levels of pollen once again.
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that sets the trend, really, for the rest of the week, this high—pressure moving in, pushing those weather fronts out of the way in the north and the low pressure out of the way further south and east, so bringing us more settled condition. with more settled conditions, it should be dry for most, the sunny spells should be lengthier and the temperatures will respond as well, creeping a little higher by day. as ever, more on the website, including the warnings.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown, building up to the latest coronavirus briefing from the government. the government confirms the remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week. the health secretary says infections will rise but the nhs could cope because of the success of the vaccination programme. 0n the basis of the evidence in front of us, we do not believe that infection rates will put unsustainable pressure on the nhs. we'll be live at downing street at five o'clock as the prime minister prepares to hold a news briefing on the lifting of england's remaining restrictions. as england prepares to lift the remaining restrictions, we'll speak to our correspondents in scotland, wales and northern ireland
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to look at the restrictions in the rest of the united kingdom.

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