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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 12, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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# good times never seemed so good. # good times never seemed so good. # i've been inclined. # i've been inclined. # to believe there never would. # to believe there never would. # look at the night, and it don't seem so lonely. # we fill it up with only two. # we fill it up with only two. # and when i heard. # and when i heard. # hurting runs off my shoulders. it's some sort of wonder strike! # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major _ # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major tournament, - # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major tournament, for - # warmth, reaching out... into the | final of a major tournament, for the first time in 55 years!
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# reaching out, touching me, touching you. # sweet caroline... # sweet caroline... # good times never seemed so good. he sets the standard for others to follow. it's saved. and it's italy! # to believe there never would. time for a look at the weather. here's helen willets. hello, good afternoon. rain in the background of my picture, which gives the hint it is another day of sunny spells and showers. but there are some torrential downpours around and that goes for the rest of the afternoon and we could see localised flash flooding, certainly lots of
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prey and standing water. why? the same area of low pressure that brought rain in sitting to the south of us, bringing showers and longer spells of rain across parts of england, as you see, more showers and thunderstorms brewing to the south and east. it's likely we see more sunshine continue parts of scotland and northern ireland, wales and the midlands but here we could brew up the odd thunderstorm and torrential downpour. if you get the sunshine between the showers, 21 degrees, a smidgen below average for the time of year but temperatures on the time of year but temperatures on the rise this week. overnight, the showers tend to fade for most part, continuing to rumble on the english channel coast, low cloud returning quite quickly across eastern scotland and eastern england, patchy fog in land, 12—14, quite warm. once that cares quite quickly tomorrow, except for the east coast, looking as if we will see fewer showers and more sunshine, that low pulling away, as you see is still a close fight to the south and east, that's
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where the most likely chances of some downpours but there won't be a completely dry picture, there will be some showers dotted around but lengthy and dry spells, lengthy spells of sunshine, temperatures responding, up to the low 20s for many of us, away from the east coast, it could stay quite carrier. in response to the sunshine, we see high to very high levels of pollen. into wednesday, that low pressure still close by enough to threaten some showers in the south and east, this week with a front brushing its way to the north—west but very few showers in comparison to what we had yesterday, and today, therefore temperatures leaping more up into the mid 20s, potentially across southern parts of england and wales. and then, high pressure starts to build and that will bring a settled end to the week of weather, so with lengthy spells of sunshine and some real warmth coming through, it is if
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you'd like that sort of weather, an improving picture with more sunshine coming through. thank you. good afternoon, it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. england's european dream ended in heartbreak after losing on penalties to italy at wembley last night. their first major international tournament final in 55 years. manager gareth southgate says he accepts responsibility for the loss — but it's matters off the field that have also been in the spotlight — including racist abuse aimed at some of the england players after the defeat. john watson is at wembley for us. many positives for the england players to take away from this euros but the final marred by some terrible behaviour from so—called fans.
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yes, you may have seen those videos on social media of some sections of the fans who didn't have tickets making their way, forcing their way through the barriers and security to gain access to wembley stadium. the police confirming that 50 arrests had been made yesterday. but it is the racist abuse suffered by the penalty takers who miss those penalties for england last night, saka, sancho, rashford, that is making headlines once again, as it seems to continually do so, receiving those racist messages on social media platforms last night. the fa condemning the behaviour, as has prime minister borisjohnson, calling it disgusting. it is only going to raise questions once again about how best to tackle this problem, oraction about how best to tackle this problem, or action can be taken, and calls once again for regulation of social media company so that this
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kind of abuse can be stopped. gareth southgate inevitably was asked about it in his press conference this morning, he was clearly fixed rated and angry that he is having to face questions like this once again. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that— unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has— unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, people that track— of that has come from abroad, people that track those things have been able to— that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it. able to explain that. but not all of it it _ able to explain that. but not all of it it is _ able to explain that. but not all of it it isjust— able to explain that. but not all of it. it isjust not what we stand for, _ it. it isjust not what we stand for. we. — it. it isjust not what we stand for. we. i_ it. it isjust not what we stand for, we, ithink, have been a beacon of tight— for, we, ithink, have been a beacon of tight in_ for, we, ithink, have been a beacon of light in bringing people together and people being able to relate to the national team, add the national teams _ the national team, add the national teams stands for everybody. interesting gareth southgate this morning saying his first thoughts last night turned to those players who missed those penalties, those young players who will have to carry that now with them, just as gareth
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southgate did at euro 96,. but hopes that after everything england have achieved in this tournament, at the highs both on and off the pitch, hopefully what happened here yesterday and what has happened since across social media, will not overshadow what has been a brilliant two for england. —— to the mentor for england. as we've been hearing questions have been asked about the policing and security at the game, afterfans managed to push through the barriers at wembley before the match and gain entry to the stadium. the fa say they will conduct a review. chief executive mark bullingham apologised to legitimate fans and said the security team had "never seen anything like it". it was sad and frustrating to see some drunken yobs trying to break into the stadium, unfortunately one of succeed, we don't quite know how many yet, we're pulling together the evidence to find out what has happened, we'll take action against people involved. when we step back
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and look at the matches we have staged at wembley and upon impact throughout the country of this extreme e and the buzz that has been created, we have had so much praise, and that will help us to future tournaments. conor murray will lead the british and irish lions for the first time when they take on south africa �*a' in cape town on wednesday. warren gatland will make 12 changes to the side that beat the sharks 71—31 on saturday. the match is to go ahead despite a covid outbreak in the springboks camp — the first lions test is on the 24thjuly. i'll have more for you in the next hour. last night's match will have given pubs and bars across the country a much—needed financial boost. with restrictions set to ease further next week, the hospitality sector will be hoping this momentum continues. sarah corker is at a brewery in salford this lunchtime. around 100 people watched the final last night here at severn brothers
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brewery in salford. there are five big screens on the walls. but social distancing rules meant that they were still only operating at about 80% capacity. but the football has brought a welcome economic boost for many businesses. beer sales here have surged over the last couple of weeks. in fact, an estimated 7 million pints a day and last night alone. the hospitality sector, though, is now planning for the 19th ofjuly. —— were downed last night. that is when final restrictions are expected to be lifted. social distancing rules could be relaxed, wearing a facemask could become a personal choice, night clubs could reopen again, and we could all have a drink at the bar and start queueing instead of table service, so lots of changes ahead. we are expecting to hear more details on the timescale from downing street later on today. businesses, you know, lots of challenges, now looking to the weeks and months ahead. with me now is keith,
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the manager of the brewery, good morning, keith. a quick question about last night, how much has of a boost has the football been for sales? football has been incredible. ever since restrictions started to be lifted from april into may, the last fortnight, the last four weeks, actually, the football has been incredible for businesses. and what about next week onwards, what changes will you be making if rules are relaxed? hopefully, rules will be relaxed. it will be tricky for us, because, you know, we are a manufacturer as well as a retailer. here we make the beer and we have our bars as well. so it is going to be tricky because people are going to have to be cautious. so we will take it, we will listen to our customers and see what they want. and take it from there, really. and you are expanding as well. namely, a new taproom at manchester airport. so more people travelling and those rules relaxed will be really important for you as well.
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yeah, thankfully, we are getting news that air travel is going to get the go—ahead. people are getting vaccinated which is incredible. so that news is a huge boost to our business. but we will see, we will see how it goes. it is something we have been planning for the last 18 months as well. this should have happened last april. so we are really, really pleased that things are starting to, you know, we are looking forward to basically. —— forward to it. some cautious optimism there. thank you. one of the things that may change is the work from home guidance could be lifted, businesses reliant on that commuter trade in city centres, they could have a lot to kind of look forward to going forward. and, jason, you have got a big garden, a big bit of open space, how important has that been over the last 18 months? it's been huge. it's been absolutely critical. i think without that and a very friendlyl
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landlord, we wouldn't be here. and the football really helped last night to get bums on seats? yes, definitely helped, definitely thirsty. - so we got from... this week was probably our best week of the i entire year. we have talked a lot about staffing and the hospitality sector, recruiting at the moment, what challenges have you come across in terms of getting the chefs, the waitresses, the bartenders that you need? as for recruitment, we have not been able to get to the level— that we needed, especially with |the football, these busy shifts.| we have been pretty constantly running a| couple of people - short on every shift. which means the team have to work that bit harder to make it— work. and table service, presumably, means that you need more staff to do that as well. will you be keeping the table service option or will we be seeing more people queueing at the bar again like we used to? we are going to be pragmatic and as cautious as we possibly can be. - we will let some - people up to the bar, | but not quite back to what it usedi to be, but we will also be keeping table service open for those people
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i who are a little bit nervous or. might be vulnerable themselves. thank you very much. good luck for the future. and some businesses are allowing their staff a later start this morning so, you know, they'll get a lie—in, time to recover from the drama of last night. ajordanian court has found two men guilty of plotting with a former crown prince to destabilise the kingdom. an ex—chief of the royal court, bassem awadullah, and a minor member of royal family have been sentenced to 15 years in prison. the prince allegedly involved in the plot, prince hamza, was not on trial. after the conspiracy emerged he reaffirmed his allegiance to king abdullah. bbc world service's middle east analyst alanjohnston has more on the background to the case. for a long time, jordan has enjoyed a reputation for stability in what is a turbulent region, but that image took a real battering back in april when it was suddenly
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announced that a senior member of the royalfamily, prince hamza, had been conspiring, allegedly, against the king, king abdullah. there was mediation between the two men and soon prince hamza reaffirmed his loyalty to the king. he has not been put on trial but two of his co—conspirators have, an ex chief ofthe royal court, bassem awadullah, and a former member of the royalfamily. —— minor member. it has been done behind closed doors, but reports have emerged that suggest that the prosecution alleged that the plotters sought to present prince hamza as an alternative to the king. they looked to capitalise on popular discontent with issues like corruption and economic hardship, said to have discussed how prince hamza should best present himself on social media, and said to have hoped they might
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eventually attract support from saudi arabia's powerful crown prince, mohammad bin salman. the men deny the charges but have been sentenced to 15 years in prison. more than 50 people have died in lightning strikes across several states in india. among the victims were young people taking selfies in the rain while standing on top of a watchtower at a popular tourist spot in the city of jaipur. the chief ministers of uttar pradesh and rajasthan, and india's prime minister narendra modi, have announced compensation for the families of those who died. the headlines on bbc news... prince william says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. he's called the online abuse of these three stars abhorrent and unacceptable. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it follows a night of heartache
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for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. now on bbc news, it's time to take a look at some of the stories making the headlines from our colleagues �*across the uk'. we'll be hearing from reporters in southampton and hull shortly — but first to manchester, where there's been widespread condemnation of racist abuse targeted at manchester united players marcus rashford and jadon sancho, after england's defeat last night in the final of the euros. both players missed penalties in the shoot—out. this morning, the local community set about cleaning and covering up racist graffitti daubed on a mural of rashford in manchester. it came after thousands packed pubs and fan zones across the region, to watch last night's match. ian haslam reports.
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it was a mural designed to honour a local lad, notjust for his it was a mural designed to honour a local lad, not just for his football achievements by a tireless campaigning against child food poverty, yet following england's defeat to italy, this marcus rashford image was vandalised with racist feet deep in an act described by greater manchester police as disgraceful behaviour that will absolutely not be tolerated. really sad, a said morning _ absolutely not be tolerated. really sad, a said morning anyway, - absolutely not be tolerated. really sad, a said morning anyway, we i absolutely not be tolerated. lie—ii sad, a said morning anyway, we dared to dream yesterday, our hopes were dashed, but wake up to this is more depressing. that we live in a country where this kind of response is the new normal.— country where this kind of response is the new normal. marcus rashford was one of— is the new normal. marcus rashford was one of three _ is the new normal. marcus rashford was one of three england _ is the new normal. marcus rashford was one of three england players i is the new normal. marcus rashford was one of three england players to i was one of three england players to miss a penalty last night, fellow united playerjadon sancho also failed to score, and he had rashford webber targeted with online racist abuse after the game along with
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arsenal's saka. the abuse was condemned by the prime minister and fa, who described it as appalling. they said, we could not be clearer than anyone behind such disgusting behaviour is not welcome in following the team. what are people thinking about to go online _ what are people thinking about to go online and _ what are people thinking about to go online and abuse these players? what is wrong _ online and abuse these players? what is wrong with some people? it is so, so sad _ is wrong with some people? it is so, so sad and _ is wrong with some people? it is so, so sad and ridiculous, add a hopeless— so sad and ridiculous, add a hopeless social media companies expose _ hopeless social media companies expose these individuals, absolutely disgusting. —— and i hope in the social_ disgusting. —— and i hope in the social media. a disgusting. -- and i hope in the social media.— disgusting. -- and i hope in the social media. a full investigation will be carried _ social media. a full investigation will be carried out _ social media. a full investigation will be carried out after- will be carried out after accusations that an employee in the north—west shared racist tweets. this morning's abuse came after the highs and those of last night's game watched by fans across the region and homes, gardens and pubs and fan zones. —— highs and lows. jubilation met the goal that came after two
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minutes from luke shaw. cheering. as we all now know, italy were to equalise and england's dream ended in the dreaded shoot—out. it is equalise and england's dream ended in the dreaded shoot-out.— in the dreaded shoot-out. it is “ust heartbreaking. fl in the dreaded shoot-out. it is “ust heartbreaking, it i in the dreaded shoot-out. it is “ust heartbreaking, it went i in the dreaded shoot-out. it is “ust heartbreaking, it went to i in the dreaded shoot-out. it isjust| heartbreaking, it went to penalties, played a good game, butjust one of those things. we played a good game, but “ust one of these things.— those things. we cannot blame the -la ers, those things. we cannot blame the players. they _ those things. we cannot blame the players. they did — those things. we cannot blame the players, they did everything - those things. we cannot blame the players, they did everything they i players, they did everything they can. players, they did everything they cah they— players, they did everything they can. they are a brilliant team. we “ust not can. they are a brilliant team. we just got to — can. they are a brilliant team. we just got to the finals, we wouldn't have _ just got to the finals, we wouldn't have deemed _ just got to the finals, we wouldn't have deemed of— just got to the finals, we wouldn't have deemed of that _ just got to the finals, we wouldn't have deemed of that before - have deemed of that before determined. _ have deemed of that before determined.— have deemed of that before determined. ., ., �* determined. football didn't quite, home this time, _ determined. football didn't quite, home this time, but _ determined. football didn't quite, home this time, but there - determined. football didn't quite, home this time, but there is - determined. football didn't quite, | home this time, but there is always next time. health officials in southampton are now using digital advertising boards and even approaching people in the street in an effort to drive up the number coming forward to have the covid jab. parts of the city have some of the lowest uptake rates along the south coast. mike apps reports.
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taking the message out to the streets. this advertising ban, directing shoppers to walk in vaccination clinics. of all the places they couldn't get to, there were people out on foot to spread the word, a sign of the level of concern about the uptake locally. for 18 to 30 volts, only one entry of how their first jab for 18 to 30 volts, only one entry of how their firstjab so for 18 to 30 volts, only one entry of how their first jab so far. really important that we encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated before the 19th ofjuly, and we those restrictions further. southampton guildhall was southampton guild hall was transformed into southampton guildhall was transformed into a mass vaccination clinic for two days. so why had people here waited until now get the jab? people here waited until now get the “ab? a , , people here waited until now get the “ab? a, , , ., jab? mainly “ust time and i never had it jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, _ jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, no _ jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, no one _ jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, no one i _ jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, no one i knew - jab? mainlyjust time and i never had it before, no one i knew had | jab? mainlyjust time and i never. had it before, no one i knew had it, i didn't feel like this, i had been in plenty of situations where i was at risk but i was fine, so mainly jet people around me, i don't want to put their race. i jet people around me, i don't want to put their race.— to put their race. i missed my appointment _ to put their race. i missed my appointment last _ to put their race. i missed my appointment last week, - to put their race. i missed my appointment last week, i - to put their race. i missed my appointment last week, i had|
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to put their race. i missed my - appointment last week, i had gotten appointment last week, i had gotten a new_ appointment last week, i had gotten a new phone and set the reminder and i old a new phone and set the reminder and told phone, _ a new phone and set the reminder and told phone, i— a new phone and set the reminder and i old phone, i forgot about it. he is ! old phone, i forgot about it. he is my— i old phone, i forgot about it. he is my third — i old phone, i forgot about it. he is my third little one, it was a bit busy _ is my third little one, it was a bit bus . , ., ., ., ., busy. there is a determination to roll out the _ busy. there is a determination to roll out the vaccine _ busy. there is a determination to roll out the vaccine is _ busy. there is a determination to roll out the vaccine is widely - busy. there is a determination to roll out the vaccine is widely as i roll out the vaccine is widely as possible before july the 19th. roll out the vaccine is widely as possible beforejuly the 19th. the possible before july the 19th. the 19th as a possible before july the 19th. the 19th as a target which has been set by the _ 19th as a target which has been set by the government _ 19th as a target which has been set by the government to _ 19th as a target which has been set by the government to open - 19th as a target which has been set by the government to open thingsl 19th as a target which has been set . by the government to open things up but more _ by the government to open things up but more importantly— by the government to open things up but more importantly to _ by the government to open things up but more importantly to me - by the government to open things up but more importantly to me is- by the government to open things up but more importantly to me is that l but more importantly to me is that we continue — but more importantly to me is that we continue this— but more importantly to me is that we continue this programme - but more importantly to me is that we continue this programme and l but more importantly to me is that i we continue this programme and get as many— we continue this programme and get as many people _ we continue this programme and get as many people vaccinated _ we continue this programme and get as many people vaccinated as - as many people vaccinated as possible _ as many people vaccinated as possible we _ as many people vaccinated as possible. we would _ as many people vaccinated as possible. we would like - as many people vaccinated as possible. we would like to . as many people vaccinated asl possible. we would like to see as many people vaccinated as - possible. we would like to see over 90% of— possible. we would like to see over 90% of the — possible. we would like to see over 90% of the 18—30 _ possible. we would like to see over 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss - possible. we would like to see over. 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss having their first _ 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss having their first vaccine _ 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss having their first vaccine and _ 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss having their first vaccine and leading - 90% of the 18—30 —year—oldss having their first vaccine and leading to - their first vaccine and leading to their— their first vaccine and leading to their second _ their first vaccine and leading to their second.— their first vaccine and leading to their second. ., , ., , ., their second. however people hear about it, their second. however people hear about it. local— their second. however people hear about it, local health _ their second. however people hear about it, local health filters - their second. however people hear about it, local health filters are - about it, local health filters are hoping all roads lead to vaccination. —— local health officials. a critical shortage of farm vets in yorkshire and lincolnshire is putting the welfare of farm animals at risk, that's according to the british veterinary association. it s claimed the departure of many eu—trained vets after brexit is one of the reasons for the growing problem. lindsey smith reports.
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this is a routine visit, we are going to be pregnancy scanning the cows. let's see if we can in a picture of the baby. —— find a nice picture. another day, another farm visit for molly. she runs one of only three practises in the whole of lincolnshire. a county that is home to tens of thousands of farm animals. i probably work 70 hours a week but it is my life, my passion, it is what i do and i love it. we need to have more vet so we can offer a good service to everybody.— service to everybody. could this be an animal welfare _ service to everybody. could this be an animalwelfare issue? - service to everybody. could this be an animal welfare issue? it - service to everybody. could this be an animalwelfare issue? it is. - service to everybody. could this be an animalwelfare issue? it is. it. an animalwelfare issue? it is. it is a shortage _ an animalwelfare issue? it is. it is a shortage across _ an animalwelfare issue? it is. it is a shortage across the - an animalwelfare issue? it is. it is a shortage across the uk, - an animalwelfare issue? it is. it is a shortage across the uk, the | is a shortage across the uk, the british veterinary association estimate ., , estimate that in lincolnshire there were some — estimate that in lincolnshire there were some areas _ estimate that in lincolnshire there were some areas that _ estimate that in lincolnshire there were some areas that have - estimate that in lincolnshire there were some areas that have no - estimate that in lincolnshire there i were some areas that have no cover whatsoever. the calls keep coming. we have arrived at an emergency for
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a farmer who is right on the edge of our area, a farmer who is right on the edge of ourarea, but a farmer who is right on the edge of our area, but unfortunately his local practice is no longer offering an emergency service. this young lady is struggling to carve. a long sticky and bloody night for all concerned, but a successful outcome, without getting the calf out, it would have been life—threatening. she has had painkillers we will get her ageing canal.— her ageing canal. despite the late now, it is her ageing canal. despite the late now. it is an _ her ageing canal. despite the late now, it is an early _ her ageing canal. despite the late now, it is an early start, - now, it is an early start, encouraging students. just gently brine our encouraging students. just gently bring your hand — encouraging students. just gently bring your hand back— encouraging students. just gently bring your hand back was, - encouraging students. just gently bring your hand back was, my - encouraging students. just gently bring your hand back was, my joy| bring your hand back was, myjoy toes. bring your hand back was, my 'oy toes. , ., ., , ., ., toes. defour told us that two you vet schools _ toes. defour told us that two you vet schools will _ toes. defour told us that two you vet schools will help _ toes. defour told us that two you vet schools will help train - toes. defour told us that two you vet schools will help train more | vet schools will help train more professionals by 2025. it is vet schools will help train more professionals by 2025. it is open to eve one, professionals by 2025. it is open to everyone. no _ professionals by 2025. it is open to everyone, no matter— professionals by 2025. it is open to everyone, no matter your- professionals by 2025. it is open to i everyone, no matter your experience. right. _ everyone, no matter your experience. right. young _ everyone, no matter your experience. right, young man. next on bully's right, young man. next on bully�*s list, a fertility test for a bull about to be sold. —— next on molly's
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list. she is also in demand because of brexit. brute list. she is also in demand because of brexit. ~ , ., ., , ., of brexit. we rely on european citizens coming _ of brexit. we rely on european citizens coming into _ of brexit. we rely on european citizens coming into the i of brexit. we rely on european i citizens coming into the country, we have seen those numbers really dry up. it have seen those numbers really dry u . _ , ., . ~' ., have seen those numbers really dry up. it is acknowledge the crucial role that vets _ up. it is acknowledge the crucial role that vets player, _ up. it is acknowledge the crucial role that vets player, not - up. it is acknowledge the crucial role that vets player, not only i up. it is acknowledge the cruciali role that vets player, not only in animal welfare bar in maintaining the standard of our food. they say they are working with the industry to ease pressure. for professionals like molly, this isn'tjust work way of life. —— isn'tjust work but a way of life. since the death of her son, dylan, beckie ramsay has been campaigning to make children safer in open water. now a petition she started, which calls for an increase in curriculum content in england about water safety, has reached other 100,000 signatures and will be debated today in parliament. nick raikes reports.
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dyla n was dylan was always going to be somebody special. from being a baby i could have told you he was going to be somebody special, i didn't know it would be like this. i always told them he would be a little heartbreaker. again, i didn't know it was my heart he would break. dylan ramsey was 13 when he drowned ten years ago. he had been swimming in the quarry in lancashire. i in the quarry in lancashire. i cannot put into words how much i miss him. just hear all the time. since his death, his mother becky has been raising awareness of the dangers of open water swimming. i realise that if this could happen to dylan, it could happen to anyone, because he was fit, healthy, strong,
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athletic, a star student, clever, i knew that i would need to make a difference and that i knew that i had already made a promise by this point dylan, i had already seen him in the mortuary, i had already hugged his body, and... i had already promised that his death would not be for nothing. last year, there were — would not be for nothing. last year, there were 176 _ would not be for nothing. last year, there were 176 accidental _ would not be for nothing. last year, there were 176 accidental water i there were 176 accidental water —related deaths recorded in england on the water incident database. a petition started by becky has now reached over 100,000 signatures and will be debated in parliament today. i want increased water safety taught on the national curriculum to include the dangers in and around open water, specifically cold water shock, because that is the biggest killer. . . ., killer. the curriculum in england currently states _ killer. the curriculum in england currently states people - killer. the curriculum in england currently states people should i killer. the curriculum in england | currently states people should be taught to swim proficiently over a
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distance of at least 25 metres and perform the saved self rescue in different water—based situations. we different water-based situations. we have different water—based situations. we have to celebrate the fact that in england — have to celebrate the fact that in england especially swimming water safety _ england especially swimming water safety is _ england especially swimming water safety is on the curriculum, in other— safety is on the curriculum, in other countries across the world and even in _ other countries across the world and even in scotland it isn't, we have to celebrate that, the challenge is around _ to celebrate that, the challenge is around a — to celebrate that, the challenge is around a quarter of children leave school _ around a quarter of children leave school not — around a quarter of children leave school not meeting curriculum requirements. the reason the majority— requirements. the reason the majority of people get into difficulty in the water is because the water— difficulty in the water is because the water temperature rarely gets above _ the water temperature rarely gets above 18 _ the water temperature rarely gets above 18 degrees in the heart of some _ above 18 degrees in the heart of some so— above 18 degrees in the heart of some so a — above 18 degrees in the heart of some so a lot of people get into cold water — some so a lot of people get into cold water shock, panic, take air in, cold water shock, panic, take air in. instead — cold water shock, panic, take air in, instead of doing something simple — in, instead of doing something simple which is what we teach, to -et simple which is what we teach, to get people to float on their back, climate _ get people to float on their back, climate i— get people to float on their back, climate i still water, simple things that teaching children in a classroom about that type of element as opposed to being able to swim in as opposed to being able to swim in a regulated environment is really cruciai— a regulated environment is really crucial to— a regulated environment is really crucial to give them skills and knowledge they that can preserve their life —
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now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. another day of sunny spells and showers out and about, lively downpours, brighter colours indicating the risk of hail and thunder, very little wind, slow moving. you can see also quite a lot of cloud clinging to the east coast. in the sunshine, pleasantly warm, 21-22 c. this in the sunshine, pleasantly warm, 21—22 c. this on—time continues into the evening as do the heavy downpours before starting to ease away through the night, many places becoming dry overnight, thickening cloud for eastern parts of both england and scotland. but all that cloud it will be warm again, it's of mist and fog in lead on tuesday morning, quickly clearing, it might take longerfor the low morning, quickly clearing, it might take longer for the low cloud to clear away from eastern coast. on balance, tuesday looks dry, lengthy spells of sunshine, fewer downpours,
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temperatures rising little higher again.
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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 2pm: the president of the football association, prince william, says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it's unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, you know, people who track those things have been able to explain that, but not all of it, and it's just not what we stand for. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. i'm annita mcveigh here at wembley. a massive 30.95 million people watched last night's euro final.

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