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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 12, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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prince william says he's sickened by the racial abuse of the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. he's called the online abuse of these three stars abhorrent and unacceptable. it's also been condemned by england's manager. it is unforgivable, really. i know a lot of that has come from abroad, you know, people that track those things have been able to explain that. but not all of it, and it's just not what we stand for. it follows a night of heartache for england fans, as hopes and dreams of ending half a century of hurt ended in familiar despair. but celebrations in rome where the victorious italian team arrived back this morning
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to a hero's welcome. we'll be live from the england team hotel and from rome. also this lunchtime... the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted next week but people will be urged to keep wearing face coverings in crowded places. and america scorched by a record—breaking heatwave as california and nevada brace themselves for even higher temperatures. and coming up on the bbc news channel, conor murray will leads the british and irish lions for the first time, when they face south africa a, with 12 changes to the side for wednesday's game.
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good afternoon, welcome to the bbc news at one. prince william has said he's sickened by racist abuse of players who missed penalites last night in england's defeat to italy in the final of the european champioship. he called the online abuse abhorrent and unacceptable. meanwhile, the fa have ordered a review after fans without tickets forced their way into wembley stadium to watch the game. england manager gareth southgate says his team's defeat has left him feeling as if his "stomach has been ripped out". andy swiss reports. saka has to score. it's saved by donnarumma, and it's italy who are the champions of europe! so near and yet so agonisingly far. england know all about the pain a penalty shoot—out but this one felt especially cruel. their tournament ending in tears. and as the players left the hotel this morning, the
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manager could only reflect on what might have been. the manager could only reflect on what might have been.— might have been. the fact that we have had the _ might have been. the fact that we have had the first _ might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs _ might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs of- might have been. the fact that we have had the first signs of some i have had the first signs of some consistency, semifinal, final, has to be a step in the right direction. it is not ultimately where we wanted to get to and when you are so close, it's even more painful of course. it feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning. it feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning.- feels like my stomach has been ripped out this morning. it had been a niuht of ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion _ ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion but _ ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion but also _ ripped out this morning. it had been a night of passion but also tension. l a night of passion but also tension. outside wembley, some fans without tickets forced their way into the stadium. the fa are conducting a review. on the pitch, england made the perfect start, luke shaw firing at them ahead afterjust the perfect start, luke shaw firing at them ahead after just two minutes. it at them ahead after 'ust two minutes. , ~ ,, ., but leonardo bonucci's second—half equaliser took the game into extra time and ultimately penalties where it was an all too. three of
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england's brightest stars, marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka where the men to miss and it was all over. the three england players have since received racist abuse on social media. this morning the fa president, the duke of cambridge, said he was sickened. england had hoped this would be a day of celebration but the mood at wembley could not be more different. but the team can look back on what they have achieved at this tournament with huge pride. over eight memorable months, they played with talent and togetherness, winning both matches and fans on their way to a first major final in 55 years. their way to a first ma'or final in 55 ears. ., ., u, their way to a first ma'or final in 55 ears. u, , their way to a first ma'or final in 55 ears. , ., their way to a first ma'or final in 55 ears. , w 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game _ 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at — 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times _ 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and - 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and i - 55 years. football can be a cruel, cruel game at times and i have . 55 years. football can be a cruel, i cruel game at times and i have been on the end of it and unfortunately these boys will feel so hurt and so angry and so disappointed. and it
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will hurt them for a while. but when you look at the whole picture, they should feel very proud of what they have given us. should feel very proud of what they have given ve— should feel very proud of what they have given ne— have given us. italy are the champions... _ have given us. italy are the champions... it _ have given us. italy are the champions... it was - have given us. italy are the champions... it was italy's| have given us. italy are the - champions... it was italy's triumph, another trephv _ champions... it was italy's triumph, another trophy for _ champions... it was italy's triumph, another trophy for them _ champions... it was italy's triumph, another trophy for them and - champions... it was italy's triumph, another trophy for them and while l another trophy for them and while england can look to the future with hope, right now there is only more heartache. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. the metropolitan police says it's investigating the online racial abuse of england players and that "it will not be tolerated." england manager gareth southgate has called the abuse unforgiveable — the prime minister has also condemned the abuse, but sir keir starmer has accused him of a failure of leadership for not calling out the booing when players took the knee to protest against racism earlier in the tournament. nesta mcgregor reports. bukayo saka, aged 19, 12 yards out, millions watching. if there was a feeling
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of inevitability about england losing another penalty shoot—out, for some the same could be said for what followed. the players, incredibly proud of what they have done. for some of them to be abused is unforgivable, really. we have got to make sure we are there and aligned with their clubs and making sure we look after those boys, absolutely. as well as saka, england team—mates jadon sancho and marcus rashford, who also missed their spot kicks were targets of racist abuse online. in a statement, the fa said it was appalled by such disgusting behaviour and urged social media companies to ban and help prosecute those responsible. the companies to ban and help prosecute those responsible.— those responsible. the social media com anies those responsible. the social media companies need _ those responsible. the social media companies need to _ those responsible. the social media companies need to act _ those responsible. the social media companies need to act and - those responsible. the social media companies need to act and stamp i those responsible. the social media companies need to act and stamp it| companies need to act and stamp it out and they can do that. we are reiterating the call for the government to bring in the online harms ill as soon as they possibly can. we do not think it is acceptable in any form of life, this race abuse that has happened and we
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wanted to stop —— online harms built. wanted to stop -- online harms built. ., wanted to stop -- online harms built. . ., wanted to stop -- online harms built. ., ., i: i: built. england exit euro 2020 with racism a tonic— built. england exit euro 2020 with racism a topic of _ built. england exit euro 2020 with racism a topic of debate _ built. england exit euro 2020 with racism a topic of debate but - built. england exit euro 2020 with racism a topic of debate but they l racism a topic of debate but they also the tournament the same way. in their first group also the tournament the same way. in theirfirst group game, some also the tournament the same way. in their first group game, some fans were booing as the players took the knee, and ongoing gesture against discrimination. at the time boris johnson did not condemn the booing but last night the prime minister said the squad should be lauded as heroes, not racially abused. what said the squad should be lauded as heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in — heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in my _ heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in my opinion _ heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in my opinion is _ heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in my opinion is this - heroes, not racially abused. what we have seen in my opinion is this kind l have seen in my opinion is this kind of conditional love for our players which _ of conditional love for our players which shouldn't be there. as long as they are _ which shouldn't be there. as long as they are performing and scoring and getting _ they are performing and scoring and getting results, of course we are all england, all behind you. the minute — all england, all behind you. the minute that doesn't happen, the abuse _ minute that doesn't happen, the abuse comes out. we should back them and support— abuse comes out. we should back them and support them, no matter the outcome — and support them, no matter the outcome is — and support them, no matter the outcome is— outcome is. last night after the name, outcome is. last night after the game. this _ outcome is. last night after the game, this mural _ outcome is. last night after the game, this mural marcus - outcome is. last night after the i game, this mural marcus rashford outcome is. last night after the - game, this mural marcus rashford was defaced. football once again at the centre of a wider societal issue.
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nesta mcgregor, bbc news. well, tens of millions of us watched england in their first major tournament final since the world cup in 1966. there had been growing hopes that football was finally coming home — hopes crushed, yet again, by the curse of the penalty shootout. tim muffet has been speaking to fans this morning. blue monday. i'm really gutted, really, really gutted. i thought we was going to do it — we didn't. come into work this morning, the whole day, we are all in a downer, we are devastated. how are you feeling? gutted, absolutely gutted. penalties, normally we get four out of five. we only got two last night. devastating. how about you 7 gutted. the clean—up operation started early in london this morning. the fan zone in trafalgar square was dismantled, rubbish swept away. rubbish which summed up the nation's mood.
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this is something no one has ever experienced before — the day after an england defeat in the final of a major football tournament. dejected, slightly flat. you know, people had built up that team so much, so much, they really wanted it. we should all be very proud of what they did achieve. as the penalty shoot—out reached its conclusion last night, so a new generation of fans learned about england heartbreak the hard way. are we going to win the world cup? we're going to win the world cup! it's heartbreaking. honestly, i've never been more heartbroken in my life. blue monday for some, but oh, what a bellissimo morning for others. ifeel elated because italy beat a very, very good team, make no mistake about it, england is a top—class team. and for italy to beat them at wembley in front of 60,000 people makes me extremely proud. keeping things in perspective remains a priority for many. how are you feeling? listen, it's only a game of football, mate.
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don't pay my bills! i'm really not bothered about it! i'm just glad all the fuss is over and we are back to actual real. life and death stuff. i am really proud of our guys, i'm proud to be english. it's sad but it's also a life lesson. sore heads, broken hearts, and a phrase we've heard before — maybe next time. tim muffett, bbc news. in a moment, we'll hear from lucy williamson in rome. first, our sports correspondent olly foster is at the england team hotel outside watford. first of all, gareth southgate said he felt as if his stomach had been ripped out but he has got to get the team are ready again for the world cup next year? he team are ready again for the world cup next year?— cup next year? he has, qualifying matches begin — cup next year? he has, qualifying matches begin in _ cup next year? he has, qualifying matches begin in september. - cup next year? he has, qualifying matches begin in september. the cup next year? he has, qualifying - matches begin in september. the last of the players have just about left but gareth southgate said he was hurting about as much as those
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players, his stomach ripped out, we will not forget that phrase for a while. he also said his logical brain will kick in in the next few days and hopefully he will be able to see the huge progress that this team has made under him in the five years since he took over. eight semifinal in russia three years ago and now a final —— a semifinal. that is a huge upward curve from where they were five years ago, at an all—time low. he will take stock and get ready to go again. he is contracted through to the qatar world cup next year. we have heard from a couple of the players are sending out messages to the fans, jordan henderson saying, "the character we have shown and the desire and sacrifice for each other has been something really special, it says a lot about those lads who took a penalty last night, huge courage but we win and lose as a team and we will learn from this experience and many of the players this morning echoing that. find this morning echoing that. and familiar questions for the football authorities about security and
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racism? it authorities about security and racism? ., , , ., ., racism? it got very ugly for a few hours around _ racism? it got very ugly for a few hours around wembley _ racism? it got very ugly for a few hours around wembley last - racism? it got very ugly for a few| hours around wembley last night. racism? it got very ugly for a few - hours around wembley last night. the stewarding was overwhelmed by thousands of people in the wembley area without tickets trying to get in. and there will be a big postmortem about that, exactly how it was policed. because certainly they were overwhelmed and not ready for that huge surge of supporters, the demand to try to get into a match of that magnitude. is for online racism, that battle goes on. southgate condemned it, like so many others this morning, in his news conference but what the football association and other sporting bodies are trying to push for is meaningful action against those who abuse the players or anybody else online. at the beginning of the talk meant we spoke to raheem sterling who had just been honoured in the queen's birthday honours list for his contribution to battling racism in sport and his is a huge powerful
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voice and think of henderson and abby rallied the players in the middle of the and also marcus rashford —— and how he rallied the players. this is a squad with a huge social conscience and they will continue to fight whatever cause is necessary. continue to fight whatever cause is necessa . ~ ., , continue to fight whatever cause is necessa . , ., ., necessary. many thanks. joy and celebration _ necessary. many thanks. joy and celebration in _ necessary. many thanks. joy and celebration in italy _ necessary. many thanks. joy and celebration in italy with - necessary. many thanks. joy and celebration in italy with them - celebration in italy with them celebrating yet another international trophy? celebrating yet another internationaltroh ? , , internationaltrophy? yes, there is a real sense _ internationaltrophy? yes, there is a real sense of _ internationaltrophy? yes, there is a real sense of national _ international trophy? yes, there is| a real sense of national celebration here _ a real sense of national celebration here at— a real sense of national celebration here. at the front pages are dominated by the phrase champions of europe _ dominated by the phrase champions of europe we _ dominated by the phrase champions of europe. we are told that over 80% of the people _ europe. we are told that over 80% of the people watching television last [ti-ht the people watching television last night were watching the match and everyone _ night were watching the match and everyone i— night were watching the match and everyone i have spoken to here this morning _ everyone i have spoken to here this morning says they saw it and they are delighted by the result. but it is a bit _ are delighted by the result. but it is a bit of— are delighted by the result. but it is a bit of sympathy for england, i have _ is a bit of sympathy for england, i have heard — is a bit of sympathy for england, i have heard time and again how good england _ have heard time and again how good england were, how the italian players — england were, how the italian players were sometimes shivering when _ players were sometimes shivering when they were playing them and how they really— when they were playing them and how they really feel for england, to lose on— they really feel for england, to
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lose on penalties like that, particularly those young, talented players _ particularly those young, talented players. one man told me, i really feel for— players. one man told me, i really feel for them missing the penalties. their own _ feel for them missing the penalties. their own team is now back in italy, they are _ their own team is now back in italy, they are due — their own team is now back in italy, they are due to meet the president later this _ they are due to meet the president later this afternoon and the prime minister— later this afternoon and the prime minister and later this afternoon and the prime ministerand if later this afternoon and the prime minister and if you saw the pictures of them _ minister and if you saw the pictures of them arriving here this morning, with the _ of them arriving here this morning, with the fans cheering them on and holding _ with the fans cheering them on and holding up — with the fans cheering them on and holding up the trophy, you can imagine — holding up the trophy, you can imagine the reception they will get this afternoon.— imagine the reception they will get this afternoon. lucy, many thanks. lucy williamson _ this afternoon. lucy, many thanks. lucy williamson in _ this afternoon. lucy, many thanks. lucy williamson in rome. - the prime minister is expected to confirm this afternoon that remaining covid restrictions in england will be lifted a week today. but borisjohnson will also empasise that caution is vital in the face of rising case numbers which he said will continue to increase as england unlocks. and people will be urged to continue to wear face coverings in crowded places. our health correspondent jim reed reports. this could be reality again next week. this pilot event in may saw 3000 clubbers back on the dance floor,
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from next monday, all nightclubs will be able to open across england as the last remaining social distancing rules are scrapped. when we moved to step four, we will see the falling away of legal obligations and legal restrictions and a move towards personal and corporate responsibility based on clear and strong guidance and people will make their own judgments. under the plans, the legal requirement to wear a mask will go although ministers have said there will still be an expectation to wear a covering on transport and in some indoor spaces. in hospitality venues, the one metre plus rule will be lifted, for example allowing pubs to serve at the bar again. the main business lobby group is supportive of the move but says some protection may still be needed. i would urge companies to put in place measures, be that covid—safe environments, culture of mass working in the office or public spaces, ventilation systems and i think communication to employees
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and consumers about what you as a business are doing. but the change to the rules in england has already been delayed a month because of sharply rising covid infections. both ministers and some scientists say caution is still needed as more restrictions are lifted. we are at a really tricky phase, actually at the moment because cases are going up in quite a concerning way, we are seeing daily cases in the 30,000s of course but on the other side of the coin we are seeing still very low numbers of deaths and very low numbers of hospital admissions, though they are creeping up a little bit. wales will also review its restrictions on thursday, northern ireland is due to ease some measures later in the month, while in scotland, most remaining rules are due to be lifted by august the 9th. jim reed, bbc news. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. we chris mason is in westminster. will hear from the i later, we will hear from the prime minister later, is there a bit of a change of
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tone from him on this? i later, is there a bit of a change of tone from him on this?— later, is there a bit of a change of tone from him on this? i think there is, don't tone from him on this? i think there is. don't expect _ tone from him on this? i think there is. don't expect a — tone from him on this? i think there is, don't expect a blaze _ tone from him on this? i think there is, don't expect a blaze of— is, don't expect a blaze of libertarian exuberance from the prime minister, instead his language will be laden with caution, vigilance, and acceptance the pandemic is not over. what we are going to get and what is consistent with what the government said a week ago is the easing of restrictions legally, the last remaining legal restrictions on social contact in england going. but restrictions on social contact in england going-— restrictions on social contact in encland anoin. �* . , , england going. but with an emphasis that is replaced _ england going. but with an emphasis that is replaced with _ england going. but with an emphasis that is replaced with personal- that is replaced with personal responsibility— that is replaced with personal responsibility so— that is replaced with personal responsibility so as _ that is replaced with personal responsibility so as jim - that is replaced with personal responsibility so as jim said, i that is replaced with personall responsibility so as jim said, it will no — responsibility so as jim said, it will no longer— responsibility so as jim said, it will no longer be _ responsibility so as jim said, it will no longer be legally- responsibility so as jim said, it will no longer be legally a - will no longer be legally a necessity— will no longer be legally a necessity to _ will no longer be legally a necessity to wear- will no longer be legally a necessity to wear a - will no longer be legally a . necessity to wear a facemask will no longer be legally a - necessity to wear a facemask on will no longer be legally a _ necessity to wear a facemask on the bus but— necessity to wear a facemask on the bus but the — necessity to wear a facemask on the bus but the government _ necessity to wear a facemask on the bus but the government will - necessity to wear a facemask on the bus but the government will say - bus but the government will say pretty— bus but the government will say pretty robust _ bus but the government will say pretty robust guidance, - bus but the government will say pretty robust guidance, i- pretty robust guidance, i understand, _ pretty robust guidance, i understand, it _ pretty robust guidance, i understand, it would - pretty robust guidance, i understand, it would be i pretty robust guidance, ll understand, it would be a pretty robust guidance, i- understand, it would be a good pretty robust guidance, i— understand, it would be a good idea that you _ understand, it would be a good idea that you ought — understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to— understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to do _ understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to do it _ understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to do it and - understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to do it and it - understand, it would be a good idea that you ought to do it and it wouldl that you ought to do it and it would be socially — that you ought to do it and it would be socially responsible _ that you ought to do it and it would be socially responsible to - that you ought to do it and it would be socially responsible to do - that you ought to do it and it would be socially responsible to do it. - be socially responsible to do it. why this — be socially responsible to do it. why this change _ be socially responsible to do it. why this change of _ be socially responsible to do it. why this change of tone. - be socially responsible to do it. . why this change of tone. bluntly, look at _ why this change of tone. bluntly, look at the — why this change of tone. bluntly, look at the numbers, _ why this change of tone. bluntly, look at the numbers, covid - why this change of tone. bluntly, look at the numbers, covid case. look at the numbers, covid case rates _ look at the numbers, covid case rates are — look at the numbers, covid case rates are soaring, _ look at the numbers, covid case rates are soaring, with - look at the numbers, covid case rates are soaring, with that - look at the numbers, covid casel rates are soaring, with that there is this— rates are soaring, with that there is this pandemic _ rates are soaring, with that there is this pandemic are _ rates are soaring, with that there is this pandemic are people - rates are soaring, with that there| is this pandemic are people being informed — is this pandemic are people being informed by— is this pandemic are people being informed by the _ is this pandemic are people being informed by the nhs _ is this pandemic are people being informed by the nhs add - is this pandemic are people being informed by the nhs add that - is this pandemic are people beingl informed by the nhs add that they have to _ informed by the nhs add that they have to incarcerate _ informed by the nhs add that they have to incarcerate themselves - informed by the nhs add that they have to incarcerate themselves ati have to incarcerate themselves at home _ have to incarcerate themselves at home for— have to incarcerate themselves at home for a — have to incarcerate themselves at home for a period _ have to incarcerate themselves at
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home for a period of— have to incarcerate themselves at home for a period of up _ have to incarcerate themselves at home for a period of up to - have to incarcerate themselves at home for a period of up to ten - have to incarcerate themselves at i home for a period of up to ten days because _ home for a period of up to ten days because they — home for a period of up to ten days because they have _ home for a period of up to ten days because they have come _ home for a period of up to ten days because they have come into - home for a period of up to ten days. because they have come into contact with a _ because they have come into contact with a positive — because they have come into contact with a positive case. _ because they have come into contact with a positive case. so— because they have come into contact with a positive case. so as _ because they have come into contact with a positive case. so as opposed i with a positive case. so as opposed to that _ with a positive case. so as opposed to that sense — with a positive case. so as opposed to that sense that _ with a positive case. so as opposed to that sense that people _ with a positive case. so as opposed to that sense that people have - to that sense that people have described _ to that sense that people have described it _ to that sense that people have described it as _ to that sense that people have described it as next _ to that sense that people have described it as next monday i to that sense that people have described it as next monday inj described it as next monday in england — described it as next monday in england being _ described it as next monday in england being freedom - described it as next monday in england being freedom day, i described it as next monday in . england being freedom day, yes described it as next monday in - england being freedom day, yes there will be _ england being freedom day, yes there will be that— england being freedom day, yes there will be that easing _ england being freedom day, yes there will be that easing of _ england being freedom day, yes there will be that easing of restrictions, - will be that easing of restrictions, that is— will be that easing of restrictions, that is significant, _ will be that easing of restrictions, that is significant, but— will be that easing of restrictions, that is significant, but at - will be that easing of restrictions, that is significant, but at the - will be that easing of restrictions, i that is significant, but at the same time, _ that is significant, but at the same time a _ that is significant, but at the same time, a recognition _ that is significant, but at the same time, a recognition we _ that is significant, but at the same time, a recognition we are - that is significant, but at the same time, a recognition we are far- that is significant, but at the samel time, a recognition we are far from the end _ time, a recognition we are far from the end of— time, a recognition we are far from the end of this _ time, a recognition we are far from the end of this process— time, a recognition we are far from the end of this process and - time, a recognition we are far from i the end of this process and instead, that awkward — the end of this process and instead, that awkward shuffle _ the end of this process and instead, that awkward shuffle back— the end of this process and instead, that awkward shuffle back to - the end of this process and instead, that awkward shuffle back to the - that awkward shuffle back to the responsibility_ that awkward shuffle back to the responsibility being _ that awkward shuffle back to the responsibility being back- that awkward shuffle back to the responsibility being back on - that awkward shuffle back to the responsibility being back on ouri that awkward shuffle back to the - responsibility being back on our own shoulders— responsibility being back on our own shoulders as — responsibility being back on our own shoulders as far— responsibility being back on our own shoulders as far as _ responsibility being back on our own shoulders as far as our _ responsibility being back on our own shoulders as far as our behaviour. responsibility being back on our own shoulders as far as our behaviour is| shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned. — shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned. as— shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned, as opposed _ shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned, as opposed to - shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned, as opposed to it - shoulders as far as our behaviour is concerned, as opposed to it being i concerned, as opposed to it being delivered — concerned, as opposed to it being delivered by— concerned, as opposed to it being delivered by diktat _ concerned, as opposed to it being delivered by diktat form _ concerned, as opposed to it beingj delivered by diktat form mistress. chris— delivered by diktat form mistress. chris mason, _ delivered by diktat form mistress. chris mason, thank— delivered by diktat form mistress. chris mason, thank you. - and the prime minister boris johnson will be leading the coronavirus downing street briefing later today. coverage of that starts here on bbc one and on the bbc news channel from a50. the time is 18 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime... widespread condemnation of racial abuse aimed at the england footballers who missed their penalties in last night's defeat to italy. and coming up, the boss of google warns the ideal of a free and open
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internet is under attack. coming up on the bbc news channel, we'll continue to look at how england pick themselves up after that agonising defeat on penalties to italy in the finals of euro 2020. gareth southgate says there are many positives. parts of the united states are struggling to contain wildfires, after a record breaking heatwave. forecasters are warning that some places including california and nevada will remain dangerously hot with fears that more fires will break out. firefighters say the air is so dry that much of the water dropped by aircraft to tackle the flames evaporates before it even reaches the ground. our north america correspondent peter bowes has this report. wildfires are burning with a ferocity that has rarely been seen before. in oregon, firefighters on the front line of this
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inferno had to be pulled back for their own safety. after almost a week, its spread to more than 600 square kilometres. in arizona, two firefighters died when their aircraft crashed while responding to another blaze. dozens are burning in california, including this enormous fire, spreading rapidly close to the border with nevada. the beckwourth complex fire, the state's biggest, was started by lightning. a vast area of forest has been closed and people have been evacuated from their homes. in the california desert, they're used to extreme heat but nothing like this. this isjoshua tree national park — a tourist destination close to the resort of palm springs, where temperatures reached a record for the time of year — 48.9 degrees celsius. it's the hottest place on earth. like, this is hot. it's never been hotter. it feels like we're
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in an oven, yeah. i came from the caribbean, i came from dominican republic, from a really hot country, and it's still hot for me so i'm trying my best. officials have warned tourists and residents here that these baking temperatures can be lethal. las vegas has also matched its all—time high temperature — the entertainment city reached 47.2 celsius. the authorities said several people were taken to hospital over the weekend with heat—related conditions. scientists say there is growing evidence that climate change is fuelling extreme weather patterns, and they are likely to become more common. last month was the hottestjune on record in north america. the high temperatures of the past few days are expected to ease off by the middle of the week but the heatwaves this summer have been relentless and the months that are usually the hottest are still to come. peter bowes, bbc news, washington.
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the chief executive of google has warned that the western model of a free and open internet is under attack from international rivals. he said many countries are restricting the flow of information, and the model is often taken for granted. he was speaking to our media editor amol rajan, whojoins me now. where does he think this thread comes from?— comes from? chief executive is nothin: comes from? chief executive is nothing but _ comes from? chief executive is nothing but diplomatic, - comes from? chief executive is nothing but diplomatic, i- comes from? chief executive is nothing but diplomatic, i asked comes from? chief executive is - nothing but diplomatic, i asked him if he thought the chinese model of the internet was in the ascendance, in the internet is much more authoritarian, used as a tool of surveillance, they crack down on companies that get to be, like a ride hailing app which they cracked down on last week, the chinese approach has inspired authoritarians all over the weekend. the chief executive did not refer to china by name when i asked him but as we see in this clip, i think his message was pretty emphatic. the free and open internet has been a tremendous force for good and i think we take it for granted, google has proudly stood for freedom of expression and the flow of
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information in a free and open way but i do think the model is being attacked and so i think it's something we take for granted but i hope we can stand up particularly in countries with strong democratic traditions and values. strong words there and we covered a huge range of topics in the well over an hour that we had. he said he wasjealous ofjeff bezos over an hour that we had. he said he was jealous ofjeff bezos flying into space and he wished he had met stephen hawking and alan turing, he said he is obsessed with cricket and on his teenagers to carpets, he said his children are allowed on to youtube, their generation will have to adapt to technology, he is encouraging them to develop boundaries of their own and talking about adapting to technology i should say the full—length version of the interview is on the bbc sounds app and on tv tonight, bbc two, 9pm. sounds app and on tv tonight, bbc two, 9m. ., ~' ,, scientists at imperial college london believe they've discovered the basis for what could be the first diagnostic
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test for long covid. our correspondent, lucy adams, who has been suffering from long covid herself, has this report. i started recording a video diary when i first got covid in march last year, thinking it would just be a few weeks on this. i've been ill for eight... i've been ill for eight months now. and i'm getting really fed up on it. doorbell rings. hi, guys. how was school? i'm one of a million people in the uk suffering from long covid, an illness with a huge range of symptoms including fatigue, breathlessness and brain fog. it's had a huge impact on me and my family. much about the illness is still unknown. i look fine on the outside, obviously, there's still a problem. i've been off work for almost a year, still unwell, i still have fatigue and headaches
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and all sorts of other problems. some believe one of the causes may be the immune system is turning on itself. we know that in some people, when they get infected with coronavirus, the body can also generate antibodies against self proteins or human proteins. normally, we create antibodies to fight disease but sometimes, the body creates auto antibodies, these attack healthy cells. the pilot data we have says you really can pick up different patterns of autoimmunity in people who have long covid so you know, start of the road but we are quite chuffed about it. professor danny altman at imperial college in london thinks he may have found unique auto antibodies in the blood of people with long covid. although more detailed research is needed, they hope a diagnostic test as possible. i'm famously optimistic so i'd hope that within six months
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we would have a simple blood test that you could get from your gp. but professor altman adds a note of caution as a social distancing ends in the country reopens. one thing we know for absolute certain is that long covid can ensue from any form of infection, asymptomatic, mild, severe, so if we are heading into a phase of 100,000 cases per day in the coming months, and we are seeing 10—20% of all infections can result in long covid, i can see no certainty that we are not brewing those long covid cases despite having a vaccinated population. 16 months on, i am much improved but i still worry about whether i will ever get back to being who i was before covid. lucy adams, bbc news. and you can see lucy adams full
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report in panorama tonight on bbc one at 7.35pm and afterwards on iplayer. the demonstrations come after a fall in cuba's economy, the worse for a number of decades. criticism has also arisen over the vaccination programme. back to the football now and a record audience watched the england's defeat to italy. the viewing audience peaked at almost 31 million viewers during the penalty shootout. that makes it the most viewed television event since the funeral of princess diana in 1997. lizo mzimba looks back on the biggest tv events of each decade. last night's nation unifying event unifying event was watched by an average of 29.85 million viewers. with the vast majority watching on the bbc —
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the biggest tv audience of the decade, the biggest for almost a quarter of a century. it gained almost 5 million more viewers than the most watched event of the 2010s, the wedding of the duke and duchess of cambridge. and close to 10 million more than the biggest tv event of the 20005, an only fools and horses christmas special which got 21.4 million. we had to go back to the funeral of diana, princess of wales in 1997 to find a bigger viewership — that was watched by 32.1 million. the football also did not quite beat the 19805 most watched show... happy christmas, ange. ..den presenting angie with divorce papers on eastenders, which included a repeat. figures were compiled differently before then but in the 19705, apollo 13'5 5plashdown was watched by an estimated 28.6 million. similarly, the estimated figure, 32.3 million who watched the 1966
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world cup final can't be directly compared to yesterday's slightly lowerfigure but if england do manage to reach a final again at next year's world cup, they mightjust set an even bigger viewing figure than last night. lizo mzimba, bbc news. well, despite the disappointment of the england team's defeat last night, let's not forget their goals and victories earlier in the tournament — and the fact that — for a few weeks at least — good times never felt so good. # hands touching hands # reaching out... he goes past one, place it into sterling! # touching me, touching you. # touching me, touching you. # sweet caroline! # sweet caroline! # good times never seemed so good.
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# good times never seemed so good. # i've been inclined. # i've been inclined. # to believe there never would. # to believe there never would. # look at the night, and it don't seem so lonely. # we fill it up with only two. # we fill it up with only two. # and when i heard. # and when i heard. # hurting runs off my shoulders. it's some sort of wonder strike! # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major _ # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major tournament, - # warmth, reaching out... into the final of a major tournament, for - # warmth, reaching out... into the | final of a major tournament, for the first time in 55 years!
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# reaching out, touching me, touching you.

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