Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 11, 2021 9:30am-10:01am BST

9:30 am
this is bbc news. the headlines... on the brink of history — england's footballers prepare to take on italy in tonight's final of euro 2020 — their biggest match in more than half a century. their resilience and experiences as a team have really prepared them well for this moment. the italians have not had to wait 55 years for a major final — but there's plenty of excitement there too, with fans gearing up for the big night. away from football, britain's health secretary warns that the number of people on nhs hospital waiting lists in england could reach 13 million in the coming months. the widow of haiti's assassinated president claims he was killed because of his drive
9:31 am
for political reform. sir richard branson prepares to venture to the edge of space, on the first passenger flight of his virgin galactic spaceship. you now the sport with gavin ramjaun. how excited are you for the game? it is something we can all look forward to, england have done so well to get this far, anyhow. england manager gareth southgate says the players need to feel the warmth and support of the fans tonight, when they face italy in the european championship final. they trained their base at st george's park yesterday morning before making thejourney to their hotel in hertfordshire. there was one notable absence — phil foden — who is a doubt for today's game with a foot injury. but there's such a depth to the squad, and captain harry kane says they know how to
9:32 am
approach big games. of course there's an extra level of excitement and anticipation, but that's all part and parcel of playing major football. a lot of us have been at the highest level in our club careers and a few of us obviously have had the opportunity in the world cup, a few years ago, so is about staying calm, staying as relentless as you can, and just look forward to being out there and enjoying the moment as much as we can. italy will, of course, be tough opponents — this is their tenth major tournament final. they've won four world cups and the euros once — but that was back in 1968. the venus rosewater dish has a new name on it after ash barty beat karolina pliskova to the wimbleon title. the world number one is the first australian women's champion for 41 years. joe wilson reports. deep breath, step forwards. two women who'd played in every type of occasion except for the wimbledon final. five foot five versus six foot one. ash barty overcame karolina pliskova's height. crowd cheers.
9:33 am
commentator: tremendous. pliskova battled her own nerves, her fierce serve gone. with it, the first set. between navratilova and king, urgent discussions in the royal box. all spectators wanted a worthy final. the second set produced a back—and—forth tension that is tennis. pliskova at the net had to win this point, didn't she? 0h! that moment went to barty. the second set went to a tie—break, with a capacity crowd who had come to sit down, you want a reason to stand up. that's pliskova's husband. one set all. the deciding set was tight but bartyjust had more. she had given up tennis for a while, there had been pressures, expectations, injuries. now ashleigh barty is champion. a private moment of triumph in front of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the fact that i wanted to dare to dream it and say i want to win
9:34 am
this incredible tournament and being able to live out my dream right now with everyone here has made it better than i ever could have imagined. 50 years ago, another indigenous australian, the great evonne goolagong, one won this title, on this court — that's inspiration. i hope i made evonne proud. you did! cheering and applause. all in all on centre court, ash barty did everyone proud. four wimbledon titles, now, for british pair of alfie hewett and gordon reed. champions again. while in the women's wheelchair doubles, britain'sjordanne whiley and japan's yui kamiji secured their fifth title here, for the first for whiley as a mother. go on, son! you are allowed to join in. after all, joy is something to be shared. joel wilson, bbc news, wimbledon. it could be an historic day in the men's final, with novak djokovic eyeing a sixth wimbledon title, as he takes on italy's matteo berrettini. djokovic has been in incredible form throughout the championships, only dropping one set. he says it would mean everything to equal roger federer
9:35 am
and rafael nadal�*s all—time record of 20 grand slam victories. grand slams are what — you know, what counts the most in our sport, and right now, at this stage of my career as well, it's about historic number one rankings and it's about grand slams and trying to, you know, fight for as many trophies and grand slams as possible. so, as i said, i put myself in a great position and now onto the last — ah, last hurdle. the last challenge is going to be a big one but i look forward to it. there was another impressive performance from england's stand—in cricket side, who wrapped up their one—day series with pakistan with a game to spare. as the main squad continues to isolate after a covid outbreak, the understudies made 2a7 at lord's — phil salt with a half cenutury. and they bowled out pakistan 52 runs short to take an unbeatable 2—0 series lead. the final game is on tuesday. the british and irish lions have maintained their 100% start to their tour of south africa. this was their toughest test so far, though — it was 26—26 at half—time, three of the sharks' tries coming
9:36 am
from lions�* mistakes. the game changed after jayden hendrikser was sent off for an elbow to liam williams�* head and the lions pulled away, anthony watson scoring two of their 11 tries. there's another tough day in prospect for mark cavendish at the tour de france, before a chance to rest tomorrow. dutchman bbauke mollema won the 14th stage, as the tour moved into the pyrenees. tadej pogacar retained the overall lead but cavendish did manage to finish within the cut—off time, keeping alive his hopes of a record—breaking 35th win. england's matt fitzpatick will have to make a very late dash to wembley for the euros final, after he took a share of the lead at the scottish open. you he joked at the start of the tournament that he didn't want to play too well, so he could get an early tee time on the last day but he'll be out late, after making six birdies to move to iii—under—par, alongside thomas detry. fitzpatrick says he'll be going to the match regardless, even if it's just
9:37 am
for the second half. that's all the sport — now here's ben with the papers. i can't let you go well at your ican't let you go well at your analysis— i can't let you go well at your analysis of the game, how do you see it going? _ analysis of the game, how do you see it auoin ? . , analysis of the game, how do you see itauoin? . , ., it going? that is the eternal question. — it going? that is the eternal question, england - it going? that is the eternal question, england are - it going? that is the eternal i question, england are playing it going? that is the eternal - question, england are playing so well, you would be foolish to maybe not back england, but italy have not been beaten by england at a tournament football match, so it is going to be a draw at full—time, thatis going to be a draw at full—time, that is the best i can say. i am just hoping not penalties. enjoyed, gavin, i am sure you will. —— enjoy it. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.
9:38 am
football of course dominates. with me are martin lipton, chief sports reporter at the sun — and john stevens, deputy political editor at the daily mail. let's take a look through some of today's front pages, starting with the sunday times. it reports that the wait time between covid jabs could be cut to just four weeks, as part of the government's plan to accelerate the roll—out of second vaccinations. the observer leads with what it describes as �*growing public alarm' ahead of borisjohnson�*s plans to ease coronavirus restrictions in england on 19th july. the paper also pictures gareth southgate, who's urging his england team to �*stay calm amongst the hype�* ahead of the euros final. the express focuses on the heartfelt message from the queen as she sends her �*good wishes�* to the england team. that message is echoed on the front of the telegraph as her majesty writes to gareth southgate, praising his squad for their "spirit, commitment and pride". the sunday people describes the three lions as the �*pride of england�* as they gear up for tomorrow�*s match at wembley.
9:39 am
if they win, it�*ll be england�*s first major tournament victory since the world cup triumph over west germany in 1966. and �*we kane be heroes�*. the mirror pictures england captain harry kane — he fired in a dramatic extra—time goal for the team to get them to the final — and in the processjoined gary lineker to become joint—top goal scorerfor england. so let�*s begin. martin, lots of messages from the queen, prince william, boris johnson, the queen on the front of the telegraph saying, i hope history records not only your success but also the spirit, commitment and pride with which you conduct yourselves. this is a fantastic
9:40 am
england team, very different from previous england teams. yes. england team, very different from previous england teams.— england team, very different from previous england teams. yes, i think the queen. — previous england teams. yes, i think the queen. as _ previous england teams. yes, i think the queen, as she _ previous england teams. yes, i think the queen, as she often _ previous england teams. yes, i think the queen, as she often does, - previous england teams. yes, i thinkl the queen, as she often does, speaks for the nation. this is a wonderful mix of players, a team that reflects the country as it stands, multicultural, multiracial, it has huge humanitarian instincts, which is not often associated with footballers. they are often accused of being cynical and money motivated etc. these are a great bunch of boys led by an outstanding intelligent and mature man in gareth southgate, who i have had the pleasure of fortune—teller no for a quarter of a century. —— fortune to know. what century. -- fortune to know. what has been the _ century. -- fortune to know. what has been the secret _ century. -- fortune to know. what has been the secret of— century. -- fortune to know. what has been the secret of his - century. —— fortune to know. what has been the secret of his success with mac he understands players, he always has, he is also a much stronger character than anyone would know looking at him. he stronger character than anyone would know looking at him.—
9:41 am
know looking at him. he has this veneer of calmness _ know looking at him. he has this veneer of calmness and - know looking at him. he has this| veneer of calmness and decency. know looking at him. he has this - veneer of calmness and decency. he also has the strength and determination required to galvanise players, he was the captain of crystal palace at 23, a team of very strong characters. that wasn�*t by chance, he has something about him, always been a leader of men. he does it in an understated manner, that belies the conviction that he has, he told the players he could do it, he told the players he could do it, he told the players he could do it, he told them his job was to banish the demons of the past. to make them be greater than the sum of their parts, when in the past england teams have been less than the sum of their collective parts, and he identified the leaders and his group in harry kane and henderson and maguire, had turned them into cornerstones of the squad. also this constant change in personnel in terms of bringing in young talented players that we have seen in the
9:42 am
tournament, but foden and sacco, sancho, they are all kids, but on the field they are not.— sancho, they are all kids, but on the field they are not. john, how do ou see the field they are not. john, how do you see the — the field they are not. john, how do you see the game _ the field they are not. john, how do you see the game tonight? - the field they are not. john, how do you see the game tonight? are - the field they are not. john, how do you see the game tonight? are you | you see the game tonight? are you nervous, confident? i you see the game tonight? are you nervous, confident?— nervous, confident? ifeel a bit sick, i nervous, confident? ifeel a bit sick. i am _ nervous, confident? ifeel a bit sick, i am not _ nervous, confident? ifeel a bit sick, i am not playing - nervous, confident? ifeel a bit sick, i am not playing so - nervous, confident? i feel a bit. sick, i am not playing so goodness knows _ sick, i am not playing so goodness knows how — sick, i am not playing so goodness knows how the players feel. you're not playing? _ knows how the players feel. you're not playing? that _ knows how the players feel. you're not playing? that is _ knows how the players feel. you're not playing? that is a _ knows how the players feel. you're not playing? that is a surprise, - knows how the players feel. you're| not playing? that is a surprise, you must be robbed. i not playing? that is a surprise, you must be robbed.— must be robbed. i don't know why they didn't — must be robbed. i don't know why they didn't pick — must be robbed. i don't know why they didn't pick me! _ must be robbed. i don't know why they didn't pick me! southgate . must be robbed. i don't know why they didn't pick me! southgate is | must be robbed. i don't know why. they didn't pick me! southgate is in they didn't pick me! southgate is in the papers — they didn't pick me! southgate is in the papers talking to players, saying — the papers talking to players, saying how they need to keep calm, i do not _ saying how they need to keep calm, i do not know— saying how they need to keep calm, i do not know how you managed to do that at— do not know how you managed to do that at such — do not know how you managed to do that at such occasions. there were some _ that at such occasions. there were some quotes from southgate's biography, he had mr spit in 1996 in the euros _ biography, he had mr spit in 1996 in the euros semifinals, he was thinking _ the euros semifinals, he was thinking at that moment about how it could go— thinking at that moment about how it could go wrong, not the things he could _ could go wrong, not the things he could control —— he missed in 1986. you have _ could control —— he missed in 1986. you have to — could control —— he missed in 1986. you have to focus, keep calm, ——
9:43 am
i996 _ you have to focus, keep calm, —— 1996 he — you have to focus, keep calm, —— 1996 he said _ you have to focus, keep calm, —— 1996. he said in his pre—torquay will not — 1996. he said in his pre—torquay will not he — 1996. he said in his pre—torquay will not be over hyping the players up will not be over hyping the players up because they are playing at wembley, a massive amount of support is there. _ wembley, a massive amount of support is there, they know the crowd is on their— is there, they know the crowd is on their side, — is there, they know the crowd is on their side, that will be hyping them up their side, that will be hyping them up -- _ their side, that will be hyping them up —— pre—talk.| their side, that will be hyping them up -- pre-talk-_ up -- pre-talk. i say said, lots of messages _ up -- pre-talk. i say said, lots of messages from _ up -- pre-talk. i say said, lots of messages from royalty, - up -- pre-talk. i say said, lots of messages from royalty, prime i messages from royalty, prime minister, also a lovely one which the mail on sunday features, a message, a letterfrom harry kane�*s wife, i will read a bit of it. you know i am not one to cry too easily but i found myself in tears when i started writing down how proud you are making us all and what your doing for the country. a very emotional and lovely letter. ibe emotional and lovely letter. be fair, this emotional and lovely letter. ea: fair, this was in the telegraph yesterday, they did a whole series of letters to players from people who knew them as kids and their families, their parents, wives etc. i think this taps into the essence of this team. in the past there have
9:44 am
been england teams who�*re global stars and at times maybe had personalities that were outwith football, whereas this lot, even the superstar players, are all quite humble stop look at things they have done, as proof. marcus rashford with this campaign, jordan henderson collecting, galvanising players across the uk to raise money for the nhs. harry kane wearing the rainbo armband against germany as a statement of intent about the inclusivity in his team. —— rainbo armband. that is not weight we�*re used to, i am not denigrating those who went before, i know them personally, i know the likes of david beckham and steven gerard and frank lampard, great blokes, but they have always been bigger than football, maybe that didn�*t quite measure the idea of a team ethic,
9:45 am
whereas these players, you read these tributes to them, they understand to sublimate themselves or the team. as a consequence you get a better team.— get a better team. interesting anal sis. get a better team. interesting analysis. john, _ get a better team. interesting analysis. john, martin - get a better team. interesting analysis. john, martin talking | get a better team. interesting - analysis. john, martin talking there about the inclusivity of the team and the multicultural nature of this team, the sandy times sort of reflecting that in terms of the unification of the country behind this team with a feature about blackburn, this town is not divided, we are one people and we all love england. we are one people and we all love encland. , , , ., ., ., , england. yes, this is a town that is often described _ england. yes, this is a town that is often described as _ england. yes, this is a town that is often described as being _ england. yes, this is a town that is often described as being quite - often described as being quite segregated between the communities but one _ segregated between the communities hut one of— segregated between the communities but one of their reporters has been there. _ but one of their reporters has been there, spoke to different people and they say— there, spoke to different people and they say no matter which part of the community— they say no matter which part of the community we are from, we support england~ _ community we are from, we support england~ i_ community we are from, we support england. i think if this has happened at any time in the last two years. _ happened at any time in the last two years. it _ happened at any time in the last two years, it would be a big moment in our country's — years, it would be a big moment in our country's history, and win or lose, _ our country's history, and win or lose, a — our country's history, and win or lose, a lot —
9:46 am
our country's history, and win or lose, a lot of— our country's history, and win or lose, a lot of people will always remember this day. however, after we have been_ remember this day. however, after we have been to _ remember this day. however, after we have been to the coronavirus crisis the last— have been to the coronavirus crisis the last couple of years, this is the last couple of years, this is the sort — the last couple of years, this is the sort of— the last couple of years, this is the sort of thing that we need to bring _ the sort of thing that we need to bring the — the sort of thing that we need to bring the country together, the biggest — bring the country together, the biggest ever tv audience in britain was in _ biggest ever tv audience in britain was in 1966 for the world cup final, i was in 1966 for the world cup final, i didnt— was in 1966 for the world cup final, i didn't quite possible that you could — i didn't quite possible that you could get a tv audience can bite on bbc and _ could get a tv audience can bite on bbc and itv— could get a tv audience can bite on bbc and itv did a 35 million people which _ bbc and itv did a 35 million people which would be the biggest tv audience in britain of all time. it is quite — audience in britain of all time. it is quite nice after all the divisions we have heard, brexit, the problems— divisions we have heard, brexit, the problems of— divisions we have heard, brexit, the problems of coronavirus, something finally— problems of coronavirus, something finally good news to bring the country — finally good news to bring the country together.— finally good news to bring the country together. finally good news to bring the count touether. , ., ., ,, country together. martin, you talked about gareth — country together. martin, you talked about gareth southgate, _ country together. martin, you talked about gareth southgate, and - country together. martin, you talked about gareth southgate, and genres| about gareth southgate, and genres talk about how calm he is, the observer brought some interesting quotes about how he is not planning to do a rousing speech in dressing room before kick—off because he wants his players to drown out the noise, he says, we do not need them
9:47 am
to be getting overhyped, there will be enough energy and excitement in the stadium itself. that is quite fascinating because you normally think a manager and a captain would be doing a big steering speech before kick—off but he is not going to. it before kick-off but he is not going to. , ., ., ., , to. it is about managing yourself under pressure. _ to. it is about managing yourself under pressure. i— to. it is about managing yourself under pressure. i remember- to. it is about managing yourself - under pressure. i remember speaking to gareth nine years ago and we sat down, a couple of us who knew him well, she was talking about penalties and saying, you have got to practice them. it is the biggest thing is psychological, the way you do it is keeping calm under pressure. the way you win matches is to have the calmest head, the clarity of thought under pressure. it is to respond when the penalty is saved, as kane did on wednesday, it is to know that if you repeat things that you have done properly, they
9:48 am
become second nature. it is all about remembering what brought us to this point, because if you repeat point bottas to this point, you can win. —— if you repeat what brought us. you have two be true to yourself, true to the instincts, true to what has brought you to this point because that is what you will need to ascend the final peak. brute need to ascend the final peak. we have hoping it doesn't come to have hoping it doesn�*t come to penalties but if it does they need to keep calm. there is other news in the newspapers, amazingly, apart from the big game tonight. don, let�*s look at the observer�*s front page, ——john, freedom day onjuly 19, highlighting what they say is public alarm at the plan for freedom day, the assumption is everyone cannot wait for this day to come, but a lot of people very nervous.
9:49 am
yes, government has gone for a big ban- yes, government has gone for a big bang reopening where all legal restrictions are going a week from tomorrow— restrictions are going a week from tomorrow in england, there is some concern, _ tomorrow in england, there is some concern, some polling, it looks like the issue _ concern, some polling, it looks like the issue of— concern, some polling, it looks like the issue of masks is something where _ the issue of masks is something where we — the issue of masks is something where we are still quite divided, the figure — where we are still quite divided, the figure of 73% of people still think— the figure of 73% of people still think they should be mandatory on public— think they should be mandatory on public transport. the problem the government has is if they do not start— government has is if they do not start getting on with reopening now, when _ start getting on with reopening now, when do _ start getting on with reopening now, when do you do it? we are coming into the _ when do you do it? we are coming into the summer which we know it's a slightly— into the summer which we know it's a slightly easier time when dealing with viruses, if you do not do it nowadays — with viruses, if you do not do it nowadays you will be staring down the barrel— nowadays you will be staring down the barrel of winter. that would be a lot more — the barrel of winter. that would be a lot more difficult if we were doing — a lot more difficult if we were doing it — a lot more difficult if we were doing it then. a lot of people do 'ust doing it then. a lot of people do just want— doing it then. a lot of people do just want to get on with getting rid of staff _ just want to get on with getting rid of staff i— just want to get on with getting rid of staff. i never had a problem with wearing _ of staff. i never had a problem with wearing a _ of staff. i never had a problem with wearing a mask, i was happy to wear went in_ wearing a mask, i was happy to wear went in the _ wearing a mask, i was happy to wear went in the supermarket and on public— went in the supermarket and on public transport, but i went to wimbledon last week and everyone was either double jabbed or been tested,
9:50 am
he didn't— either double jabbed or been tested, he didn't have to wear a mask when you waiting — he didn't have to wear a mask when you waiting inside the ground, not having _ you waiting inside the ground, not having to — you waiting inside the ground, not having to wear a mask for the first time _ having to wear a mask for the first time in _ having to wear a mask for the first time in public in ages was actually really— time in public in ages was actually really nice — time in public in ages was actually really nice. once people get a taste of that— really nice. once people get a taste of that freedom, they will quite enjoy— of that freedom, they will quite enjoy it — of that freedom, they will quite enjoy it. one of the problems is about— enjoy it. one of the problems is about confusing —— infusion of the messages — about confusing —— infusion of the messages. we have sajid javid out this morning saying he thinks it would _ this morning saying he thinks it would be — this morning saying he thinks it would be irresponsible not to bury mask— would be irresponsible not to bury mask in_ would be irresponsible not to bury mask in a — would be irresponsible not to bury mask in a crowded place afterjuly 19, and _ mask in a crowded place afterjuly 19, and we — mask in a crowded place afterjuly 19, and we know that during the pandemic— 19, and we know that during the pandemic the government hasn't always— pandemic the government hasn't always been great at giving clear communications to the public, saying you do— communications to the public, saying you do not— communications to the public, saying you do not have to wear one bylaw but you _ you do not have to wear one bylaw but you are — you do not have to wear one bylaw but you are advised to, it starts to -et but you are advised to, it starts to get confusing. all but you are advised to, it starts to get confusing-— get confusing. all part of that is the vaccine _ get confusing. all part of that is the vaccine roll-out, _ get confusing. all part of that is the vaccine roll-out, and - get confusing. all part of that is the vaccine roll-out, and study| the vaccine roll—out, and study times highlighting that the weight between vaccines could be cut to four weeks, a lot of concern about younger people, especially young men, not getting vaccinated even though they have been given the
9:51 am
opportunity for that, apparently nearly half of 18 to 24—year—old men are on —— unvaccinated more than three weeks after they were given access to the vaccine.— access to the vaccine. sometimes there is the _ access to the vaccine. sometimes there is the confidence _ access to the vaccine. sometimes there is the confidence of - access to the vaccine. sometimes there is the confidence of youth i access to the vaccine. sometimes l there is the confidence of youth and makes you believe you are invulnerable. obviously the truth is you are not, i was at wembley on wednesday, a lot of fear amongst you is that people were taking their covid status to get into the ground, they had borrowed somebody else�*s nhs e—mail to show that they had been vaccinated, done a little flow test that day. i cannot conceive of why you would not want to be vaccinated but i do think it�*s interesting this change of timetable, we were told it had to be eight weeks or 12 weeks depending on the vaccine between chaps, now four. i am sure there is scientific justification but you wouldn�*t have thought the vaccine had changed too much in that period, may be slightly
9:52 am
tweaked to do with new varieds, but the government clearly has to roll—out the numbers of people being vaccinated which has dropped considerably —— variants. 400,000 a down to a quarter of that, in big difference, so anything that can be used to persuade and via people to was taking the vaccine, particularly those in the late 20s, early 30s, though likely to be out meeting socially than people my age, we do not tend to go to pubs all—night to often these days. cannot handle it. laughter. thanks for that, martin. john, the worry is that all of this, one of the knock—on effects of this whole pandemic has been a terrible rise in hospital waiting lists, and sajid javid now talking about waiting list in the next two months of up to 30
9:53 am
million, an extraordinary figure. yes, at the moment we have 5 million people _ yes, at the moment we have 5 million people on— yes, at the moment we have 5 million people on waiting lists but he is warning — people on waiting lists but he is warning that he thinks it might double. — warning that he thinks it might double, partly because once people start going to their doctor, things that they— start going to their doctor, things that they would have gone weeks ago and months ago, they find there is a problem _ and months ago, they find there is a problem and they get added to the list of— problem and they get added to the list of people waiting for tests and procedures. we obviously know the reasons _ procedures. we obviously know the reasons that has caused this, obviously— reasons that has caused this, obviously coronavirus and lockdown, people _ obviously coronavirus and lockdown, people not— obviously coronavirus and lockdown, people not being able to go for the czechs— people not being able to go for the czechs they would do, but less clear what the _ czechs they would do, but less clear what the solution is, how we will sort this— what the solution is, how we will sort this out, to think suggested in this article — sort this out, to think suggested in this article is the possibility of using — this article is the possibility of using private hospitals, but they only have — using private hospitals, but they only have so much capacity and if you take — only have so much capacity and if you take surgeons working in the nhs to private _ you take surgeons working in the nhs to private hospitals, that has not really _ to private hospitals, that has not really solving the issue. the other things— really solving the issue. the other things about doing more virtual appointments, ratherthan things about doing more virtual appointments, rather than people going _ appointments, rather than people going to _ appointments, rather than people going to a — appointments, rather than people going to a hospital for a consultation, you can do a toy
9:54 am
phone, — consultation, you can do a toy phone, but— consultation, you can do a toy phone, but that only has some sort of limited _ phone, but that only has some sort of limited impact. —— you can do it on your— of limited impact. —— you can do it on your phone. of limited impact. -- you can do it on your phone-— of limited impact. -- you can do it on your phone. last story, richard branson, on your phone. last story, richard branson. going — on your phone. last story, richard branson, going off— on your phone. last story, richard branson, going off to _ on your phone. last story, richard branson, going off to space - on your phone. last story, richard j branson, going off to space today, first of the billionaires to do it. i am told he is leaving at 2pm, a 90 minute journey, i am told he is leaving at 2pm, a 90 minutejourney, so he will i am told he is leaving at 2pm, a 90 minute journey, so he will be i am told he is leaving at 2pm, a 90 minutejourney, so he will be back in the game if he wants to watch it. yeah, i think this is the most incredible story because i do not understand why he would do it now. maybe because he wants to be astronaut 01 or whatever he has named himself, as may be because he can add he is a thrill—seeker and needs this, but i think absolutely —— | needs this, but i think absolutely —— i would be terrified, he goes up in a rocket thing, they drop it off out of the middle of the plane and he is next on the pilot and they go up he is next on the pilot and they go up to 50,000 feet or whatever, into
9:55 am
near space, up to 50,000 feet or whatever, into nearspace, iam up to 50,000 feet or whatever, into near space, i am thinking, let someone else do it and prove it works first. laughter. let�*s be sensible. i couldn�*t imagine it, it is sci—fi, and incredible thing, maybe this is the beginning of something that will change the way we live our scientific lives in terms of exploration and such. a bit of me, one day, i wouldn�*t mind going to the moon but not yet. you one day, i wouldn't mind going to the moon but not yet.— one day, i wouldn't mind going to the moon but not yet. you don't have the moon but not yet. you don't have the inventor — the moon but not yet. you don't have the inventor and _ the moon but not yet. you don't have the inventor and explorer _ the moon but not yet. you don't have the inventor and explorer spirit, - the moon but not yet. you don't have the inventor and explorer spirit, i - the inventor and explorer spirit, i don�*t think. the inventor and explorer spirit, i don't think-— don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he _ don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he has— don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he has always - don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he has always had - don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he has always had a - don't think. no, but to be fair to ranson, he has always had a bit| don't think. no, but to be fair to i ranson, he has always had a bit of gung ho, that has made him the incredible business success has been. i will still be enjoying the sunshine, but there you go. to boldly go, in—built ambition. a quick score prediction from both of you. how you see it? z=1 quick score prediction from both of you. how you see it?— quick score prediction from both of you. how you see it? 2-1 to england. in normaltime? _ you. how you see it? 2-1 to england.
9:56 am
in normaltime? martin? _ you. how you see it? 2-1 to england. in normaltime? martin? what - you. how you see it? 2-1 to england. in normaltime? martin? what is - you. how you see it? 2-1 to england. | in normaltime? martin? what is your in normal time? martin? what is your analysis? i in normaltime? martin? what is your anal sis? , , , analysis? i spent my entire life watchin: analysis? i spent my entire life watching england _ analysis? i spent my entire life watching england ms _ analysis? i spent my entire life watching england ms near - analysis? i spent my entire life - watching england ms near misses, pharmacies, i am unable to call this —— far misses. i distally hope to be supported —— celebrating an england victory, but whatever happens, this is the finest england team of a generation. is the finest england team of a generation-— is the finest england team of a aeneration. ~ ., ., ., ., ,, generation. well said, good to talk to both of you. _ generation. well said, good to talk to both of you, thank _ generation. well said, good to talk to both of you, thank you - generation. well said, good to talk to both of you, thank you for - generation. well said, good to talk to both of you, thank you for being j to both of you, thank you for being with us, many thanks again. that�*s it for the papers this hour. goodbye for now. hello, there. with such a big sporting day ahead, what does the weather hold in store? it�*s not exactly a simple picture day, it�*s quite complicated. it�*s sunny spells and showers, low pressure sat to the south—west of us. it looks as if we�*ll see fewest showers in southern and eastern areas, some of the heaviest ones, northern england and scotland, light winds mean they will be
9:57 am
slow—moving, some torrential, thundery downpours, and then this is a more persistent band of rain moving in on the weather front to the south and west through the afternoon. now, in the sunshine, 22, 20 three celsius. that�*s possible at wimbledon for the final day of play. i�*d say, on balance, probably mostly dry, the odd light shower, but into the evening, this rain may arrive, if the play continues that late, so, it does look as if it�*s going to arrive in time for the football at wembley around about kick—off, it will be around through the match, and certainly for the players�* and fans�* journey home, because that rain, when it�*s set in, is with us through the evening overnight in southern areas, showery outbreaks of rain, some heavy rain, as well. any big showers in the north will tend to ease down overnight. we keep quite a bit of cloud, we pick up the mist and fog again as we have this morning. it�*s going to be quite a mild night for most of us. now, by tomorrow, that low pressure is set to the east of us inside of the south—west, so, different distribution of the showers, more around southern and eastern areas circulating around
9:58 am
that area of low pressure, but, equally, it�*s still low pressure, so there�*s going to be some sharp downpours further north and west, but, perhaps, here, some of the longer spells of sunshine. i think quite warm in the sunshine. now, the reason that we have got low pressure to the east of us is the jet stream has dived southwards, so that low pressure�*s developed across central parts of europe, it hangs around for much of the week, just drifting a bit further eastwards and allowing this ridge of high pressure, the azores high, to move in its place with some weak weather fronts in the north, but for tuesday, still the risk of a few lively downpours, particularly central and eastern areas close to that area of low pressure. wouldn�*t like to rule out some more persistent rain in southern and eastern areas, but when we get the length list spells of sunshine, that�*s where we will see temperatures slowly responding, creeping up a degree or so, i think, to go through the week with lengthier spells of sunshine and, on the whole, fewer showers. as ever, you can find out more information on the website.
9:59 am
10:00 am
this is bbc news. our top stories: on the brink of history — england�*s footballers prepare to take on italy in tonight�*s final of euro 2020 — their biggest match in more than half a century. their resilience and experiences as a team have really prepared them well for this moment.— a team have really prepared them well for this moment. good morning from wembley _ well for this moment. good morning from wembley stadium _ well for this moment. good morning from wembley stadium where - well for this moment. good morning from wembley stadium where the i from wembley stadium where the countdown to kick off continues. 60,000 fans are expected in the stadium behind me, with tens of millions more watching around the country is all of england hopes for one more win. the italians have not had to wait 55 years for a major final — but there�*s plenty of excitement there too, with fans gearing up for the big night. the uk�*s vaccine minister says the high number of people having had theirjabs,
10:01 am
means the government is confident that plans to lift a range of covid restrictions will go ahead onjuly

25 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on