Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 10, 2021 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

10:30 pm
this rain marches its way higher. this rain marches its way eastwards towards wembley later on this evening. there is more rain to come as we head into the start of next week because low pressure still in charge. that is sitting over the uk. we are looking at more rain more widely, i think. uk. we are looking at more rain more widely, ithink. it uk. we are looking at more rain more widely, i think. it could lead to localised flooding. downpours developing in scotland. it looks at this stage that northern ireland may see some of the driest weather. that low pressure bringing the downpour pushes away and it starts to dry. this is where all the heavy downpours are. not far away from the south—east of england. a few showers around on tuesday but fewer and
10:31 pm
lighter so temperatures will start to creep up just a better bet that drying out process continues as we head into wednesday. high pressure coming across the uk and more in the way of sunshine. dry weather as well. still not that warm across east anglia and the south—east and a week where the will be being ploughed into the north—west of the uk. the man—eaters are dry day with some sunshine. that week where the front is running around. as we get into thursday tracks down into the high pressure and brings cloud. maybe one or two spots of rain but essentially it is dry. more sunshine following to scotland and northern ireland. some computer models bring
10:32 pm
high pressure in and then pull it away fairly quickly and we expect high pressure to hang a little longer and with high pressure band it means we've got much—needed dry weather and it looks like it will be dry. a bit there rather than hot because the breeders coming around. the mediterranean are across the eastern side for hot weather.
10:33 pm
10:34 pm
hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. england's footballers are settling in at their hotel near london, ahead of tomorrow's match against italy in the final of euro 2020. ahead of the historic match, their manager gareth southgate says his team want to bring the trophy home. it always comes back to tomorrow, we're in a final and we're here... we're here to win. the build—up reaches fever pitch — millions of fans around the country preparing to watch the game tomorrow night at eight o'clock. and at wimbledon, world number one ashleigh barty has won her first ladies singles title —
10:35 pm
she beat the eighth seed karolina pliskova in three sets. fully vaccinated nhs staff could be let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone with covid, to try to tackle staff shortages. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are former welsh labour adviser and broadcasterjo kiernan, and columnist for the article, ali miraj. tomorrow's front pages. let's take a look through some of tomorrow's front pages already in, starting with the observer.
10:36 pm
it leads with what it describes as growing public alarm ahead of borisjohnson�*s plans to ease coronavirus restrictions in england on 19th july. the paper also pictures gareth southgate who's urging his england team to stay calm amongst the hype ahead of the euros final. the express focuses on the heartfelt message from the queen as she sends her good wishes to the team. that message is echoed on the front of the telegraph as her majesty writes to gareth southgate, praising his squad for their spirit, commitment and pride. the sunday people describes the three lions as the "pride of england" as they gear up
10:37 pm
for tomorrow's match at wembley. there is some uncertainty over the health of one of the players over a foot injury. if they win, it'll be england's first major tournament victory since the world cup triumph over west germany in 1966. and "we kane be heroes" — the mirror pictures england captain harry kane — he fired in a dramatic extra time goal for the team to get them to tomorrow's final, and in the processjoined gary lineker to become joint top goal scorerfor england. so let's begin. joe, do you want to kick us off at the front page on the sunday people, a very striking image of the england team. i suppose it sums it up that this is not a team without stars and
10:38 pm
individuals but about the collective be more than the sum of its parts. it is interesting, i was reflecting earlier, firstly getting a welsh person on to be talking about the england match! but that aside, this team seems so together, so sensible, and given the sort of, you know, the histrionics, the sum of the high we have seen in past tournaments from past teams, there is so much to admire in this young team. the way they look, the way they conduct themselves, some of the stories of themselves, some of the stories of the adversity that they have faced growing up in pursuing their dreams, their political nous, they're refusing to give into bullying or taking the knee, for example. they seem extraordinarily grounded and buried together, and you just know they want this so badly. you
10:39 pm
mention. — they want this so badly. you mention, obviously, - they want this so badly. you mention, obviously, you - they want this so badly. you mention, obviously, you are a welsh political activist in your time, a welsh journalist and broadcaster and you know how much pride there is in the welsh team, and a lot of pride in how they did in the euros tournament, so in a sense, it is not a zero—sum game, is it? you can be proud of wales as achievements but still hopefully be on the england side or even the italian side, as long as the spirit is one of the most positive i can rememberfor a long time. i most positive i can remember for a lona time. . ., long time. i agree with that entirely. — long time. i agree with that entirely, huge _ long time. i agree with that entirely, huge discipline - long time. i agree with that. entirely, huge discipline that long time. i agree with that - entirely, huge discipline that wales didn't get further. a lot of people i know we'll be supporting italy tomorrow. that old rivalry, cultural, political. ido tomorrow. that old rivalry, cultural, political. i do think that the way the team have conducted themselves has really tempered some of that age—old rivalry. i will be sitting back tomorrow, i will be wishing our next—door neighbours well in the final and hopefully it is a game where the the final, too.
10:40 pm
i'm sure everybody hopes that, ali, i'll draw a contrast between the telegraph with the whole team and the mirror has gone for a different take, and i think there is any disrespect intended in that, it has a five line—up. and the plan, thank goodness there are mains they can pan with. —— names they can plan with. pan with. -- names they can plan with. , . . pan with. -- names they can plan with. , ., ., ., ~ ., pan with. -- names they can plan with. , ., ., ., ~' ., , , with. yes, and a market for buying sterlin: with. yes, and a market for buying sterling for — with. yes, and a market for buying sterling for some _ with. yes, and a market for buying sterling for some time. _ with. yes, and a market for buying sterling for some time. i _ with. yes, and a market for buying sterling for some time. i think - sterling for some time. i think tomorrow_ sterling for some time. i think tomorrow is a date with destiny and i think. _ tomorrow is a date with destiny and i think. as _ tomorrow is a date with destiny and i think, asjoe said, this is a team that is_ i think, asjoe said, this is a team that is comfortable in their own skin, _ that is comfortable in their own skin. and — that is comfortable in their own skin, and you look at it led by a man: _ skin, and you look at it led by a man, gareth southgate, who has been on his_ man, gareth southgate, who has been on his own _ man, gareth southgate, who has been on his ownjourney. 1996, he felt the pain— on his ownjourney. 1996, he felt the pain of— on his ownjourney. 1996, he felt the pain of missing the penalty in germany— the pain of missing the penalty in germany but this is a man, you track a story— germany but this is a man, you track a story from — germany but this is a man, you track a story from the time he was 13 and
10:41 pm
a story from the time he was 13 and a half— a story from the time he was 13 and a half playing for southampton. they dropped _ a half playing for southampton. they dropped him from the squad and said he would _ dropped him from the squad and said he would never be a professional foothaller— he would never be a professional footballer and then he took up a contract — footballer and then he took up a contract with crystal palace when he was 15 _ contract with crystal palace when he was 15 and _ contract with crystal palace when he was 15 and they said after his first season— was 15 and they said after his first season that he should be a travel agent _ season that he should be a travel agent he — season that he should be a travel agent. he even got sacked as middlesbrough manager but he still kept going. he refused to take this england _ kept going. he refused to take this england job in 2016, literally, and it was— england job in 2016, literally, and it was only— england job in 2016, literally, and it was only when his colleague the welsh _ it was only when his colleague the welsh manager actually said, southgate washed an interview with him saying you should go for things in life. _ him saying you should go for things in life, don't hold back, that southgate actually stepped up and thought, i am going to do this. it is a date — thought, i am going to do this. it is a date with destiny. people in his squad. — is a date with destiny. people in his squad, raheem sterling, to use the technical bbc turn, sean, raheem sterling _ the technical bbc turn, sean, raheem sterling is— the technical bbc turn, sean, raheem sterling isjust a good bloke. what kind of— sterling isjust a good bloke. what kind of person goes out to his old school _ kind of person goes out to his old school and — kind of person goes out to his old school and gives 550 fa cup semifinal tickets to his, two people
10:42 pm
at the _ semifinal tickets to his, two people at the school, just so they could experience the atmosphere at wembley that he _ experience the atmosphere at wembley that he did _ experience the atmosphere at wembley that he did as a child when he came to this _ that he did as a child when he came to this country, aged five from jamaica — to this country, aged five from jamaica after his father was murdered when he was two. i do hope that kane _ murdered when he was two. i do hope that kane and sterling and sure ann maguire _ that kane and sterling and sure ann maguire and the others really bring this home — maguire and the others really bring this home. i think they have an excellent — this home. i think they have an excellent chance, italy's serious opposition, we know that, but i think— opposition, we know that, but i think 60 — opposition, we know that, but i think 60 wonderful atmosphere, home advantage, _ think 60 wonderful atmosphere, home advantage, fingers crossed. back think 60 wonderful atmosphere, home advantage, fingers crossed.— advantage, fingers crossed. back row one, the advantage, fingers crossed. back row one. the sunday _ advantage, fingers crossed. back row one, the sunday telegraph _ advantage, fingers crossed. back row one, the sunday telegraph leads - advantage, fingers crossed. back rowj one, the sunday telegraph leads with a quote from the letter that the queen sent to the team wishing them good luck for tomorrow and praising some of the things we have talked about already, and i suppose, again, i was looking at the pictures earlier and there is still on one of the front of the pages tomorrow morning of the queen resplendent in yellow on the world cup final day in
10:43 pm
1966, handing out the winners medals to the team. and she says, i was there, i know what it meant to that team and all their supporters. i mean, in some ways, you can say history is a bit of a new sense because itjust keeps... it is the kind of default line, the first biggest win since 1966 and actually they are about now, not then. but there is something about that connection with the past that seems to resonate, or is itjust a journalistic obsession? i to resonate, or is itjust a journalistic obsession? i think the ictures of journalistic obsession? i think the pictures of the — journalistic obsession? i think the pictures of the queen _ journalistic obsession? i think the pictures of the queen handing - journalistic obsession? i think the l pictures of the queen handing over the trophy, and as you say, it really resonated in the letter that was sent today, were just lovely. i'm a 1996 -- was sent today, were just lovely. i'm a 1996 "1966 was sent today, were just lovely. i'm a 1996 —— 1966 baby so i was never allowed to forget that i was there last year they won the cup. it is putting it to bed now, isn't it? as i say, this team are incredibly hungry, they've got some really, really stiff competition but home
10:44 pm
advantage and all of that, i have got a sneaking suspicion it might just be done tomorrow. mi. got a sneaking suspicion it might just be done tomorrow. ali, again, ou have just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to _ just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to give — just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to give it _ just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to give it to, _ just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to give it to, whether - just be done tomorrow. ali, again, you have to give it to, whether it l you have to give it to, whether it is the queen herself or the people who manage her public image, again, spot on with their timing. weill. spot on with their timing. well, look, the queen _ spot on with their timing. well, look, the queen is _ spot on with their timing. well, look, the queen is an _ spot on with their timing. well, look, the queen is an utter - look, the queen is an utter professional. through the past 16 months. — professional. through the past 16 months, which has been absolutely horrendous for all the people in the country. _ horrendous for all the people in the country, people struggling, people in the _ country, people struggling, people in the breadline, the nhs working around _ in the breadline, the nhs working around the clock in the pandemic that we _ around the clock in the pandemic that we are — around the clock in the pandemic that we are hopefully coming out of now without fantastic vaccination roll-out — now without fantastic vaccination roll—out. and throughout all of this. _ roll—out. and throughout all of this. the — roll—out. and throughout all of this, the one person always look to is the _ this, the one person always look to is the queen as a unifying figure, and prince — is the queen as a unifying figure, and prince charles and the duke of cambridge — and prince charles and the duke of cambridge has also come out and wish them well _ cambridge has also come out and wish them well. the queen is one individual— them well. the queen is one individual that can unified the country— individual that can unified the country in that way. it was only a few weeks—
10:45 pm
country in that way. it was only a few weeks ago that she was unfortunately bearing prince philip but, again, back to work, at a professional that she is. she made that vow— professional that she is. she made that vow all those years ago that she would — that vow all those years ago that she would serve her country until her dying — she would serve her country until her dying day, and she does that in exemplary— her dying day, and she does that in exemplary fashion. and, yet again, wishing _ exemplary fashion. and, yet again, wishing the — exemplary fashion. and, yet again, wishing the team well, and recalling in 1966— wishing the team well, and recalling in 1966 when she presented that in1966 when she presented that trophy— in1966 when she presented that trophy to— in 1966 when she presented that trophy to bobby moore and hoping that it _ trophy to bobby moore and hoping that it can— trophy to bobby moore and hoping that it can be done again, and southgate himself has said, the title of— southgate himself has said, the title of his own book is anything is possible _ title of his own book is anything is possible and that is what he thinks will happen tomorrow. he is very clear— will happen tomorrow. he is very clear that — will happen tomorrow. he is very clear that he was the new wembley to have its _ clear that he was the new wembley to have its own set of new memories with these — have its own set of new memories with these players and to create history — with these players and to create history. let's hope that tomorrow, they enjoy— history. let's hope that tomorrow, they enjoy the occasion, they are focused. — they enjoy the occasion, they are focused, remain calm, and bring it home _ focused, remain calm, and bring it home. �* , .,~ focused, remain calm, and bring it home. �* , ., focused, remain calm, and bring it home. ~ , ., , home. and can break italy's unbroken 33 match wins — home. and can break italy's unbroken 33 match wins in _ home. and can break italy's unbroken 33 match wins in the _ home. and can break italy's unbroken 33 match wins in the process. - home. and can break italy's unbroken 33 match wins in the process. no - 33 match wins in the process. no losses in that time. we'll keep our fingers crossed, he says in a
10:46 pm
shameless display of bias, from the bbc presenter. let's move on to politics. you both wear your colours on your sleeves, but no bias from may. ali, g want to pick offered —— kick off the observer? may. ali, g want to pick offered -- kick off the observer?— kick off the observer? apparently 5096 of the public _ kick off the observer? apparently 5096 of the public are _ kick off the observer? apparently 5096 of the public are quite - 50% of the public are quite concerned about this and they want freedom _ concerned about this and they want freedom date delayed and i don't want _ freedom date delayed and i don't want the — freedom date delayed and i don't want the removal of facemasks on public— want the removal of facemasks on public transport and also within hospitals, that has been backed by nhs staff— hospitals, that has been backed by nhs staff and bosses as well. you've -ot nhs staff and bosses as well. you've got to _ nhs staff and bosses as well. you've got to remember that the current infection— got to remember that the current infection rate is running at almost 30.000 _ infection rate is running at almost 30.000 a — infection rate is running at almost 30,000 a day, it could go up to 50.000 — 30,000 a day, it could go up to 50.000 try— 30,000 a day, it could go up to 50,000 byjuly the 19th, which is the so—called freedom day. sajid javid _ the so—called freedom day. sajid javid said — the so—called freedom day. sajid javid said it could peak at 100,000 a day— javid said it could peak at 100,000 a day in _ javid said it could peak at 100,000 a day in the — javid said it could peak at 100,000 a day in the summer. the arrival of sajid _ a day in the summer. the arrival of sajid javid. — a day in the summer. the arrival of sajidjavid, he is a day in the summer. the arrival of sajid javid, he is two weeks into the job. — sajid javid, he is two weeks into thejob, has sajid javid, he is two weeks into the job, has changed the balance within— the job, has changed the balance within the — the job, has changed the balance within the cabinet. in favour of more _ within the cabinet. in favour of more opening up, rather than...
10:47 pm
within the cabinet. in favour of more opening up, ratherthan... i think— more opening up, ratherthan... i think there — more opening up, ratherthan... i think there is _ more opening up, ratherthan... i think there is a shift there and clearly— think there is a shift there and clearly the government was to get the economy back up and running. we have got— the economy back up and running. we have got 350 billion of borrowing, 2 trillion _ have got 350 billion of borrowing, 2 trillion of— have got 350 billion of borrowing, 2 trillion of public debt to contend with. _ trillion of public debt to contend with. and — trillion of public debt to contend with, and there is a lot of mental health— with, and there is a lot of mental health issues to deal with as well. sajid _ health issues to deal with as well. sajid javid — health issues to deal with as well. sajid javid and the rest of the cabinet — sajid javid and the rest of the cabinet want to get the country back on its _ cabinet want to get the country back on its feet— cabinet want to get the country back on its feet but there is concern. and just — on its feet but there is concern. and just remember that the government was very slow in posing facemasks _ government was very slow in posing facemasks in the first place. it was july the _ facemasks in the first place. it was july the 24th last year that it was introduced in shops and during the 15th after— introduced in shops and during the 15th after it was introduced on public— 15th after it was introduced on public transport, months after it started. — public transport, months after it started, and now they are removing them _ started, and now they are removing them and _ started, and now they are removing them and there doesn't seem to be a real necessity to do that. i think there _ real necessity to do that. i think there is— real necessity to do that. i think there is concern out there. we have to see _ there is concern out there. we have to see what — there is concern out there. we have to see what the prime minister announces that it certainly seems to be announces that it certainly seems to he the _ announces that it certainly seems to he the case — announces that it certainly seems to be the case that he was to go for an all-out— be the case that he was to go for an all—out opening onjuly be the case that he was to go for an all—out opening on july the 19th. jo. i_ all—out opening on july the 19th. jo, i wonder how it looks in an area
10:48 pm
like north wales, where big numbers of people will be coming on holiday during the summer in this year at the staycation, and hospital resources, as they are in a place like cornwall, for example, which has just truro as a general hospital and the nearest hospital is plymouth, parts of wales, particularly coastal wales committee is quite hard to find enough hospital beds normally, but if you add in hospitalisations because of a viral infection, they must be some degree of concern about that. there inevitably is — degree of concern about that. there inevitably is and _ degree of concern about that. there inevitably is and i _ degree of concern about that. there inevitably is and i have _ degree of concern about that. there inevitably is and i have to _ degree of concern about that. there inevitably is and i have to say - inevitably is and i have to say forest back plans for the 19th art england only. we are expecting an announcement next week here in wales about possibly moving to level one quite quickly, and further details perhaps on all restrictions being lifted but a much more cautious approach here. and i parley is because we have large rural areas
10:49 pm
that get very, very busy in the summer with two arrests, where it is a considerable distance to the local hospital and beds are limited. we are told that we are several weeks behind england, in terms of the rising rates there. but even so, we have had two lh bees, local health boards in wales say that they are only now starting to see significant numbers of people coming in with covid and it is putting a burden and strain on the hospitals because obviously they are trying to get through the waiting lists on other disciplines, which had been held back through the pandemic. and so you can see that there is anxiety, and understandable anxiety, but equally as ali said, on the removal of mask wearing and social distancing. it is a really complicated situation, undoubtedly
10:50 pm
there are risks involved in all of these decisions. but to take away mask wearing, social distancing, doesn't seem right, doesn't sit right with people. and i think it is going to put an unfair burden on the most vulnerable in our society. 0bviously, most vulnerable in our society. obviously, the measures are related to england, the announcement that borisjohnson will make, but obviously, travel throughout the uk is a lot easier than it was. and different decisions will be made by nicola sturgeon, i think she's talking about august for hers, we will find out more about what is happening, and indeed in northern ireland, in the coming weeks, ten days. jo, on the same topic on the sunday telegraph, there is an interview with sajid javid where he is talking about waiting list topping 30 million in the months ahead. never mind who is to blame or any of that, if anyone is to blame, the consequences for the nhs at this
10:51 pm
infection, what it has done over the last 15 months, are likely to be with us for years to come. i think that i am remembering - with us for years to come. i think that i am remembering this - with us for years to come. i think that i am remembering this rightj with us for years to come. i think- that i am remembering this right but i think i remember hearing the first minister of wales are saying they expected it to be a full six years before we made our way through the backlog. and just going back to the previous story, with all the risks and uncertainty about freedom day, so—called freedom day, in any of the home nations, because it has to come at some point, it isjust home nations, because it has to come at some point, it is just whether in nine days' time is the right time. there is a risk of our nhs getting overwhelmed again, regardless of the stories we have heard this weekend about nhs staff not having to isolate if they come into contact with someone who has covid if they are double jab, as they all should be by now. there are lots of ifs and
10:52 pm
buts here and ifear that be by now. there are lots of ifs and buts here and i fear that is going to be a really difficult autumn and winterfor to be a really difficult autumn and winter for our to be a really difficult autumn and winterfor our nhs staff. to be a really difficult autumn and winter for our nhs staff. they have been through so much over the last 15 or 16 months, it hardly beggars belief that they might have to go through that again. i think people waiting for routine outpatient appointments, routine surgery, may have very, very long wait ahead of them. . . have very, very long wait ahead of them. , , �*, , them. this is sa'id javid's first interview he — them. this is sajid javid's first interview he has _ them. this is sajid javid's first interview he has done - them. this is sajid javid's first interview he has done since i them. this is sajid javid's first - interview he has done since becoming health secretary a fortnight ago today, what do you make of it? he has got a humongous entry. jo has already— has got a humongous entry. jo has already talked about the backlog, 5.3 million people who have not had operations. — 5.3 million people who have not had operations, cancelled treatments, heart _ operations, cancelled treatments, heart surgery etc that was needed, urgent _ heart surgery etc that was needed, urgent operations that there is a backlog. — urgent operations that there is a backlog, and sajid javid said that was partly down to their sense of britishness is not wanted to bother nhs staff— britishness is not wanted to bother nhs staff and they had other things to deal— nhs staff and they had other things to deal with, and that is —— could
10:53 pm
increase — to deal with, and that is —— could increase to — to deal with, and that is —— could increase to 13 million, which is completely scary. 0n increase to 13 million, which is completely scary. on top of that, he has to— completely scary. on top of that, he has to deal— completely scary. on top of that, he has to deal with mental health fall of this— has to deal with mental health fall of this pandemic. he has also to appoint— of this pandemic. he has also to appoint a — of this pandemic. he has also to appoint a new head of nhs england, simon _ appoint a new head of nhs england, simon stephens is on his way out and is going _ simon stephens is on his way out and is going to _ simon stephens is on his way out and is going to the house of lords. he has to— is going to the house of lords. he has to work— is going to the house of lords. he has to work out a pay settlement for doctors _ has to work out a pay settlement for doctors and — has to work out a pay settlement for doctors and nurses. he has also got to have _ doctors and nurses. he has also got to have a _ doctors and nurses. he has also got to have a discussion of the chancellor and the prime minister about— chancellor and the prime minister about what is going to be done for a long-term _ about what is going to be done for a long—term plan for social care, which — long—term plan for social care, which the _ long—term plan for social care, which the prime minister promised on the steps _ which the prime minister promised on the steps of— which the prime minister promised on the steps of downing street when he took over— the steps of downing street when he took over that he had a plan in place. — took over that he had a plan in place. we _ took over that he had a plan in place, we are still waiting for it. so, place, we are still waiting for it. so. sajid — place, we are still waiting for it. so, sajidjavid place, we are still waiting for it. so, sajid javid has that in his entry— so, sajid javid has that in his entry as _ so, sajid javid has that in his entry as well. he has a lot to do and i_ entry as well. he has a lot to do and i don't — entry as well. he has a lot to do and i don't envy the task at all. but he — and i don't envy the task at all. but he is — and i don't envy the task at all. but he is an— and i don't envy the task at all. but he is an experienced politician, he has _ but he is an experienced politician, he has operated in five different departments of state, so he has got the experience to do it. but i sadly think— the experience to do it. but i sadly think it _ the experience to do it. but i sadly think it is — the experience to do it. but i sadly think it is a — the experience to do it. but i sadly think it is a very tall order and he has a _ think it is a very tall order and he has a lot— think it is a very tall order and he has a lotto — think it is a very tall order and he has a lot to get through. ali,
10:54 pm
think it is a very tall order and he has a lot to get through.- has a lot to get through. ali, g want to pick — has a lot to get through. ali, g want to pick up _ has a lot to get through. ali, g want to pick up on _ has a lot to get through. ali, g want to pick up on the - has a lot to get through. ali, g want to pick up on the story i has a lot to get through. ali, g j want to pick up on the story on has a lot to get through. ali, g - want to pick up on the story on the front of the independent which is intriguing because it may offer an explanation for the government doing something for not much financial benefit, the plan to not carry on with the foreign aid pledge they gave. brute with the foreign aid pledge they ave. ~ ~ ., with the foreign aid pledge they cave. . " ., .. gave. we know the government announced _ gave. we know the government announced it _ gave. we know the government announced it would _ gave. we know the government announced it would reduce - gave. we know the government announced it would reduce the l announced it would reduce the pledge. — announced it would reduce the pledge, which is actually enshrined in law. _ pledge, which is actually enshrined in law. so— pledge, which is actually enshrined in law, so they were going to change that and _ in law, so they were going to change that and reduce it to knock .5%, and we know— that and reduce it to knock .5%, and we know that — that and reduce it to knock .5%, and we know that a number of prominent conservative backbenchers, including theresa _ conservative backbenchers, including theresa may, david davies, andrew mitchell. _ theresa may, david davies, andrew mitchell, have all been vociferously against _ mitchell, have all been vociferously against theirs, and now this paper is saying _ against theirs, and now this paper is saying that on climate change, boris _ is saying that on climate change, borisjohnson announced is saying that on climate change, boris johnson announced in the g7 boris johnson announced in the 67 that there — boris johnson announced in the 67
10:55 pm
that there would be a green marshall plan to— that there would be a green marshall plan to help developing countries, help them green up, that money is going _ help them green up, that money is going to _ help them green up, that money is going to again be taken from the development aid budget. so, again, slashing _ development aid budget. so, again, slashing that to deploy on climate change _ slashing that to deploy on climate change if— slashing that to deploy on climate change. if you look at this and you compare _ change. if you look at this and you compare it — change. if you look at this and you compare it to china's road initiative, which i know president biden. _ initiative, which i know president biden. it — initiative, which i know president biden. it is — initiative, which i know president biden, it is on his mind, he and i sit at— biden, it is on his mind, he and i sit at the— biden, it is on his mind, he and i sit at the g7. _ biden, it is on his mind, he and i sit at the g7, china is spending billions — sit at the g7, china is spending billions on _ sit at the g7, china is spending billions on that, not only in centrai— billions on that, not only in central asia and the silk road but in africa _ central asia and the silk road but in africa to — central asia and the silk road but in africa to europe, and we should respond. — in africa to europe, and we should respond, the green marshall plan, the green — respond, the green marshall plan, the green new deal, and rubbing this from the _ the green new deal, and rubbing this from the development budget is not great _ from the development budget is not great but— from the development budget is not great. but the other issue is we are in a crisis. — great. but the other issue is we are in a crisis. we — great. but the other issue is we are in a crisis, we are in a pandemic, we need— in a crisis, we are in a pandemic, we need to— in a crisis, we are in a pandemic, we need to cut spending somewhere. julie. _ we need to cut spending somewhere. julie. i_ we need to cut spending somewhere. julie. i will— we need to cut spending somewhere. julie, i will give you a chance to pick up the story when we come back at 11:30pm. for now, thank you both very much. another chance to look at
10:56 pm
the papers and the front pages after the papers and the front pages after the 11 o'clock news. the weather next. fairly dry and the weather front. it is a very big day in the world of sport, we have got wimbledon, we've got the final at wembley, too, so i was in the weather, too, we would like the best weather conditions we could possibly get. this is what it looks like early in the morning, some sunshine and dry but weather france are approaching and showers are growing. the good news is that for wimbledon, we are expecting fine weather conditions, very pleasant temperatures of around 18 to 20 celsius with some scattered cloud. this is what it looks like for most of us through the morning, dry but
10:57 pm
in the afternoon very quickly heavy showers will develop across parts of northern england and scotland, some of them could be thundery. also in the south—west, a weather front approaching at the same time so wet weatherfor approaching at the same time so wet weather for the west country, parts of wales, too, and this weather front will move slowly eastwards through the course of the day so areas that have been dry through the afternoon may turn a little cloudy and then wet and that does mean that just about to kick off time, we are expecting some rain at wembley. but the good news is it should be mostly light and fleeting. the forecast into the week ahead, here is a date into the week ahead, here is a date in thejet into the week ahead, here is a date in the jet stream and you can see blobs of blue so that indicates further showers on the cards, quite often when we get a dip in the jet stream we have a low pressure over us and the ingredients for further showers so lots of showers in the way for monday, some of them heavy, if you squint, you can make out some lime green colour is that, that indicates a downpour or two. temperatures in the sunshine will be
10:58 pm
20 degrees or so —— or so. view it showers around on tuesday, we will watch them, in the north france, and they could hit the south—east. for a mid week onwards, we are expecting high pressure to gradually drift from two hour direction and that means the weather will settle down, there will be lighter winds and a little bit warmer, i suspect in one or two spots eventually it was the end of the weekend, temperatures will hit 25, but wherever you are today, have a good day.
10:59 pm
11:00 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. extreme heatwave is building up in the western united states. millions of people are under warning of dangerous conditions. we'll be live in california, as it braces for record—breaking temperatures. also on the programme: fighting continues in afghanistan, as the taliban rapidly retake land from government forces. killed in the blink of an eye — the widow of haiti's president describes the moment her husband was murdered. less than 20 hours until the euro 2020 final between england and italy, we'll have the latest from both camps. and the billionaire richard branson gets ready to fly to space. we'll look at the risks and the rewards.

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on