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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 10, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. fighting continues in afghanistan, as the taliban rapidly retake land across the country. haiti requests foreign troops, after the president's assassination as the contry descends into chaos. extreme heat is building in the western united states, as california and nevada brace for record—breaking temperatures. less than 2a hours until the euro 2020 final between england and italy — we'll have the latest from both camps. and — the billionaire richard branson gets ready to fly to space. we'll look at the risks
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and the rewards. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the afghan president, ashraf ghani, has called on the taliban to resume political negotiations saying that his government wants peace. the taliban say they are continuing to capture territory and claim they've made further military advances, seizing, two districts of pa rwan. earlier they captured a key border crossing. islaam kalaa is one of the biggest trade gateways into neighbouring iran, generating around 20 million dollars a month for the afghan government. haroonjanjua is a freelance journalist reporting on the taliban advances in the region.
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they claim that they have seized control of 85% of the territory but the government has denied it. but the government has denied it. but the intense fighting has been going on in the western part of the country. control was gained in one district on friday and control of a crossing which is very significant, the border with iran, and also a us built border crossing with pakistan. but the fighting in the western province is the first provisional capital held by the taliban since the us began pulling out. it was captured briefly but hundreds of the commandos have regained control on thursday and the taliban insurgents are still present, fighting forces,
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and there is chaos in fighting everywhere people are in panic. they are collecting custom money, which is becoming a new source of income for them. ., is becoming a new source of income for them. . ., thanks to him there. the widow of haiti's assassinated president, jovenel moise, has posted an audio message on twitter saying that he was killed by mercenaries because of his determination to re—write the constitution and improve the lives of ordinary people. three days after the assassination of its president, haiti's political crisis is deepening. there are reports the country's lawmakers have nominated the head of the senate, joseph lambert, as interim president. a rival political faction though, which includes the acting interim prime minister claudejoseph, says the move is unconstitutional. courtney bembridge reports. crowds gathered outside the us embassy in port—au—prince with suitcases packed, looking for a way out. translation: i can't close my eyes.
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i can't sleep at night. i had to come here to the embassy because i'm scared. there are so many gunshots, and you don't even know where they're coming from. i've abandoned my home. i can't go back, i don't know about my family. the country of 11 million people is reeling from the assassination of its president, shot dead inside his home on wednesday. translation: look at what happened to the head of the state. _ i can't stay here. it's important to leave the country. these are two of the men haitian authorities say carried out the plot. they were attacked by the public as they were loaded into a police car. 17 men have been arrested so far, most of them colombian, but investigators are still looking for who ordered the killing. haiti was already plagued by hunger and gang violence, but the assassination has pitched the country deeper into turmoil. it's requested the united nations and the united states send troops to help secure the country and protect key infrastructure. the us has declined the request, and the un may also be reluctant to get involved.
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ithinkthe un is- thoroughly sick of haiti. they had a 13—year peacekeeping force there that got in a lot - of trouble in a lot of ways. i the last thing being the cholera i epidemic which the peacekeeping forces brought into haiti. so, i think they don't really. want to get entangled again. i think most outside forces don't |want to get militarily entangled| again in haiti if they can avoid it. adding to the uncertainty is the political situation. there's no working parliament, two men are claiming to be the prime minister, and a third of the senate has just nominated another man to lead as interim president. courtney bembridge, bbc news. let's take a look at some of
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the other stories making the news... the islamist militant group al shabab says it carried out a car bombing in somalia which eyewitnesses say killed at least five people. a vehicle laden with explosives rammed into a police convoy at a busy intersection in the capital mogadishu. the blast targeted the city's police chief, farhan mohamud, who survived unharmed. south africa's president cyril ramaphosa has called for calm following violent protests linked to the imprisonment of the former president jacob zuma. 25 lorries were torched and shops were looted overnight in kwa zulu natal province. major roads were blocked with burning barricades. the police said at least 26 people were arrested. the statue of confederate general robert e. lee in charlottesville has been removed. the controversial momunement was the focal point of the white supremacist �*unite the right rally�* in 2017, which saw anti—racism protester heather heyer killed by a neo—nazi terrorist. south korea has reported more than 1,300 new cases of coronavirus — a record for the third day in a row as the government prepares to impose
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further restrictions in the capital seoul. the country had previously been praised for the way it managed to control the virus but the subsequent vaccine rollout has been slow with just 11 percent of all adults fullyjabbed. police in bangladesh have arrested the owner of a food and drinks processing factory where more than 50 people died in a fire. the blaze broke out late on thursday. shahan shah azad, the owner of hashem foods, is one of eight people arrested so far. he's expected to face murder charges. most of those who died were trapped inside the building. children were among the dead — and this has led to an investigation into the use of child labour at the factory. akbar hossain is in the bangladesh capital dhaka with this update.
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this is a huge factory and after the fire incident which killed 52 people the police are now investigating and they said that the factory owner cannot avoid responsibility and many people are describing the incident as a deliberate murder. this factory was operating flouting rules and regulations and they were maintaining labour laws and regulations and safety standards. that is why police did this as a homicide case and this is why people who are in charge of responsibly running factory had to face charges. and the dreadful news for the families, of course, of those affected. it still filtering through. affected. it still filtering through-— affected. it still filtering throu~h. , , ., , through. yes. they are still gathering _ through. yes. they are still gathering in _ through. yes. they are still gathering in front _ through. yes. they are still gathering in front of- through. yes. they are still gathering in front of the - through. yes. they are still- gathering in front of the factory in search of their relatives because, many people are still unaccounted for, all of the fire department say that they as far as they could and
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no one is missing but still they are trying to find out more inside the rubble. police have been collecting dna to help identify victims and many people who have lost relatives are gathering holding voters at their relatives and asking the police to help identify and search the people and this is a dreadful scene in front of the factory. the whole factory is ablaze and many people, especially victims relatives actually do not know what to do, how to find their relatives was is why they are gathering in front of the factory. they are gathering in front of the facto . ., , , ., factory. there are plenty of factories — factory. there are plenty of factories like _ factory. there are plenty of factories like this _ factory. there are plenty of factories like this and - factory. there are plenty of i factories like this and building such as this in the country and this is the first disaster we've seen. yes, it is. fire safety is always ignored in bangladesh. although there are some steps taken by the government after the big factory collapse in 2012 which killed more
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than 1200 workers. after that, big brands in europe and america helped to improve safety standards but outside the garment industry like the food processing industry and some others they do not follow the rules and regulations and do not follow safety standards and the government is not improving safety standards, it is widely alleged. and people are saying that this factory, it is widely alleged that this factory also employs child labour which is another major concern that all the bangladesh government claims there is no child labour in bangladesh but a few years back international labour organisations came up with a report that said that still 1.2 million child labour is employed in different sectors in bangladesh and this factory, among the dead bodies there are some children so this is a huge concern for many people in bangladesh. child labour is going on.
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ethiopia's prime minister abiy ahmed's prosperity party has won the most seats in a parliamentary election a victory that assures him another term in office. his party won a10 of a36 seats — prime minister abiy called the results �*historic�*. meamwhile the un world food programme is moving aid into the tigray region of northern ethiopia where a conflict has left millions in need of assistance. a convoy of 50 lorries had to find an alternative route after a bridge was destroyed. the ethiopian government and tigrayan rebels have accused each other of sabotaging the delivery of aid. the headlines on bbc news... afghanistan's president, ashraf ghani, has urged the taliban to resume political negotiations about the country's future. haiti has appealed for international military help to secure strategic sites, after the assassination of its president.
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more than 30 million people in the southwestern united states are experiencing another brutal heatwave. with excessive heat warnings and record temperatures in las vegas. the heat is linked to a heat dome , or ridge of high pressure , over the region. hundreds of people died in western canada and the us when a similar heat dome shattered temperature records at the end ofjune. bbc weather presenter nick miller has the details. this latest heatwave is under way with. although not reaching the highest temperatures recorded in the recent heatwave it is still hot from alberta to ontario was tipped as well above 30. higher temperatures
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being felt across the south—west of the usa, particularly through nevada and california, well above a0 but in some spots above 50 degrees. even in a part of the usa, accustomed to extreme heat and heat waves this is a particularly difficult and extraordinary situation. death valley california on friday recorded a high of 5a.a celsius. 130 fahrenheit matching a temperature recorded in august last year which some argue is the highest temperature reliably recorded on earth but the official record at death valley actually goes back to 1913, 50 6.7 celsius. while not expected to threaten that this weekend we still could see temperatures getting a bit higher over the weekend at death valley. gradually, temperatures will subside as we go through the week ahead. closer to the seasonal average and may threaten the record of las vegas that avocados of the actual numbers
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and regardless of records this is clearly another extreme heatwave affecting some people and places in the usa. affecting some people and places in the usa. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. that is tremendous. she battled her own nerves, a fearsome serve gone within the first set. between.
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the second set went to the tie—break. the capacity crowd, you come to sit down, you want a reason to stand up. that is her husband. 0ne to stand up. that is her husband. one set all. it had become a captivating final right up until the deciding point in the fourth set. a private moment of triumph. in front of the world. it private moment of triumph. in front of the world-— of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise — of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the _ of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the fact _ of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the fact i _ of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the fact i wanted - of the world. it took me a long time to verbalise the fact i wanted to - to verbalise the fact i wanted to dare to dream and say i wanted to win this incredible tournament and being able to live out my dream right now with everyone here has made it better than i ever could have imagined.— made it better than i ever could have imagined. another indigenous australian won _ have imagined. another indigenous australian won this _ have imagined. another indigenous australian won this title _ have imagined. another indigenous australian won this title 50 - have imagined. another indigenous australian won this title 50 years i australian won this title 50 years ago on this court. i
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australian won this title 50 years ago on this court.— australian won this title 50 years ago on this court. i hope i made her roud. ago on this court. i hope i made her proud- you — ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. _ ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. all _ ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. all in _ ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. all in all, _ ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. all in all, she - ago on this court. i hope i made her proud. you did. all in all, she did i proud. you did. all in all, she did eve one proud. you did. all in all, she did everyone proud- _ proud. you did. all in all, she did everyone proud. less _ proud. you did. all in all, she did everyone proud. less than - proud. you did. all in all, she did everyone proud. less than 24 - proud. you did. all in all, she did i everyone proud. less than 24 hours everyone proud. less than 2a hours to go until italy and england meet at wembley for the european championship final. at wembley for the european championshipfinal. both at wembley for the european championship final. both teams left their training bases and arrived at their training bases and arrived at their respective hotels earlier. close to the ground where the match will take place on sunday. the england manager says he enters god have blocked out the distractions of the past and are fully focused on what they have to do. to the past and are fully focused on what they have to do.— what they have to do. to be recognising _ what they have to do. to be recognising the _ what they have to do. to be recognising the contribution what they have to do. to be - recognising the contribution others have made and the respectful of that but the near misses and tournaments are not gone so well were not important for this team and over the last four years they've not done so many barriers and they have come through so many different challenges, different ways to win
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matches, had to come back from being behind, had to go to extra time ago the penalty shoot—out so there are zillions of experiences as a team have really prepared them well for this moment. translation: we need to stay calm. we know what a tough game it will be for a number of reasons. but we need to be absolutely focused on what the game is all about and we need to try to implement that to the maximum potential and we know this will be our last game so if we want to enjoy a sales were 90 minutes we need to do so tomorrow night because then the championship will be over and the championship will be over and the guys holidays over still want to enjoy yourselves got 90 minutes available tomorrow night. another football final this weekend. it is a few hours' time. it is expected to be a good match. brazil versus argentina. believe it or not,
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argentina. believe it or not, argentina have not won a top level tournament since 1993. they are facing the defending champions brazil in rio dejaneiro. viewers in the uk will be able to watch the game on the bbc. more 0lympic venues will be without fans after organisers announced that events will be staged from behind closed doors. the spiking coronavirus cases in tokyo reading to a state of emergency in the japanese capital there is hope that some sports being held further afield could host spectators but baseball and football will not be allowed. in the tour de france stage 1a is finished. a dutchman broke free from the leader group with 26 miles to go and held on to take the victory. a canadian athlete replaced the leader while a
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slovenian athlete ratings the overall lead. we will finish where we started in london and the one—day international between england and pakistan. the match was reduced to a7 overs. england has managed just a7 overs. england has managed just a7 all out. in the last few minutes pakistan have been bowled out. england won by 52 runs. more details on that story and on all the others but that is it for now. thank you jane. the british billionaire businessperson sir richard branson is set for his latest venture. he will fly to the edge of space as a passenger in the back of the unity rocket plane his virgin galactic company has been developing in the us for the better part of two decades. here's the rocket on a test flight. if all goes according to plan
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the flight will last about 90 minutes, taking mr branson and his crew in an almost vertical climb through the outer fringe of earth's atmosphere. and if successful it will will give him bragging rights to beating amazon rivaljeff bezos into space by nine days. so what sort of risks are attached to tomorrow's flight? will whitehorn is president of uk space — the trade body for the british space industry — and the former president of branson's company virgin galactic. good evening. how nervous are you for our good evening. how nervous are you for your former _ good evening. how nervous are you for your former boss? _ good evening. how nervous are you for your former boss? i _ good evening. how nervous are you for your former boss? i am, - for your former boss? i am, actually. — for your former boss? i am, actually, more _ for your former boss? i am, actually, more nervous - for your former boss? i am, j actually, more nervous than for your former boss? i am, | actually, more nervous than i expected to be. space is not easy and they are actually going into space. masha's official definition of space is 18 kilometres, as of the us government and federal aviation authority so tomorrow, within 2a hours, he will earn his astronaut wings according to government regulations. —— nasa. they been in a
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very big test programmes that they have been setbacks and tragic accidents you know, this is not an attempt to regularise access to space, regularise it for space satellites and regularise it for virgin galactic. this is about getting economically achievable access to the industrialisation of space. it is a really important right tomorrow. we space. it is a really important right tomorrow.— space. it is a really important right tomorrow. space. it is a really important riaht tomorrow. ~ right tomorrow. we might come under some of the — right tomorrow. we might come under some of the implications _ right tomorrow. we might come under some of the implications later - right tomorrow. we might come under some of the implications later but - right tomorrow. we might come under some of the implications later but i i some of the implications later but i want to focus on the flight. what will he experience and what will he see? i will he experience and what will he see? ., ., ., ., ., ., see? i am fortunate enough to have exoerienced — see? i am fortunate enough to have experienced some _ see? i am fortunate enough to have experienced some of— see? i am fortunate enough to have experienced some of it _ see? i am fortunate enough to have experienced some of it during - see? i am fortunate enough to have experienced some of it during my i experienced some of it during my training to be an astronaut and the first thing is a lot of geez so you drop from the mother ship and in this patient there will be four in the back and two pilots up front. it drops 500 feet and you feel it on your back. you feel the g forces and your back. you feel the g forces and you go through the sound barrier and
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you go through the sound barrier and you are travelling 31st and then you get into space and the first thing you experiences silence. then you experience weightlessness as you leave your seat and then easier vision of the earth below you not dissimilar to the curvature we are seeing this picture by me at the moment. and with all of those sensations going it once it really is, it is a blast of sensations and you realise how fragile the earthers. every astronaut i've known, and i know quite a few of the nasser and easter astronauts, every single one says one should go into space you never ever forget it. it sounds exhilarating or terrifying depending on your point of view. probably both. thank you so much for coming on.
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sam schmidt, is a former indycar driver, who was severely injured and paralyzed from the shoulders down following a racing accident 21 years ago. using a specially adapted car, sam wears a headset that detects his head motions to steer, while to accelerate and brake he inhales and exhales though a small tube. he can now race again at speeds of 320 kilometres per hour and is making his uk debut at the goodwood festival of speed. i never would have thought i would have driven ever before, let alone 200 miles an hour. i have no use if anything below the shoulders. i really think the sky is the limit. i was sort of born into racing. i wanted to go to the indy 500 my entire life so that was the goal i set at a very young age and was fortunate to race there and won the las vegas race in september of 1999 and then unfortunately i had my
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accident four months later. sam, can you look left? look right. look centre. perfect. i have a store in my mouth that i blow to go and i suck to stop. the camera is directly in front of me, they read off the helmet movement and that is what turns it. i can't really focus on where it goes. are you ready? you have control. push and drive. this technology really has the capability to change the world. i am really excited about the future. not only what the opportunities that technology offers everybody but specifically people with disabilities. part of our goal on the engineering side has been to get it to a point where it is very
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easily transferable to any vehicle. i mean, there is no reason right now why you can't really put this in like a formula 1 car or a mail truck. in the driver seat, the main seat of the car, there is an overtake system installed to allow whoever is in that driving seat to take control in an emergency. sitting next to him, though, he goes fast. i think he makes it a goal to try and scare the person next to him a little bit. i don't want him to know that i get nervous but i did get a little bit nervous. driving at goodwood is such an honour, and i have watched it. i guess you could say this is an epic moment. it is the first time i have been to goodwood, the first time i have been driving at an actual race course in the uk so this is phenomenal. the car is much better than i am right now, but the technology and everything it has to offer, we'lljust keep going faster and faster. this project, if it has shown me one
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thing, is that you can truly do anything you can put your mind to. pursue your passion. we'll take a look at tomorrow's front past at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining shaun ley tonight are ali miraj, columnist at the article and jo kiernan — the former welsh labour adviser now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. well, the weather was a little hit—or—miss today with some heavy showers. same for tomorrow, and of course tomorrow a very big day in the world of sport. we've got wimbledon, obviously the match at wembley, and there are some showers on the cards. so, here's the forecast through the night. a weather front is
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approaching from the west. it is going to bring some rain to the very far west of northern ireland through the night and possibly south—western parts of england, but for many of us, it's actually a dry night with variable amounts of cloud. and the forecast for wimbledon isn't looking too bad at all. very comfortable temperatures, around the high teens or 20 degrees or so, but with increasing amounts of cloud ahead of this weather front here, which will sweep into south—western areas of the uk, bringing potentially some heavy rain at least for a time. also showers breaking out across northern england and scotland. these could be heavy as well, but other than that, it is a mostly dry day for a lot of us with temperatures in the low 20s. now, watch this weather front. it moves gradually towards the east. it could reach the london area, wembley, by around kick—off time, so there is a chance of some rain. certainly by half—time, i think increasing amounts of cloud and the possibility of a bit of rain.
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here's the outlook into monday. dip in the jet stream here keeping things cool across western parts of europe. blobs of blue there indicating further showers. the showers could be heavy on monday, potentially thundery as well, particularly across some western and northern parts of the country. probably the brightest of any weather will be across more south—eastern areas on monday, and here temperatures getting up to around 21 or so. then the outlook into tuesday, fewer showers around, but we're watching this cluster of storms here very close around the near continent. they could clip the south east of the country, but i think for most of us across western and northern areas, tuesday is looking bright at the very least, if not sunny. now, here's the outlook into midweek and towards the end of the week. we are expecting high pressure to very slowly build off the atlantic, so that will settle things down.
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probably a little bit of rain before that happens across some northern areas, but generally speaking, it does look as though things are on the up. that's it from me. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: england's footballers have arrived at their hotel near london ahead of tomorrow's match against italy in the final of euro 2020. the build—up reaches fever pitch — millions of fans around the country preparing to watch the game tomorrow night at eight o'clock. italy are unbeaten in 33 games. they've now flown to luton from their training base near florence, hoping to win their second euros trophy. in other news — fully vaccinated nhs staff could be let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone with covid to try to tackle staff shortages.
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and at wimbledon, world number one ash barty has

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