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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 10, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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good afternoon. this is bbc news. the headlines at apm: england's footballers complete their last training session and head to their hotel near london ahead of tomorrow's final against italy in the final of euro 2020. england captain harry kane says he's desperate to win it for the fans. yeah, i know they'll all be there cheering us on around the country and we just can't wait to, hopefully, yeah, try and win the game for them. the build—up reaches fever pitch — millions of fans around the country preparing to watch the game tomorrow night. italy are unbeaten in 33 games — they've now flown to luton from their training base near florence, hoping to win their second euros trophy. fully vaccinated nhs staff could be let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone
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with covid, to try to tackle staff shortages. and, at wimbledon australia's ashleigh barty is just one game away from winning her first ladies�* singles title. she's serving to win the match. and coming up... tiktok had a fantastic pandemic, stacking up over 800 million users. but what's next for this upstart? we'll find out in half an hour, in the media show. good afternoon. england are on their way to the team hotel near watford, just over 2a hours before they take on italy in the european championship final at wembley.
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victory tomorrow night would be the first major tournament win for the team since the 1966 world cup. the italian side has landed in the uk. their manager, roberto mancini, is due to speak to journalists in the next hour. we will have coverage of that. our sports correspondent, john watson, reports. england train for the final time at their base in burton today, ahead of the biggest game of their professional lives. standing between them and a first major trophy in over half a century, former winners italy, who arrive in london this afternoon. it's a great occasion, you know, for the country to be involved in, and the lads have done the whole country proud. yeah, we'rejust... i think everybody�*s got that sort of butterfly feeling in the belly that we can obviously win a first major trophy for a very long time. ending england's drought in major tournaments has been a plan long in the making. the opening of england's
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state—of—the—art training centre at st george's park nine years ago sowing the seeds for the future. in 2017, signs of progress. a young phil foden, the player of the tournament, as england lifted the under—17s world cup. the under—20s winning their equivalent. with gareth southgate�*s promotion to england manager, continuity in the england set—up, bringing with it results. reaching the semi—finals at the last world cup, hope superseded by belief. but are england ready to take the toughest step of all? there is no doubt england have begun to reshape the history that has weighed them down in major tournaments of the past. now, they will have to be at their very best if they're to topple a tough italian side and they're to go on and realise their euro dream. italy are on a record 33—match unbeaten run, edging out spain on penalties in the last four. in what will be their fourth european championship final, this is england's first.
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captain harry kane with the goal that ended that run of major championship semi—final defeats. tomorrow evening, the focus of millions will fall on wembley. the question on everyone�*s lips, can england complete their euro dream? john watson, bbc news, wembley. let's speak to husband and wife, england fans sophie and dean cornish. dean will be at the final tomorrow, and sophie will be watching at home with the children. dean is a lucky man. so today is dean's turn to look after the children while sophie enjoys her half of the weekend. have you been to any of the games before, dean? is this going to be yourfirst won this before, dean? is this going to be your first won this tournament? m0. your first won this tournament? no, i have been — your first won this tournament? no, i have been to _ your first won this tournament? no, i have been to all _ your first won this tournament? iifr, i have been to all the games at wembley, apart from the scotland game. luckily i am a member of the supporters club, so i have been able to get enough loyalty points over the years to guarantee myself
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tickets for the games at wembley. it has been an absolutely fantastic journey and i can't wait for it tomorrow night. it has been 20 years i have had following england, i have always loved the thought of travelling around the world supporting the national side and i have been to some pretty non—exotic places, places like kazakhstan and belarus and poland for a game that was ultimately rained off and i really feel that tomorrow night we have got the chance to make history. for me, it sounds cheesy to say, but it is the end of the journey, it really feels like that. i have had so many disappointing nights, like in moscow in the world cup three years ago, but finally i can actually see our national team in a final and potentially can see hurricane lifting the trophy. i can't wait! 50 hurricane lifting the trophy. i can't wait!— hurricane lifting the trophy. i can't wait! . ., hurricane lifting the trophy. i can't wait! ., ., , , can't wait! so you are england super fan? i wouldn't _ can't wait! so you are england super fan? i wouldn't say _ can't wait! so you are england super fan? i wouldn't say that, _ can't wait! so you are england super fan? i wouldn't say that, there - can't wait! so you are england super fan? i wouldn't say that, there are l fan? i wouldn't say that, there are len of fan? i wouldn't say that, there are plenty of peeple — fan? i wouldn't say that, there are plenty of people who _ fan? i wouldn't say that, there are plenty of people who have - fan? i wouldn't say that, there are plenty of people who have done i fan? i wouldn't say that, there are i plenty of people who have done more games than i have, but i counted them up sadly and i have done about 43 away games over the last 20 years and countless others as wembley as
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well, but yes, i love the national team, always have and a lot of friends in the past have taken the mickey out of me for going to some of the less important games, let's say, like warm up games in norway or going out to ukraine for different times to watch the national side. it is funny that now they are the ones that are jealous i'm is funny that now they are the ones that arejealous i'm going to is funny that now they are the ones that are jealous i'm going to the game. it is hilarious that so many of them asking me for tickets, but they certainly were not when i was going to kazakhstan for five days in 2007. , ., ., going to kazakhstan for five days in 2007. , a, a, _, going to kazakhstan for five days in 2007. a, a, ., 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan — 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan as— 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan as well, _ 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan as well, but _ 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan as well, but do - 2007. sophie, what about you? you are a big fan as well, but do you - are a big fan as well, but do you ever go to the games as well? i have been to a counle _ ever go to the games as well? i have been to a couple of— ever go to the games as well? i have been to a couple of the _ ever go to the games as well? i have been to a couple of the friendlies, i been to a couple of the friendlies, but like _ been to a couple of the friendlies, but like dean said, he is the supporters club, while i stay at home — supporters club, while i stay at home and _ supporters club, while i stay at home and look after the kids and he has paid _ home and look after the kids and he has paid his — home and look after the kids and he has paid his dues, and i don't feel like i_ has paid his dues, and i don't feel like i have — has paid his dues, and i don't feel like i have as much, so... yet. will ou be like i have as much, so... yet. will you be watching — like i have as much, so... yet. will you be watching on _ like i have as much, so... yet. will you be watching on tv _ like i have as much, so... yet. will you be watching on tv tomorrow? | like i have as much, so... yet. will- you be watching on tv tomorrow? yes, m little you be watching on tv tomorrow? yes, my little one. — you be watching on tv tomorrow? yes, my little one. my _ you be watching on tv tomorrow? yes, my little one, my one—year—old, will be in _ my little one, my one—year—old, will be in bed. _ my little one, my one—year—old, will be in bed. but— my little one, my one—year—old, will be in bed, but the other two, 17—year—old and old, i will keep up them _ 17—year—old and old, i will keep up them up. — 17—year—old and old, i will keep up them up. a—
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17—year—old and old, i will keep up them up, a little one has got to step— them up, a little one has got to step because she could be watching history _ step because she could be watching histo . . , . step because she could be watching histo . , , ., , step because she could be watching histo . , , . , step because she could be watching histo . , , ., , ., history. yes, dean is looking after the kids today _ history. yes, dean is looking after the kids today and _ history. yes, dean is looking after the kids today and you _ history. yes, dean is looking after the kids today and you are - history. yes, dean is looking after the kids today and you are looking after them tomorrow, is that right? yes, i've left my friend around the corner— yes, i've left my friend around the corner in— yes, i've left my friend around the corner in the — yes, i've left my friend around the corner in the pub to do this and then— corner in the pub to do this and then tomorrow i will look after the kids and _ then tomorrow i will look after the kids and we will swap over. how do ou see kids and we will swap over. how do you see the — kids and we will swap over. how do you see the game _ kids and we will swap over. how do you see the game going _ kids and we will swap over. how do | you see the game going tomorrow? kids and we will swap over. how do i you see the game going tomorrow? it will probably be incredibly tense and tight as well because the two teams have amazing defences. i teams have amazing defences. i agree, it is going to be very tight, but i think england are speaking just the right time. italy did fantastically well in the group stages when they played all their games in a row, but i think they peaked a bit too early, to be honest, whereas england were pragmatic in the group stage and gradually got better and better and i can see tomorrow night england winning, not comfortably, but i think it will be to — one, i can see harry kane getting on the scoresheet with the boot and raheem sterling scoring a goal as well. they have been fantastic up front for england. so yes, i think we can win this! and so yes, i think we can win this! and sohie, so yes, i think we can win this! and sophie. what _ so yes, i think we can win this! and sophie, what about you? will you be
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watching closely tomorrow night? are you confident, nervous? knapp watching closely tomorrow night? are you confident, nervous?— you confident, nervous? know this, but confident. _ you confident, nervous? know this, but confident, definitely. _ you confident, nervous? know this, but confident, definitely. i- you confident, nervous? know this, but confident, definitely. i also - but confident, definitely. i also think— but confident, definitely. i also think it — but confident, definitely. i also think it will be a 2—1win, so yes, ithink— think it will be a 2—1win, so yes, i think we — think it will be a 2—1win, so yes, i think we have had a steady run and now we _ i think we have had a steady run and now we are — i think we have had a steady run and now we are peaking at just the right time. _ now we are peaking at just the right time. like _ now we are peaking at just the right time, like dean said, so we are on pretty— time, like dean said, so we are on pretty common ground with this one, me and _ pretty common ground with this one, me and dean, for once! for pretty common ground with this one, me and dean, for once!— me and dean, for once! for once! richt, me and dean, for once! for once! riht, i me and dean, for once! for once! right. i won't _ me and dean, for once! for once! right, i won't ask— me and dean, for once! for once! right, i won't ask you _ me and dean, for once! for once! right, i won't ask you any - me and dean, for once! for once! right, i won't ask you any more l right, i won't ask you any more about that. sophie and dean cornish, enjoy the game and let's hope it is a smooth ride at a victory. many thanks to you. let's just bring you the latest from wimbledon because while the born ashleigh barty has won herfinal, beating the eighth seed karolina pliskova in three sets. it was the first time they played each other in a wimbledon final. there hasn't been a to first—time women finalist since 1997. let's hearfrom our correspondent chetan pathak, who is at wimbledon now. quite a fightback by pliskova, who didn't do too well
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at the beginning, but in the end produce move for ashleigh barty? the end produce move for ashleigh ba ? . . the end produce move for ashleigh ba ? , ., ., the end produce move for ashleigh ba ? , . ., ., the end produce move for ashleigh ba? , , barty? yes, what a great story this is for ash ltarty- — barty? yes, what a great story this is for ash barty. just _ barty? yes, what a great story this is for ash barty. just minutes - barty? yes, what a great story this is for ash barty. just minutes ago i is for ash barty. just minutes ago hear a loud eruption on the hill to the right of me, euphoria for ash barty. some fantastic scenes on centre court, as she first of all knelt to the ground, could not believe she had won this match in three sets and then when she composed herself she managed to make her way up to the box, where her team were and was hugging and kissing them, as you can imagine, with sheerjoy, almost reminiscent of what pat cash did and we have seen so many players do as the years, just an incredible story for ash barty, who of course has been trying to emulate what her idol, her hero, evonne goolagong, thirsted here 50 years ago. barty has talked about how much she idolises evonne goolagong and now ash barty as well has a wimbledon title. she has two grand slams. she won the french open
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backin grand slams. she won the french open back in 2019, but she has made no secret about how this is the one she has wanted. credit to karolina pliskova, as you say, the eighth seed. she did really fight her way back into this match. she made a tussle of it after being really overwrought in the first set, she levelled up in the second, but ash bartyjust levelled up in the second, but ash barty just too good levelled up in the second, but ash bartyjust too good for her. the czech player had reached a grand slam final before she ends up with the runners—up trophy this time on centre court and getting a good round of applause, which is thoroughly deserved. she had a great championship here, hasn't she? she beat sabalenka, the number two seed, in the semifinals, but this is ash barty�*s day. what a moment it is for her and for australia, and she will now be awarded without the yunus rose water dish and hopefully you can hear the cheers on the hill beside me here and of course on centre court, as the duchess of cambridge presents her with that dish. the world number one, who has
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been a junior champion here and now she wins the big one. she can hardly believe it. she came into this with an injury, i mean, she was having to walk out of the french open in the second round with a hip injury. we didn't know whether she would be fit in time for wimbledon and here she is, a wimbledon champion and a fantastic end to this lady's final. yes, ash barty they're realising a childhood dream on centre court. chetan pathak, thank you very much indeed for bringing us that latest news from wimbledon. ministers are considering lifting the need for fully vaccinated nhs staff in england to self—isolate if they've been in close contact with someone who's tested positive for the coronavirus. hospital trusts have warned of staff shortages unless action is taken. it comes as medical leaders says case numbers are rising dramatically and that people should continue to act with care. here's our health correspondent, katharine da costa. some hospitals in england and scotland are extremely busy
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with record numbers of patients in a&e. several have already had to postpone planned operations. and with a sharp rise in covid infections, growing numbers of doctors and nurses are self—isolating after coming into contact with people infected with the virus. the bma and the royal college of nursing has backed calls to allow fully vaccinated staff to continue working with appropriate testing and ppe. the nhs is incredibly busy at the moment, it is going full pelt recovering care backlogs, we have record levels in many places of emergency care demand, we have lost a lot of capacity due to infection control and we have now got large numbers of staff who are effectively having to self—isolate. infections are spreading across england, with 0xford the latest area to see cases spike to their highest level in the pandemic. from monday, the city will get extra government support for surge testing and to help boost vaccine take—up. it is about getting on with your
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lives in a sensible way, in a pragmatic way, and exercising personal responsibility. and i think if people do that and get themselves tested, and have their vaccinations, we can certainly address this steep rise in covid cases that we have seen in the city. medical leaders say people should remain cautious after restrictions are lifted in england injust over a week's time, including wearing face masks in crowded indoor areas. they warn that things are likely to get worse before they get better. many people have just had . or are about to have their first dose of the vaccine and this virus is rampaging through society. . and although far fewer people are ending up in hospital- and dying, at present, than have previously, i because the vaccine is helping, - actually, many of the people who get covid will go on to get long covid. the government says its decision to delay reopening by four weeks has bought more time to allow many more people to get their second doses,
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which will help strengthen the wall of immunity once restrictions end on the 19th. ministers in scotland, wales and northern ireland will announce their plans for easing soon. katharine da costa, bbc news. we can bring you the latest coronavirus figures for the united kingdom now. let'sjust have coronavirus figures for the united kingdom now. let's just have a coronavirus figures for the united kingdom now. let'sjust have a look at them there. and... the uk reporting 32,367 new covid cases and 34 deaths in the latest 24—hour period. that compares... that is a slight drop in the number of cases on the day previously. it was 35,707 the day before and 29 deaths, so similar, but a slight drop in the number of cases and a slight rise in the number of deaths stop those of the number of deaths stop those of
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the latest figures that we also just seeing the vaccination figures. the first dose, 88,000, second dose 166,000 as well, so total first doses of 45 million, creeping up to 46 million, and a second dose 34.5 million so far. the headlines on bbc news... it's all set for tomorrow night at wembley — a clash between england and italy to crown the winners of euro 2020. italy are unbeaten after 33 matches, so expectations are sky—high there too, with fans hoping their team can bring home their second euros trophy. that is the italian team leaving their base near florence, heading for theirflight their base near florence, heading for their flight to the uk today. fully vaccinated nhs staff could be let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone with covid, to try to tackle staff shortages. so ash barty has won the women's
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title at wimbledon. let's get more on that and all the rest of the sport news as well with ben croucher. as you've just been hearing, ashleigh barty is the new wimbledon champion. she beat karolina pliskova three sets to lift the venus rosewater dish for the first time. we can head back to the all england club and rejoin chetan pathak and real emotion from barty when she realised the scale of her achievement? absolutely, real emotion around this whole place, ben. the hill to the right of me erupted in cheers for ash barty, such a popular winner, someone who has been so great at connecting with tennis fans and this has been the slam that she has wanted for more than any other. she was a wimbledon champion in the juniors ten years ago and now she has that eunice rose water dish in her hands. and a historic moment for australia as well. she has been trying to emulate her idol, evonne
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goolagong, what she first did 50 years ago here at wimbledon and now she has by winning the championships. she did it the hard way against pliskova today, went to do three sets. barty started in blistering form, winning the first 14 points of this match. she was 4—0 up, and all firing, that slice and dice, that great kick serve she has got, asking all sorts of questions of pliskova, who throws a bit at the beginning, i think it is fair to say, the czech eighth seed, but credit to karolina pliskova because she fought back, she battled in that second set and managed to win it on a tie—break, finding the lines where she needed to, forcing the errors from barty, in particular that slice backhand was a little bit wayward. into a third set we went and barty managed to hold her own. we really were not sure what to expect of ash barty going into wimbledon, bearing in mind she had to withdraw from the
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french open midway through her round two with a hip injury, but here with very little preparation time she has gone all the way, dropping just a couple of sets en route to the wimbledon title and full of emotion at the end, dropping to the ground. we have seen her in floods of tears, running up to her box to hug her family and the rest of the team, and like i say, this is her dream realised. in the last few moments, she has been telling the crowd on centre court, remember a full house there, 15,000, to see her big moment, how they have helped her to make her dream come true for ash barty, a player who walked away from tennis when she was 17, 18, for about a year and a half and went off to play cricket at a really high level. she said it was too much, the pressure coming from a great grand slam nation like australia, but since she returned and worked her way to world number one she has found that balance, is really injuring her tennis and when you see her in press conferences afterwards to feel she is loving the way she is playing and now she is a double
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grand slam champion, a wimbledon champion and full of smiles lifting the trophy. as i look down at my screen at the moment, had a really popular winner. screen at the moment, had a really popularwinner. i screen at the moment, had a really popular winner. i am glad to say we have had a really good final as well, fitting of these championships, ash barty beating karolina pliskova in three sets. absolutely. chetan pathak at wimbledon, thank you very much. tomorrow italy could have two reasons to cheer in london. matteo berrettini is in the men's final and the football team will be aiming to win the european championship for the first time. for the second time. in case you hadn't seen, they're playing england at wembley. we're just under 28 hours away from kick—off. john watson is at wembley — john, england trained this morning at st george's park, but there's concern over one player. yes, good afternoon, then. that player is phil foden, who didn't train today before england departed their training base at st george's park. we understand this is just a precautionary measure, a minor knock, so in no indication as to whether that will rule him out of
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the final here at wembley tomorrow. we will be hearing from both managers. the england manager gareth southgate will give his press conference later from their hotel in watford. we will also be hearing from roberto mancini, the italian manager, who will be holding a press conference a bit later on. they have trained for the final time at the tottenham training ground, having flown over from the france base earlier today, flying into luton. we will get a sense from front then from both managers as to how their respective teams are faring in this huge game to come out wimbledon tomorrow. it huge game to come out wimbledon tomorrow. . huge game to come out wimbledon tomorrow. , ., , ., ., tomorrow. it will be a big one and we will have _ tomorrow. it will be a big one and we will have built _ tomorrow. it will be a big one and we will have built up _ tomorrow. it will be a big one and we will have built up right - tomorrow. it will be a big one and we will have built up right here i tomorrow. it will be a big one andj we will have built up right here on bbc news throughout the day. staying in london... england have set pakistan 248 to win the second one—day international at lords and level the series. the much—changed team due to a covid outbreak relied heavily on phil salt and james vince, who both made half centuries. lewis gregory added a useful 40 as well, as england failed to see out their reduced 47 overs. hassan ali picked up five wickets.
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in reply... pakistan are just about to get under way. it's the first 0di at lord's since the world cup final in 2019. as the british and irish lions prepare for another warm up game against the sharks in south africa this evening, wales have drawn with argentina in cardiff. and it was argentina who suffered an early setback — juan cruz mallia sent off for this dangerous tackle after just half an hour. but, despite being a man down, argentina scored two tries to lead 20—6. wales did fight back — and score two tries of their own, to make it 20—20 — and they could have won it late on, but missed a last—minute penalty. elsewhere, england are playing canada — england lead 61—14. quite a comfortable lead. bauke mollema has won stage 14 of the tour de france with a fine solo ride. the dutchman broke free from the lead group with 26 miles
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to go on a lumpy stage into quillan and held on to take the victory. slovenia's tadej pogacar retained the overall lead and britain's mark cavendish should finish within the cut off time, keeping his hopes of more stage victories alive. that's all the sport for now. plenty more reaction to ashleigh barty�*s plenty more reaction to ashleigh ba rty�*s victory plenty more reaction to ashleigh barty�*s victory at wimbledon on the bbc sport website. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much, congratulations to her, a fantastic victory there. labour have called for the former downing street director of communications, sir robbie gibb, to be sacked from the bbc board after he reportedly tried to block a senior editorial appointment at the corporation. the financial times reports that gibb warned that relations with the government would be "shattered" if the preferred candidate for the role of executive news editor overseeing the bbc�*s news channels was appointed. labour's shadow culture secretary, jo stevens, said the allegations, "raise very serious questions about conservative cronyism "at the heart of the bbc." a spokesperson for the bbc said it
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didn't comment on ongoing recruitment processes, but added, "for the record, no recruitment process has been blocked" and that, "as a general principle, board members are able to discuss "issues with other board members or senior executives." former boxer chris eubank says he is devastated at the death of his son, sebastian, who has died just days before his 30th birthday. sebastian had followed his father's footsteps and become a professional boxer himself. he died yesterday morning in dubai, where he was based. three days after the assassination of its president, haiti's political crisis is deepening. there are reports the country's lawmakers have nominated the head of the senate, joseph lambert, as interim president. a rival politicalfaction, though, which includes the acting interim prime minister claudejoseph, says the move is unconstitutional. haitian officals have taken the extraordinary step of requesting military help from the united states
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and the united nations. courtney bembridge reports. crowds gathered outside the us embassy in port—au—prince, with suitcases packed, looking for a way out. translation: i can't close my eyes, i can't sleep at night. _ i had to come here to the embassy because i'm scared. there are so many gunshots and you don't even know where they're coming from. i've abandoned my home, i can't go back, i don't know about my family. the country of 11 million people is reeling from the assassination of its president, shot dead inside his home on wednesday. translation: look at what happened to the head of — translation: look at what happened to the head of the _ translation: look at what happened to the head of the state. _ translation: look at what happened to the head of the state. i _ translation: look at what happened to the head of the state. i can't - to the head of the state. i can't stay _ to the head of the state. i can't stay here _ to the head of the state. i can't stay here. it is important... these are two of the men haitian authorities say carried out the plot. they were attacked by the public as they were loaded
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into a police car. 17 men have been arrested so far, most of them colombian, but investigators are still looking for who ordered the killing. haiti was already plagued by hunger and gang violence but the assassination has pitched the country deeper into turmoil. it's requested the united nations and the united states send troops to help secure the country and protect key infrastructure. the us has declined the request and the un may also be reluctant to get involved. i think the un is thoroughly sick of haiti. they had a 13—year peacekeeping force there that got in a lot of trouble in a lot of ways. the last thing being the cholera epidemic which the peacekeeping forces brought into haiti. so i think they don't really want to get entangled again. i think most outside forces don't want to get militarily entangled again in haiti, if they can avoid it. adding to the uncertainty is the political situation — there is no working parliament,
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two men are claiming to be the prime minister, and a third of the senate has just nominated another man to lead as interim president. courtney bembridge, bbc news. wild swimming has grown in popularity, especially during lockdown, but swimmers may need to be cautious about the cleanliness of england's rivers. just 16% of them are classed as meeting a good ecological standard, according to the environment agency. here s our science correspondent richard westcott. you wouldn't catch me doing it, but this wild swimming group has 1000 members. today, they are taking a dip in northamptonshire's river nene. how's the water? great! you sound really convincing! a bit of cold, this lot can handle. but how clean is the water? the last time this river was properly tested a couple of years ago, it was rated as poor.
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pollutants from farming and road traffic get washed into the water by the rain. after a lot of heavy rain, you don't really want to go swimming. yeah, i won't swim, leave two or three days after heavy rain because of the storm drains. we don't take it seriously enough, no, and there is a need for action. as much as we want to make it safe for the humans in here, we also want to make safe for the animals and wildlife. in fact, the environment agency admits all our rivers, lakes and streams are polluted in some way. just 16% of them are classed as good. so that's the river where the swimmers were. now i have the sun coming out so it is perfect. as well as farms and industry, campaigners are worried about run—off from busy roads. tiny bits of tyre rubber, metalfrom brake pads and clutches, and a group of hydrocarbons from emissions that wash off the tarmac and into rivers.
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we need to do a lot more to tackle pollution from road run—off. frankly, we're not doing much at all at the moment, so we can perhaps put a levy on tyres so when you buy a tyre a bit of money goes into treatment systems. or a storm water utility levy alongside your council so that we all pay to a pot to pay for these treatments. we did talk to the government, who told us that clearing up rivers is an urgent priority, but they admitted that more work needs to be done. richard wescott, bbc news, on the river nene in northamptonshire. a couple have celebrated their marriage in a bristol hospital, so that their child, who has a serious illness, could be a bridesmaid at their ceremony. karim and louise tied the knot earlier than they'd originally planned to make sure their six—month—old daughter layla could be involved. alex howick has been speaking to them. even before layla was born, karim and louise dreamed of having their daughter
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at their wedding as their bridesmaid. when we got engaged i was pregnant. it just felt really important to do it. it's not nice to think about, but the idea that she might not have been there if we waited too long, we didn't want to take that risk, really. so once they had done the legal bit down the road at the bristol register office, staff at the bristol royal hospital for children created this for them. it took my breath away when i went in. the nurses got layla ready into her little dress. 0ur aisle, i suppose, if you want to call it that, was the hospital ward. it was an unforgettable day. it was really good. we were just expecting the chaplain to come down and do a blessing at the bedside with layla, we weren't expecting what actually happened. it was really special. leila has something called charge syndrome has spentjust ten days layla has something called charge
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syndrome has spentjust ten days at home since she was born on christmas day. it is really rare. it's an acronym that stands for a lot of the things that can go wrong. i won't list them out, but essentially it can affect everything in the body — the heart, the eyes, the hearing, a lot of the senses. doctors have told them they don't know what life will be like for layla and the level of independence she will experience, but karim and louise say the hospital staff have already given them one of the most memorable days of their lives. alex howick, bbc news, bristol. it is for 30 pm exactly, which means it is time to look at the weather forecast with darren bent. —— 4:30pm exactly. hello there. the cloudy, damp weather we've had in the south—east of england is moving away. as we head into the evening we've
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still got some heavy showers across northern england, scotland, perhaps north wales.

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