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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 10, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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good afternoon. i am ben brown. this is bbc news with the latest headlines: england complete their final training session and will head south ahead of the clash tomorrow at wembley against italy in the final of euro 2020. england captain harry kane wants to win it for supporters. yeah, i know they'll all be there cheering us on around the country and we just can't wait to, hopefully, yeah, try and win the game for them. the build—up has reached fever pitch — tens of millions of football fans will be managing their nerves, ahead of kick—off tomorrow night. italy are unbeaten after 33 matches, so expectations are sky—high there too, with fans hoping their team can bring home their second euros trophy. fully vaccinated nhs staff could be
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let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone with covid to try to tackle staff shortages. the wimbledon women's final is about to get under way — world number one ashleigh barty faces karolina pliskova pliskova for the title. and at 2.30pm, panorama follows companies on the brexit frontline as they navigate their way through britain s new trading relationship with europe. good afternoon. there are just about 30 hours to go before england take on italy in the euro 2020 final at wembley. victory tomorrow night against italy
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would be the first major tournament win for the team since the 1966 world cup. the italian side has landed in the uk and they will use tottenham's training ground for their final preparations, while gareth southgate�*s side have been training at st george's park before heading to their team hotel in hertfordshire. 0ur sports correspondent, john watson, reports. england train for the final time at their base in burton today, ahead of the biggest game of their professional lives. standing between them and a first major trophy in over half a century, former winners italy, who arrive in london this afternoon. it's a great occasion, you know, for the country to be involved in, and the lads have done the whole country proud. yeah, we'rejust... i think everybody�*s got that sort of butterfly feeling in the belly that we can obviously win a first major trophy for a very long time. ending england's drought in major tournaments has been a plan long in the making.
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the opening of england's state—of—the—art training centre at st george's park nine years ago sowing the seeds for the future. in 2017, signs of progress. a young phil foden, the player of the tournament, as england lifted the under—17s world cup. the under—20s winning their equivalent. with gareth southgate�*s promotion to england manager, continuity in the england set—up, bringing with it results. reaching the semi—finals at the last world cup, hope superseded by belief. but are england ready to take the toughest step of all? there is no doubt england have begun to reshape the history that has weighed them down in major tournaments of the past. now, they will have to be at their very best if they're to topple a tough italian side and they're to go on and realise their euro dream. italy are on a record 33—match unbeaten run, edging out spain on penalties in the last four. in what will be their fourth european championship final, this is england's first.
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captain harry kane with the goal that ended that run of major championship semi—final defeats. tomorrow evening, the focus of millions will fall on wembley. the question on everyone�*s lips, can england complete their euro dream? john watson, bbc news, wembley. tens of millions of football fans will be getting ready to watch the match tomorrow night on television. for those lucky enough to have tickets, some are being offered thousands of pounds for their tickets to the game. here's daniela relph. if you sell england merchandise, this weekend is boom time. two for a fiver. face paints for two quid. at romford market in essex, the early trade was brisk. but if you are lucky enough to have tickets for the game, there was no business to be done. i have a guy come up, who wanted to give... he said, i will give you eight grand for the four tickets.
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i said, "mate, no money buys these tickets. "no chance. "we are going." for those who taught harry kane at chingford foundation school in essex, there is obvious pride at his success. clearly very gifted, a talented footballer from a very early age, right from the very beginning, it was clear to see that he had a special gift as far as football is concerned. generally speaking, a really nice, all—round, very humble and well—behaved young lad. has he kind of credited you with some of his... yeah, it is all down to me, it's all down to my management! sheldon edwards has become the go—to barber for many england players. i've got the likes of jadon sancho, raheem sterling, phil foden, jude bellingham. those are my most prominent clients in the england team. his work on phil foden�*s hair went viral and is now much in demand. there is a clamourfor some of the stardust of this group of players. 10 downing street has nailed its colours to the front door. across england, whether you are at home or the pub watching tomorrow, football is proving
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good for business. we've seen sharp increases in sales before matches of things like frozen stone—baked pizzas, our barbecue range, of course, booze and alcohol, a whole different range of stuff, as people stock up and celebrate these big tournaments. but some households will be conflicted. chef giuseppe is italian. his wife sarah is english. half the family is english, half the family is italian. i'm thinking, after all these years, maybe england deserve to win but, obviously, inside of me, i want italy to win. at the end of this, one of us is going to be really sad. and i want it to be you. it is now a tense countdown for england fans, as they manage the nerves and the hope ahead of kick—off tomorrow night. daniela relph, bbc news.
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now this? really? that —— nervous england have been holding their final training session at st george's park, before tomorrow's final. 0ur sports correspondent, 0lly foster, has been telling us the only absentee was manchester city's phil foden. the fa are telling us that he is just sitting out this final training session, which hasjust come just sitting out this final training session, which has just come to a close, actually, because they took a knockin close, actually, because they took a knock in training yesterday, so it is precautionary, but obviously he is precautionary, but obviously he is now in doubt for what would be the greatest match of his life and all these england players. not such all these england players. not such a huge blow to gareth southgate because his position is one that he has rotated. phil foden did start the first two matches of this tournament, against croatia and scotland, he came off the bench in extra time in the semifinal the other night against denmark, which england obviously one with that penalty from hurricane in extra time, that position, sacco is the
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man in position at the moment, the teenager, barely a man at all, but jayden sancho will also be vying for a spot up top with raheem sterling and jack grealish a huge push from the public to see him more involved. that is all from gareth southgate over the next 2a hours or so, but his players have done what they had to in this final training session to try and get a place into the starting 11. gareth southgate has told us from the very start that thatis told us from the very start that that is the difficult part of this job, leaving out some magnificent players in the squad. perhaps this is the difference with previous england generations. the depth that he has at his disposal. yes, it is becoming more settled over the last couple of weeks, but he still has sleepless nights about who he should leave out. but phil foden will be a doubt after sitting out training today. 0lly foster with the latest team news. ministers are considering lifting the need for fully vaccinated nhs staff in england to self—isolate
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if they've been in close contact with someone who's tested positive for the coronavirus. hospital trusts have warned of staff shortages unless action is taken. it comes as medical leaders says case numbers are rising dramatically and that people should continue to act with care. here's our health correspondent, katharine da costa. some hospitals in england and scotland are extremely busy with record numbers of patients in a&e, several have already had to postpone planned operations. and with a sharp rise in covid infections, growing numbers of doctors and nurses are self—isolating after coming into contact with people infected with the virus. the bma and the royal college of nursing has backed calls to allow fully vaccinated staff to continue working with appropriate testing and ppe. the nhs is incredibly busy at the moment, it is going full pelt recovering care backlogs, we have record levels in many places of emergency care demand, we have lost a lot of capacity due to infection control and we have now got large numbers
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of staff who are effectively having to self—isolate. infections are spreading across england, with 0xford the latest area to see cases spike to their highest level in the pandemic. from monday, the city will get extra government support for surge testing and to help boost vaccine take—up. it is about getting on with your lives in a sensible way, in a pragmatic way, and exercising personal responsibility. and i think if people do that and get themselves tested, and have their vaccinations, we can certainly address this steep rise in covid cases that we have seen in the city. medical leaders say people should remain cautious after restrictions are lifted in england injust over a week's time, including wearing facemasks in crowded indoor areas. they warn that things are likely to get worse before they get better. many people have just had . or are about to have their first dose of the vaccine and this virus is rampaging through society. .
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and although far fewer people are ending up in hospital- and dying, at present, than have previously, i because the vaccine is helping, - actually, many of the people who get covid will go on to get long covid. the government says its decision to delay opening by four weeks has bought more time to allow many more people to get their second doses, which will help strengthen the wall of immunity once restrictions end on the 19th. ministers in scotland, wales and northern ireland will announce their plans for easing soon. katharine da costa, bbc news. labour have called for the former downing street director of communications, sir robbie gibb, to be sacked from the bbc board after he reportedly tried to block a senior editorial appointment at the corporation. the financial times reports that gibb warned that relations with the government would be "shattered" if the preferred candidate for the role of executive news editor overseeing the bbc�*s news channels was appointed.
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labour's shadow culture secretary jo stevens said the allegations "raise very serious questions about conservative cronyism "at the heart of the bbc." a spokesperson for the bbc said it didn't comment on ongoing recruitment processes, but added, "for the record, no recruitment process has been blocked" and that, "as a general principle, board members are able to "discuss issues with other board members or senior executives." three days after the assassination of its president, haiti's political crisis is deepening. there are reports the country's lawmakers have nominated the head of the senate, joseph lambert, as interim president. a rival politicalfaction, though, which includes the acting interim prime minister claudejoseph, says the move is unconstitutional. haitian officals have taken the extraordinary step of requesting military help from the united states and the united nations. courtney bembridge reports.
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crowds gathered outside the us embassy in port—au—prince, with suitcases packed, looking for a way out. translation: i can't close my eyes, i can't sleep at night. _ i had to come here to the embassy because i'm scared. there are so many gunshots and you don't even know where they're coming from. i've abandoned my home, i can't go back, i don't know about my family. the country of 11 million people is reeling from the assassination of its president, shot dead inside his home on wednesday. look at what happened to the head of the states. i can't stay here. it is important to leave the country. these are two of the men haitian authorities say carried out the plot. they were attacked by the public as they were loaded into a police car. 17 men have been arrested so far, most of them colombian, but investigators are still looking for who ordered the killing.
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haiti was already plagued by hunger and gang violence but the assassination has pitched the country deeper into turmoil. it's requested the united nations and the united states send troops to help secure the country and protect key infrastructure. the us has declined the request and the un may also be reluctant to get involved. i think the un is thoroughly sick of haiti, they had a 13—year peacekeeping force there that got in a lot of trouble in a lot of ways. the last thing being the cholera epidemic which the peacekeeping forces brought into haiti. so i think they don't really want to get entangled again. i think most outside forces don't want to get militarily entangled again in haiti if they can avoid it. adding to the uncertainty is the political situation — there is no working parliament, two men are claiming to be the prime minister, and a third of the senate has just nominated another man to lead
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as interim president. courtney bembridge, bbc news. former boxer, chris eubank, says he is devastated at the death of his son, sebastian, who has died just days before his 30th birthday. sebastian had followed his father's footsteps and become a professional boxer himself. he died yesterday morning in dubai, where he was based. the headlines on bbc news... it's all set for tomorrow night at wembley — a clash between england and italy to crown the winners of euro 2020. fully vaccinated nhs staff could be let off having to self—isolate after contact with someone with covid to try to tackle staff shortages. the wimbledon women's final is underway — karolina pliskova is facing world number one ashleigh barty for the title. former ipswich town and england
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international striker paul mariner has died at the age of 68. he scored 135 goals for ipswich and was part of bobby robson's fa cup—winning side of 1977—78. he also had stints at plymouth, arsenal, portsmouth and scored 13 goals for england. he later went on to play in australia and the united states and had managed plymouth argyle and toronto fc. a couple have celebrated their marriage in a bristol hospital, so that their child, who has a serious illness, could be a bridesmaid at their ceremony. karim and louise tied the knot earlier than they d originally planned to make sure their six—month—old daughter layla could be involved. alex howick has been speaking to them. even before leila was born, karim and louise dreams of having their daughter at their wedding is a
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bridesmaid.— daughter at their wedding is a bridesmaid. ~ ., ., bridesmaid. when we got engaged, i was pregnant _ bridesmaid. when we got engaged, i was pregnant it _ bridesmaid. when we got engaged, i was pregnant. itjust _ bridesmaid. when we got engaged, i was pregnant. it just felt _ bridesmaid. when we got engaged, i was pregnant. itjust felt really - was pregnant. itjust felt really important to do it. it is was pregnant. itjust felt really important to do it.— was pregnant. itjust felt really important to do it. it is not nice to think about, _ important to do it. it is not nice to think about, but _ important to do it. it is not nice to think about, but the - important to do it. it is not nice to think about, but the idea - important to do it. it is not nice | to think about, but the idea that she might — to think about, but the idea that she might not have been there if we waited _ she might not have been there if we waited too _ she might not have been there if we waited too long... we wouldn't want to take _ waited too long... we wouldn't want to take that— waited too long... we wouldn't want to take that risk, really. so waited too long... we wouldn't want to take that risk, really.— to take that risk, really. so once the had to take that risk, really. so once they had done — to take that risk, really. so once they had done the _ to take that risk, really. so once they had done the legal- to take that risk, really. so once they had done the legal bit - to take that risk, really. so once| they had done the legal bit down to take that risk, really. so once - they had done the legal bit down the road at bristol registry office, staff at the bristol royal hospital for children created this for them. it took my breath away when i went in. the nurses and the play team got one ready in her little dress. 0ur aisle, i suppose, one ready in her little dress. 0ur aisle, isuppose, if one ready in her little dress. 0ur aisle, i suppose, if you want to call it that, was the hospital ward. it is an unforgettable day. it was really _ it is an unforgettable day. it was really good, yeah. we were just expecting — really good, yeah. we were just expecting a chaplain to come down and do _ expecting a chaplain to come down and do a _ expecting a chaplain to come down and do a blessing at the bedside with layla, we were not expecting what _ with layla, we were not expecting what actually happened. yes, with layla, we were not expecting what actually happened.— with layla, we were not expecting what actually happened. yes, it was really special- _ what actually happened. yes, it was really special. layla _ what actually happened. yes, it was really special. layla has _ what actually happened. yes, it was really special. layla has something | really special. layla has something called child syndrome _ really special. layla has something called child syndrome and - really special. layla has something called child syndrome and has - really special. layla has something l called child syndrome and has spent just ten days at home since she was born on christmas day. it is just ten days at home since she was born on christmas day.— born on christmas day. it is really rare and it — born on christmas day. it is really rare and it is _ born on christmas day. it is really rare and it is an _ born on christmas day. it is really rare and it is an acronym - born on christmas day. it is really
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rare and it is an acronym that - rare and it is an acronym that stands — rare and it is an acronym that stands for— rare and it is an acronym that stands for a lot of the things that can go— stands for a lot of the things that can go wrong. i won't list them out, but essentially it can affect everything in the body, the heart, the eyes, — everything in the body, the heart, the eyes, the hearing, a lot of the sensors _ the eyes, the hearing, a lot of the sensors. ., , ., ., , sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what _ sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what life _ sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what life is _ sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what life is going - sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what life is going to - sensors. doctors have told them they don't know what life is going to be i don't know what life is going to be like for leila and the level of independence that she will experience, but karim and louise say the hospital staff have already given them one of the most memorable days of their lives. alex howitt, bbc news, bristol. wild swimming has grown in popularity, especially during lockdown, but swimmers may need to be cautious about the cleanliness of england's rivers. just 16% of them are classed as meeting a good ecological standard, according to the environment agency. here s our science correspondent, richard westcott. you wouldn't catch me doing it, but this wild swimming group has 1,000 members. today, they are taking a dip
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in northamptonshire's river nene. in the northamptonshire village of dunford. how's the water? great! you sound really convincing! a bit of cold, this lot can handle. but how clean is the water? the last time this river was properly tested a couple of years ago, it was rated as poor. pollutants from farming and road traffic get washed into the water by the rain. after a lot of heavy rain, you don't really want to go swimming. no, leave two or three days after heavy rain because of the storm drains. we don't take it seriously enough, no, and there is a need for action. as much as we want to make it safe for the humans in here, we also want to make safe for the animals and wildlife. in fact, the environment agency admits all our rivers, lakes and streams are polluted in some way. just 16% of them are classed as good. so that's the river where the swimmers were.
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now i have the sun coming out, so it is perfect. as well as farms and industry, campaigners are worried about run—off from busy roads. tiny bits of tyre rubber, metalfrom brake pads and clutches, and a group of hydrocarbons from emissions that wash off the tarmac and into rivers. we need to do a lot more to tackle pollution from road run off. frankly, we're not doing much at all at the moment, so we can perhaps put a levy on tyres so when you buy a tyre a bit of money goes into treatment systems. or we could put a utility levy alongside your council tax, so that we all pay for these treatments. we did talk to the government, who told us that clearing up rivers is an urgent priority, but they admitted that more work needs to be done. richard wescott, bbc news, on the river nene in northamptonshire. so
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from that river swimming to tennis. at wimbledon, the women's final hasjust got underway. world number one ashleigh barty is playing the eighth seed karolina pliskova. it's the first time they've both played at a wimbledon final. there hasn't been two first—time women finalists since 1977. 0ur sports correspondent, chetan pathak, is at wimbledon. how is going? it is going really well, how is going? it is going really well. then. _ how is going? it is going really well, then, at _ how is going? it is going really well, then, at the _ how is going? it is going really well, then, at the moment - how is going? it is going really well, then, at the moment for| how is going? it is going really - well, then, at the moment for ash barty. she has won the first 1a points of this final and she is a double break up, 4—0 up in list first set, as i speak. ash barty chasing history here, trying to emulate what her idol did. it is 50 years since that idol won her first wimbledon title, and she mean so much to the indigenous community in australia and party barty wants to see if she can try to imitate what her idol did. she has got better across these championships, only
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dropping one set en route to the final, against carla suarez in the opening round. it has been staggering for barty because we were not sure what sort of fitness she was in going into these championships, had injury to her hip before this, there are a little prep time for wimbledon, but her slice and dice, herwonderful time for wimbledon, but her slice and dice, her wonderful serve, time for wimbledon, but her slice and dice, herwonderfulserve, great variety, such a great disruption and the most consistent player in the women's tour, she has battled her way to this title, knocking out the... tenth champion and angelique kerber. she is a star and as i speak i can see karolina pliskova just trying to edge their way into this match. she has got three points, so pliskova trying to get herself on the board here after a brilliant start from ash barty.- the board here after a brilliant start from ash barty. yes, she has not it all start from ash barty. yes, she has got it all to — start from ash barty. yes, she has got it all to do. _ start from ash barty. yes, she has got it all to do. all _ start from ash barty. yes, she has got it all to do. all right, _ start from ash barty. yes, she has got it all to do. all right, chetan i got it all to do. all right, chetan pathak, thank you very much indeed.
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a quadriplegic man who is paralysed from the shoulders down has made his uk racing debut at the goodwood festival of speed. former professional racing driver sam schmidt was severely injured in a crash 21 years ago. now through advances in technology he is able to drive a car by moving his head to steer and using his breath to accelerate and break, reaching speeds of up to 200mph. ? he explained how it all works. ? i never would have thought i would have driven ever before, let alone, you know, 200 miles an hour. i have no use of anything below the shoulders. i really think the sky is the limit. i was sort of born into racing. ijust wanted to go to the indy 500 my entire life, so that was the goal that i set at a very young age and i was fortunate to race there and won the las vegas race in september of 1999 and then unfortunately had my accident four months later. sam, can you look left? and right?
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perfect. centre? perfect. i have a straw in my mouth that i blow to go and i suck to stop. the cameras directly in front of me, they read off the helmet movement and that is what turns it. you have just got to be really focused on where you're going, that is for sure. are you ready? yeah. right, you have control. let's put you in drive. this technology really has capability to change the world. i am really, really excited about the future and not only the opportunities technology offer everybody, but specifically people with disabilities. part of our goal on the engineering i side has been to get it to a pointl where it is very easily transferable into any vehicle. _ i mean, there is no reason right now you can't really put this _ in a formula 1 car or a mail truck. in the driver's seat, -
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the main seat of the car, there is an overtake system installed to allow whoever i is in that driver's seat to take control in an emergency. - sitting next to him, he goes fast. i think he makes it a goal to drive and scare the person next- to him a little bit. so i don't want him to know i get nervous, but i get - a little bit nervous. driving up the hill at goodwood is such an honour and i have watched it a zillion times on youtube, you know, and... i guess you could say this is an epic moment because it is definitely the first time i have been to goodwood, first time i have been driving on an actual race course in the uk, so this is phenomenal. the car is much better than i am right now, the technology and everything it has to offer, i mean... we willjust keep going faster and faster. this project, if it has shown me one thing, it is that you can truly do anything
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you put your mind to, so... ..pursue your passion. but to the football now and raheem sterling has been... raheem sterling has been a crucial part of the england team's success in the euros — and a couple from merseyside can feel particularly proud. they took the young footballer into their home when he was training at liverpool. and he hasn't forgotten what they did for him. andy gill reports. he's a millionaire sportsman with an mbe for promoting racial equality in sport. and england's second top scorer at euro 2020. but for three key years of his life, he lived with sandra and peter reeves in rainhill, near st helens. the couple took in young players like raheem sterling when they moved from other parts of the country to play for liverpool. raheem was really good. he was such a grounded young man, and he had a path in his head. he knew where he wanted to go, so to be signed for liverpool was really good for him, because that's where he was going and he knew, and he was lovely.
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players like sterling would attend the local school, go training with liverpool in the afternoon and started and ended their days with foster parents like the reeveses. i used to do sausage sandwiches for them and a cup of tea and i would take it up and say, come on, you've only got so long to get to school, you know. what's it been like watching him in the euros? oh, it's been exciting. hasn't he turned it on for the euros? absolutely marvellous very proud. because he was going through a bit of a flat period at city, wasn't he? he has really come good and he's on a roll now. let's hope he keeps going! just one more match to do. do you get nervous for him? i do, yes. yeah. i can't look sometimes. you don't, you're all right, but i do. no. we can't look, you know, when they get near the goal and he's there. you know, i'm so proud of him, when he gets it. so, give me a prediction for sunday. 0h, golly, it's going to be hard.
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it's going to be tight, isn't it? if we win by one we will be lucky. we're going to win. sandra texted raheem a couple of times when he scored in the euros. he texted back to say how much their support still means to him. andy gill, bbc news. pretty sure he is going to score at least one goal tomorrow, maybe two, actually. the football kicks off at eight o'clock tomorrow night and we have a sneak prediction for you. these "mystic" meerkats were given the english and italian flags — and they chose to knock the england flag overfirst. apparently that means that england will win — but the experiment took place at london zoo, so they might be biased. well, we can also get a prediction
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may be from darren bent, who has got the weather forecast. what do you think? like the meerkats idea, i will go for england to win, if that is what you are asking. yes, it is coming home, it is absolutely coming home in! fingers crossed. now, predicting the highest temperature today will be in the glasgow area, 23 degrees. elsewhere showers around, a bit cooler towards the east, where we have cloud and drizzle, but that will move away through the afternoon and evening, but heavy showers across wales and parts of scotland and england, which will top centre fade away through the afternoon and evening, but heavy showers across wales and parts of scotland and england, which will top centre fade away later. cloudy overnight, temperatures typically 12 degrees, a misty start for tomorrow and for many it will brighten up again with some sunshine but also heavy showers across northern england and northern ireland. more cloud coming back tomorrow into wales and the south—west, bringing a bit of rain, temperatures lower than today, but towards the south—east, east anglia and parts of the midlands, drier and brighter, so temperatures will be a
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bit higher. a few sore heads on monday, hopefully celebrating, but we could be celebrating in the rain, heavy rain and thunderstorms threatening with some local flooding, temperatures at best 20 degrees. —— 21 degrees. hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... not long now, then... it's all set for tomorrow night at wembley — england versus italy. who will win euro 2020?
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england captain harry kane wants to win it for supporters.

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