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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 10, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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this is bbc news. very good to have you with us. i'm rich preston. our top stories: haiti's call for help as unrest continues following the killing of the president. the government asks the us to send in troops. the taliban are rapidly retaking land across afghanistan as the us—led mission withdraws the last of its troops. if the taliban push for a military solution, the outcome is likely to be a long war. california braces itself for a weekend of record—setting temperatures as the heat continues to rise on the west coast. and novak djokovic books his place in the wimbledon final — will he nowjoin federer and nadal in the 20 majors club?
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hello and welcome to bbc news. haiti has asked the united nations to send troops to help secure the country, in particular key infrastructure, after the assassination of presidentjovenel moise. the letter said the aim was "to support the efforts of the national police, aiming to restablish security and public order in the whole territory". haitain government officials say they've also asked for support from the us military. the white house has yet to commment on the request, but says it is sending fbi agents to help assess the situation, as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. some of the men the haitian authorities say assassinated to the country public president. on parade for the media hours
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after a long gunfight with security forces. the police also displayed some of the weapons they seized. three members of the gang were killed and eight are on the run. the citizens of this impoverished nation are angry. some members of the public have joined nation are angry. some members of the public havejoined in the search for those still at large. as well as former colombian soldiers, the gang also included two americans of haitian descent. the us says it will help with the investigation. in will help with the investiuation. , , ., investigation. in response to the haitian _ investigation. in response to the haitian government's - the haitian government's request for security and investigative assistance will sending senior fbi and dhs officials to port—au—prince as soon as possible to assess the situation and how we may be able to assist.— situation and how we may be able to assist. jovenel moise, the leader— able to assist. jovenel moise, the leader of _ able to assist. jovenel moise, the leader of the _ able to assist. jovenel moise, the leader of the country - able to assist. jovenel moise, the leader of the country with i the leader of the country with a long history of political upheaval, had been under intense pressure and was fighting to stay in power. the nation is now facing a constitutional crisis, with no
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president or working parliament. claude joseph president or working parliament. claudejoseph the parliament. claude joseph the interim parliament. claudejoseph the interim prime minister is in charge of the time being. this is the poorest nation in the western hemisphere, with a raft of problems, spiralling inflation, intense poverty, and gang violence. but why a foreign hit squad will be deployed to kill its president remains a mystery. peter bowes, bbc news. joining me now from the us is amy wilentz, a journalist who focusses on haiti. thank you very much for being with us. do we know more about what the us will be sending to haiti? i what the us will be sending to haiti? 4' �* , ., haiti? i think we've just heard haiti? i think we've 'ust heard so far basically _ so far basically law enforcement, intelligence, fbi personnel. i think the united states has yet committed any trips to haiti and i don't see why it would at this point— i have not seen, listening to people and looking at videos on the ground, i have not seen a
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kind of chaotic unrest that even compares to what there was before jovenel moise was assassinated on the ground so i am unimpressed by people gathering outside the police station and yelling about the guys who were arrested in the investigation into the assassination.- investigation into the assassination. there is a fractious _ assassination. there is a fractious history - assassination. there is a| fractious history between assassination. there is a - fractious history between haiti and the united states. president trump supported jovenel moise. president biden allowed him to continue his presidency, if you like. does this change the situation in the relationship between the us? ~ ~ the relationship between the us? . ~ ., , us? well, i think it has - it has certainly _ us? well, i think it has - it has certainly gotten - us? well, i think it has - it has certainly gotten the - has certainly gotten the attention of the united states, whereas they were sort of hoping that they could just get jovenel moise through to an election that would look like a real election that might actually be one, although most of us doubted that. they hoped that that could happen, even with this guy who was really not an effective executive or
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leader of his country. but now of course they cannot rely on jovenel moise to sort of shepherd through a seeming election and now they're stuck and they don't know what to do so that will be hard for the us and the international community in general does make the un, the organisation of american states, et cetera.— states, et cetera. you mentioned _ states, et cetera. you mentioned the - states, et cetera. you mentioned the un, i states, et cetera. you | mentioned the un, this states, et cetera. you mentioned the un, this request is gone to the un for security forces to be deployed to haiti. do we expect to see international foreign troops on the street of port—au—prince? well, i don't know. obviously. but i think the un is thoroughly sick of haiti. i had a 13 year peacekeeping force there they got in a lot of trouble in a lot of ways. last thing being the cholera epidemic which the peacekeeping forces brought into haiti. so i think they don't really want to get entangled again. i think most outside forces don't want to get militarily entangled again in haiti if they could avoid it. ., .,
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again in haiti if they could avoid it— again in haiti if they could avoid it. ., ~ ., .,~ avoid it. thank you for making the time- _ in a major escalation since international troops started withdrawing from afghanistan, the taliban have seized a key border crossing. islam qala is one of the biggest trade gateways into neighbouring iran, generating around 20 million dollars a month for the afghan government. afghanistan's defence ministry says security forces are trying to recapture the site. from kabul, our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more on the situation across afghanistan. these are momentous and deeply uncertain times in afghanistan. and for those who don't follow afghanistan closely, what are these details coming in every day tell us? well, they tell us the taliban are making rapid advances into all areas of the country, much more quickly than anybody expected — possibly even the taliban. the latest news is they have taken over this border crossing
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on the border with iran at islam qala. russian media now reporting tell taliban now control most of the afghan border. there's reports now the territory of the southern province of kandahar and the television network in afghanistan reported east of kabul, the village is also coming under taliban control. while these reports were coming in, the afghan president ghani made his first visit to what was the biggest us military base in the country at bagram. he conceded that the country was now going through a critical transition, but vowed that his government and his security forces would prevail. that is the message we heard last night, afghans heard last night, from the us presidentjoe biden, who emphasised that american support would not end. and that the afghan political leadership and security forces have the capability to prevent a taliban takeover.
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but he asked, as afghans are asking, will they do it? the taliban, of course, are saying that they are advancing. but in a sign of how they are ever mindful of their international legitimacy, they held a press conference today in the russian capital of moscow. a member of the taliban negotiating team boasted that if they could take 40—50 districts in a day, —— if they could take 111—15 districts in a day, they could take over all of the country within two weeks. but he says they are not after power. as the taliban make gains in districts, many of our viewers have been asking us what is the mood like in kabul? is kabul also coming under attack? so we decided to go to the streets of the city to find out what is the mood here. the city springs to life. kabul�*s oldest market, one of its busiest. painters, masons, plasterers,
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they all come here to find a day's work. it's always been tough, but much tougher now. translation: the . foreigners are leaving. we are worried about the war. it's everywhere. people are fleeing into the cities but there is no work here. we are under so much pressure. this fridge. and they sold all their crockery? yes. selling up, upping sticks. more afghans are leaving. a street of second—hand goods. nusrat set up shop here when his job ended with the us military. lots of afghans were working with them, now they are jobless. a lot of them are planning to go out of afghanistan because of their security and because of a lack ofjobs. the americans said it's time to go, it's 20 years, that's enough. for what purpose did they come in, for what purpose are they going? what is the conclusion?
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if they didn't gain something, they didn't build something for us, they didn't make the security for us — why are they coming? tea and treats in the city centre. sweet moments for afghans who can afford them. the kind of life many young afghans here, men and women, want to live. growing insecurity already threatens it. we are hurrying just coming to the restaurant, coming to a cafe, meeting our friends, just go home. the taliban say this is a western lifestyle. maybe they say we are acting like europeans or american people. but i think it's not true. we have the right to choose our life. a lot is being knocked out of afghan lives. at this popular bowling alley, we hear notjust worry about the taliban. the government is failing them too, even in promoting sports like this.
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munir ahmad assafi is a national champion. translation: fewer people are coming here now. before we used to gather about a0 people, we would divide into teams and hold competitions, but that doesn't happen any more. the changes over the past 20 years in afghanistan have brought new measures of freedom
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to many living in kabul. it's a life they want to hold onto and now fear they are losing. the departure of international forces is turning into the loss of so much more. for now, the walls keep rising to protect the most powerful, most privileged. the government under pressure to protect its own people. as the taliban make rapid gains beyond kabul, you feel the rising uncertainty on every street. the united nations security council has voted to extend a cross—border operation bringing aid into syria from neighbouring turkey for another year. the mandate for the long—running operation was due to expire on saturday, but a last—minute compromise was reached between russia and the us. jean mackenzie reports from turkey—syria border. here was her last resort. it's where she ran to after two of her sons were killed. as millions fled the syrian regime, they found shelter in this corner of the country, outside the government's control. now they're trapped in makeshift camps, up against the border with turkey, existing on help from outside. just over the border in turkey, trucks are loaded with food, water, and medicine —
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part of an un agreement to bring crucial aid into a part of the country still controlled by rebels. 1,000 of these trucks go across the border every month carrying vital supplies, and that now includes covid vaccines. this is an absolute lifeline for people in idlib. for many, it's their only lifeline. that lifeline was in danger. russia, syria's key ally, signalled it wanted to close the crossing, preferring aid to come from inside syria instead. but after a last—minute compromise, all members of the security council voted to keep it open for another year. this has proven to be the safest, the most direct, and the most reliable way of getting aid to people. whatever happens, we must keep
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this border crossing open. if we can have more crossing points, we would welcome that. for this hospital, where medicines and supplies were already running low, it's avoided a catastrophe. the us ambassador to the un said after the vote that the security council had made the decision to save lives — that millions of syrians can breathe a sigh of relief tonight. jean mackenzie, bbc news, on the turkey—syria border. stay with us on bbc news. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: haiti's call for help as unrest continues following the killing of the president — the government asks the us to send in troops. and the taliban are rapidly retaking land across afghanistan as the us—led mission withdraws the last of its troops. residents of california are bracing for a weekend of record—setting temperatures as heat continues to build on the west coast. the us national weather service has issued an excessive heat alert, with meteorologists warning that some of southern california's inland areas could reach temperatures of 49 celsius —
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that is 120 farenheit. eric schoening is a meteorologist with the us national weather service's western region. hejoins me from salt lake city. thank you for being with us, what is the situation right now? ., ., what is the situation right now? ., ~' , ., what is the situation right now? ., ~ , ., ., , now? thank you having me. this is a lona now? thank you having me. this is a long duration _ now? thank you having me. this is a long duration and _ is a long duration and widespread heatwave across much of the western us which has already begun, it is really going to peak this weekend, we are going to see really hot temperatures and really big heat impacts, potential health impacts for the population through the weekend and into the beginning of next week. find the beginning of next week. and this comes _ the beginning of next week. and this comes off— the beginning of next week. and this comes off the back of periods of drought in california, fire concerns, talk us through how those play out in this situation?— in this situation? absolutely, much of the _ in this situation? absolutely, much of the western - in this situation? absolutely, much of the western us - in this situation? absolutely, much of the western us is i in this situation? absolutely, much of the western us is in | in this situation? absolutely, i much of the western us is in an extreme drought, it has been going on for quite a while, and that creates a lot of concerns, water supply concerns in many places, we also have fire
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concerns in many places, where a lot of our fuels for potential wildfires are quite dry, and then you add on the heat and that dries out the potential wildfire fuels even more, and as i mentioned, potentially leads to a lot of health concerns across the population. health concerns across the imputation-— health concerns across the --oulation. ., ., ., population. how long are you exaecting _ population. how long are you exaecting this _ population. how long are you expecting this to _ population. how long are you expecting this to go - population. how long are you expecting this to go on - population. how long are you expecting this to go on for? i expecting this to go on for? around wednesday this week is when a lot of the heat really started building across south—eastern california, and a lot of places across the us west will see the worst of the heat this weekend, saturday and sunday, potentially going into monday in a lot of places, and then we will finally get some relief tuesday and wednesday as we get a little bit of cooling across the region. in we get a little bit of cooling across the region.— across the region. in the cities and _ across the region. in the cities and states - across the region. in the cities and states that - across the region. in the j cities and states that are affected, they prepared for these kinds of temperatures? you know, it is something that a lot of these states do see in
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the summer, and thankfully in this case we were able to get the warning out quite early, so a lot of the cities and states have been setting up things like cooling centres and getting a lot of resources out to the people, but at the same time, we are seeing temperatures that are meeting or sometimes exceeding all—time record highs, so while this is something that a lot of these areas are ready for, at the same time these are temperatures that you know, even people who have lived there a long time have never seen before.— there a long time have never seen before. ., ., seen before. you mentioned the record high _ seen before. you mentioned the record high daytime _ record high daytime temperatures, but these temperatures, but these temperatures are staying high at nighttime as well, aren't they? at nighttime as well, aren't the ? . v , at nighttime as well, aren't the ? ., �*, , ., they? that's right, they are uuite they? that's right, they are quite warm _ they? that's right, they are quite warm at _ they? that's right, they are quite warm at night, - they? that's right, they are quite warm at night, a - they? that's right, they are quite warm at night, a lot l they? that's right, they are| quite warm at night, a lot of places that will be staying in the 70s and 80s degrees fahrenheit, so something like 25 celsius or even 30 celsius overnight in some places, that is something that is really concerning, it really adds to
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the health concerns when people cannot call off overnight. and cannot call off overnight. and in terms of — cannot call off overnight. and in terms of trends, _ cannot call off overnight. and in terms of trends, is - cannot call off overnight. and in terms of trends, is this the kind of weather event you expect to see more of, year—on—year? expect to see more of, year-on-year?- expect to see more of, year-on-year? expect to see more of, ear-on- ear? , ., , ., , year-on-year? yes, as the globe continues — year-on-year? yes, as the globe continues to _ year-on-year? yes, as the globe continues to warm, _ year-on-year? yes, as the globe continues to warm, studies - year-on-year? yes, as the globe continues to warm, studies have | continues to warm, studies have shown we will see more and more extreme weather events like this. i can't necessarily tie particular event to climate change very easily, we will continue to see more see more and more of these extreme weather events across the globe. weather events across the lobe. . ., weather events across the lobe. ., ~' ,, , weather events across the lobe. ., ~' , . weather events across the lobe. . ,, , . ., globe. thank you very much for bein: globe. thank you very much for being with _ globe. thank you very much for being with us. _ globe. thank you very much for being with us. thank— globe. thank you very much for being with us. thank you - globe. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very l being with us. thank you very much, being with us. thank you very much. have — being with us. thank you very much, have a _ being with us. thank you very much, have a great _ being with us. thank you very much, have a great evening. | a fire that tore through a factory near the bangladeshi capital has seen nearly 52 people missing. many workers are still unaccounted for. the blaze broke out on thursday when hundreds of people were inside the building, and it was still burning nearly 2a hours later. many workers were injured after they jumped later. many workers were injured after theyjumped from injured after they jumped from
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the injured after theyjumped from the upper floors as the fire engulfed the six story building. coronavirus infections in the uk have risen to their highest level for five months. the office for national statistics says about one in 160 people had the virus last week — that's a 50% increase on the week before. the surge in infections has led to a large number of people being told to isolate by the nhs covid tracing app used in england and wales. tonight the bbc has learned that the app is to be modified so that it sends out fewer alerts. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. have you been pinged lately? 26 million people have downloaded the nhs covid app, though it's unclear how many have it switched on. the app uses bluetooth to detect the distance between phones, and if someone tests positive, will ping those who have been in close proximity, within two metres for 15 minutes, and advise them to self—isolate. tonight a source at the app team
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told the bbc they had been told to adjust its sensitivity so that it sends out fewer alerts. as our restrictions change, of course the app needs to change in line. things like the relaxing of the 1m—plus rule, for example, on 19july, might well lead to a review of the way the app itself needs to function. but labour says the sensitivity of the app shouldn't be weakened. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector, and that is never a good idea. that is an important protection. i am equally worried by the stories of people deleting the app altogether. as covid cases have risen, so have the number of app alerts. 360,000 people received one in the last week ofjune. this climbing centre in surrey had to close after nearly all its staff were pinged. i don't even know what's going to happen for the future, but obviously there
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is an immediate impact on the basis that we're losing income, again. and it's going to hurt. the latest survey from the office for national statistics suggests that around 400,000 people in the uk had covid last week, up nearly 60% on the previous week. in england, it's estimated that one in 160 people were infected. in scotland, one in 100 had covid. in wales, it was one in 340, and in northern ireland, one in 300. new analysis of covid infection data has confirmed children are at extremely low risk from coronavirus. there were 25 deaths among 12 million under—18s in england. half of those had complex neuro disabilities. there were no deaths in children who had asthma as a single diagnosis, no deaths in children who had cystic fibrosis,
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no deaths in children who had trisomy 21 or down syndrome, and no deaths in children and people who had type 1 diabetes. this research, suggesting a two—in—a—million chance of dying among children, may persuade some scientists against recommending covid jabs for 12—17—year—olds — a decision that's due very shortly. let's get some of the day's other news. the death toll from a collapsed apartment building in miami has risen to 78, after 1a more bodies were pulled from the rubble. the search—and—rescue mission has now ended and become a recovery effort, more than two weeks after the 12—storey champlain towers south fell in the middle of the night. dozens of people remain missing. thailand is tightening restrictions in greater bangkok and some southern provinces. the measures are designed to curb a wave of coronavirus infections which saw a high number of new cases and deaths on thursday.
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the men's final is all set for wimbledon, with top seed novak djokovic facing matteo berrettini on sunday. our correspondent chetan pathak was watching the semifinal action at the all england club. ultimately, it's no surprise to see novak djokovic into his seventh wimbledon final. this is a man motivated by numbers. and, win on sunday, and he'll have 20 grand slams — the same number as roger federer and rafael nadal. standing in his way on friday was denis shapovalov, the 22—year—old canadian who's won so many admirers at these championships with the way he plays. and he made djokovic work hard for this. losing in straight sets, yes, but hanging in there in each and every one. from the beginning, when he broke djokovic early, he showed his intent, and at times, he got tight and nervous — and that was his undoing on this occasion. but he will hope for better in the future. matteo berrettini is who awaits
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novak djokovic in sunday's final — the first italian man to reach a wimbledon final. he got past hubert hurkacz in four sets, the polish 14th seed had already knocked out roger federer and daniil medvedev. but for hurkacz, he couldn't keep his nerves under control, at least in the first two sets before he battled back to win the third. but berrettini's powerful serve and forehand got him over the line. before the men's final on sunday, we have the women's final on saturday — the world number one ash barty and the eighth seed karolina pliskova playing in their first wimbledon final. for barty, she's the first australian woman to get to a wimbledon final since evonne goolagong in 1980. for pliskova, she had been written off by many — not a name people were expecting to see in the final, but could she yet pull off a surprise win? some cycling news, and britain's mark cavendish has equalled the long standing
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record of stage wins in the tour de france. he claimed his fourth win in this year's race. he now has 3a stage wins — equal with the legendary belgian rider eddy merckx — a five—time overall winner of the tour. he claimed his 34th stage win way back in 1975. and before we go, england will play italy in the euro 2020 final on sunday. many here in the uk will be glued to their seats. but they don't need to be, because we think we know who's going to win — because a group of so—called �*mystic meerkats�* at london zoo have picked england as the winner! a zookeeper put flags in their enclosure — one for each country. the first to come down would be victorious. the meerkats are the latest in a long line of animals with predictive powers — a german octopus picked winners during the 2010 world cup. let's see if the meerkats�* prediction is correct.
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i will be back in a moment with the latest headlines, for me and the team, thanks for being with us. hello there. it's looking unsettled this weekend as well, but it's not going to be raining all the time everywhere. there will be some places staying dry, but the general theme this weekend is for sunny spells and for scattered showers to develop. again, these will be heavy and thundery, and slow—moving as winds will be light. if you look at the pressure chart for saturday, we've got this weather front across the south, bringing an area of more persistent rain to southern counties. it will continue its journey eastwards through the morning through the channel islands, southern and south—eastern counties of england, then clear away in the afternoon. elsewhere, after a dry start, we'll see those showers developing a little bit further westwards this time, affecting wales, west midlands, north—west england and scotland. again, it will be heavy, slow—moving torrential downpours which could lead to localised flooding.
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those temperatures range from 19—21 degrees. now, those showers will fade away during saturday evening, and then, overnight, most places will be dry, but rain will start to push into the far west later on, those temperatures in double figures. it's going to be another mild and muggy night for most of us. now, for sunday, a new area of low pressure starts to push in off the atlantic, affecting northern and western areas. it looks like some eastern parts may stay dry altogether with some hazy spells of sunshine. so, most of the heavy showers on sunday will be across more northern parts of the uk, but wales, northern ireland, the southwest of england will start to see areas of more persistent rain moving in. in the east, with that sunshine, we could see 22—23 celsius, and again, it's going to feel quite humid. so, for wimbledon this weekend, saturday, the early rain will clear away to leave something a bit drier into the afternoon. sunday, mainly dry, but i still can't rule out the odd shower there. and for wembley on sunday, certainly it's a dry start, but into the evening, we start to see some of that rain in the west pushing its way eastwards. that's because this area
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of low pressure will be working its way southwards and eastwards across the country. by monday, this is the position it'll be in. it's going to bring a very unsettled day. most northern and western areas will see sunny spells, some heavy showers. it's england and wales which will see the cloudiest skies and areas of heavy, maybe even thundery rain affecting central and southern areas, which could lead to some issues. the temperatures not quite as high — 19—20 celsius will be the high. the heavy, thundery showers clearing away from the south and east. on tuesday and wednesday, by the mid—latter part of the week, high pressure wants to build in, so it'll start turning sunnier, drier, and warmer.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: haitian government officials say they've asked the us to send troops to protect key infrastructure as the country reels from wednesday's assassination of president jovenel moise. the white house has declined to confirm the request. the murky circumstances surrounding the killing have triggered political turmoil and unrest in the streets. the taliban in afghanistan say they've captured two major frontier points — one with iran and the other with turkmenistan. the militants are rapidly retaking land as the us—led mission withdraws the last of its troops. president ashraf ghani has conceded his security forces are in a critical transition. california residents are bracing for a weekend of record—setting temperatures as the heat continues to build on the west coast. the us national weather service has issued an excessive heat alert with meteorologists warning some of southern california's inland areas could reach temperatures of 49 degrees celsius.

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