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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 9, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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the tele— band have told talks and mark —— the taliban. since troops began withdrawing from afghanistan. following the assassination of the haitian president earlier this week. lee said a group of mercenaries were in involved in his killing. emergency services except the number of dead to rise as many workers are still missing. united nations security council has voted to extend a cross—border aid operation into syria from turkey after a last—minute compromise was reached between raja and the united states —— between russia.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are polly mackenzie, chief executive of think tank demos, and joe twyman, director of the polling organisation deltapoll. and is clearly already worked out the views of the majority of the people in the country. we will deal with football little later, but let's bring you up—to—date. no more self—isolation rules for nhs workers, says the ft. it reports that ministers are reviewing the policy amid fears of a staffing crisis ahead of the next phase of rule relaxing, which could see the introduction of covid passports, according to the times, which leads with reports that bars, restaurants and clubs will require certificates for entry in a bid
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to drive up vaccinations. �*0ne game from glory�* — england's squad, which has �*won over public with skill, bravery and humility�* take the front of the i, ahead of sunday's final. which is expected to draw in 35 million viewers around the uk — that's according to the front of the mail, which writes the nation hopes harry kane will follow in the golden footsteps of bobby moore. the moment england made it to the final, gareth scout gate on the front of the mirror. the express focuses on... let's begin. do you want to kick us off with the story on the front of the ft? we heard earlier in the week that people who have been double vaccinated will no longer have the
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self—isolate, but this goes a little bit further. it's more focused on the fears there might be a resurge that will have real impact in hospital. that will have real impact in hosital. , , ., , ., hospital. this starts from the government's _ hospital. this starts from the government's determination | hospital. this starts from the l government's determination to hospital. this starts from the - government's determination to press ahead with the full release of all covid restrictions onjuly ahead with the full release of all covid restrictions on july the 19th. as a result, we expect that case numbers will rise in the government is relatively relaxed about that because we have because of our amazing programme had a impact among case rakes and deaths. the problem is if you have 100,000 people, new cases a day, that's a lot of contacts to get cleaned by the nhs app, so there's been a whole series of stories circulating about what they might do to kind of reduce the impact of this test and trace, brings plenty of people, as is and
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the nature of public health, who turned out not to have contracted covid. that means the average person who has it is infecting 125 people. we're trying to restrict the impact. sajid javid having come in as the new health care secretary, it's reported the thing he was most struck by is perhaps 7 million people, fewer than normal came forward in search of treatment. some of these will be acute cases that have simply gone away without treatment, but lots will be people who didn't come forward for tests and scans that could diagnose serious illness. his core message as health secretary is absolutely, we've got to clear that backlog, so the last thing he wants is half the
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nhs workforce sick because they're constantly being pinged. the problem is me know, i think they're called knows tropic infections, i probably got it wrong. it knows tropic infections, i probably got it wrong-— knows tropic infections, i probably l got it wrong._ aren't got it wrong. it sounds good! aren't absolutely core _ got it wrong. it sounds good! aren't absolutely core part _ got it wrong. it sounds good! aren't absolutely core part of _ got it wrong. it sounds good! aren't absolutely core part of the - absolutely core part of the transmission. so, if we're going to release it these are the worst people to let off the hook, but anyway, it's complicated. but it reaired anyway, it's complicated. but it repaired some _ anyway, it's complicated. but it repaired some thought - anyway, it's complicated. but it repaired some thought because anyway, it's complicated. but it i repaired some thought because in essence, people watching might think this is part of the consequences. if you lift all the restrictions, if you lift all the restrictions, if you have your big bang on the 19th ofjuly, go off on holiday, some
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parts of the country where maybe the ability of health services is less widespread, your kind of co—creating a circumstance where this is likely. as a result of these loosening rules which _ as a result of these loosening rules which will_ as a result of these loosening rules which will be announced on monday, we will— which will be announced on monday, we will see _ which will be announced on monday, we will see a rise in infection. i thihi
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the radius _ not self—isolating the? do we narrow the radius around people and say people _ the radius around people and say people who come into contact this distance. — people who come into contact this distance, pain? all of these things are essentially an estimate. we don't _ are essentially an estimate. we don't know what impact it will have, but it's— don't know what impact it will have, but it's all— don't know what impact it will have, but it's all being put in place to address— but it's all being put in place to address the issue that if the infection— address the issue that if the infection rate does go up, that inevitably— infection rate does go up, that inevitably means locked more people will be _ inevitably means locked more people will be pings, so that means lots of different— will be pings, so that means lots of different industries, organisations, companies, etc will face the strain. that means — companies, etc will face the strain. that means the nhs will be the top of that— that means the nhs will be the top of that list. if you don't want the nhs to— of that list. if you don't want the nhs to suffer, which has been the government's line throughout the pandemic, that means the nhs has to have enough people. the question is what with— have enough people. the question is what with the next stage be, would it mean _ what with the next stage be, would it mean people on public transport, people _ it mean people on public transport, people looking and various different areas. _ people looking and various different areas. do _ people looking and various different areas, do they follow similar rules? 0r areas, do they follow similar rules? or the _ areas, do they follow similar rules? or the rules — areas, do they follow similar rules?
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or the rules they did for everyone? ithink— or the rules they did for everyone? i think there's a lot of uncertainty. it is very complicated and it _ uncertainty. it is very complicated and it will— uncertainty. it is very complicated and it will take, i imagine, a few weeks. — and it will take, i imagine, a few weeks. if— and it will take, i imagine, a few weeks, if not monks to find the right— weeks, if not monks to find the right level— weeks, if not monks to find the right level that is a balance between opening things ought but thinking _ between opening things ought but thinking people safe —— if not nronths _ thinking people safe —— if not months. no one knows where that point _ months. no one knows where that point is _ we'll leave the football for a bit and that great for autograph. —— photograph. coven passports for pubs. this is what the government has to —— has blown hot coal on —— covid passports. i has to -- has blown hot coal on -- covid passports-— covid passports. i was surprise civen covid passports. i was surprise given that _ covid passports. i was surprise given that in — covid passports. ! was surprise given that in other— covid passports. i was surprise given that in other areas, - covid passports. i was surprise given that in other areas, they | covid passports. i was surprise - given that in other areas, they have at least _ given that in other areas, they have at least adapted to the evidence in the situation on the ground. it doesn't — the situation on the ground. it doesn't surprise me that this is now being _ doesn't surprise me that this is now being rolled out in some form. we don't _ being rolled out in some form. we don't know— being rolled out in some form. we don't know exactly what form it will take, _ don't know exactly what form it will take, but _ don't know exactly what form it will take, but it's something that is popular— take, but it's something that is
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popular with a large proportion of the public — popular with a large proportion of the public. i'm not saying it's popular— the public. i'm not saying it's popular in _ the public. i'm not saying it's popular in everyone, but around two thirds _ popular in everyone, but around two thirds of— popular in everyone, but around two thirds of people do support the principal— thirds of people do support the principal of vaccine passports, and around _ principal of vaccine passports, and around three quarters say they personally would be happy to use then _ personally would be happy to use them. when it comes to using them in pubs, _ them. when it comes to using them in pubs, the _ them. when it comes to using them in pubs, the situation is more complicated. they found that 45% supported the idea and 45% opposed it. so, _ supported the idea and 45% opposed it. so, when it comes to pubs, the situation _ it. so, when it comes to pubs, the situation is — it. so, when it comes to pubs, the situation is more complicated, but i think— situation is more complicated, but i think as _ situation is more complicated, but i think as a _ situation is more complicated, but i think as a nation, it's ineligible whether— think as a nation, it's ineligible whether it's travel or going to hospitals _ whether it's travel or going to hospitals or care homes or pubs, i think— hospitals or care homes or pubs, i think it's _ hospitals or care homes or pubs, i think it's inevitable that we will have _ think it's inevitable that we will have to — think it's inevitable that we will have to get used to some degree to the idea _ have to get used to some degree to the idea of— have to get used to some degree to the idea of perusing vaccination negative — the idea of perusing vaccination negative for how long that last remains — negative for how long that last remains to be seen, but i do think this is— remains to be seen, but i do think this is more — remains to be seen, but i do think this is more likely to happen the not, _ this is more likely to happen the not, particularly if the government is committed to opening things up.
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paule? _ is committed to opening things up. paule? ., ., , , , ., paule? the good news is they want hot and cold- _ paule? the good news is they want hot and cold. we've _ paule? the good news is they want hot and cold. we've gone - paule? the good news is they want hot and cold. we've gone round - paule? the good news is they want| hot and cold. we've gone round and round. 80 months ago, we were talking about possible infection certificates to prove you have the disease —— 18 months. but that was given up on when we realise it didn't necessarily protect you from getting it again. so, ithink didn't necessarily protect you from getting it again. so, i think one of the reasons why they're going round the reasons why they're going round the house is two reasons. the first is with the previous story, you get the sense that different departments are sort of flying heights and the government hasn't confirmed view about what to do. we're getting bits and pieces of slightly conflicting stories about what the response might be an we've seen that throughout the pandemic. the other thing is it's actually in ministry difficult to do this vaccine certification. not everybody has a smartphone. not everybody can get vaccinated, and arby going to keep
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people who don't have smartphones from getting vaccinated from interacting —— are we? that might feel unjust. we don't have a tech solution for this. if you just have a paper—based solution, as i'm sure you guys do, the car they gave me from thy vaccination at the centre, it's written down that i have two doses. what's the system that can actually work for that, is a much bigger question than the principal questions, whichjoe is talking about, where the public is broadly on that side. we have to sort some of that stuff out already because of travel or other countries will be sorting things out for us. but it's not as easy as just pushing a button and somehow, it's confirmed. i think the reason they're excited about it is they're worried about vaccine uptake among younger people who are
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less likely to feel bothered. it might create an incentive. taking that to my _ might create an incentive. taking that to my days _ might create an incentive. taking that to my days that _ might create an incentive. taking that to my days that are - might create an incentive. taking that to my days that are very - might create an incentive. taking| that to my days that are very long gone of those bits of plastic put around your risk that you couldn't take off and those marks that were stamped on your hand so that you could get back in and you needed to p0p could get back in and you needed to pop out for a cigarette or to use the toilet. something more innovative in these modern times. do you want us to take us to the... you can understand why it happened, but in terms of a hugely important story, the admission of the entry of guilty plea by the police officer who was found to have murdered sarah everard. it's a small power on the part of the telegraph, but it's point is important. there are lots
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of unanswered questions.- of unanswered questions. there really are- _ of unanswered questions. there really are. cressida _ of unanswered questions. there really are. cressida dick, - of unanswered questions. there really are. cressida dick, the . of unanswered questions. there i really are. cressida dick, the head of the metropolitan police, made a statement today and i thought she did better than she has done in previous interactions about this case. she seemed contrite and heavy hearted about the fact that serving police officer murdered a woman in cold blood. and, there were allegations of sexual misconduct and indecent exposure in the days leading up to that that weren't dealt with. and when a flag like thatis dealt with. and when a flag like that is raised against a serving police officer, it's incredibly important that it's taken seriously immediately. she didn't, cressida dick, i mention that fact or apologise for that fact, though she said she had spoken to and apologised to him, said that she was sorry to the family for their
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extraordinary loss. and i think the whole of policing really needs to think about that process of how do you hold our police officers, who are such an essential part of a strong and safe society, how do you hold them to a high standard? indeed. it's a question which is yet to be answered. we'll find out a bit more about the previous allegations and if what actions were taken against wayne cousins. they've been certain notices. more broadly, joe, it really has highlighted again the extent of violence towards women and the problem in terms of how that's reacted when cases of this rise in. i think the question of culture is a really— i think the question of culture is a really important one. it's very
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clear— really important one. it's very clear that _ really important one. it's very clear that mistakes were made by the metropolitan police in this case. exactlv — metropolitan police in this case. exactly what those mistakes were, we don't have _ exactly what those mistakes were, we don't have the full details, but it's really— don't have the full details, but it's really important for public trust — it's really important for public trust and _ it's really important for public trust and for the effectiveness of policing — trust and for the effectiveness of policing in this entire country that the metropolitan police is open and transparent. and owns up to its mistakes — transparent. and owns up to its mistakes. and talks about, in an open _ mistakes. and talks about, in an open wav, — mistakes. and talks about, in an open way, about how they will ensure this does— open way, about how they will ensure this does not happen again, because it simply— this does not happen again, because it simply cannot be the case that a situation _ it simply cannot be the case that a situation like this is brushed under the carpet — situation like this is brushed under the carpet and it's not referred to again. _ the carpet and it's not referred to again. and — the carpet and it's not referred to again, and it's simply dismissed as this is— again, and it's simply dismissed as this is one — again, and it's simply dismissed as this is one bad apple. that may be the case, — this is one bad apple. that may be the case, but openness and transparency will be vitally important in the move forward. let's move on to, given your outfit — i suspect
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you won't change in the next

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