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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the taliban are rapidly retaking land across afghanistan as the us—led mission removes the last of its troops. if the taliban and push for a military solution, the outcome is likely to be a long war. police in haiti say 28 foreigners were involved in the president's assassination on wednesday, most of them colombians. coronavirus infections across the uk return to levels not seen sincejanuary — as more and more people are forced to self—isolate. the men's final is set at wimbledon — we'll have the latest on the action at the all england tennis club.
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in a major escalation since international troops started withdrawing from afghanistan, the taliban have seized a key border crossing. islaam kalaa is one of the biggest trade gateways into iran, generating around 20 million dollars a month for the kabul government. the defence ministry says security forces are trying to recapture the site. the defence ministry says security forces are trying to recapture the site. from kabul our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more on the situation across afghanistan. these are momentous and deeply uncertain times in afghanistan. for those who don't follow afghanistan closely, what are these details coming in tell us?
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they tell us the taliban are making rapid advances in all areas of the country much more quickly than anybody expected. and possibly even the taliban. the latest news is they have taken over this border crossing on the border with iran at islaam kalaa. russian media now reporting tell taliban now control most of the afghan border. this report is now their territory of the southern province of kandahar and the television network in afghanistan reported east of kabul the village is also coming under taliban control. while these reports were coming in, the afghan president made his first visit to what was the biggest us military base in the country at bagram. he conceded that the country was now going through a critical transition, but vowed that his government and his security forces would prevail. that is the message we heard last night, afghans heard last night, from the us presidentjoe biden, who emphasised that american support would not end. and that the afghan political
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leadership and security forces have the capability to prevent a taliban takeover. but he asked as afghans are asking will they do it. the taliban of course are saying that they are advancing. but in a sign of how they are ever mindful of their international legitimacy, they held a press conference today in the russian capital of moscow. a member of the taliban negotiating team boasted that if they could take 15 districts in a day, they could take over all of the country within two weeks. but he says they are not after power. as the taliban make gain an districts, many of our viewers have been asking us what is the mood like in kabul. is kabul also coming under attack? we decided to go to the streets of the city to find out what is the mood here.
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the city springs to life. kabul�*s oldest market, one of its busiest. painters, masons, plasterers, they all come here to find a day's work. it's always been tough, but much tougher now. translation: the . foreigners are leaving. we are worried about the war. it's everywhere. people are fleeing into the cities but there is no work here. we are under so much pressure. this fridge. and they sold all their crockery? yes. a street of second—hand goods. nusrat set up shop here when his job ended with the us military. lots of afghans were working with them, now they are jobless. a lot of them are planning to go out of afghanistan because of their security and because of a lack ofjobs.
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the americans said it's time to go, it's 20 years, that's enough. for what purpose did they come in for what purpose are they going? what is the conclusion? if they didn't gain something, they didn't build something for us, they didn't make the security for us, why are they coming? tea and treats in the city centre. sweet moments for afghans who can afford them. the kind of life many young afghans here, men and women, want to live. growing insecurity already threatens it. we are hurrying just coming - to the restaurant, coming to a cafe, meeting our friends, just go home. - the taliban say this is a western lifestyle. maybe they say we are acting - like europeans or american people. but i think it's not true. we have the right| to choose our life.
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a lot is being knocked out of afghan lives. at this popular bowling alley, we hear notjust worry about the taliban. the government is failing them too, even in promoting sports like this. munir ahmad assafi is a national champion. translation: fewer people are coming here now. - before we used to gather about a0 people, we would divide into teens and hold competitions, but that doesn't happen anymore. the changes over the past 20 years in afghanistan have brought new measures of freedom to many living in kabul. it's a life they want to hold onto and now feel they are losing. the departure of international forces is turning in to forces is turning into the loss of so much more. for now, the walls keep rising to protect the most powerful, most privileged. the government under pressure to protect its own people. as the taliban make rapid gains beyond kabul, you feel the rising uncertainty on every street.
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coronavirus infections in the uk have risen to their highest level for five months. the office for national statistics suggests around 400,000 people would have tested positive for the virus in the last week. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. have you been pinged lately? 26 million people have downloaded the nhs covid app, though it's unclear how many have it switched on. the app uses bluetooth to detect the distance between phones, and if someone tests positive, will ping those who have been in close proximity, within two metres for 15 minutes, and advise them to self—isolate. the planned ditching of social distancing in england might lead to the sensitivity of the app being reduced. as our restrictions change, of course the app needs to change in line.
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things like the relaxing of the one metre plus rule, for example, on the 19th ofjuly, might well lead to a review of the way the app itself needs to function. but labour says the sensitivity of the app shouldn't be weakened. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector, and that is never a good idea. that is an important protection. i am equally worried by the stories of people deleting the app altogether. as covid cases have risen, so have the number of app alerts. 360,000 people received one in the last week ofjune. this climbing centre in surrey had to close after nearly all its staff were pinged. i don't even know what's going to happen for the future, but obviously there is an immediate impact on the basis that we're losing income, again. and it's going to hurt. the latest survey from the office for national statistics suggests that around 400,000 people in the uk
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had covid last week, up nearly 60% on the previous week. in england, it's estimated that one in 160 people were infected. in scotland, one in 100 had covid. in wales, it was one in 340, and in northern ireland, one in 300. new analysis of covid infection data has confirmed children are at extremely low risk from coronavirus. there were 25 deaths among 12 million under—18s in england. half of those had complex neuro disabilities. there were no deaths in children who had asthma as a single diagnosis, no deaths in children who had cystic fibrosis, no deaths in children who had trisomy 21 or down syndrome, and no deaths in children and young people who had type one diabetes.
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this research, suggesting a two in a million chance of dying among children, may persuade some scientists against recommending covid jabs for 12—17—year—olds, a decision that's due very shortly. fergus walsh, bbc news. the united states says it will send law enforcement officers to haiti as soon as possible, after the assassination of president jovenel moise earlier this week. haitian police say a group of 28 foreign mercenaries were responsible for the killing. several of them are thought to be former colombian soldiers. it's still unclear who organised the attack, or why. but several of the suspected mecenaries were colombian. the bbc�*s daniel pardo is in bogota and told me what more we know about the assassa ntaion. we know that they are former military soldiers, very young in their military career around 40 to 45 years old, but who retired partly because salaries were not graded in
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the colombian military forces, as well as the fact that escalating moving up in the military is very difficult. they retire and then they have the possibility to enter these huge and very international industry of mercenaries, where for a lot of money, they can get involved in these international operations. we've been hearing about colombian mercenaries being involved in the iraq war, afghanistan and yemen, so this is part of an industry that has been growing for many decades now in columbia after the development of the war on terror and the war on drugs that has been partly financed by the united states, so these are people who were part of that military that has been trained by the united states or partly at least, and are very pro and have really good skills in this sort of operation. here in the uk, a metropolitan police officer has pleaded
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guilty to the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard, who disappeared from the streets of south london in march. pc wayne couzens snatched the 33—year—old marketing executive as she walked home from a friend's house at around nine at night. it's still not clear what motivated his attack on a complete stranger. sarah everard's family were in court as he admitted murder. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. what happened to sarah everard is what many woman often fear — the fear of walking home alone. sarah was just walking home, and that night the life that she hadn't fully lived ended. the man responsible, wayne couzens, in the custody of his own force — a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer. abusing his police promise to uphold the law, he broke it in the most brutal way. after couzens pleaded guilty today, we can now report more about what happened to the marketing
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executive originally from york. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. he also bought a roll of strong self—adhesive film. this is the last picture of sarah, buying wine, heading to a friend's house. just after 9:30 on poynders road, a busy main road in clapham, a bus camera shows that vauxhall astra on the pavement. two people, presumed to be sarah and couzens, are standing there. the hire car then heads out of london to kent. couzens faced allegations of indecent exposure in london three days before kidnapping sarah and, it was revealed today, similar allegations in 2015 in kent — possible police failures now being investigated. this is where sarah was last seen. when couzens was arrested, he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang
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for underpaying a prostitute and they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver them another girl. he admitted kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over, alive and unharmed, to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he'd kidnapped her, couzens had bought two builder's bags at b&q. her body was found in one. the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken. in court, she'd satjust feet from the everard family. i was able to speak to them earlier today and say again how very sorry i am for their loss and fortheir pain and their suffering.
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all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man's crimes. they are dreadful, and everyone in policing feels betrayed. shame on you, shame on you, shame on you...! questions for the force how couzens could have been cleared to carry a gun when he would go on to kill. and the police watchdog is now investigating what met officers did when he exposed himself twice just days before the murder, and what kent officers did about similar allegations six years ago — could he have been stopped? the murder of one woman resonated with thousands of others — demands that the streets must be safe, violence against women must stop, harassment and abuse must be
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taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish — that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took her future away. lucy manning, bbc news. the un security council has voted to extend a cross border aid operation into syria from turkey for another year. the mandate for the long—running operation was due to expire on saturday, but a last minute compromise was reached between russia and the us. jean mackenzie reports from reyhan—li in southern turkey. this was her last resort, it is where she ran to after two of her sons were killed. as millions fled the syrian regime, they found shelter in this corner of the country, outside the government's control. now they are stuck in makeshift camps, trapped up against the border with turkey, existing on help from outside.
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just over the border in turkey, trucks are loaded with food, water and medicine. part of an un agreement to bring crucial aid into a part of the country still controlled by rebels. 1000 of these trucks go across the border every month carrying vital supplies and that now includes covid vaccines. this is an absolute lifeline for people in idlib. for many, it is the only lifeline. that lifeline was in danger. russia, syria's key ally, signalled it wanted to close the crossing, preferring aid to come from inside syria instead. but after a last—minute compromise, all members of the security council voted to keep it open
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for another year. this has proven to be the safest, the most direct and the most reliable way of getting aid to people. whatever happens, we must keep this border crossing open. if we can have more crossing points, we would welcome that. for this hospital, where medicines and supplies were already running low, it's avoided a catastrophe. the us ambassador to the un said after the vote that the security council had made the decision to save lives, that millions of syrians can breathe a sigh of relief tonight. jean mackenzie, bbc news, on the turkey—syria border. stay with us on news, still to come: californians brace themselves for a weekend of record—setting temperatures — as the heatwave on the us west coast continues.
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education is the only solution. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. the taliban captures a key border crossing with iran in an offensive launched as us troops pull out of afghanistan. coronavirus infections across the uk return to levels not seen sincejanuary — as more and more people are forced to self—isolate. california residents are bracing for a weekend of record—setting temperatures as heat continues to build in the west coast. the us national weather service has issued an excessive heat alert, with meteorologists warning that some of southern california's inland regions could reach tempreatures of 49 degrees celsius — that is 120 degrees farenheit. dr david eisenman is the director of ucla centre for public health and disasters.
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he told me the severity of such heatwaves is increasing. we heatwaves is increasing. know there have been not more we know there have been not only more often but happening earlier in the summer season some heat events are lasting longer, and more severe. and importantly, the night times are not cooling down as well as they used to be. not cooling down as well as they used to be— not cooling down as well as they used to be. . ., , , ., ., used to be. and that brings a danger with it, doesn't _ used to be. and that brings a danger with it, doesn't it? _ used to be. and that brings a danger with it, doesn't it? this _ used to be. and that brings a danger with it, doesn't it? this sounds - with it, doesn't it? this sounds like a dangerous weekend just looking at what those temperatures are going to be, they could be a lot of trouble with the.— of trouble with the. absolutely. coofinr of trouble with the. absolutely. coolin: is of trouble with the. absolutely. cooling is not _ of trouble with the. absolutely. cooling is not a _ of trouble with the. absolutely. cooling is not a luxury - of trouble with the. absolutely. cooling is not a luxury for - of trouble with the. absolutely. cooling is not a luxury for the i cooling is not a luxury for the human body. the body instead of a temperature of approximately 36.8 celsius, that is the normal temperature. —— is set at a temperature. —— is set at a temperature. 0nce temperature. —— is set at a temperature. once it reaches 40 celsius, it starts to break down, and inflammatory processes, toxins are released, and organs are damaged
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and people die. what are released, and organs are damaged and peeple die-— and people die. what can emergency services do to _ and people die. what can emergency services do to prepare _ and people die. what can emergency services do to prepare for— and people die. what can emergency services do to prepare for this? - services do to prepare for this? what are they doing to prepare and what can people and some of these most affected areas do as well? we want to most affected areas do as well? - want to make sure that people who have come who don't have air conditioning have some access to cool space. conditioning have some access to coolspace. be conditioning have some access to cool space. be a cold water for a while, a cool shelter, something thatis while, a cool shelter, something that is air—conditioned commit is really important to have a few hours at least every day when the body is cool down. we also recommend that if you know somebody who is older and living alone, you check in on them several times a day, to make sure they are hydrating and staying cool. you mention people who are older but with a heat wave like this, are there certain groups that are more at risk than others coachella extreme of a some of the youngest in the very oldest, are at higher risk for some people of chronic diseases like diabetes or kidney disease or heart disease.—
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like diabetes or kidney disease or heart disease. ~ ., , ., , ., heart disease. when are people who are on house — heart disease. when are people who are on house or— heart disease. when are people who are on house or homeless _ heart disease. when are people who are on house or homeless or - heart disease. when are people who are on house or homeless or are - heart disease. when are people who are on house or homeless or are at i are on house or homeless or are at higher risk. and really anybody who doesn't have air conditioning in the home, which seems to be low income communities are at higher risk. this weekend is — communities are at higher risk. this weekend is when it is predicted to get to be hot this. but this is obviously a long—term issue that people are going to be having to deal with in this area. it is people are going to be having to deal with in this area.— deal with in this area. it is with that we need _ deal with in this area. it is with that we need to _ deal with in this area. it is with that we need to start _ deal with in this area. it is with that we need to start treating i deal with in this area. it is with - that we need to start treating these extreme heat events like other disasters, like hurricanes or tornadoes. we need to not think of them as another set of hot days, these are new disasters that are coming on more frequently. we need to prepare for them but we do for hurricanes and tornadoes with the and take them just as seriously. the men's final is all set for wimbledon — with top seed novak djokovic facing matteo berrettini. 0ur correspondent chetan was watching this semifinal action at
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the all england club. ultimately it is no surprise to see novak djokovic into his seventh wimbledon final. this is a man motivated by numbers and when on sunday he will have 20 grand slams, the same number as roger federer and rafe on the golf lots of standing in his way on friday was dennis, the 22—year—old canadian who has won so many admirers. —— rafael nadal. he may djokovic work hard for this. losing in straight sets, yes, but hanging in straight sets, yes, but hanging in there and each and everyone. from the beginning when he broke djokovic early to him he showed his intent. at times, he got tight and nervous and that was his undoing on this occasion. but he will hope for better in the future. matteo barry quini is to away snow back in sunday. the first italian man to reach a woman a final. he got past hubert her cash in four sets in the polish 14 seat already knocked out roger federer. but he couldn't keep
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his nerves under control. at least in the first two sets. before he battled back to win the third. but that the powerful serve and forehand got him over the line. before the men's final on sunday, we have the women's final on saturday, the world number one as party in the eighth seed karolina pliskova playing in theirfirst seed karolina pliskova playing in their first wimbledon final. parties their first wimbledon final. parties the first also a woman to get to a woman in since 1980. her pliskova, she had been written off by many, not a name people were expecting to see in the final but could she get put off a surprise when? —— at barty. cycling news. 0ur cabinets has equalled the long—standing record of stage wins in the tour de france. he claimed his fourth went in this year is tournament and he is now 34 states wounds equal with the legendary belgian writer eddie marx, a
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five—time winner of the tour. stay with us here on bbc news. hello. it's been a day for sky watchers today. some very big building clouds. not everybody�*s caught a heavy downpour or thunderstorm, but there have been some around, particularly into parts of east anglia, even a funnel cloud in county durham today, a tornado that hasn't touched the ground. and where we have been seeing some of these torrential downpours, only slowly fading as we get into the night, an area of rain arriving towards southwest england and south wales in what is a mild and muggy night to come. now, the rain in the southwest, from an area of low pressure running quickly across southern parts during the first part of saturday. further showers and thunderstorms scattered about elsewhere, another area of low pressure coming at us from the west later on sunday. ahead of that, scattered showers and thunderstorms. let's look at both days this weekend and see what's on offer.
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a damp start in southern england, the rain pushing across south east england into parts eight east anglia before slowly clearing on saturday afternoon. a cloudier, cooler day here. elsewhere, there will be sunny spells after a mostly cloudy start, but you can see the very well scattered thundery downpours breaking out. they could be torrential slow moving in places, parts of wales, the midlands, northern england. this time also to the west of the pennines scattered about in scotland too. the odd downpour can't be rolled out along with the sunny spells in northern ireland. a cooler feeling day in east anglia in the southeast. pleasant elsewhere if you get to see some sunny spells, a few will be around into the evening, as again, the thunderstorms will slowly fade. a lot of dry weather to begin on sunday, but the downpours flare up again particularly into northern england and scotland, and then cloud and showers or rain, starting to pile in from the west as we go on into the later stages of the day. outbreaks of rain into southwest england and parts of wales to end the afternoon. and temperatures in the high teens, low 20s, some warmth around where you get to see some sunshine.
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as for wimbledon this weekend, the rain only slowly clearing as we get on through saturday afternoon. brighter to end the day, a lot of cloud on sunday. showers can't be ruled out, it looks like the bulk of sunday's wet weather around the london area, though, is going to hold off until we get into the evening. there is a certain big match happening at wembley, it may well be a damp start or end to that, hopefully not to damp spirits. and just a word of warning, overnight and into monday, with this area of low pressure close by, the potentialfor some areas to see some very heavy rain. we will keep you updated on that.
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this is bbc world news. the headlines... the taliban and have told talks in moscow that they had seized key border crossings with iran. it's seen as a major escalation activity since international trip started withdrawing from afghanistan. in bangladesh, at 52 people have been killed after a fire broke out at a factory. emergency services say they expect the number of dead to rise as many workers are still missing. the united states send law enforcement officers to haiti as soon as possible following the assassination of the president. haitian police say a group of 28 foreign mercenaries were responsible foreign mercenaries were responsible for the killing. un security council has voted to extend a cross—border aid operation into syria from turkey after a last—minute compromise was reached between russia and the us. at ten 0'clock, will be here with
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a full round up of the days news.

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