Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at eight. metroplitan officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to murdering sarah everard after snatching her from a street in south london. he raped and murdered her before dumping her body in kent. the head of the met said every officer felt betrayed by his actions. all of us in the met are sickened, angered, and devastated, by this mans crimes, they are dreadful. sarah everard's killing prompted questions around women's safety and the handling of investigations involving officers. the news to be a major cultural change in the cultural revolution almost in relation to the way in
8:01 pm
which police offending is dealt with. coronavirus infections across the uk return to levels not seen since january as more and more people are forced to self—isolate. focused on the task ahead england prepare for sunday's euro 2020 final, their captain says the team must enjoy these moments of history. we're just normal, normal lads. we wear a badge of pride, but we represent the country and in a way that makes everyone else proud as well. coming up on bbc news, is the bbc scaring people unnecessarily over rising covid cases or showing too much enthusiasm for relaxing restrictions? that is news watch at 19:45pm on bbc news.
8:02 pm
good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. a metropolitan police officer has pleaded guilty to the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard, who disappeared from the streets of south london in march. pc wayne couzens snatched the 33—year—old marketing executive as she walked home from a friend's house at around nine at night. it's still not clear what motivated his attack on a complete stranger. sarah everard's family were in court as he admitted murder. the head of the metropolitan police, dame cressida dick, spoke to them afterwards and apologised for their loss, pain and suffering. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. what happened to sarah everard is what many woman often fear — the fear of walking home alone. sarah was just walking home, and that night the life that she hadn't fully lived ended.
8:03 pm
the man responsible, wayne couzens, in the custody of his own force — a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer. abusing his police promise to uphold the law, he broke it in the most brutal way. after couzens pleaded guilty today, we can now report more about what happened to the marketing executive originally from york. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. he also bought a roll of strong self—adhesive film. this is the last picture of sarah, buying wine, heading to a friend's house. just after 9:30 on poynders road, a busy main road in clapham, a bus camera shows that vauxhall astra on the pavement. two people, presumed to be sarah and couzens, are standing there. the hire car then heads out of london to kent. couzens faced allegations
8:04 pm
of indecent exposure in london three days before kidnapping sarah and, it was revealed today, similar allegations in 2015 in kent — possible police failures now being investigated. this is where sarah was last seen. when couzens was arrested, he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang for underpaying a prostitute and they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver them another girl. he admitted kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over, alive and unharmed, to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he'd kidnapped her, couzens had bought two builder's bags at b&q.
8:05 pm
her body was found in one. the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken. in court, she'd satjust feet from the everard family. i was able to speak to them earlier today and say again how very sorry i am for their loss and fortheir pain and their suffering. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man's crimes. they are dreadful, and everyone in policing feels betrayed. shame on you, shame on you, shame on you...! questions for the force how couzens could have been cleared to carry a gun when he would go on to kill. and the police watchdog is now investigating what met officers did when he exposed himself twice just
8:06 pm
days before the murder, and what kent officers did about similar allegations six years ago — could he have been stopped? the murder of one woman resonated with thousands of others — demands that the streets must be safe, violence against women must stop, harassment and abuse must be taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish — that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took her future away. the metropolitan police have faced many difficult times in much criticism but this must be their darkest day. their own officer pleading guilty to murder. and how did he become an officer when he faced exposure allegations in 2015? and can't. and what happened three days before sarah was kidnapped when he faced more exposure allegations?
8:07 pm
—— in kent. what was then about that and could he have been stopped? the criticism of the met police over this and other issues, he goes right to the top to cressida dick, just what is happening inside the metropolitan police. in the wider police force as well because the police watchdog is investigating 12 officers in connection to the sarah everard investigation, some from the met police and other from other forces as well. it also poses this wider question, will violence against women be policed in a different way? will women feel safer on the streets? there are no answers to that at the moment and no answers to that at the moment and no answers to the questions the everard family have, which isjust what to the questions the everard family have, which is just what happened to sarah. because although wayne couzens expresses regret and his remorse through his lawyer, he is still refusing to say exactly what happened.
8:08 pm
early i spoke to the deputy director of the campaign group and violence against women and ask her for her reaction to the guilty plea today. this women absolutely massive outpouring of grief and distress. —— there has been an absolutely. women just reacting to what happened to sarah but that we had a spotlight on violence against women since the tragic murder of sarah and those of nicole and others. all of this is really serves to illustrate just how differently women are experiencing going about their daily lives compared to men. violence gets women's and girls affects all of us deeply. women of course but as lucian also their loved ones, friends and a whole society really. in terms of the whole society point, there is some pretty shocking for some people, depressing reality for some people, depressing reality for some come evidence to suggest that this problem is absolutely in terms
8:09 pm
of how many particular treat women. absolutely. across society, we see an epidemic of all forms of violence against women committed largely by men. there is a massive range of offending from including harassment, stalking, domestic abuse, rape, murder, and the reason why all of this is so prevalent is these deep—rooted attitudes where this violence is normalised, excuse, minimise, and we really need to shift the narrative and talk about the fact that violence against women and girls is not an inevitable fact of life. they are concrete actions that can be taken to and prevent violence against women. coronavirus infections in the uk have risen to their highest level for five months. the office for national statistics suggests around 400,000 people would have tested positive for the virus last week.
8:10 pm
the surge in infections has seen a large number of people being contacted via the nhs covid tracing app and today the government said the app used in england and wales may need to be altered as coronavirus restrictions change. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. have you been pinged lately? 26 million people have downloaded the nhs covid app, though it's unclear how many have it switched on. the app uses bluetooth to detect the distance between phones, and if someone tests positive, will ping those who have been in close proximity, within two metres for 15 minutes, and advise them to self—isolate. the planned ditching of social distancing in england might lead to the sensitivity of the app being reduced. as our restrictions change, of course the app needs to change in line. things like the relaxing of the one metre plus rule, for example, on the 19th ofjuly, might well lead to a review of the way the app itself needs to function. but labour says the sensitivity
8:11 pm
of the app shouldn't be weakened. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector, and that is never a good idea. that is an important protection. i am equally worried by the stories of people deleting the app altogether. as covid cases have risen, so have the number of app alerts. 360,000 people received one in the last week ofjune. this climbing centre in surrey had to close after nearly all its staff were pinged. i don't even know what's going to happen for the future, but obviously there is an immediate impact on the basis that we're losing income, again. and it's going to hurt. the latest survey from the office for national statistics suggests that around 400,000 people in the uk had covid last week, up nearly 60% on the previous week. in england, it's estimated that one in 160 people were infected.
8:12 pm
in scotland, one in 100 had covid. in wales, it was one in 340, and in northern ireland, one in 300. new analysis of covid infection data has confirmed children are at extremely low risk from coronavirus. there were 25 deaths among 12 million under—18s in england. half of those had complex neuro disabilities. there were no deaths in children who had asthma as a single diagnosis, no deaths in children who had cystic fibrosis, no deaths in children who had trisomy 21 or down syndrome, and no deaths in children and young people who had type one diabetes. this research, suggesting a two in a million chance of dying among children, may persuade some scientists against recommending covid jabs for 12—17—year—olds, a decision that's due very shortly.
8:13 pm
fergus walsh, bbc news. i'm joined now by dr deepti gurdasani, a clinical epidemiologist at queen mary university of london. thank you very much for being with us on bbc news. can i ask you what you make of in the light of these numbers now, of the decision to subject to the reevaluation on monday statistics, and all likelihood to go ahead with lifting restrictions?— likelihood to go ahead with lifting restrictions? �* ., ., ,, ., restrictions? before i address that i want to address _ restrictions? before i address that i want to address the _ restrictions? before i address that i want to address the piece - restrictions? before i address that i want to address the piece of - i want to address the piece of misinformation that came out before you started interviewing me that says the impact of coronavirus on children is not severe. while the risk of death might be quite low, the risk of lung covid is quite high and i want to say we have 33,000 children are suffering with long covid including 9000 who had symptoms of more than a year. that is far more severe and i think the bbc should do more to report this more accurately. but i will get to the question you asked me. i'm very concerned about the strategy. we see a rapid rise in cases in a rapid rise in hospitalisations. we have
8:14 pm
500 people being admitted daily and rising at this point in time. we are hearing from nhs trust you've had to cancel routine care for cancer patients and operations. we've heard from the chair of the bma this is likely to become quite a concern problem. the government appears to be following and a hybrid strategy and protection to vaccination. about half of our population has been fully vaccinated for them and trying to attain her immunity through him mass affection in our young by letting it rip to them rather than protecting them. that herd immunity. —— protecting them with vaccines which we could do in the coming weeks. it which we could do in the coming weeks. , ., ., _, , weeks. it is our dilemma come up with the doses _ weeks. it is our dilemma come up with the doses available. - weeks. it is our dilemma come up with the doses available. in - weeks. it is our dilemma come up with the doses available. in the i with the doses available. in the decision by the government to have booster vaccine deuces for all the people and doubts are being raised about supplier, never mind the question of whether you should vex and the adults in other countries. how can you more effectively resolve that dilemma because we have a limited capacity? i that dilemma because we have a limited capacity?— that dilemma because we have a limited capacity? i don't see that as a debt limit _
8:15 pm
limited capacity? i don't see that as a debt limit at _ limited capacity? i don't see that as a debt limit at all. _ limited capacity? i don't see that as a debt limit at all. we - limited capacity? i don't see that as a debt limit at all. we might l as a debt limit at all. we might have limited capacity but we need to be honest that's a very limited capacity in the sign suggest that children should be vaccinated. in which case we need to put it measures to protect children why they are waiting for vaccination like other countries are doing. but in mitigation and schools to keep infection rates low, infection rates are skyrocketing among children and we are in the danger of producing a generation with chronic disability because of mass exposure. if we don't have vaccine for them right now, let's be honest about that and say let's protect them and not expose them to huge levels of infection while they're waiting to vaccinate. the whole dichotomy of vaccinating our children and other countries is a completely false one. the uk has produced over 500 million doses of vaccine. they can easily donate to other countries which they have not done. they —— they kind of foreign aid that could have been helped to resource the vaccines.
8:16 pm
days could have supported technology and there is so much that uk could be doing to support this, taking a million away from 500 million they've already procured is not going to affect what they do in terms of the global context was that this decision is purely ideological, not scientific. i’m this decision is purely ideological, not scientific.— not scientific. i'm interested you set ideological. _ not scientific. i'm interested you set ideological. that _ not scientific. i'm interested you set ideological. that is - not scientific. i'm interested you set ideological. that is your - set ideological. that is your judgment but in the light of that, why would so many senior scientist who advised the government have apparently endorsed the strategy, including the chief scientific adviser and chef medical officer? it is shocking to have. some of them have openly said children said rather effective been vaccinated. this policy exposing people including children to mask infection has been divided by the —— rather infected than vaccinated. i has been divided by the -- rather infected than vaccinated. i should 'ust infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify- _ infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify- i _ infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify. i take _ infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify. i take your— infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify. i take your point. - infected than vaccinated. i should just clarify. i take your point. you are quoting the —— who quite
8:17 pm
correctly. but it was, there was a very specific question he was asked. he was not being asked by the uk. he was saying with a country were to make the judgment that he thought that he could have herd immunity in the government doesn't say it seeking that.— the government doesn't say it seeking that. the government doesn't say it seekin: that. , ., ., seeking that. the question was about the uk strategy- _ seeking that. the question was about the uk strategy. i'm _ seeking that. the question was about the uk strategy. i'm sorry. _ seeking that. the question was about the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i - seeking that. the question was about the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i have - the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i have to be specific— the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i have to be specific about _ the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i have to be specific about this. - the uk strategy. i'm sorry. i have to be specific about this. my - to be specific about this. my understanding, i will give you a chance to answer, my understanding, the doctor it was asked about the uk. it was then asked about government specifically saying they would use her immunity. 0ur government says it is not doing that. he government says it is not doing that. . , government says it is not doing that. ., , ., government says it is not doing that. ., ., government says it is not doing that. .,, ., ., ., that. he was asked about government, the uk government, _ that. he was asked about government, the uk government, whether - that. he was asked about government, the uk government, whether people i the uk government, whether people should be exposed essentially she would expose them now rather than later. �* ., ., , ., , ., later. but not as a plan herd immunity? _ later. but not as a plan herd immunity? i— later. but not as a plan herd immunity? i think _ later. but not as a plan herd immunity? i think we - later. but not as a plan herd immunity? i think we have l immunity? i think we have vaccination so we can go ahead with reducing the restrictions, which is not the same as saying we are consciously trying to greet herd immunity. there is a distinction.
8:18 pm
yes. i can't say the government is consciously trying. i yes. i can't say the government is consciously trying.— yes. i can't say the government is consciously trying. i 'ust wanted to be clear about _ consciously trying. i 'ust wanted to be clear about that. — consciously trying. i just wanted to be clear about that. the _ consciously trying. i just wanted to be clear about that. the impact . consciously trying. i just wanted to be clear about that. the impact of| be clear about that. the impact of the oli be clear about that. the impact of the policy is _ be clear about that. the impact of the policy is essentially _ be clear about that. the impact of the policy is essentially that. - be clear about that. the impact of the policy is essentially that. the | the policy is essentially that. the whole idea of saying it is better to open up now rather than in winter, that it implicitly means that they want children to acquire immunity naturally before want to because otherwise what is the advantage? if you look at the imperial model, that is what he shows. the only advantage is what he shows. the only advantage is that there will be many more children that are immune with natural infection rather than by vaccination. i want to say the uk vaccination. i want to say the uk vaccination policy is not aligned with almost all european countries, the us and israel who are all vaccinating adolescents. the the idea we don't have safety on this is quite wrong at this point in time. by quite wrong at this point in time. by the government advisers are not doing this is something i cannot comprehend at this point in time. b, comprehend at this point in time. a pleasure to speak to you again. thank you very much for your time.
8:19 pm
the latest official figures show that in the past 24 hours 29 deaths were reported and 35,707 new infections were recorded across the uk, the highest figure since the end of january. it means on average 29,435 new cases were reported per day in the past week. more than 96,000 people received a first dose of the vaccine in the latest 24 hour period. almost 45.7 million people have had their first jab 86.8% of uk adults. more than 175,000 people have had their second dose. meaning more than 34 million people are fully vaccinated that's 65.3% of adults. bookings for holidays and flights to amber list destinations have surged after it was announced yesterday that uk residents who are fully vaccinated will no longer need to quarantine on their return to england or northern ireland. immigration officials have said the government needs to warn passengers there will be long queues at the uk border as international travel continues to open up. meanwhile, malta, which is currently on the government's green list says
8:20 pm
it will ban all visitors to the country from wednesday, unless they are double jabbed. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davis reports. international travel is opening up — if you have been fully vaccinated in the uk. soon, you won't need to quarantine if you travel from an amber list country. the announcement seems to have been enough to persuade some to start booking. within an hour of the announcement, we saw a 53% increase in traffic to skyscanner, following the same time the day before. and that isjust, i mean, a clear sign of the huge appetite that there is for travel. the policy will start on the 19th ofjuly in england and the 26th ofjuly in northern ireland. scotland and wales are yet to say whether they will do the same thing. more passengers will be welcome for the travel industry, but there are worries about queues like these, seen earlier in the year, too. 0ne union has warned it will be
8:21 pm
impossible to prevent even longer queues without more resources. the real backlog would potentially be at the place you leave from, rather than when you get back to the uk _ people should expect, i think, more disruption than usual, but i know everyone is working very hard to minimise those queues. some will be left out — passengers will still need to buy tests, which will price some out of going abroad. many under—30s are still not fully vaccinated, and the policy currently only applies to those who have been jabbed in the uk. aria lives in the uk but had both of her vaccines in america, so the old amber rules, including the need to quarantine, will still apply to her. i just want to see my family. it is frustrating because i have had both jabs of the pfizer vaccine which is an approved vaccine. butjust because they were administered in the us, i am treated completely differently. other countries have already started accepting vaccination certificates from around the world. how difficult would it be for the uk
8:22 pm
to accept other countries' vaccination certificates? if we look at countries in the european bloc, we have digital vaccination certificates being issued. and we think it is also important that the uk is able to accept non—digital certificates as well, because there are many countries around the world issuing certification in paper form. and there are countries accepting that, so no reason the uk cannot in the early days. the government has said that it hopes to have some news on recognising people vaccinated in the eu in a couple of weeks. for some, foreign skies are a little closer. for others, they seem as far away as ever. caroline davies, bbc news. the england captain, harry kane, says his team must enjoy these moments of history as they prepare to take on italy in the euro 2020 final on sunday. it's the first time for 55 years that england's men will line up in a majorfinal and excitement is expected to reach frenzied levels
8:23 pm
over the next two days. harry kane says they know they have a tough game ahead but england believe they can win. 0ur sports editor dan roan looks at how preparations are going. he's proud, prolific and passionate. harry kane is just one win away from doing what no other england captain has achieved for more than half a century, today explaining just how it felt to be within touching distance of glory. to be playing and leading the boys out on our first european final is going to be extra special, so i mean, the excitement�*s there, i'm sure there will be a few nerves, butjust look forward to it, you've got to take these moments, enjoy these moments of history, and hopefully we can go one step further and win the whole thing. it's the biggest game in my career so far. doing something special with england would probably always surpass anything at club level, just because of the magnitude, the long wait for a final, the long wait to win a trophy. 1966 world cup winning captain
8:24 pm
bobby moore remains the only man to lead england to such silverware. now kane could emulate him. how does that make you feel, to be compared with an icon like that? whenever your name is mentioned in that company, yeah, it only gives you motivation, gives you confidence. of course, it would be an incredible achievement. i mean, these are the opportunities you have to grab with both hands. but one of football's most successful national teams stand in the way. european champions in 1968 and four times world cup winners, italy have been a formidable force at these euros. it is a real 50/50 game, i think. of course, italy have a better history than us in terms of winning tournaments, but i think, obviously, a lot of us in our team now have had experience at club level of playing in the biggest games, biggest finals across across europe. of course, we believe that we can win the game, but we also know it'll be tough. schmeichel saves... kane is there to follow in! out of sorts at the start of the tournament, harry kane has now scored four goals and spearheaded a team that has thrilled the nation.
8:25 pm
how special is it to you to know that this team has made such an impression on people, given the times that we're in and how tough it's been for a lot of people? yeah, that's been amazing, really, and i think sometimes, as footballers, we don't take all that in, you know, we see ourselves as kist doing a job. i think we've shown that we're just normal lads. you know, we wear the badge with pride. everyone should be proud, the way they have represented themselves, and obviously their friends and their family across the country. very best of luck, harry. thank you. british cyclist mark cavendish has equalled the record for the most stage wins in the tour de france. today's sprint finish took his tally to 34 level with belgium's eddie merks who's held the record since 1975. cavendish who won his first tour stage 13 years ago is now aiming to break the record before this year's race concludes in paris in nine days' time. novak djokovic is due to his seventh
8:26 pm
wimbledon final. —— is going to his seventh wimbledon final. wimbledon final. -- is going to his seventh wimbledon final.— wimbledon final. -- is going to his seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it will _ seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it will number _ seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it will number one _ seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it will number one b - seventh wimbledon final. ruthless at the end! it will number one b in - the end! it will number one b in straiaht the end! it will number one b in straight sets — the end! it will number one b in straight sets as _ the end! it will number one b in straight sets as he _ the end! it will number one b in straight sets as he looked - the end! it will number one b in straight sets as he looked at. the end! it will number one b in i straight sets as he looked at taking six title and 20th grand slam overall. he will face the nine seed and sunday's final on centre court. social care workers on the front line in england are being paid around 7000 pounds less than workers with equivalent skills in the public sector according to a charity. community integrated care has called the pay gap "immoral" and wants the prime minister to meet his promise to fix the social care crisis once and for all. the government says it has provided more than £2 billion for the sector including infection prevention, control measures and ppe. 0ur social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. # oh, i believe in yesterday... joyful times that make all the difference for residents and staff at landermeads care
8:27 pm
home in nottinghamshire. covid has made the last year tough, but for lucy, these are the moments that underline why she loves working with people who have dementia. i think i make a big difference every day and everybody that works here makes such a big difference every day. and like all care staff, she has huge responsibilities. i'm notjust in thisjob making tea and wiping bums, like, there's so much more that goes to it. for instance, if someone starts choking halfway through mealtime and you've got the nurse upstairs sorting out tablets, you're the only person there that can save them. she's 25, a team leader, and is paid £10.30 an hour. many colleagues are on the minimum wage. some days, i've had an awful day, i've got home, i've only made £10.30 an hour, when i could have been at lidl stacking shelves for £12.50 an hour and think about, "is it really worth it?" and today's report shows the pay gap between care staff and otherjobs
8:28 pm
with equivalent demands. it found care workers in england were paid an average ofjust under £17,700 a year, compared with the 24,600 average pay in the uk for similar roles, like senior teaching assistants and police community support officers. nhs health care assistants are generally paid more. amy works for the charity that commissioned today's report. most of the people she supports, like tony, are funded by local authorities. she's 22 and gets £8.88 an hour. you work long hours, you don't feel appreciated, and then you're underpaid. it's not going to attract people to the sector, if the sector isn't appealing. it just needs to change. her boss says council fees simply don't cover the real costs of care. if we suddenly announced today that we were going to put salaries up across 6000 people, the charity wouldn't be
8:29 pm
here in a year or two's time, because we would be making substantial losses. we would have to sell off or shut down other parts of the charity, and when you've got a growing national demand, that's the absolute opposite direction that you should be going on. the government says extra money has been put into the care system and that it will publish plans for reform later this year. alison holt, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. thunderstorms which have been affecting parts of eastern england today will slowly fade as we get on into tonight. still left with a few showers around as the night goes on but less intense and a lot of cloud and a little misty in places. 0utbreaks and a little misty in places. outbreaks of rain becoming a bit more widespread across southwest england in south wales. it is going to be quite mild and muggy night to come. tomorrow, we start the day with a lot of client around. some sunny spells gradually breaking
8:30 pm
through, that is from seven england were the first part of the day is what, the rain pushing the south east england and parts of east anglia and slowing clearing away to the afternoon in the cooler feeling that here. elsewhere, very pleasant and some sunshine but you see the showers and thunderstorms breaking out again. light winds, slow—moving and potential breadth under, parts all over. this time more to the west and scattered about in scotland in the i shower it with sunny spells possible in northern ireland.
8:31 pm
hello this is bbc news. the headlines... metroplitan officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to murdering sarah everard after snatching her from a street in south london. he raped and murdered her before dumping her body in kent. the head of the met said every officer felt betrayed by his actions. all of us in the met are sickened, angered, and devastated, by this mans crimes, they are dreadful. sarah everard's killing prompted questions around women's safety and the handling of investigations involving officers. coronavirus infections across the uk return to levels not seen since january as more and more people are forced to self—isolate. focused on the task ahead england prepare for sunday's euro 2020 final their captain says the team must enjoy these moments of history.
8:32 pm
we're just normal, normal lads. let's get a man in his own words. the england team is getting ready for sunday's euro 2020 final against italy. the players have been training at st george's park in staffordshire. if england win on sunday, it will be their first major tournament win since, yes you guessed it 1966. ahead of the final, our sports editor dan roan has been speaking to the england captain harry kane if you can deliver on sunday as england's captain, you will be compared to iconic figures like bobby markham of the only man to ever lift silverware as in england captain. i does that feel to be compared with an icon like that? i mean whenever your name is mentioned in the same company, you acclimate on the get. it will be an incredible
8:33 pm
achievement. we have waited so long as players, as the public, as people to cs in the final. this is the opportunity to grab with both hands. we have an easy chance to win our second major trophy as a country. the players that we have had over the years and produce, yeah, we feel proud to be representing them as well. we have to be excited for it, we've got to enjoy it, of course, any football match, we are all winners here. we are going to need every bit of that to get the job done on sunday. he every bit of that to get the 'ob done on sundayd every bit of that to get the 'ob done on sunday. he could see the celebrations _ done on sunday. he could see the celebrations across _ done on sunday. he could see the celebrations across the _ done on sunday. he could see the celebrations across the country i done on sunday. he could see the celebrations across the country at | celebrations across the country at how much it means to people, but it is notjust on the field that you have made an impression, but it is off the field, the way you have expressed yourselves, conduct yourselves, the solidarity you have shown for certain causes. how special is that for you to know that this team has made such an impression on people give in both on and off the field? it’s impression on people give in both on and off the field?— and off the field? it's been amazing. _ and off the field? it's been
8:34 pm
amazing, really. _ and off the field? it's been amazing, really. we - and off the field? it's been amazing, really. we don't| and off the field? it's been - amazing, really. we don't really take that all end. we see ourselves as just doing a take that all end. we see ourselves asjust doing a job, doing take that all end. we see ourselves as just doing a job, doing football, representing each have their across the country, that's been a real big part, it's been great to be here and see the connections we have made with the fans, the togetherness that we have created. i think we have shown that we are just normal lads. you know, we wear the badge with pride, but we represent the country in a way that makes everyone else proud as well, yeah, it is great to see, it is great to be a part out. like i said, that sort of stuff is probably things you take after the tournament. at the moment, everyone is so focused on the next again, the next moment, but we should be proud as a group of what we are doing and what we are achieving. like i mentioned earlier, we all want to win, so we know that the ultimate goal is to finish the job now. for sure, everyone should be proud of the way they have represented themselves. theirfriends, their family across the country should be
8:35 pm
proud. family across the country should be roud. . , family across the country should be roud. ., , ., ~' ., family across the country should be roud. ., , ., ~ ., proud. harry came talking to dan roan. thousands of school pupils across england will be allowed to arrive late to class on monday morning so they can watch the match. we can speak to caroline, she is the head teacher of the primary skill and hartlepool. 0ne head teacher of the primary skill and hartlepool. one of a number of school getting pupils along their monday morning line. let me to speak with you. what have you said to parents who have children at your school? indeed, what prompted it? we school? indeed, what prompted it? - told them that they can arrive any time before 10:30am on monday, so they want to be marked late, they want to get in any trouble for coming a bit late, and it's been prompted, really, because of the excitement that the children have felt right down to five—year—olds about the semi final, they all stayed up to watch that, they came to school the next day and they were quite visibly tired and a little bit fed up. they had little sleep and some children took the whole day off, so we felt that arranging for them to come in a bit later but at
8:36 pm
least mean they came to school at some point, but also it meant that they could enjoy some evening with they could enjoy some evening with the final with their parents not wearing about bedtimes. you posted this on facebook. _ wearing about bedtimes. you posted this on facebook. you _ wearing about bedtimes. you posted this on facebook. you have - wearing about bedtimes. you posted this on facebook. you have had - wearing about bedtimes. you posted this on facebook. you have had an i this on facebook. you have had an extraordinary amount of reaction. yeah! i wasn't expecting 4 million views when i went to bed last night thinking this has taken on quite a lot of interest, and we haven't anticipated it at all. we have had e—mails today from all over europe from people that have seen things on twitter and our other social media platforms, and it has been quite strange, but i think what it's done for the children is shown them that they are part of history. they are part of something that hasn't happened in this country in 55 years, and it could be something really, really special, and it will be special for the children on sunday whether england win or lewis, and i think that massive media
8:37 pm
attention that the schools had today has really helped to cement that for them. �* ., ., ,., has really helped to cement that for them. �* ., ., i: i: i: , them. and told about 4000 comments, never mind all— them. and told about 4000 comments, never mind all of— them. and told about 4000 comments, never mind all of that _ them. and told about 4000 comments, never mind all of that thousands - them. and told about 4000 comments, never mind all of that thousands of - never mind all of that thousands of shares and likes that you have had. a generally positive reaction. what about the parents themselves. haunt. about the parents themselves. now, we don't. sometimes _ about the parents themselves. now, we don't. sometimes it _ about the parents themselves. now, we don't. sometimes it feels - about the parents themselves. now, we don't. sometimes it feels like, i we don't. sometimes it feels like, robabl . we don't. sometimes it feels like, probably- the _ we don't. sometimes it feels like, probably. the pants _ we don't. sometimes it feels like, probably. the pants are _ we don't. sometimes it feels like, probably. the pants are very - probably. the pants are very positive- _ probably. the pants are very positive- i — probably. the pants are very positive. i think— probably. the pants are very positive. i think they - probably. the pants are very i positive. i think they expected probably. the pants are very - positive. i think they expected it from us because they know that as a staff we always try to think of things that will make life easier for children and our faculty, things that will make life easier for children and ourfaculty, and they are really pleased, because what they say as it will relieve that pressure on monday morning at trying to get the children out of bed at seven o'clock, not for everyone, but it's obviously some parents do still have to go to work and their children will be there, tired or not, at eight o'clock in the morning. but for quite a few, they will have a bit of a lion. i’m they will have a bit of a lion. i'm sure that _ they will have a bit of a lion. i'm sure that teachers might be grateful as well at that pressure is a little bit easier than normal for first thing on monday morning. he say they will not miss any class, so how will you deal at that? indie
8:38 pm
will not miss any class, so how will you deal at that?— will not miss any class, so how will you deal at that? we are 'ust going to come at this * you deal at that? we are 'ust going to come at this time _ you deal at that? we are 'ust going to come at this time of _ you deal at that? we are just going to come at this time of year, - to come at this time of year, normally, schools are spending a lot of time practising for sports days and putting in sports days for the parents and putting on musical performances in the hall, and unfortunately, none back and take place this year, it is very very different from the normal curriculum that happens. so this is going right up that happens. so this is going right up to the last minute, which as i would say in primary schools doesn't always happen in that way because of all that time performing and inviting parents in. so we were already quite ahead of that curriculum. also in the morning, we'rejust going to curriculum. also in the morning, we're just going to have a softer start to the day. it will give us time to reflect on the match the night before, extended assemblies to get the teachers a bit of a break, and then the maths and english sessions will be later.— sessions will be later. caroline reed, sessions will be later. caroline reed. lovely — sessions will be later. caroline reed, lovely to _ sessions will be later. caroline reed, lovely to speak - sessions will be later. caroline reed, lovely to speak with - sessions will be later. caroline | reed, lovely to speak with you. sessions will be later. caroline i reed, lovely to speak with you. i should think that children will have a lot to discuss and debate whatever the outcome. quite an education expense and inhabits up. thanks for
8:39 pm
being with us. enjoy the match out. thank you. we've spoken a lot about england but what about their opponents in sunday's final italy. the azzurri are unbeaten in 33 matches and with expectations running high fans are hoping the team can bring home their second euros trophy. 0ur correspondent mark lowen report from rome. it's notjust england impatient for football glory. italy's last european title came 53 years ago. but there's no national trauma here, since world cup victory followed in 1982. playing on both triumphs was goalkeeper dino zoff. how did he feel at that crowning moment? in heaven, he says. in the scramble for silverware, italy is hungry, and, he says, ready. translation: they don't - need my advice, but in any final you need to stay calm and positive, to believe you can do it. it takes me back to 1968.
8:40 pm
when you lift the trophy, you feel like a god. you're on cloud nine, and i think italy can do it again. they're a very strong team. and they know it. they've been transformed by roberto mancini since the shame of failing to qualify for the last world cup, giving the team youth and confidence. but with england's home advantage, perhaps the odds aren't in italy's favour. this time is an underdog. i think england has more to lose. i think of course if italy will lose, maybe we criticise, of course. but i think we have to be grateful for this month of happiness. that is the mood here. joy, as all ages rally behind the flag. football runs through the veins of italians, and italy's success has already inspired generations. yes, england is yearning for the game to come home,
8:41 pm
but in passion and dedication, they'll face a tough fight. italy is at football fever pitch. they've waited 53 years for european glory. now perhaps it's two days away. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. it's thought sunday's match could be the uk's most watched tv event ever breaking the record of 32 million who watched the 1966 world cup final. preparations are under way for parties in towns and cities across the country, and for some the day will take on even greater significance, asjon kay reports. it could be a honeymoon that's very short—lived at this stage! don't say that, don't say that! david and selene, just married. he's english, she's italian. they'll be watching the final with her family near venice. i think it's going to be the first test of marriage, to be honest. of course, i want italy to win, but even if england wins, it's my adopted country, you know...
8:42 pm
that's the spirit, that's the spirit! dave, are you going to be equally delighted italy win? well, i'm going to pretend to be, to keep the honeymoon going. but, you know, yeah, we'll see. it was always going to be a huge weekend at the three lions in bristol. but it's bittersweet. customer paul surridge died during the tournament. they clapped him during the semifinal, and they'll do the same again on sunday. it was his life, that was what he lived for. he lived for england. he was known to his mates as scooter. i hope we do it, notjust for england, but for scooter. it would mean so much to him if he were there. he would love it, absolutely love it. he's up there, watching. we're gonna win. whatever the result, sunday night will be remembered by millions for ever. and for all kinds of reasons. you have a bit of a fixture clash, then, don't you?
8:43 pm
brad and ellie's baby will be born this weekend. she is nearly two weeks late, and could well be induced on sunday. brad is a massive england fan. do you feel you are going to have his undivided attention this weekend? probably not, jon, if i am being honest. i doubt it quite a bit. but the football won't be on some kind of device in the delivery suite, i think that will be up possibility. brad? if push comes to shove, there is only one place i will be, which is obviously watching the game. 0nlyjoking. i don't think pushing and shoving will be the right phrase to use. their baby girl will be named bobbie, not after charlton or robson, but after robin, her big brother's choice.
8:44 pm
the headlines on bbc news... metroplitan officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to murdering sarah everard after snatching her from a street in south london. he raped and murdered her before dumping her body in kent. the head of the met said every officer felt betrayed by his actions. coronavirus infections across the uk return to levels not seen since january as more and more people are forced to self—isolate. focused on the task ahead england prepare for sunday's euro 2020 final their captain says the team must enjoy these moments of history. now on bbc news it's time for newswatch your views on the coverage of events by bbc news. your views on the covered events by us here on the bbc news.
8:45 pm
hello and welcome to news watch. coming up is bbc news scaring people unnecessarily over rising covid cases, or showing too much enthusiasm for relaxing restrictions? when will that time the right to stop broadcasting the totals of new cases, hospitalisations and covid debts? —— covid debts? since we first became aware of covid—19 early last year, there has been a division between those who are alarmed at the spread of virus and favour strict measures to reduce it and others who think the risks are exaggerated and that we should learn to that with covid as the restrictions as possible. that split became more stark than ever this week as the prime minister announced plans to sweep away most of the limits on our behaviour on the 19th ofjuly, just as data showed new cases had risen to over 30,000 on a single day for the first
8:46 pm
time since january. here is vicki young on wednesday.

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on