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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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hello, it's five o clock. this is bbc news, i'm vic d. here are your headlines. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard — he'll be sentenced in september. he had already admitted kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old — who went missing as she walked home in south london. sarah everard's killing prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely excitment�*s building ahead of england's euro 2020 final against italy on sunday. defenderjohn stones says it's a �*massive occasion�* for the team. it is huge. i think with it being at wembley as well, it is even more special. i think something we could only have dreamt of really at the start of the tournament.
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the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge and infection rates have hit their highest level in the uk since february. meanwhile the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england a surge in foreign holidays bookings as the government says fully—vaccinated uk travellers coming back from amber—list countries won't have to isolate afterjuly 19. and coming up — mark kermode takes a look at the latest cinematic releases — including marvel�*s black widow, that's in the film review. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens has pleaded guilty at the old bailey to the murder of sarah everard.
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the 33—year—old disappeared as she walked home in clapham in south london in march this year. her body was found a week later in woodland near ashford in kent. the head of the metropolitan police cressida dick said outside court she was �*sickened and angered�* by the crimes committed by couzens. our special correspondent lucy manning is at the old bailey, and she gave us an update on what happened in court. well, sarah everard�*s murder was one that chilled the entire country, and it resonated with women everywhere. but most importantly, it devastated her family. and her family were in court today to hear wayne couzens appear via video link from belmarsh prison. and he said the word guilty, when asked whether he murdered sarah everard. his lawyer said he felt genuine remorse and guilt, and that would be a burden for his whole life. but the real burden is for the everard family, who have lost a daughter, sarah, who they said brought them so much joy.
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what happened to sarah everard is what every woman fears — the fear of walking home alone. sarah was just walking home, and that night, the life that she hadn�*t fully lived, the 33 years of bringing pride and joy to herfamily, ended. the man responsible — wayne couzens, a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer, abusing his police promise to uphold the law. he broke it in the most brutal way. farfrom protecting sarah, the only danger she faced that night was couzens himself. we can now report more about what happened to sarah. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. on the 3rd of march, at 7am, he finished his shift protecting
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embassies and collected the car. that same evening, the last picture of sarah buying a bottle of wine before heading to herfriend�*s house in clapham. around nine that evening, she started to walk home, calling her boyfriend on the way. just after 9:30, on poynders road, a bus camera shows the vauxhall astra parked on the pavement with hazard lights flashing. two people are standing next to it. three minutes later, the car is pictured with the two front doors open. the hire car then heads out of london to kent, and it�*s returned at 8:30 in the morning. this is where sarah was last seen. when couzens was arrested, he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang for underpaying a prostitute, and they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver them another girl. he admitted kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over,
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alive and unharmed, to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he�*d kidnapped sarah, couzens had bought two builder�*s bags at b&q. her body was found in one. couzens lived 30 miles away in deal, married with two children — a man who served in the territorial army, in the civil nuclear constabulary. and two and a half years before killing sarah, he joined the met police. shame on you, shamel on you, shame on you! questions for the force — how could he have been cleared
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to carry a gun when he would go on to kill? and questions about what officers did when couzens was reported for exposing himself — twice, in a takeaway restaurant — just days before the murder. could he have been stopped? the ashen—faced metropolitan commissioner spoke to the everard family this morning to say how sorry she was for their loss. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man�*s crimes. they are dreadful. and everyone in policing feels betrayed. the murder of one woman resonated with thousands of others — demands that the streets must be safe, violence against women must stop, harassment and abuse must be taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish — that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took
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her future away. lucy manning, bbc news. the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken when she came out of court to make that statement. there are serious questions for her force and other officers as well. what exactly happened to that vetting of wayne couzens when he joined the met? we know he was vetted in his previousjob of guarding nuclear power stations. was he vetted again when he joined the met? and serious questions about that indecent exposure. what happened to that investigation? it was three days before he kidnapped sarah, it was the very day that he booked his hire car. and we now understand from the police regulator that there was another indecent exposure allegation in 2015 in kent. so, what did kent police do about that? more than anything, sarah everard�*s family want to know what happened to her,
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because wayne couzens, although he has pleaded guilty, still has not given the police any information. he only told them a fake story. he will be sentenced in september. our home editor mark easton is here. could the met have done more to stop it? ., �* , ., ., could the met have done more to stop it? ., , it? that's one of the serious questions — it? that's one of the serious questions that _ it? that's one of the serious questions that the _ it? that's one of the serious - questions that the metropolitan police have got to answer. this was a firearms officer who worked in parliamentary and diplomatic protector work for the civil nuclear constabulary, all of which required him to be vetted on a regular basis. scotland yard say that they have been back over the vetting that was done and in all of those occasions there was no information that they had that would�*ve the decision on those vetting so the allegation of indecent exposure that lucy mentioned from 2015 in kent, we don�*t know but it would appear that
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that did not come through as part of that did not come through as part of that vetting procedure. 0r presumably flags should have been raised. then again those two incidents shortly before sarah�*s murder when he decently exposed himself in south london and in kent, there will be questions as to whether the response to that was good enough. we know that two officers are still under investigation over that. and of course given that he went on to kidnap, rape and murdera course given that he went on to kidnap, rape and murder a woman he did not know, were all these allegations taken seriously enough? and is that what game cressida dick meant when she expressed written regrets on behalf of the force? is this so they wrong with the attitude of some officers? i think the cultural question, is there a mindset is wrong, is perhaps the more serious one in a way. there
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have been suggestions that there�*s a misogynistic element in police culture. there was anger, as you will remember, at the way that women were arrested at the vigil for sarah, lots of criticism of the police in that time. we now know that an officer who manned a cordon at the search for sarah had shared what�*s been described as an inappropriate graphic on social media, three officers have been served with gross misconduct notices around that, seven officers disciplined for sharing confidential information from the murder inquiry on a messaging app and there�*s people come as a segment who would say this is evidence of systemic misogyny. that said scotland yard has endured an enormous amount of criticism in recent months, but the investigation in this case i think is, it�*s been widely praised for being thorough and professional. we got a conviction in a relatively short space of time. and senior
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officers may feel justified short space of time. and senior officers may feeljustified in arguing that in this instance the bulk of the condemnation should be directed at the murderer, rather than those who brought him to justice. let�*s talk to dal babu, former chief superintendent at the metropolitan police. i ask you first of all your response to the fact that wayne couzens pleaded guilty to murder today? i think the family have dealt with this with — think the family have dealt with this with a huge amount of dignity and my— this with a huge amount of dignity and my condolences to the family. the fact_ and my condolences to the family. the fact that he has not pleaded not guilty— the fact that he has not pleaded not guilty allows this to conclude, but as mark_ guilty allows this to conclude, but as mark has said and lucy said previously— as mark has said and lucy said previously there's a still a lot of questions _ previously there's a still a lot of questions. he basically lied from the moment he was arrested, came up with some _ the moment he was arrested, came up with some story to try and cover his tracks _ with some story to try and cover his tracks 50 _ with some story to try and cover his tracks. so police will still want to know _ tracks. so police will still want to know the — tracks. so police will still want to know the details of what happened during _ know the details of what happened
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during the kidnapping and where sarah _ during the kidnapping and where sarah was meant to be buried, we still don't — sarah was meant to be buried, we still don't know those kinds of facts — still don't know those kinds of facts it— still don't know those kinds of facts. �* ~ . still don't know those kinds of facts. ~ ., facts. a met police officer, what turns them _ facts. a met police officer, what turns them into _ facts. a met police officer, what turns them into some _ facts. a met police officer, what turns them into some of - facts. a met police officer, what turns them into some of that i turns them into some of that kidnapped, raped and murdered as a young woman? it is kidnapped, raped and murdered as a young woman?— young woman? it is unprecedented. it's an young woman? it is unprecedented. it's an appalling _ young woman? it is unprecedented. it's an appalling situation _ young woman? it is unprecedented. it's an appalling situation and - young woman? it is unprecedented. it's an appalling situation and i - it's an appalling situation and i think— it's an appalling situation and i think the — it's an appalling situation and i think the questions will be raised around _ think the questions will be raised around vetting, how it affected was the vetting and clearly significant short— the vetting and clearly significant short cuts. we are now hearing those allegations _ short cuts. we are now hearing those allegations of indecent exposure going _ allegations of indecent exposure going back to 2015. i think there will be _ going back to 2015. i think there will be a — going back to 2015. i think there will be a need to ensure there is no other— will be a need to ensure there is no other crimes — will be a need to ensure there is no other crimes investigated, but i am very. _ other crimes investigated, but i am very. very— other crimes investigated, but i am very, very shocked at the level of vetting _ very, very shocked at the level of vetting allowing something to be, someone — vetting allowing something to be, someone involved in indecent exposure _ someone involved in indecent exposure and then involved in metropolitan police and having a
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weapon — metropolitan police and having a wea on. ~ . ~' metropolitan police and having a weaon. . ., ~ ., weapon. what he think about the numerous investigations - weapon. what he think about the numerous investigations now - weapon. what he think about the l numerous investigations now going weapon. what he think about the - numerous investigations now going on and other officers. in doing appropriately with reports of indecent exposure surrounding allegations of graphic images being shared on social media? it�*s allegations of graphic images being shared on social media?— shared on social media? it's very, very frightening — shared on social media? it's very, very frightening to _ shared on social media? it's very, very frightening to see _ shared on social media? it's very, very frightening to see how- very frightening to see how extensive some of these shortcomings are. extensive some of these shortcomings are the _ extensive some of these shortcomings are the very— extensive some of these shortcomings are. the very fact that you have a police _ are. the very fact that you have a police officer who has been convicted of murder is bad enough but then— convicted of murder is bad enough but then you have incredibly unprofessional behaviour from individuals sharing information and then you _ individuals sharing information and then you have the situation where indecent — then you have the situation where indecent exposure was not investigated and now appears there is an incident in kent. indecent exposure — is an incident in kent. indecent exposure is often initial event and it's really— exposure is often initial event and it's really important to deal with her because you deal with individuals who potentially could go on to commit further offences. mark easton described _ on to commit further offences. mark easton described as _ on to commit further offences. mark
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easton described as what _ on to commit further offences. i— easton described as what might be seen as a cultural problem in the metropolitan police and towards women, what would you say about that? ., , , women, what would you say about that? . y , ., that? certainly in my time at the olice that? certainly in my time at the police there _ that? certainly in my time at the police there was _ that? certainly in my time at the police there was a _ that? certainly in my time at the police there was a culture - that? certainly in my time at the police there was a culture of - police there was a culture of misogyny amongst some officers, there _ misogyny amongst some officers, there is— misogyny amongst some officers, there is issues of people treating people _ there is issues of people treating people unfairly. so i think we will need _ people unfairly. so i think we will need to— people unfairly. so i think we will need to make sure that we scrutinise the decision—making that's made by individunl— the decision—making that's made by individual officers. we need to have a cultural— individual officers. we need to have a cultural understanding of the organisation, and we need to ensure that its— organisation, and we need to ensure that its look— organisation, and we need to ensure that its look at and efficiently. the independent office of policing is doing _ the independent office of policing is doing that but we also need to make _ is doing that but we also need to make sure — is doing that but we also need to make sure the police are not marking their own _ make sure the police are not marking their own homework. they are getting people _ their own homework. they are getting people into _ their own homework. they are getting people into look at it. i was a public— people into look at it. i was a public order trained commander and i would _ public order trained commander and i would not _ public order trained commander and i would not have police that vigil in the same — would not have police that vigil in the same way it was. there are those of us _ the same way it was. there are those of us who— the same way it was. there are those of us who are — the same way it was. there are those of us who are experiencing policing who would've done things very differently. —— experience in policing _ differently. —— experience in policing. will it take on board the
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significant — policing. will it take on board the significant shortcomings from the sarah _ significant shortcomings from the sarah case and learn or will it continue _ sarah case and learn or will it continue to carry on in the same way? _ continue to carry on in the same wa ? . ~ continue to carry on in the same wa ? ., ,, , ., continue to carry on in the same wa ? ., ~' , ., , continue to carry on in the same wa ? ., ,, , ., , . continue to carry on in the same wa? ., , . ., ., way? thank you very much, thanks for talkin: to way? thank you very much, thanks for talking to us- — way? thank you very much, thanks for talking to us- a _ way? thank you very much, thanks for talking to us. a former— way? thank you very much, thanks for talking to us. a former chief _ talking to us. a former chief superintendent at the metropolitan police. the england team is getting ready for sunday�*s euro 2020 final against italy. the players have been training at st george�*s park in staffordshire. this afternoon, england defender john stones said the chance to play in the final was merely a dream at the start of the tournament. i think it�*s huge. with it being at wembley as well, it�*s even more special. i think it�*s something we could have only dreamt of, really, at the start of the tournament. we are here to try and win it and we have got this far now, and i think we have just grown and grown throughout the tournament. we have not put too much pressure on ourselves. i think we have overcome some tough tests over the past few years and learned a lot of things and gained a lot of experience from those games. and i think all the learning curves and experiences that we�*ve
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been through have got us to where we are on sunday. so it�*s a massive occasion. we have definitely thrived off the fans, and i suppose we�*re living their dream. right at the front, out on the pitch. and we can�*t thank them enough for all their support. so what about the opposition. before roberto mancini took charge, italy failed to reach the 2018 world cup finals. the failure shocked italian fans. but mancini has revived italy�*s fortunes. they have not lost in nearly three years and are now on a 33 game unbeaten run. let�*s find out what it is like working under the man credited with the current renaissance in italian football. nedum 0nuoha was a defender at manchester city when robert mancini was in charge there. they both felt a defence but who of the two is more defensive? i
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they both felt a defence but who of the two is more defensive?- the two is more defensive? i think southuate the two is more defensive? i think southgate is _ the two is more defensive? i think southgate is more _ the two is more defensive? i think southgate is more overtly - the two is more defensive? i think i southgate is more overtly defensive, but with roberto i think you look at the run of results they have been on and he can only see the ten goals and he can only see the ten goals and 33 games so it must be from a strong base. i would said they are quite similar. it�*s strong base. i would said they are quite similar-— quite similar. it's hard to imagine gareth losing _ quite similar. it's hard to imagine gareth losing it, _ quite similar. it's hard to imagine gareth losing it, but _ quite similar. it's hard to imagine gareth losing it, but roberta - quite similar. it's hard to imagine gareth losing it, but roberta has| gareth losing it, but roberta has lost it and you have experienced that. tell us about the character then. �* , , , that. tell us about the character then. h , _.,,., ., that. tell us about the character then. h , ,-~~ ., then. he's very, very passionate and has very high — then. he's very, very passionate and has very high standards. _ then. he's very, very passionate and has very high standards. i _ then. he's very, very passionate and has very high standards. i think - has very high standards. i think ellis is a plan in his mind and he expects that to be executed perfectly. does not necessarily work that way they could get quite frustrating because as a player he was obviously exceptional. when he goes on and sees people not being able to do the things you expect them to do it to be disappointed but ultimately very, very driven and the success that came from manchester
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city was tenuous because everybody knew it exactly what they needed to do. they could�*ve played blithely because they knew were each person was going to be and that was down to the amount of times he would force it into people, this is what i want, this is what i want. not sometimes, this is what i want. not sometimes, this is what i want all the time and you can see that with the italian team now. you can see that with the italian team now— you can see that with the italian team now. ., , , ., . ., you can see that with the italian team now. ., , . ., ., team now. really focus and clear and secific team now. really focus and clear and specific instructions. _ team now. really focus and clear and specific instructions. were _ team now. really focus and clear and specific instructions. were you - specific instructions. were you there when he was supposed to have had that fight with the training ground? i had that fight with the training round? . , had that fight with the training round? .,, ., �*, ,., ground? i was not. it's so interesting _ ground? i was not. it's so interesting because - ground? i was not. it's so interesting because with l ground? i was not. it's so - interesting because with mario it was like a son to roberto. so he wrote freedom of it differently. in the same way that if he was having a fight with him he might give him a cuddled the they had a very unique relationship. i don�*t know if it helped mario but i think to see anyway. helped mario but i think to see an a . �* ., helped mario but i think to see an a. ., ., , helped mario but i think to see an ,, anyway. both managers believe in outh and anyway. both managers believe in youth and giving _ anyway. both managers believe in youth and giving him _ anyway. both managers believe in youth and giving him players - anyway. both managers believe in youth and giving him players a - youth and giving him players a chance but who has the best record there you think? i
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chance but who has the best record there you think?— chance but who has the best record there you think? i think roberto has icked u- there you think? i think roberto has picked up a — there you think? i think roberto has picked up a site _ there you think? i think roberto has picked up a site it's _ there you think? i think roberto has picked up a site it's very _ there you think? i think roberto has picked up a site it's very much - there you think? i think roberto has picked up a site it's very much been| picked up a site it�*s very much been transitional, and in some ways he had to revert to that, but i think he has done it very well because all those players out there are exceptionally talented and incredibly passionate to play for the national team and be a part of the national team and be a part of the rich history that they have. with gareth southgate i don�*t think you necessarily had to but i do like it and it�*s a young team come about for me it�*s more so the fact that as you can see in the term it now you don�*t need to be playing forjust manchester united or chelsea or liverpool to get a chance to play because you look at the centre midfielder which has been incredible when a guy for west ham and a guy from leeds. i love that. and when a guy for west ham and a guy from leeds. i love that.— from leeds. i love that. and the fans do as _ from leeds. i love that. and the fans do as well. _ from leeds. i love that. and the fans do as well. everybody - from leeds. i love that. and the fans do as well. everybody talks j fans do as well. everybody talks with the bond in the italy team, everybody talks about the bond in the england team and i�*m just, maybe this is to sentimental but both italy and england have had a really tough 12, 16 months particularly in terms of covid. and both sets of players have kind of, i don�*t know,
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everyone has fallen in love with them, haven�*t they? the everyone has fallen in love with them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible. them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible- i— them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible. i think— them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible. i think for— them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible. i think for me _ them, haven't they? the outcome is incredible. i think for me looking - incredible. i think for me looking at this england site in the past i think england have had bigger stars and they have been relatable but when you look at this england team now, especially from the stuff they�*re trying to do off the field as well, you can feel the decay really get behind them and really good people, they are so happy to play for the country. so happy to play for the country. so happy to play for the fans and to be there and do it in a fully committed way. every game could be their last and we love that. exactly the same as the italians, and that level of passion is exactly what we needed after the tough 18 months that the whole world had to go through. still going through to some extent. but come sunday in front of 60,000 people, you forget the value of going out into a stadium and seeing people there and going to play in the european chip each of final it�*s going to be incredible. for those italians as well because they have
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not had big crowds either. it�*s going to be so special. not had big crowds either. it's going to be so special.- not had big crowds either. it's going to be so special. what is your expectation? _ going to be so special. what is your expectation? i— going to be so special. what is your expectation? i cannot _ going to be so special. what is your expectation? i cannot say _ expectation? i cannot say expectation _ expectation? i cannot say expectation but _ expectation? i cannot say expectation but my - expectation? i cannot say expectation but my hope| expectation? i cannot say. expectation but my hope is expectation? i cannot say - expectation but my hope is that england play well because if they do they can win the game. the expectation is it will be cultural and have a more rich history. and i can tell you for a fact the manager expects to win all those big games but like i say england play well and if they do it that will be the case. brilliant insight. thank you. the latest government data shows that in the past 21t hours, there were 35,707 new covid infections recorded across the uk and 29 deaths. nearly 45.7 million people have had their first coronavirus vaccine, and 34.3 million have received both doses. the coronavirus reproduction number, or r value, in england has increased slightly and is between 1.2 to 1.5, according to the latest
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government figures. last week, it was between 1.1 and 1.3. r represents the average number of people each covid—19 positive person goes on to infect. when the figure is above 1, an outbreak can grow exponentially but when it is below 1, it means the epidemic is shrinking. danny altmann, is professor of immunology at imperial college london. hello to you. what is the significance of this rise in the r number? i5 significance of this rise in the r number? , , _, . ., .,, number? is become much harder as we have these discussions _ number? is become much harder as we have these discussions a _ number? is become much harder as we have these discussions a year— number? is become much harder as we have these discussions a year ago - have these discussions a year ago when we had the r number because it linked to hospitalisations have infections and deaths. now our discussions are much more nuanced that we think much more hard about it because of the it�*s not translating into the kind of numbers we saw injanuary or february. but it is filtering through, and it�*s because concern and we should be
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worried. ~ , , ., , ., worried. why should we be worried from the health _ worried. why should we be worried from the health secretary, - worried. why should we be worried from the health secretary, when . worried. why should we be worried i from the health secretary, when the chief vertical officer and prime minister has warned us to expect that cases will rise, that there will be some hospitalisations, albeit on a much lesser scale and will be some more deaths? the fact that they have _ will be some more deaths? the fact that they have warned _ will be some more deaths? the fact that they have warned me _ will be some more deaths? the fact that they have warned me of - will be some more deaths? the fact that they have warned me of it - will be some more deaths? the fact that they have warned me of it does not make me any less worried. he comes down to the key term which was weakening of the link between infection and severe infection and deaths. we mean by that word weekend, how much it has been weakened, the data that i look at looks like a very steeply rising curve of infections and numbers going into hospital tend to rise quite steeply and my colleagues in hospitals are quite worried, quite battle scarred and fatigued. would rather not be up for another enormous wave of hospitalisations. would you therefore, bearing in mind
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what you have just said, would you delay the easing of restrictions on the 19th ofjuly in england? if. .. the 19th ofjuly in england? if... if mrjohnson — the 19th ofjuly in england? if... if mrjohnson or— the 19th ofjuly in england? if... if mrjohnson or any _ the 19th ofjuly in england? if... if mrjohnson or any of- the 19th ofjuly in england? if... if mrjohnson or any of his - if mrjohnson or any of his colleagues were prepared to have a zouma meeting ray coffee with me i would try and explain that sure we will want freedom, but maybe let�*s pass the big symbolism of the single freedom day and have a much more pragmatic stepwise easing of restrictions and looking at the data. ., ~' �* , restrictions and looking at the data. ., ~ �*, ., ,~ ., . data. you think there's any chance of them changing _ data. you think there's any chance of them changing their _ data. you think there's any chance of them changing their mind? - data. you think there's any chance | of them changing their mind? that the oli of them changing their mind? t'isgt the policy question, not a science question. i hope they will be looking at the data and taking some wise decisions. there are risks out there both with infection and overstretching of the nhs and on covid. what is driving this rise in use cases? —— new cases. the
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vaccines are truly amazing, they are far better than we expected. but we did not foresee delta variant, we have dealt a variant at the moment and to be fully protected from delta variant you really need to be a person who has made a good immune response to two full doses of the vaccine and we don�*t really have, we barely have the majority of our country on two full doses, and even of those some might still be vulnerable because they had a poor immune response. it can still break through. immune response. it can still break throu~h. . ~ immune response. it can still break throu~h. ., ,, , immune response. it can still break throu~h. . ~ , . ., through. thank you very much for talkin: to through. thank you very much for talking to us- _ the nhs covid contact tracing app used in england and wales may need to become less sensitive as restrictions change. the transport secretary grant shapps has said the end of social distancing on 19july may mean the app needs to change. there�*s been a huge rise in alerts as infections surge. our health correspondent jim reed reports. it�*s the alert you really don�*t want to get. 350,000 pings like this were sent
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in the last week ofjune, telling smartphone users in england they have been near someone who later tested positive for covid. this climbing centre in surrey had to close this week after 13 of its staff were pinged and couldn�*t come into work. it really just escalated to the point where we ended up with probably only two staff members that were available, so we had to act very quickly obviously. so what�*s been the knock—on effect for the business as a whole? i don�*t even know what�*s going to happen for the future, but as an immediate impact on the basis we�*re losing income again. and it�*s going to hurt. the nhs covid app uses bluetooth technology, a data signal that can work out roughly how far your phone is from another device and for what length of time. an algorithm then calculates how risky that contact is. above a certain level,
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and you get told so self—isolate for up to ten days. but unlike a call from test and trace, that instruction has always been advisory. an update to the app later this month could make that more explicit, then from mid—august anyone double jabbed in england will be able to avoid self—isolation completely. but the recent spike in covid cases is already leading to a sharp increase in smartphone alerts. ministers have suggested the app may be tweaked, perhaps allowing users to stay closer to a positive case for longer, before they are pinged. it's in the interest of us as a society to carry on doing the things which help protect each other. and we will make sure the app is reviewed so it is appropriate for the period of time we are living through, particularly now as we are getting into the majority of adults having been double vaccined. labour says any attempt to change the way the app works could be counterproductive. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector- and that is never a good idea, i
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that is an important protection. i'm equally worried by the fact that, driven, i think, - by the likely high numbers told to self—isolate, people, - the stories of people - deleting the app altogether. ministers say there is no real evidence that people are deleting the app en masse. a downing street source says people in england are still being encouraged to isolate if they get that ping. jim reed, bbc news. bookings for holidays and flights to amber list destinations have surged after it was announced yesterday that uk residents who are fully vaccinated will no longer need to quarantine on their return to england or northern ireland. immigration officials have said the government needs to warn passengers there will be long queues at the uk border as international travel continues to open up. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davis reports now it�*s time for a look
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at the weather with nick miller. hello. just limited sunny spells around today. some big clouds developing too with a few showers, thunderstorms, could be some slow—moving torrential downpours in some places. you see them scattered around here, more towards central and eastern parts of england, into scotland as well. but a shower is possible just about anywhere. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, could see a bit of patchy rain out of that. fairly warm, fairly humid, of course, particularly where you get to see a few of those sunny spells. a few heavy, thundery downpours continuing to this evening before easing. another spell of rain pushing into south—west england, parts of wales as the night goes on. and as for temperatures tonight, they are holding up. it is a mild, muggy night to come. it could be a bit misty in places too. a lot of cloud around for tomorrow morning, some sunny spells developing. an area of rain pushing across south—east england to east anglia, gradually clearing during the afternoon. chance of a shower, and again, scattered about into the afternoon and evening will be some heavy and perhaps thundery downpours.
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because hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard — he�*ll be sentenced in september. he had already admitted kidnapping and raping the 33 year old — who went missing a sshe walked home in south london. sarah everard�*s killing prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely excitment�*s building ahead of england�*s euro 2020 final against italy on sunday. defenderjohn stones says it�*s a �*massive occasion�* for the team. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge and infection rates have hit their highest level in the uk since february. sport and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, good afternoon. hi martine, we start with cycling because mark cavendish has made history at the tour de france. the manx missile won stage 13 — his ltth stage win of this year�*s tour — to equal eddy mercx�*s all—time record of 3a stage wins at the tour. a record, that for years, many thought wouldn�*t be equalled. these were the closing stages, cavendish in the green jersey, riding into cycling�*s history books, after the 219 kilometer stage from nimes to carcassonne. he was a late call up to the deceuninck quick—step team only a week before the race started — but he said equalling the record was what he�*d always dreamed of since he was a boy. now, over to wimbledon where world number one novak djokovic is taking on the canadian dennis shapovalov in the second men�*s semifinal of the day. 0ur reporter chetan parthak is there for us. how is that one going chetan?
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it isa it is a pretty tight start to the second semifinal, isn�*t it? i�*m second semifinal, isn't it? i'm havin: second semifinal, isn't it? i'm having to _ second semifinal, isn't it? i'm having to take _ second semifinal, isn't it? in having to take my eyes off second semifinal, isn't it? i�*m having to take my eyes off this second semifinal, isn't it? in having to take my eyes off this at the moment, it is not an easy thing to do because they are making a match of this against the world number one. and of course, at 5—4, he was serving for the first set and what a moment that would�*ve been but he doesn�*t he often does and us fight his way back. he is the greatest return on the history of tennis and showing us at the moment we are into a tie—break situation at the end of that first set and he is 4-2 the end of that first set and he is lt—2 and that at the moment and he is only dropped one set and that was against the british wild card and 19, jack draper and the first round and with that back hand and that
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really reliable service looked so strong but when he had the chance to serve for the set, he got tight, bit wild with some of this shotmaking, he has not been in this position before in a grand slam semifinal, can he find his way over the line. it looks like novak is going to get his way out of here. and awaiting the winner of this match is going to be the man was made history for italy, the first italian man to make it to the wimbledon final. to good in the end, winning this one and four sets. in the end, winning this one and foursets. he in the end, winning this one and four sets. he had come and won the queens title and he beat kam norrie and it�*s been a breakthrough slam for him now in the first round and on route, he couldn�*t quite get the job done in this and the italian was
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the better player this time. and gordon reed is in the final bidding for nandez in three sets and he has won the final of the men�*s double and jordan are going to face each other in the wheelchair doubles for the women, i�*ll bring you up—to—date with all of that and we are joined by tracy austin on sports day at 630. well, the full england squad trained at st george�*s park today. but not in front of the media — gareth southgate trying to keep his line—up and tactics under wraps perhaps. some of the players were put through a more gentle stretching programme yesterday, after the exertions of wednesday night�*s semi—final win over denmark. but, of course, they don�*t have long to recover, with only two days until kick—off at wembley. and as for the italians, they�*re still at their base near florence, before they fly to london tomorrow.
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england defenderjohn stones spoke to the media earlier. we�*ve watched lots of games and clips and try not to over flood our minds and concentrate on ourselves but, they seem to be very organised and very defensively solid and also have a lot of flair with the place of they�*ve got and that is why there in the finals and two great teams i believe deserve to be there and hopefully, i believe that we come out of the winning side on sunday. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. we�*ll have more for you in sportsday at half past six.
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that�*s talked to chris bryant, the head of tournament delivery and no pressure there and susan cooper, the volunteer manager. right, a massive undertaking, how do you prepare? it right, a massive undertaking, how do you prepare?— you prepare? it takes years of ”lannin you prepare? it takes years of planning and _ you prepare? it takes years of planning and teamwork- you prepare? it takes years of planning and teamwork and i you prepare? it takes years of. planning and teamwork and the you prepare? it takes years of - planning and teamwork and the euros has been no different to that. the final will be her eighth match and a 14 game at wembley stadium with fans and we have been able to refine and improve reparations each and every time to ensure that on sunday, the biggest occasion, we can deliver the very best event for all involved. what are the covid—19 protocols? unquestionably, covid—19 this change things we had a significant impact with the teams, the staff, the suppliers, the strict testing the most be adhered to in the fans, all
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8 euros matches, including the final on sunday are part of the government research programme and for all staff members need to show proof of the covid—19 status before entering the stadium and is very much remains the case for sunday. stadium and is very much remains the case for sunday-— case for sunday. once inside, they can chant. — case for sunday. once inside, they can chant, shout, _ case for sunday. once inside, they can chant, shout, cheer, _ case for sunday. once inside, they can chant, shout, cheer, chuck- case for sunday. once inside, they l can chant, shout, cheer, chuck beer at each other and in the air. yes. at each other and in the air. yes, but obviously. — at each other and in the air. yes, but obviously, you _ at each other and in the air. yes, but obviously, you don't - at each other and in the air. yes but obviously, you don't need to but obviously, you don�*t need to wear a mask, you are able to enjoy the game like normal and obviously, we are asking for where you can issue to social distancing in certain areas of the stadium wear masks, vessel will ask you to do but watch from the bull, you�*re able to enjoy the game like any other football match. ads, enjoy the game like any other football match.— enjoy the game like any other football match. �* ., ., , football match. a dozen volunteers, will they be — football match. a dozen volunteers, will they be doing _ football match. a dozen volunteers, will they be doing on _ football match. a dozen volunteers, will they be doing on sunday? - football match. a dozen volunteers, will they be doing on sunday? i - will they be doing on sunday? i think we've got a thousand think we�*ve got a thousand volunteers and so, they�*re doing an amazing job on the pitch but volunteers and so, they're doing an amazing job on the pitch but amazing volunteer team _ amazing job on the pitch but amazing volunteer team and _ amazing job on the pitch but amazing volunteer team and behind _ amazing job on the pitch but amazing volunteer team and behind the - amazing job on the pitch but amazing | volunteer team and behind the scenes of the _ volunteer team and behind the scenes of the pitch _ volunteer team and behind the scenes
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of the pitch. making sure that it is as good _ of the pitch. making sure that it is as good in— of the pitch. making sure that it is as good in the event as can be and we have _ as good in the event as can be and we have a — as good in the event as can be and we have a chance 14 and are members across _ we have a chance 14 and are members across the _ we have a chance 14 and are members across the site and welcoming visitors — across the site and welcoming visitors and volunteers in a medium teams. _ visitors and volunteers in a medium teams. and — visitors and volunteers in a medium teams, and around 50 volunteers making _ teams, and around 50 volunteers making sure that spectators entering the park— making sure that spectators entering the park have a great welcome and a great _ the park have a great welcome and a great atmosphere. will the park have a great welcome and a great atmosphere.— great atmosphere. will be good for them to say that _ great atmosphere. will be good for them to say that we _ great atmosphere. will be good for them to say that we sort _ great atmosphere. will be good for them to say that we sort the - great atmosphere. will be good for them to say that we sort the final. them to say that we sort the final out. �* , ,., , them to say that we sort the final out. absolutely, i cannot sing our volunteers _ out. absolutely, i cannot sing our volunteers praise _ out. absolutely, i cannot sing our volunteers praise is _ out. absolutely, i cannot sing our volunteers praise is enough. - out. absolutely, i cannot sing ourj volunteers praise is enough. they have _ volunteers praise is enough. they have done — volunteers praise is enough. they have done so much and it's really the icing — have done so much and it's really the icing on — have done so much and it's really the icing on the cake that in the during _ the icing on the cake that in the during the — the icing on the cake that in the during the final. not every single one of— during the final. not every single one of them is in england supporter but it— one of them is in england supporter but it is— one of them is in england supporter but it is a _ one of them is in england supporter but it is a part of history and i'm so proud — but it is a part of history and i'm so proud of— but it is a part of history and i'm so proud of the team and in a really difficult _ so proud of the team and in a really difficult circumstances, covid—19 is throwing _ difficult circumstances, covid—19 is throwing a — difficult circumstances, covid—19 is throwing a lot of curveballs is meant — throwing a lot of curveballs is meant to— throwing a lot of curveballs is meant to take place last year but
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the volunteers are going to be stuck in massive _ the volunteers are going to be stuck in massive events and really make history— in massive events and really make history it _ in massive events and really make history it is — in massive events and really make history it is on to thank each and everyone — history it is on to thank each and everyone of— history it is on to thank each and everyone of them stop i to to watch the match? — everyone of them stop i to to watch the match? great question. unfortunately no. and with the knowledge that they will be up to watch _ knowledge that they will be up to watch the match themselves, that makes _ watch the match themselves, that makes even more special. they will come _ makes even more special. they will come along, — makes even more special. they will come along, do a great role and then they will— come along, do a great role and then they will head home shortly after they will head home shortly after the kick—off. will they will head home shortly after the kick-off-_ the kick-off. will miss the first half. the kick-off. will miss the first half- yep. _ the kick-off. will miss the first half. yep, unfortunately. - the kick-off. will miss the first half. yep, unfortunately. they| the kick-off. will miss the first. half. yep, unfortunately. they had to show the _ half. yep, unfortunately. they had to show the covid-19 _ half. yep, unfortunately. they had to show the covid-19 status, - half. yep, unfortunately. they had to show the covid-19 status, what| to show the covid—19 status, what does that mean in practical terms? we really want everyone to enjoy themselves will want everyone to be prepared and safe. and they are of the stadium, you need to have your nhs covid—19 pass a lateral flow test ready as you approach the stadium and they would then check the status before checking you�*ve got a ticket in the come on to the
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stadium and going to the stadium for what i do think is going to be an incredible occasion, a very special occasion for football. there s no doubt that if you ve got tickets for sunday s euro 2020 final between england and italy, you are very lucky indeed. the match at wembley is one of the biggest 0ur correspondent steve holden is here. to and a pair of tickets on one side for £15,000 incredible amounts. and across social media in the secondary ticket websites which act as an online marketplace that have been investigated in the past. it is important in many people might not realise this, it is illegal in the uk to resell their football tickets. it has been since 1994. that is most
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the cloud gives you permission. either way, the cloud gives you permission. eitherway, if the cloud gives you permission. either way, if they risked trying to buy a ticket, someone wants to pay that much money, how do you even know that real. to that much money, how do you even know that real.— know that real. to but if it's lecit. know that real. to but if it's legit- and — know that real. to but if it's legit. and that _ know that real. to but if it's legit. and that some - know that real. to but if it's| legit. and that some people know that real. to but if it's - legit. and that some people sing don't even _ legit. and that some people sing don't even try — legit. and that some people sing don't even try and _ legit. and that some people sing don't even try and use _ legit. and that some people sing don't even try and use some - legit. and that some people sing - don't even try and use some common don�*t even try and use some common sense. many say is a dumb risk to take. ., �* , , , ., take. you've been seeing this, what have they been _ take. you've been seeing this, what have they been saying? _ take. you've been seeing this, what have they been saying? almost - have they been saying? almost sellin: it have they been saying? almost selling it for — have they been saying? almost selling it for £9,000 _ have they been saying? almost selling it for £9,000 for - have they been saying? almost selling it for £9,000 for two i selling it for £9,000 for two tickets and he said the reason was because he had two children he didn�*t want to choose which one to take to the game. i did not believe him. bottom line is you�*re making money. another person was selling four tickets and they did not want to see england potentially when it wembley so we�*d rather sell the tickets. and another guy, his mate got in one it is made tried to pay them off and sell it out for nearly 7000. in the bottom line is, what
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are they are doing, making money? it is illegal to do. what net what did they say? it is very clear that any tickets offered on the different platforms are breaching the terms and conditions and basically, they said they will take action and will take action and cancel tickets when identified, it threatens legal actions against third parties were found to be selling them. in the uk, all trading standards will invest any —— investigate in any of this activity ended government department will look at these platforms and this statement was very simple. those looking to attend the final should think twice before buying a ticket online that might be a scam. i think the final thing is it�*s common sense, isn�*t it? when ticket experts that if you can�*t get a ticket through an official channel and in this case it is ua foot and it is sold out, then don�*t buy it,
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just go to the pub and just watch at your house, don�*t risk losing thousands of pounds are being turned away at the door because your ticket is not real. i am going to watch it at my house or the pump.- is not real. i am going to watch it at my house or the pump. thank you, steve -- pub- — hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode. rounding out the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home. one of the most intriguing releases of the week is tove. a finnish biopic about moomin�*s
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creator, tove jansson. alma poysti plays the swedo—finnish finish author, painter, novelist and illustrator inside an intelligent film which was their entry for international feature at the recent 93rd academy awards. i�*m extremely happy. 0h! well, pardon me. are you all right? i thought finland was a quiet place. it's always like this. having failed to gain recognition for the paintings which she believes define her, sculptor�*s daughterjansson turns rather reluctantly to the strange doodles and secret languages of the moomins to earn a living. meanwhile, her personal passions are inflamed by theatre director vivica bandler, played with fiery relish by krista kosonen, of whom she falls head over heels in love.
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while political philosopher atos wirtanen offers more steadfast, if less thrilling affections. sensitively written by eeva putro, tove offers an engrossing portrait of a rebellious spirit whose unconventional outsider status ironically enabled her to connect with generations of readers. having first created her strangely hippo—like characters as a distraction from the horrors of world war ii, moomins became international fairy tale icons, gracing books, stage shows, tv series, theme parks and more. handsomely lensed and focusing on the formative postwar decade, tove benefits from an electrifying performance from poysti who dances her way through the ups and downs of her character�*s life, which she describes as a wonderful adventure that one should exploit all its twists and turns. that is something this movie does with a plum.
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you can find it in cinemas now.

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