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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines... metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard. he'll be sentenced in september. he had already admitted kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old, who went missing on a walk in south london. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man's crimes. they are dreadful. the killing of sarah everard prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge. but as infections rise, the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england. a huge surge in bookings forforeign
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holidays as the government says fully vaccinated uk travellers coming back from amber list countries won't have to isolate afterjuly 19th. local authorities across england say they face a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets over the next three years. the olympic flame arrives in tokyo, two weeks before the games. but no spectators are allowed. and as anticipation continues to build for the euro 2020 final, we'll be hearing from some of the players ahead of england vs italy. welcome to bbc news. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens has pleaded guilty at the old bailey to the murder
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of sarah everard. the 33—year—old disappeared as she walked home in clapham in south london in march this year. her body was found a week later in woodland near ashford in kent. the head of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, said outside court she was �*sickened and angered' by the crimes committed by couzens. our special correspondent lucy manning is at the old bailey, and she gave us an update on what happened in court today and what the reaction was. well, sarah everard's murder was one that chilled the entire country, and it resonated with women everywhere. but most importantly, it devastated her family. and her family were in court today to hear wayne couzens appear via video link from belmarsh prison. and he said the word guilty, when asked whether he murdered sarah everard. his lawyer said he felt genuine remorse and guilt, and that would be a burden for his whole life. but the real burden is for the everard family, who have lost a daughter, sarah, who they said brought them so much joy.
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what happened to sarah everard is what every woman fears — the fear of walking home alone. sarah was just walking home, and that night, the life that she hadn't fully lived, the 33 years of bringing pride and joy to herfamily, ended. the man responsible — wayne couzens, a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer, abusing his police promise to uphold the law. he broke it in the most brutal way. farfrom protecting sarah, the only danger she faced that night was couzens himself. we can now report more about what happened to sarah. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. on the 3rd of march, at 7am, he finished his shift protecting
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embassies and collected the car. that same evening, the last picture of sarah buying a bottle of wine before heading to herfriend's house in clapham. around nine that evening, she started to walk home, calling her boyfriend on the way. just after 9:30, on poynders road, a bus camera shows the vauxhall astra parked on the pavement with hazard lights flashing. two people are standing next to it. three minutes later, the car is pictured with the two front doors open. the hire car then heads out of london to kent, and it's returned at 8:30 in the morning. this is where sarah was last seen. when couzens was arrested, he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang for underpaying a prostitute, and they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver them another girl. he admitted kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over,
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alive and unharmed, to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he'd kidnapped sarah, couzens had bought two builder's bags at b&q. her body was found in one. couzens lived 30 miles away in deal, married with two children — a man who served in the territorial army, in the civil nuclear constabulary. and two and a half years before killing sarah, he joined the met police. shame on you, shamel on you, shame on you! questions for the force — how could he have been cleared to carry a gun when he would go
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on to kill? and questions about what officers did when couzens was reported for exposing himself — twice, in a takeaway restaurant — just days before the murder. could he have been stopped? the ashen—faced metropolitan commissioner spoke to the everard family this morning to say how sorry she was for their loss. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man's crimes. they are dreadful. and everyone in policing feels betrayed. the murder of one woman resonated with thousands of others — demands that the streets must be safe, violence against women must stop, harassment and abuse must be taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish — that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took
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her future away. lucy manning, bbc news. the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken when she came out of court to make that statement. there are serious questions for her force and other officers as well. what exactly happened to that vetting of wayne couzens when he joined the met? we know he was vetted in his previousjob of guarding nuclear power stations. was he vetted again when he joined the met? and serious questions about that indecent exposure. what happened to that investigation? it was three days before he kidnapped sarah, it was the very day that he booked his hire car. and we now understand from the police regulator that there was another indecent exposure allegation in 2015 in kent. so, what did kent police do about that? more than anything, sarah everard's family want to know
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what happened to her, because wayne couzens, although he has pleaded guilty, still has not given the police any information. he only told them a fake story. he will be sentenced in september. that was lucy manning reporting there from the old bailey. following that guilty plea from wayne couzens, the independent office of police complaints has published an update in investigations into new police complaints connected to sarah everard's death. in total, the iopc has served 12 gross misconduct or misconduct notices on police officers from several forces. they include an investigation into alleged met police failures to investigate two allegations of indecent exposure linked to pc couzens in london in february 2021. an investigation into alleged kent police failures to investigate an indecent exposure incident linked to pc couzens in kent in 2015.
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and an investigation into allegations that officers from a number of forces breached standards of professional behaviour while sharing information linked to the prosecution of pc couzens via a messaging app. our home editor mark easton is here. you believe there may be another allegation that we have not even covered in that list. the allegation that we have not even covered in that list.— covered in that list. the list including — covered in that list. the list including the _ covered in that list. the list including the list _ covered in that list. the list including the list in - covered in that list. the list including the list in the - covered in that list. the list including the list in the eye | covered in that list. the list - including the list in the eye seat was another investigation, three officers have been served with gross misconduct notices over the sharing of what they call an inappropriate graphic on social media. in a way, i think that that allegation, we don't know what this inappropriate graphic was, but clearly there has been a lot of pressure on the metropolitan police and police more generally over a culture of misogyny. a culture of racism, a culture of corruption, as we have heard. and i think that that is where the police
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are at their most vulnerable in relation to this. but their reputation, if it is thought that there is a culture that does not take things as seriously as they should, in this case. i would make the point that actually the investigation into sarah everard's murder was thorough and professional, they achieved, they saw through wayne couzens's lies quickly and achieved a guilty plea on all charges. this was the relatively speedy conviction that everybody wanted. but as that list of investigations that the iopc has been doing illustrates, and indeed questions about the vetting of wayne couzens, who was a firearms officer, parliamentary and diplomatic protection duties, that is where the police are more vulnerable. in terms of the culture that goes on. whether
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treating the crime as seriously as they should have done? the two counts of indecent exposure that you mentioned, that matter still under investigation from february involving metropolitan police officers. did they take that seriously enough? to officers. did they take that seriously enough?- officers. did they take that seriously enough? officers. did they take that seriousl enou~h? ., . , ., seriously enough? to add insult to in'u for seriously enough? to add insult to injury for many _ seriously enough? to add insult to injury for many people, _ seriously enough? to add insult to injury for many people, when - seriously enough? to add insult to i injury for many people, when women did guard protesting to try to reclaim the streets, as it was called, one of the movements involved, there was criticism of how the police managed those events. indeed, the sarah everard feature on clapham common, there was a lot of criticism for the way the metropolitan police arrested women and dragged them away in handcuffs. it was regarded as unnecessary use of force. the review into the operations of that to exonerate the metropolitan police, it did exonerate them. fine awful lot of women, it seems to be symptomatic of a force that did not take crimes
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against women seriously enough. the metropolitan police can say that this was one officer who did this, you cannot say that all officers are corrupt. and that has never been said. but when you add up the institutional corruption allegations or findings that came out of the daniel morgan report, when you look at the criticism of how the deaths of bebe henry and nicole smallman, two black women were investigated compared with the murder investigation for sarah everard, it starts to build a picture that people will say there is a contextual problem here. ultimately, the most important _ contextual problem here. ultimately, the most important thing _ contextual problem here. ultimately, the most important thing is _ the most important thing is retaining public confidence and trust in the police. we have a system of policing by consent in this country, we don't generally have armed officers for instance, thatis have armed officers for instance, that is the way we like to do it. and that requires there to be a trusting relationship between the public and the police. in fact, there has been a decline in some
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measures of confidence and trust over the last few years, but nothing very, very significant. and i do think that that will be the real question — can the police retain broad public confidence and trust after, as you say, this raft of scandals and problems. because if they lose that, then we really are in deep trouble. for they lose that, then we really are in deep trouble.— they lose that, then we really are in deep trouble. for the moment, thank ou in deep trouble. for the moment, thank you very — in deep trouble. for the moment, thank you very much. _ in deep trouble. for the moment, thank you very much. mark - in deep trouble. for the moment, | thank you very much. mark easton in deep trouble. for the moment, - thank you very much. mark easton our home editor. felicia willow is the chief executive of the fawcett society, a charity that campaigns for gender equality. thank you very much forjoining us. first of all, let's look at this issue of keeping women safe. we saw all of those protests, women demanding the right to be safe on the streets. what has changed since sarah everard's death? indie the streets. what has changed since sarah everard's death?— sarah everard's death? we had the announcement _ sarah everard's death? we had the announcement that _ sarah everard's death? we had the announcement that misogyny - sarah everard's death? we had the announcement that misogyny is . sarah everard's death? we had the i announcement that misogyny is going to be trialled as a hate crime from the autumn. 0ther to be trialled as a hate crime from the autumn. other than that, i would not say that we have seen a huge amount of change. i think what
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happened after sarah's murder was this enormous outpouring of stories, of grief, this fear that women feel every day. and it is still not being taken seriously. i think that is really the main message is that we need to take this seriously. your previous guest talked about a culture of misogyny within the police, i would say we have a culture of misogyny throughout our entire society. and we need to address that head—on so that we don't have women feeling this way constantly all the time. it is just not ok. 50 constantly all the time. it is 'ust not ok. ., constantly all the time. it is 'ust not ok, ., , constantly all the time. it is 'ust notok. ., , , , not ok. so how is misogyny tackled then? across _ not ok. so how is misogyny tackled then? across society _ not ok. so how is misogyny tackled then? across society and _ not ok. so how is misogyny tackled then? across society and within - then? across society and within police forces? is it a simple matter of making sure women are better represented? that it is a 50—50 mix in terms of personnel? ida. represented? that it is a 50-50 mix in terms of personnel?— in terms of personnel? no, it is a lot more convoluted _ in terms of personnel? no, it is a lot more convoluted than - in terms of personnel? no, it is a lot more convoluted than that. it| lot more convoluted than that. it begins with gender stereotypes. fawcett figure major project into gender stereotypes last year which revealed gender stereotypes start in a very early age is that we have to be addressing male violence against
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women and girls, the fact that it is built on these gender stereotypes which are embedded in children, very young children and a very young age. it will take significant effort to really start changing that narrative, changing how men and boys see women and girls and really recognising that this is a massive problem. it is something i think people like to dismiss, to laugh off, to say equality, inequality is a thing of the past. actually we have seen male violence against women be really endemic in the society. jess phillips mp read out the names of all the women being murdered by men on international women's day, i think you are not 118 names. i think in the midst of this, i think we need to recognise that sarah everard's murder was one of many women who have been murdered by men and that we have to do something about this, we need to take it seriously. about this, we need to take it seriously-— about this, we need to take it seriousl. �* ., , ., ., , seriously. and many of those deaths will be at the — seriously. and many of those deaths will be at the hands _ seriously. and many of those deaths will be at the hands of _ seriously. and many of those deaths will be at the hands of someone - seriously. and many of those deathsj will be at the hands of someone that women nose. it is not stranger danger is it? it
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women nose. it is not stranger danger is it?— women nose. it is not stranger danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion er danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion per year. _ danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion per year. we _ danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion per year. we don't - danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion per year. we don't have i danger is it? it cost al society 66 billion per year. we don't have a| billion per year. we don't have a figure for what whip violence against women and girls cost. that is the financial cost, it is not the emotional cost of these women, their friends —— it costs our society 66 billion per year. we don't have a figure for what violence against women and girls costs. recognise the problem for what it is and see the investment and effort that we need to change it. investment and effort that we need to change it— to change it. some people say that feminism's — to change it. some people say that feminism's job _ to change it. some people say that feminism's job is _ to change it. some people say that feminism's job is done, _ to change it. some people say that feminism's job is done, what - to change it. some people say that feminism's job is done, what is - to change it. some people say thatl feminism's job is done, what is your feminism'sjob is done, what is your reply? i feminism's “0b is done, what is your rel ? ., , feminism's “0b is done, what is your rel? ., ., reply? i would say they are not -a in: reply? i would say they are not paying attention. _ reply? i would say they are not paying attention. there - reply? i would say they are not paying attention. there are - reply? i would say they are not - paying attention. there are massive inequalities in our society and feminism is not needed as it ever was. we still have a massive pay gap between men and women, we still see this endemic violence against women and girls, we see women in every walk of life experience inequality thatis walk of life experience inequality that is really unacceptable. we have just had a pandemic where the
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interest of women were completely not represented and so the inequality between men and women has increased during that period. as has all forms of inequality gotten worse. feminism is a force that is needed now more than ever, and to be honest, what we need to see is solidarity. we need everybody to recognise this is a problem and work together. and to spend more time on addressing what is wrong rather than arguing about what needs to be done. we need to take action and work together on this. it is we need to take action and work together on this.— together on this. it is not 'ust a woman's problem. i together on this. it is notjust a woman's problem. absolutely l together on this. it is notjust a i woman's problem. absolutely not. together on this. it is notjust a - woman's problem. absolutely not. and then i woman's problem. absolutely not. and then i probably — woman's problem. absolutely not. and then i probably to _ woman's problem. absolutely not. and then i probably to completely - woman's problem. absolutely not. and then i probably to completely agree i then i probably to completely agree with you on this, for a change. —— i am probably allowed to completely agree with you on this for a change. i think a lot of men do understand. i think a lot of men do understand. i think a lot of men do understand. i think they don't know what they need to do. we are talking about gender stereotypes, we need to be talking to boys and a very young age but also to girls was that we need to be working with teachers, with early years providers, obviously the government, even people who market products to children and the
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messages they are sending to parents. following those stages. and throughout life, recognising these different messages being sent and questioning some of that. as you say, we know that gender stereotypes, the reason that suicide is a no.1 of death in men under a5, thatis is a no.1 of death in men under a5, that is not a good thing for men. these things need to be addressed, and having equality between men and women is something that is good for everyone. i think it does need effort and attention at every level, and there are things that every man can do to get involved to recognise what is going on, to open their eyes, to listen to women about their experiences and what they see and to take the action they can to change the world, to change our society. felicity, thank you very much. bookings for holidays and flights to amber list destinations have surged after it was announced yesterday that uk residents who are fully vaccinated will no longer need to quarantine on their return to england or northern ireland. immigration officials have said the government needs to warn passengers there will be long queues at the uk border as international
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travel continues to open up. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davis reports. international travel is opening up. if you have been fully vaccinated in the uk, soon, you won't need to quarantine if you travel from an amber list country. the announcement seems to have been enough to persuade some to start booking. within an hour of the announcement, we saw a 53% increase in traffic to skyscanner, following the same time the day before. and that isjust, i mean, a clear sign of the huge appetite that there is for travel. the policy will start on the 19th ofjuly in england and the 26th ofjuly in northern ireland. scotland and wales are yet to say whether they will do the same thing. more passengers will be welcome for the travel industry, but there are worries about queues like these, seen early in the year too. 0ne union has already warned it will be impossible
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to prevent even longer queues without more resources. the place to expect queues are at the airport you are coming from. once you get back to the uk, all of that is starting to be automated. the real backlog would potentially be at the place you leave from, rather than when you get back to the uk. people should expect, i think, more disruption than usual, but i know everyone is working very hard to minimise those cues. but i know everyone is working very hard to minimise those queues. some will be left out — passengers will still need to buy tests, which will price some out of going abroad. many under—30s are still not fully vaccinated, and the policy currently only applies to those who have been jabbed in the uk. aria lives in the uk but had both of her vaccines in america, so the old amber rules, including the need to quarantine, will still apply to her. i just want to see my family. it is really hard, i had an approved vaccine, butjust because they were administered in the us, i am treated completely differently. other countries have already started accepting vaccination certificates
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from around the world. how difficult would it be for the uk to accept other countries' vaccination certificates? if we look at countries in the european bloc, we have digital vaccination certificates being issued, and it is also important that the uk is able to accept non—digital certificates as well. there are many countries around the world issuing certification in paper form. and there are countries accepting that, so no reason the uk cannot in the early days. the government has said that it hopes to have some news on recognising people vaccinated in the eu in a couple of weeks. for some, foreign skies are a little closer. for others, they seem as far away as ever. caroline davis, bbc news. and coming up in a few minutes, we'll be answering your questions on all things travel—related. we'll be joined by simon calder, travel correspondent for the independent, and lisa minot, travel editor of the sun. that's at 2.30pm.
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we are well provided for. the coronavirus reproduction number, or r value, in england has increased slightly and is between 1.2 to 1.5, according to the latest government figures. last week, it was between 1.1 and 1.3. r represents the average number of people each covid—19 positive person goes on to infect. when the figure is above one, an outbreak can grow exponentially but when it is below one, it means the epidemic is shrinking. the nhs covid contact tracing app used in england and wales may need to become less sensitive as restrictions change. the transport secretary grant shapps has said the end of social distancing on 19thjuly may mean the app needs to change. there's been a huge rise in alerts as infections surge. our health correspondent jim reed has more. it's the alert you really don't want to get. 350,000 pings like this were sent in the last week ofjune, telling smartphone users in england
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they have been near someone who later tested positive for covid. this climbing centre in surrey had to close this week after 13 of its staff were pinged and couldn't come into work. it really just escalated to the point where we ended up with probably only two staff members that were available, so we had to act very quickly obviously. so what's been the knock—on effect for the business as a whole? i don't even know what's going to happen for the future, but there's an immediate impact on the basis we're losing income again. and it's going to hurt. the nhs covid app uses bluetooth technology, a data signal that can work out roughly how far your phone is from another device and for what length of time. an algorithm then calculates how risky that contact is. above a certain level, and you get told so self—isolate above a certain level, and you get told to self—isolate for up to ten days.
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but unlike a call from test and trace, that instruction has always been advisory. an update to the app later this month could make that more explicit, then from mid—august anyone double jabbed in england will be able to avoid self—isolation completely. but the recent spike in covid cases is already leading to a sharp increase in smartphone alerts. ministers have suggested the app may be tweaked, perhaps allowing users to stay closer to a positive case for longer, before they are pinged. it's in the interest of us as a society to carry on doing the things which help protect each other. and we will make sure the app is reviewed so it is appropriate for the period of time we are living through, particularly now as we are getting into the majority of adults having been double vaccined. labour says any attempt to change the way the app works could be counterproductive. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector- and that is never a good idea, i that is an important protection. i'm equally worried by the fact
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that, driven, i think, - by the likely high numbers told to self—isolate, people, - the stories of people - deleting the app altogether. ministers say there is no real evidence that people are deleting the app en masse. a downing street source says people in england are still being encouraged to isolate if they get that ping. jim reed, bbc news. there s no doubt that if you've got tickets for sunday's euro 2020 final between england and italy, you are very lucky indeed. the match at wembley is one of the biggest sporting events in years, and it's sold—out. but that hasn't stopped tickets for the match? being advertised for thousands of pounds online and across social media. uefa and the uk government are warning people not to get caught out by touts. our correspondent steve holden is here. iam being i am being pestered all the time by one of our producers to get him a ticket. not much chance of it. what prices are they going for?—
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prices are they going for? online, astronomical _ prices are they going for? online, astronomical figures. _ prices are they going for? online, astronomical figures. i _ prices are they going for? online, astronomical figures. i looked - prices are they going for? online, astronomical figures. i looked on | astronomicalfigures. i looked on one secondary ticket website which is essentially a big marketplace being offered for £15,000 for one ticket. generally, they start at about 2005 and pounds £3000, way face value. —— 2000 £500. reselling a football ticket in the uk for profit is illegal and has been for decades. unless the club or the organiser of the tournament has given you permission to resell it, you should not be making profit from your ticket. you should not be making profit from our ticket. ., , ., , you should not be making profit from our ticket. ., , .,, ., your ticket. how can people do it, then? they _ your ticket. how can people do it, then? they just — your ticket. how can people do it, then? theyjust have _ your ticket. how can people do it, then? theyjust have to _ your ticket. how can people do it, then? theyjust have to very - then? theyjust have to very secretively? then? they 'ust have to very secretively?— then? they 'ust have to very secretivel ? , . ,, ., �* secretively? they take their don't the ? secretively? they take their don't they? they _ secretively? they take their don't they? they take _ secretively? they take their don't they? they take their _ secretively? they take their don't they? they take their chance - secretively? they take their don't they? they take their chance and | they? they take their chance and hope it is not checked on the door or scrutinise. we will come to what uefa said in a moment, but generally people across social media, especially at the moment, are offering tickets left right and centre. you don't know whether that person that you engage with is going to be a bot, an automated account, you don't know whether you will get the ticket in your pocket at the end
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of the day. it is really risky. some would say a stupid risk to even engage in trying to get one. you have been _ engage in trying to get one. you have been talking to genuine people are saying their tickets. what are they saying to you about why they are doing it? i they saying to you about why they are doing it?— are doing it? i spoke to three --eole. are doing it? i spoke to three people- one _ are doing it? i spoke to three people. one person - are doing it? i spoke to three people. one person said - are doing it? i spoke to three people. one person said his. are doing it? i spoke to three - people. one person said his mate had got him a ticket and his mate had decided he would rather make some money off this so bumped off his friend. and he got £4800 for the ticket to the final. another person was selling two tickets on ebay. i askedis was selling two tickets on ebay. i asked is this legit? why are you doing this? he said "i have two children and don't want to choose which child has to come." the third person was scottish and did not want to see england potentially win. but the bottom line of all three of these stories as they are making money. these stories as they are making mone . , . ., ~ ., , ., money. they are making money, that is what concerns _ money. they are making money, that is what concerns uefa. _ money. they are making money, that is what concerns uefa. what - money. they are making money, that is what concerns uefa. what do - money. they are making money, that is what concerns uefa. what do they. is what concerns uefa. what do they say? in a statement, they surf any tickets being sold —— they said...
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and then of course there has been concern from the government, the competition and markets authority, they have issued a statement. thea;r they have issued a statement. they have investigated _ they have issued a statement. they have investigated the _ they have issued a statement. tue: have investigated the secondary ticket websites before. a simple statement from them "football fans looking to attend... the bottom line here is use a bit of common sense. i was speaking to one industry expert who has looked into ticketing for years, if you cannot buy the ticket through the official channel, in this case it is uefa, and it is sold out, thenjust this case it is uefa, and it is sold out, then just watch the game in the pub or round your house. don't risk losing thousands of pounds. thank ou ve losing thousands of pounds. thank you very much- — now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. just limited sunny spells around today.
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some big clouds developing too with a few showers, thunderstorms, could be some slow—moving torrential downpours in some places. you see them scattered around here, more towards central and eastern parts of england, into scotland as well. but a shower is possible just about anywhere. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, could see a bit of patchy rain out of that. fairly warm, fairly humid, of course, particularly where you get to see a few of those sunny spells. a few heavy, thundery downpours continuing to this evening before easing. another spell of rain pushing into south—west england, parts of wales as the night goes on. and as for temperatures tonight, they are holding up. it is a mild, muggy night to come. it could be a bit misty in places too. a lot of cloud around for tomorrow morning, some sunny spells developing. an area of rain pushing across south—east england to east anglia, gradually clearing during the afternoon. chance of a shower, and again, scattered about into the afternoon and evening will be some heavy and perhaps thundery downpours.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard. he'll be sentenced in september. he had already admitted kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old, who went missing on a walk in south london. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man's crimes. they are dreadful. the killing of sarah everard prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge. but as infections rise, the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england. a huge rise in bookings forforeign holidays as the government says fully vaccinated uk travellers
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coming back from amber list countries won't have to isolate afterjuly19th. local authorities across england say they face a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets over the next three years. the olympic flame arrives in tokyo, two weeks before the games. but no spectators are allowed. and as anticipation continues to build for the euro 2020 final, we'll be hearing from some of the players ahead of england vs italy. sport now. and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. it isa it is a very busy time for sport at the moment. the first of the men's semi—finals is under way at wimbledon.
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italian matteo berrettini has taken the first set against poland's hubert hurkacz — neither player has reached the final of a grand slam before. and following them, it's world number one novak djokovic against denis shapovalov. well, chetan pathak is at wimbledon for us — how's this first semi—final going chetan? it is all going the way of matteo berrettini at the moment. hubert hurkacz has had two fantastic results at these championships, knocking out second seed daniil medvedev and then roger federer in straight sets in the quarterfinals. he has struggled in this semifinal so far against matteo berrettini. i'm not sure berrettini has had to bring his best, so many errors from hurkacz, including when he was trying to hang in in the first set and a mistake in the end handed berrettini the first set 6—3. this match is very much in danger of running away from the 14th seed hurkacz at the moment. his serve which has been so good and consistent in these championships seems to have deserted him. he has
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got his net play completely wrong, some drop shots he's going for fall for no reason at all, and we know the power berrettini has on the serve and the forehand. i'm not saying berrettini has been immaculate in this match so far. frankly, he has not had to be, and hurkacz will have to get his head in the right place pretty soon or he will find himself out of this championships pretty quickly. 5—0 down in the second set, clearly not happy with the way things are going. hurkacz hasn't been past the second round of any grand slam. still a monumental achievement to reach the semifinals of wimbledon but it is not going his way at the moment, evenif not going his way at the moment, even if that challenge has at least gone his way and got the crowd excited. they want to see more sets, because after this match we are going to see the world number one, defending champion, novak djokovic. who can stop him? denis shapovalov who he will face later today. djokovic has that sense of a man who is embracing his destiny, who really
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believes he can now win wimbledon and make it three slams in a row this year going into the olympics and then the us open which he is chasing, that golden slam, which no man has done in tennis history by winning all four majors and olympic gold. shapovalov has beaten andy murray, roberto bautista agut, philipp kohlschreiber, he has had some five set tussles along the way, shapovalov, he has a great all—round game, but djokovic is the greatest return in the history of tennis, such a brilliant problem solver on the court. it seems really hard who will stop him but at least we have three new semifinalists at wimbledon. i will tell you too that former champion gordon reid in the wheelchair singles has just won a great three setter on court 17 behind us, beating gustavo fernandez in three sets, so into the final he goes. another british person in the final to go with england over the weekend. chetan pathak, at wimbledon for us.
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the full england squad is expected to take part in training at st george's park today, as the countdown continues to sunday's euro 2020 final against italy. some of the players were put through a more gentle stretching programme yesterday, after the exertions of wednesday night's semi—final win over denmark. but, of course, they don't have long to recover. with only two days until kick—off at wembley. we're expecting to hear from some of the players in the next hour or so. as for the italians, they're still at their base near florence, before they fly to london tomorrow. away from the football now. nick kyrgios has pulled out of the olympic games, after it was announced there'll be no fans allowed at any venues in tokyo. he said the thought of playing in front of empty stadiums just didn't sit right, although he stressed he hadn't made the decision lightly and that it had always been his dream to represent australia at an olympics. he also said he'll take the time out to work on some minor health issues and didn't want to take a place away
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from a healthy athlete. well, the olympic flame has arrived in tokyo but the public was kept away from a very low—key ceremony. the decision to ban spectators from events in the capital, was made after tokyo was placed in a state of emergency. that'll run throughout the games which start in two weeks' time. there may be some fans allowed at venues outside tokyo and a decision on the paralympics will be made after the olympics. tyson fury�*s third fight against deontay wilder has been postponed after tyson fury tested positive for coronavirus. they were due to make in las vegas in two weeks' time but he returned the positive test yesterday and after discussions with medical experts the decision was made to call off the fight. it is likely to be rearranged for october. theory beat wilder to become wbc champ in february last year, 14 months after the pair shared that thrilling draw you might remember in los angeles. —— tyson fury beat
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deontay wilder. you said it was busy, martin! not sure about the kissing... thank you. the extent of financial pressures facing councils across the uk as they emerge from the pandemic has been revealed in a special bbc investigation. analysis of 171 authorities has found that councils hit by falling income and increased costs are set to make at least £1.7 billion worth of savings over the next year while also using more than £500 million worth of reserves to balance their books. ten struggling councils in england are set to offset or borrow £290 million after being given exceptional permission from the ministry of housing, communities & local government to try to remedy what it called their �*unmanageable pressures�*. but despite making savings, local authorities are currently predicting a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets by the end of 2024. a spokesman for the ministry of housing, communities
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and local government pointed to £12 billion given to local authorities during the pandemic, and said in coming months the government would take stock of the demands they faced and decide a timetable for funding changes. councillor peter fleming is a conservative councillor for sevenoa ks district council. he is also the innovation & improvement board chairman for the local government association. councillor fleming, thank you for joining us. what is the shortfall in your authority?— your authority? good afternoon. local government, _ your authority? good afternoon. local government, as _ your authority? good afternoon. local government, as you - your authority? good afternoon. i local government, as you possibly know, is a fairly complex mix across the country and this research looks at upper tier authorities, those authorities that have adult social care to children�*s services, two of the highest demand led services and areas that local government has for areas that local government has for a long time been calling on government to fund fully. i think for authorities like mine we have seen government support during the covid pandemic in particularfor the
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immediate response that we made and also support to businesses in particular. i think what we are all looking at, this is across local government, and all different tiers of local government, is increasing pressure pressures going forward. once the pandemic hopefully is over we will still see those high demands. we will still see a reduction in those fees and charges that we charge, and we will still see people struggling to play dough might pay council tax and business rates. there is a funding that are really important to us at a time when we have seen a decade�*s worth of reduction in grant from central government. —— struggling to pay council tax. government. -- struggling to pay counciltax-_ government. -- struggling to pay counciltax. ., , council tax. the government points to the fact £12 _ council tax. the government points to the fact £12 billion _ council tax. the government points to the fact £12 billion has _ council tax. the government points to the fact £12 billion has been - to the fact £12 billion has been made available because they recognise how hard it has been during the pandemic. how much is that help? it sounds like a huge amount of money but there is a huge need. tt amount of money but there is a huge need. , . ., ., ., ., , need. it is a huge amount of money at local government _ need. it is a huge amount of money at local government recognises - need. it is a huge amount of money at local government recognises that immediate support to central
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government put in but when we look at the other side of the coin, things such as reductions in fees and charges, and in terms of people�*s ability to pay council tax, they are only funding a proportion of that going forward. i think where they decide to stop supporting councils around that is going to be key because i don�*t think there will be a single ticking point in the post—pandemic world with councils still picking up significant reductions in fees and charges but also in terms of other types of income that councils rely on duty of the reductions in grant funding that councils have seen, as i say, for the last decade. th councils have seen, as i say, for the last decade.— the last decade. in an ideal world, how much increase would you say| how much increase would you say is neededin how much increase would you say is needed in council tax levels. ? government tends to talk about council spending power and increasing council spending power. i think it�*s important to point out to your viewers that spending power increases are government code for
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your council will have this amount more money to spend if it puts up council tax to the maximum that we allow in law, that is capped by central government as well. i think government is starting to recognise that this is part of a wider debate about how local government is funded. what government�*s expectations around how councils provide services, and hopefully this is a tipping point in a time when actually councils can be more responsive to how their local communities wish council services to be delivered going into the future. i think covid has really shone a light on the fact that actually locally provided services to communities is the way that we need to move ahead, rather than central command and control.— command and control. council of peter fleming — command and control. council of peter fleming from _ command and control. council of peter fleming from sevenoaks i peter fleming from sevenoaks district council and local government association, thank you for your time. the olympic flame has arrived
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in tokyo in a low—key ceremony without any crowds, two weeks before the opening of the games. yesterday, japanese officials announced there would be no spectators at olympic venues because of the rise in covid cases. our correspondent rupet wingfield—hayes reports. this should have been a moment of high excitement, the start of the final leg of the olympic torch relay. instead, the governor of tokyo this morning received the olympic flame in an empty arena. there will be no torch relay in tokyo. and as we found out last night, no spectators at the olympic games either. translation: hide night, no spectators at the olympic games either. translation: we are now faced with _ games either. translation: we are now faced with rising _ games either. translation: we are now faced with rising covid-19 - now faced with rising covid—19 infections. so we unfortunately have no other choice but to hold the games in a limited way. the problem now is the delta _ games in a limited way. the problem now is the delta variant. _ games in a limited way. the problem now is the delta variant. it _ games in a limited way. the problem now is the delta variant. it has - now is the delta variant. it has become very apparent in the last couple of weeks that because of that new variant the current covid measures in force here in tokyo are
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no longer working. add to thatjapan is still way behind on vaccinations and it is clear that either the big wave of covid was going to strike here right about the time of the olympics if something drastic wasn�*t done. olympics if something drastic wasn't done. ., ., done. from the infection-control pempective _ done. from the infection-control pempective and _ done. from the infection-control perspective and also _ done. from the infection-control perspective and also for - done. from the infection-control perspective and also for the - done. from the infection-control. perspective and also for the ethical perspective, the spectators should not be allowed to come into the stadium. also because the government called for a state of emergency and asked people to be isolated or restricted activities. so why would the olympics be the only exception against it? but the olympics be the only exception aainst it? �* , , . the olympics be the only exception aiainstit? �* , ,. ., , against it? but olympic fans with tickets told _ against it? but olympic fans with tickets told me _ against it? but olympic fans with tickets told me this _ against it? but olympic fans with tickets told me this ban - against it? but olympic fans with tickets told me this ban is - against it? but olympic fans with tickets told me this ban is an - tickets told me this ban is an overreaction. t tickets told me this ban is an overreaction.— tickets told me this ban is an overreaction. i understand the situation is — overreaction. i understand the situation is still _ overreaction. i understand the situation is still dangerous - overreaction. i understand the situation is still dangerous to l overreaction. i understand the - situation is still dangerous to hold the olympic games, but at the same time i— the olympic games, but at the same time i think— the olympic games, but at the same time i think we should find a way to
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manage _ time i think we should find a way to manage to — time i think we should find a way to manage to hold big events. we need to live _ manage to hold big events. we need to live with_ manage to hold big events. we need to live with covid from now on. so we need _ to live with covid from now on. so we need to— to live with covid from now on. so we need to find a way and we need to prove _ we need to find a way and we need to prove that— we need to find a way and we need to prove that we can do it. and now it�*s time for your questions answered. hello. the transport secretary, grant shapps, has said that travellers who have had both doses of a covid vaccine will no longer need to quarantine when returning to england from an amber list country. the new rules will come into force onjuly19th, a week on monday. this afternoon we are answering your questions on this, with our two guests. we have given them a season ticket, you could say! with me is simon calder, travel correspondent for the independent. and also i�*m joined by lisa minot, travel editor of the sun. lovely to have you here again, two daysin lovely to have you here again, two days in a row. thank you very much. let�*s start with simon. we have lots of questions from people who have
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been fully vaccinated asking about portugal, canada, switzerland. question one is about travelling from spain. karen plante asks simon, i�*m trying to figure out what my mum needs to do to travel to the uk from spain. she is british but a spanish resident and fully vaccinated there. that might be critical. we have an important funeral coming up at the end ofjuly and i�*m confused about what she needs to do in order to be able to come. can you help? weill. able to come. can you help? well, karen, able to come. can you help? well, karen. first— able to come. can you help? well, karen. first of— able to come. can you help? well, karen, first of all— able to come. can you help? well, karen, first of all i'm _ able to come. can you help? well, karen, first of all i'm so _ able to come. can you help? well, karen, first of all i'm so sorry - karen, first of all i�*m so sorry about the reason for the trip and so sorry also to say that your mother�*s vaccination status is of no relevance to the uk. the transport secretary grant shapps speaking on bbc breakfast this morning said that he would be in a position to make a statement about possibly recognising european union vaccinations in a couple of weeks. i think it is most unlikely there will be anything in place before the trip over from
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spain. so therefore she will need to comply with standard amber list rules for medium risk that means a test, really any flavour, before she gets on the plane to britain, going straight into isolation in the uk. there is a test required on day two and day eight for which she will have to book separately. she can also test to release after five days if there is a really important event like a funeral, then it is possible temporarily to leave self—isolation. but i�*m afraid the idea that she would be able to swerve quarantine completely, not at the moment. it is something that the department for transport is working on. there is quite a lot of surprise around europe and more widely around the world because british vaccination certificates are recognised by dozens of countries.- certificates are recognised by dozens of countries. thank you, simon. dozens of countries. thank you, simon- lisa. —
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dozens of countries. thank you, simon. lisa, alan _ dozens of countries. thank you, simon. lisa, alan from - dozens of countries. thank you, simon. lisa, alan from londonl dozens of countries. thank you, - simon. lisa, alan from london says, concerning the new rules on travel to amber countries, if you only want to amber countries, if you only want to do a weekend visit, how do you take a destination predeparture test three days before returning to the uk, if in that time you haven�*t even left the uk yet to arrive at your destination?— left the uk yet to arrive at your destination? , ., �* , , destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say _ destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it — destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it is _ destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it is up _ destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it is up to _ destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it is up to three - destination? yes, that's very true. the rules say it is up to three daysj the rules say it is up to three days before _ the rules say it is up to three days before you — the rules say it is up to three days before you return to the uk. so i did a _ before you return to the uk. so i did a trip— before you return to the uk. so i did a trip to _ before you return to the uk. so i did a trip to portugal on the first day of— did a trip to portugal on the first day of international travel in may and we _ day of international travel in may and we basically arrived to as we arrived _ and we basically arrived to as we arrived i— and we basically arrived to as we arrived i was only staying one night — arrived i was only staying one night as— arrived i was only staying one night. as we arrived we took a lateral— night. as we arrived we took a lateral flow test via a video interview with a government approved provider— interview with a government approved provider and they provided us with a certificate _ provider and they provided us with a certificate that we could then take to obviously show when we came back into the _ to obviously show when we came back into the country the next day. it may— into the country the next day. it may seem — into the country the next day. it may seem slightly daft in that we had to _ may seem slightly daft in that we had to have a test to get into the country— had to have a test to get into the country as— had to have a test to get into the country as well, and that probably wasn't _ country as well, and that probably wasn't relevant, but it is a case of ”p wasn't relevant, but it is a case of up to— wasn't relevant, but it is a case of up to three — wasn't relevant, but it is a case of up to three days before we come back, _ up to three days before we come back, so— up to three days before we come back, so you can take it at any
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point — back, so you can take it at any point in — back, so you can take it at any point in that time.— back, so you can take it at any point in that time. that makes a lot of sense, thank _ point in that time. that makes a lot of sense, thank you. _ point in that time. that makes a lot of sense, thank you. simon, - point in that time. that makes a lot l of sense, thank you. simon, malcolm cowling in lincoln asks, does the covid predeparture test taken three days before returning to the uk have to be a pcr test or can it be a lateral flow test? tt to be a pcr test or can it be a lateral flow test?— to be a pcr test or can it be a lateral flow test? it can be any flavour you _ lateral flow test? it can be any flavour you like, _ lateral flow test? it can be any flavour you like, really. - lateral flow test? it can be any| flavour you like, really. lateral flavouryou like, really. lateral flow is the obvious one to go for. you can go for a more expensive and cumbersome and slow test like the pcr test if you want to. but personally, i�*m very happy with my lateral flow test. right across europe in all the popular locations there are places that will organise this for you. whether it is at the airport before you depart, whether it is at your hotel. sometimes medical teams will come and test you there, and local pharmacies are also getting ready for an onslaught of brits. typically about 30 or 40
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euros per person, so £25— £35 that you would pay for that. but of course you also have to pre—book your pcr test for day two when you are coming back into the uk, even if you are coming in from the green list country, or lucky enough to have had both jabs, it is the 19th ofjuly and you are coming in from an amber country.— an amber country. yes, that's the date things _ an amber country. yes, that's the date things change _ an amber country. yes, that's the date things change markedly, - an amber country. yes, that's the date things change markedly, ofl date things change markedly, of course. lisa, roger in london says i�*m due to travel to the dip in and you are coming in from an amber country. yes, that�*s the date things change markedly, of course. lisa, roger in london says i�*m due to travel to the dip dominican republic in september, how do i get a test in the dominican republic before returning to the tourism is so important to the dominican republic, most of the hotels, if not all of the hotels, have facilities on site to offer the test you would need to get the lateral flow test negative results _ get the lateral flow test negative results to get back into the uk. that— results to get back into the uk. that is— results to get back into the uk. that is perfectly possible. there are lots — that is perfectly possible. there are lots of— that is perfectly possible. there are lots of pharmacies around the dominican — are lots of pharmacies around the dominican republic that are also offering —
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dominican republic that are also offering either a pcr or a lateral flow test — offering either a pcr or a lateral flow test and ranging in price from about— flow test and ranging in price from about £25— flow test and ranging in price from about £25 up to £45. what we also need _ about £25 up to £45. what we also need to _ about £25 up to £45. what we also need to be — about £25 up to £45. what we also need to be well aware of is the fact dominican — need to be well aware of is the fact dominican republic was added to our red list _ dominican republic was added to our red list in _ dominican republic was added to our red list in the last traffic light update — red list in the last traffic light update and we can only hope that by september that's not the case. but at the _ september that's not the case. but at the moment if you are returning from _ at the moment if you are returning from the _ at the moment if you are returning from the dominican republic you have to -o from the dominican republic you have to go into _ from the dominican republic you have to go into hotel quarantine. thank ou, to go into hotel quarantine. thank you. lisa. — to go into hotel quarantine. thank you, lisa. simon, _ to go into hotel quarantine. thank you, lisa. simon, stuart- to go into hotel quarantine. thank you, lisa. simon, stuart scott- to go into hotel quarantine. thank you, lisa. simon, stuart scott in l you, lisa. simon, stuart scott in hitchen asks, can we drive to the czech republic to visit my wife�*s family without breaking any rules? that�*s ambitious! leaving hitching will be perfectly ok. laughter if you have been fully vaccinated, you can get into france, you�*ve got to take a test before you go there. you can then get into germany, again, only if fully vaccinated. you most certainly are going to have to drive around belgium. i�*m afraid you can�*t get there. austria, i think
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they are pretty sniffy about brits, and again, essential purposes only. but you can swerve that and go in from germany into the czech republic. but i�*m afraid, last time i checked, czech republic really didn�*t want anybody from the uk unless it is for special reasons, or indeed czech citizens can go back. dare i say, you would need to check with the czech consulate to make sure whether or not you will be allowed in. but at the moment, driving, there are plenty of flights are still going to prague and back even though they are not desperately to see us, like sadly quite a lot of the rest of europe. $5 to see us, like sadly quite a lot of the rest of europe.— to see us, like sadly quite a lot of the rest of europe. as it is you we will let you _ the rest of europe. as it is you we will let you get — the rest of europe. as it is you we will let you get away _ the rest of europe. as it is you we will let you get away with - the rest of europe. as it is you we will let you get away with those i will let you get away with those terrible puns! good geography knowledge! thank you. lisa, sharon from belvedere in kent says, our grandson will be 16 months old on
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the 24th ofjuly and we haven�*t met him yet. we are desperate to get to texas. ourson him yet. we are desperate to get to texas. our son and daughter—in—law have green cards and are in the process of applying for citizenship. as our grandson was born there, is there any chance of us getting to texas? my husband and i are both double vaccinated and so are our son and daughter—in—law. we get to know all sorts of things about our viewers in these sessions will stop what is the answer to sharon? weill. what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately _ what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately not. _ what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately not. it _ what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately not. it is _ what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately not. it is going - what is the answer to sharon? well, unfortunately not. it is going to be a bit longer before they get to see their lovely grandchild. it really is quite — their lovely grandchild. it really is quite baffling but the way this is quite baffling but the way this is being — is quite baffling but the way this is being seen at the moment, as we discussed _ is being seen at the moment, as we discussed yesterday, president biden has to— discussed yesterday, president biden has to actually declare null his presidential proclamation that restricts — presidential proclamation that restricts access to anyone from the uk entering the us at the moment. there _ uk entering the us at the moment. there is— uk entering the us at the moment. there is this task force that was set up _ there is this task force that was set up after the g7 summit and they are looking —
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set up after the g7 summit and they are looking at how they can open transatlantic corridors again. it is a huge _ transatlantic corridors again. it is a huge cost — transatlantic corridors again. it is a huge cost for our economies, 23 million _ a huge cost for our economies, 23 million a — a huge cost for our economies, 23 million a day they say it is costing not having — million a day they say it is costing not having this transatlantic corridor— not having this transatlantic corridor open. unfortunately there is no _ corridor open. unfortunately there is no way— corridor open. unfortunately there is no way to— corridor open. unfortunately there is no way to get into the us at the moment— is no way to get into the us at the moment for— is no way to get into the us at the moment for a reason like that. you need _ moment for a reason like that. you need a _ moment for a reason like that. you need a very— moment for a reason like that. you need a very specific reason and one of these _ need a very specific reason and one of these essential reasons and the americans— of these essential reasons and the americans are being very strict on this at— americans are being very strict on this at the — americans are being very strict on this at the moment. we saw a cruise director— this at the moment. we saw a cruise director who— this at the moment. we saw a cruise director who was due to fly into america — director who was due to fly into america and get onto a cruise ship to run— america and get onto a cruise ship to run the — america and get onto a cruise ship to run the cruise ship being told i have _ to run the cruise ship being told i have a _ to run the cruise ship being told i have a dome at heathrow airport that he wasn't _ have a dome at heathrow airport that he wasn't allowed to travel of because — he wasn't allowed to travel of because the risks and concerns about the dell— because the risks and concerns about the dell variant. as because the risks and concerns about the dell variant.— the dell variant. as you say, sharon has a bit longer _ the dell variant. as you say, sharon has a bit longer to _ the dell variant. as you say, sharon has a bit longer to wait, _ has a bit longer to wait, unfortunately. —— delta variant. simon, philsays, whatare unfortunately. —— delta variant. simon, phil says, what are my chances to carry out a much postponed rail trip through europe, france, belgium, austria in early september? i am double vaccinated and have the nhs covid app. right. and have the nhs covid app. right, phil, the good _
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and have the nhs covid app. right, phil, the good news _ and have the nhs covid app. right, phil, the good news is _ and have the nhs covid app. right, phil, the good news is france - and have the nhs covid app. right, phil, the good news is france and l phil, the good news is france and germany will allow you to go in at the moment, testing required certainly for france, but if we are looking for september, that�*s two months away, a huge amount is going to change between now and then. as a word of caution, the more borders you intend to cross within europe the tougher it is going to be. and certainly belgium, for instance, wants to know if you have spent more than 12 hours in the uk in the past 14 days. and if you have then you can�*t come in, except for special reasons. so anybody who, like me, loves international rail travel across europe, ifear loves international rail travel across europe, i fear this loves international rail travel across europe, ifear this isn�*t necessarily the summer when it is going to be especially easy. although overall i expect things will have calmed down quite a lot by september when, will have calmed down quite a lot by septemberwhen, of will have calmed down quite a lot by september when, of course, will have calmed down quite a lot by septemberwhen, of course, everyone has to get back to school or college, or the office or whatever, and it�*s only people like me, dare i say it, lisa who don�*t have proper
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jobs who will be swanning around enjoying the last of the sunshine. we are hugely envious of people like you but we are very grateful for your expertise and your insight. i�*ve got some general questions to finish with. lisa, it is very confusing and you are having to keep abreast of the changes all the time. give us an idea of how great the efforts are that are being made across the piece to get international travel going again. t international travel going again. i didn't quite hear that, sorry. across — didn't quite hear that, sorry. across all— didn't quite hear that, sorry. across all the various elements, the different authorities, the countries, medically as well, it is a huge effort that�*s going on, isn�*t it? a huge effort that's going on, isn't it? , , , ., ., ., it? there is, yes. you have to remember— it? there is, yes. you have to remember that _ it? there is, yes. you have to remember that global - it? there is, yes. you have to| remember that global tourism it? there is, yes. you have to i remember that global tourism is vital to— remember that global tourism is vital to so — remember that global tourism is vital to so many economies around the world — vital to so many economies around the world it — vital to so many economies around the world. it is within many countries' _ the world. it is within many countries' interests to make sure they are — countries' interests to make sure they are getting borders opened as quickly— they are getting borders opened as quickly as— they are getting borders opened as quickly as possible. it is an unprecedented situation, unlike anything — unprecedented situation, unlike anything else. we don't have global
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certification, we don't have global agreements on anything to do with this so— agreements on anything to do with this so far— agreements on anything to do with this so far and that is where it is going _ this so far and that is where it is going to — this so far and that is where it is going to take time. it has taken up untiliust _ going to take time. it has taken up untiljust the last couple of days for the — untiljust the last couple of days for the eu — untiljust the last couple of days for the eu to come up with their digital— for the eu to come up with their digital green certificate and that's now up— digital green certificate and that's now up and running which is great news _ now up and running which is great news you — now up and running which is great news. you look at somewhere like the states. _ news. you look at somewhere like the states. their— news. you look at somewhere like the states, their vaccination certificates are issued individually by each _ certificates are issued individually by each state so there is 50 different _ by each state so there is 50 different types of vaccination certificate alstom how do you actually — certificate alstom how do you actually get that to be recognised globally— actually get that to be recognised globally is going to be the real challenge. many of them are still 'ust challenge. many of them are still just paper certificates. if you have to multiply that across the whole world _ to multiply that across the whole world it — to multiply that across the whole world it is — to multiply that across the whole world it is going to be a big challenge to get a seamless global agreement on this kind of thing. there _ agreement on this kind of thing. there are — agreement on this kind of thing. there are some very clever heads being put to use to try and get it all to work. lisa minot from the sun newspaper and simon calder from all to work. lisa minot from the sun newspaper and simon calderfrom the independent, once again, thank you forjoining us on your questions
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answered. hello. just limited sunny spells around today. some big clouds developing too with a few showers, thunderstorms, could be some slow—moving torrential downpours in some places. you see them scattered around here, more towards central and eastern parts of england, into scotland as well. but a shower is possible just about anywhere. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, could see a bit of patchy rain out of that. fairly warm, fairly humid, of course, particularly where you get to see a few of those sunny spells. a few heavy, thundery downpours continuing into this evening before easing. another spell of rain pushing into south—west england, parts of wales as the night goes on. and as for temperatures tonight, they are holding up. it�*s a mild, muggy night to come. it could be a bit misty in places too. a lot of cloud around for tomorrow morning, some sunny spells developing. an area of rain pushing across south—east england to east anglia, gradually clearing during the afternoon. chance of a shower, and again, scattered about into the afternoon
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and evening will be some heavy and perhaps thundery downpours.
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this is bbc news. i�*m martine croxall. the headlines... metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard. he�*ll be sentenced in september. he had already admiited kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old who went missing on a walk in south london. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man�*s crimes. they are dreadful. the killing of sarah everard prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely. and as anticipation continues to build for the euro 2020 final, in the coming minutes we�*ll be hearing from some of the players ahead of england vs italy. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge.
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but as infections rise, the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england. a huge surge in bookings forforeign holidays as the government says fully vaccinated uk travellers coming back from amber list countries won�*t have to isolate afterjuly 19. local authorities across england say they face a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets over the next three years the olympic flame arrives in tokyo, two weeks before the games, but no spectators are allowed. good afternoon. we will be hearing from the england camp, the training camp at st
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george�*s park in staffordshire in a little while. we are expecting a press conference ahead of sunday�*s euro 2020 final. obviously a lot of questions about who will be fielded, the kind of approach is that they will take when they take on italy in their first will take when they take on italy in theirfirst majorfinal will take when they take on italy in their first major final in the men�*s game since 1966. that beat sports presenter. a huge amount of interest about how gareth southgate will approach this, austin. absolutely. that is the question _ approach this, austin. absolutely. that is the question all _ approach this, austin. absolutely. that is the question all fans - approach this, austin. absolutely. | that is the question all fans around the country will be asking, who will be taking to the field on sunday night at wembley for that huge game against italy? we are expecting to hear from against italy? we are expecting to hearfrom england defenderjohn hear from england defenderjohn stones hearfrom england defenderjohn stones in the next few minutes, that press conference. he has played such a big role in the england team so far throughout this tournament. he has played in every game, he has been a real feature of that defence,
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at the back for england. they have been so crucial throughout this tournament, we have heard about harry kane of raheem sterling who have done the business for england at the top end of the pitch, but don�*t forget england have only conceded one goal throughout this entire tournament. and that was in their last game against denmark in their last game against denmark in the semifinal. five games with five clean sheets before that. the defence has been crucial, and we are hoping to hearfrom defence has been crucial, and we are hoping to hear from john stones soon. i can�*t imagine he will be giving too many secrets away about the team sheet come sunday night. he certainly won't be. when you look at certainly won�*t be. when you look at the calibre of some of the players who have stayed on the bench, who were part of that squad, and don�*t really get a look in, it tells you really get a look in, it tells you really how many players gareth southgate has to choose from. absolutely, i think that is something that is filling the england fans with confidence at the moment. the likes of phil foden, who of course has been one of the best players in the premier league all season for manchester city. he has been on the bench since the first couple of games of the tournament.
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the likes ofjadon couple of games of the tournament. the likes of jadon sancho who is joining manchester united next season. and others, jack grealish yu has been such a key player in the premier league, such big names who are all not able to get into this starting team. there is perhaps one position which is up for debate, bukayo saka the 19—year—old from arsenal is the man who filled that position for the semifinal win over denmark. that is one that could change. i would denmark. that is one that could change. iwould not denmark. that is one that could change. i would not be surprised to be honest if gareth southgate stuck to the tried and tested team has fared so well for england recently. you just wonder sometimes is it always the best thing to be the favourites? is it always best to play at the home of football? wembley? yes, you are surrounded by a lot of fans who are desperate for england to win, but how much does that add to the pressure? tt certainly will add to the pressure. 60,000 are expected to be in wembley for the game. and the vast majority
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of those are going to be england fans, because of course of travel restrictions meaning italy fans will not be able to come. they have to be based here in england. but previously, we might have said that would really pile on top of the england players. but this time around, itjust feels a little bit different. they have perhaps not got that baggage, so let�*s hope things are a little bit different this time around. , ., ,, ., , are a little bit different this time around. . ., ,, ., , , are a little bit different this time around. , ., ,, ., , , , are a little bit different this time around. ,, ., , , , around. john stones is 'ust coming into the press h around. john stones is 'ust coming into the press centre. _ around. john stones isjust coming into the press centre. crikey, - around. john stones isjust coming into the press centre. crikey, i - into the press centre. crikey, i think you might be playing a game of darts before he gets started. it is one way to loosen up, isn�*t it? is he really going to do that? maybe he is. i will not even try to commentate, i cannot do an impersonation of a darts commentator. i will carry on talking to you while they are at the key. you cannot take italy for granted, can you? mancini is someone to be reckoned with.— reckoned with. absolutely, italy have been _ reckoned with. absolutely, italy
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have been one _ reckoned with. absolutely, italy have been one of _ reckoned with. absolutely, italy have been one of the _ reckoned with. absolutely, italy have been one of the favourites| have been one of the favourites throughout, haven�*t they for this tournament. it is perhaps one of the only games, barring the germany game you may rememberfrom only games, barring the germany game you may remember from the last 16, where england are not the clear favourites going into this one. it is almost 50—50 because italy really have an incredible record as you mention. they are undefeated in 33 games. and that is an amazing achievement in a normal league season with a club team, but 33 games for international fixtures, that spreads over a couple of years, it really is an incredible statistic. italy are going to be fierce competition for england come sunday night. t fierce competition for england come sunday night-— sunday night. i think it ought to stick to the _ sunday night. i think it ought to stick to the football. _ sunday night. i think it ought to stick to the football. i'm - sunday night. i think it ought to stick to the football. i'm not. sunday night. i think it ought to l stick to the football. i'm not sure stick to the football. i�*m not sure that was the highest score i�*ve ever seen. reaction is not bad. let�*s listen to see and hear whatjohn stones has got to say. just listen to see and hear what john stones has got to say.— listen to see and hear what john stones has got to say. just wait for those guys — stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to _ stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to set _ stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to set up. _ stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to set up. i _ stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to set up. i don't - stones has got to say. just wait for those guys to set up. i don't think| those guys to set up. i don't think we are quite _ those guys to set up. i don't think we are quite ready _ those guys to set up. i don't think we are quite ready yet, _ those guys to set up. i don't think we are quite ready yet, are - those guys to set up. i don't think we are quite ready yet, are we? l those guys to set up. i don't think. we are quite ready yet, are we? we know how this feel sitting there
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waiting to get started. the media are already gathered, this is at saint jake —— are already gathered, this is at saintjake —— st george�*s park where they have been training this week. we have been seeing pictures from yesterday, those who had not played the night before when training. those who had played must have had very tired legs, so they were back at base relaxing. not sure when this is going to get going. goad is going to get going. good afternoon. _ is going to get going. good afternoon, everybody, - is going to get going. good afternoon, everybody, and| is going to get going. (13pm afternoon, everybody, and welcome to this media conference withjohn stones. we will take a mixture of questions from those in the room and thosejoining us on questions from those in the room and those joining us on zoom. questions from those in the room and thosejoining us on zoom. hi. questions from those in the room and those joining us on zoom.— those 'oining us on zoom. hi, john, iood those joining us on zoom. hi, john, iood to those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see — those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see you- — those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see you. as _ those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see you. as a _ those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see you. as a player, - those joining us on zoom. hi, john, good to see you. as a player, it - good to see you. as a player, it does _ good to see you. as a player, it does not — good to see you. as a player, it does not get _ good to see you. as a player, it does not get much _ good to see you. as a player, it does not get much bigger- good to see you. as a player, it does not get much bigger thanl good to see you. as a player, it - does not get much bigger than this, does not get much bigger than this, does it? _ does not get much bigger than this, does it? try— does not get much bigger than this, does it? try to— does not get much bigger than this, does it? try to put— does not get much bigger than this, does it? try to put it _ does not get much bigger than this, does it? try to put it into— does not get much bigger than this, does it? try to put it into context i does it? try to put it into context how big _ does it? try to put it into context how big it — does it? try to put it into context how big it is— does it? try to put it into context how big it is how— does it? try to put it into context how big it is how big _ does it? try to put it into context how big it is how big an - does it? try to put it into context how big it is how big an occasionl does it? try to put it into context. how big it is how big an occasion is it. how big it is how big an occasion is it it— how big it is how big an occasion is it. , ~ it. it is huge. i think with it beini it. it is huge. i think with it being at— it. it is huge. i think with it being at wembley - it. it is huge. i think with it being at wembley as - it. it is huge. i think with it being at wembley as well, | it. it is huge. i think with it | being at wembley as well, it it. it is huge. i think with it - being at wembley as well, it is even more _ being at wembley as well, it is even more special, i think. something we could _ more special, i think. something we could only— more special, i think. something we could only have dreamt of at the start _ could only have dreamt of at the start of— could only have dreamt of at the start of the tournament. we are here
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to try— start of the tournament. we are here to try and _ start of the tournament. we are here to try and win it, and we have got this far— to try and win it, and we have got this far now _ to try and win it, and we have got this far now. i think we have grown and grown — this far now. i think we have grown and grown throughout the tournament. we have _ and grown throughout the tournament. we have not— and grown throughout the tournament. we have not put too much pressure on ourselves _ we have not put too much pressure on ourselves i_ we have not put too much pressure on ourselves. i think we have overcome some _ ourselves. i think we have overcome some tough— ourselves. i think we have overcome some tough tests over the past few years. _ some tough tests over the past few years. and — some tough tests over the past few years, and we have learned a lot of things— years, and we have learned a lot of things and — years, and we have learned a lot of things and gained a lot of experience from those games. and i think all— experience from those games. and i think all of— experience from those games. and i think all of the learning curves and experiences that we have been through— experiences that we have been through has got us to where we are on a sunday. it is a massive occasion _ on a sunday. it is a massive occasion-— on a sunday. it is a massive occasion. ., ~ ., ., ., �*, occasion. you know how england's world cup winning _ occasion. you know how england's world cup winning squad - occasion. you know how england's world cup winning squad of - occasion. you know how england's world cup winning squad of 1966 l occasion. you know how england's - world cup winning squad of 1966 have kind of— world cup winning squad of 1966 have kind of been_ world cup winning squad of 1966 have kind of been heralded _ world cup winning squad of 1966 have kind of been heralded ever— world cup winning squad of 1966 have kind of been heralded ever since. - kind of been heralded ever since. absolute — kind of been heralded ever since. absolute heroes— kind of been heralded ever since. absolute heroes of— kind of been heralded ever since. absolute heroes of this _ kind of been heralded ever since. absolute heroes of this nation. i kind of been heralded ever since. i absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared _ absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to— absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to think _ absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to think about _ absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to think about how, - absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to think about how, if - absolute heroes of this nation. have you dared to think about how, if you| you dared to think about how, if you win this _ you dared to think about how, if you win this thing. — you dared to think about how, if you win this thing, it _ you dared to think about how, if you win this thing, it might _ you dared to think about how, if you win this thing, it might change - you dared to think about how, if you win this thing, it might change yourl win this thing, it might change your life? ., �* win this thing, it might change your life? . �* ., ., ~ life? yeah, i've dared to think. i think from _ life? yeah, i've dared to think. i think from my — life? yeah, i've dared to think. i think from my personal-
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life? yeah, i've dared to think. i - think from my personal perspective, it is approaching the game in how we have every— it is approaching the game in how we have every other game in this tournament. every other game that we io tournament. every other game that we go out _ tournament. every other game that we go out as— tournament. every other game that we go out as professionals at club level— go out as professionals at club level or— go out as professionals at club level or where ever it might be, whatever— level or where ever it might be, whatever competition we are in, and giving _ whatever competition we are in, and giving everything. i think from the outside _ giving everything. i think from the outside and what i have been hearing from people is the england team, whoever— from people is the england team, whoever plays or whoever has come on the pitch— whoever plays or whoever has come on the pitch or— whoever plays or whoever has come on the pitch or contributed throughout this tournament in the past two years. — this tournament in the past two years, everyone has given everything for that— years, everyone has given everything for that shirt and everything for the nation. we all love the england team, _ the nation. we all love the england team, growing up as fans, being able to play— team, growing up as fans, being able to playfor_ team, growing up as fans, being able to play for them now we absolutely cherish _ to play for them now we absolutely cherish it~ — to play for them now we absolutely cherish it. it is a special moment for us _ cherish it. it is a special moment for us when _ cherish it. it is a special moment for us when we do that, and i think, as i for us when we do that, and i think, as i said. _ for us when we do that, and i think, as i said, people are saying they love watching us and seeing how we represent _ love watching us and seeing how we represent the country. and i think that is— represent the country. and i think that is something we should be proud of as players stop and definitely on
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sunday— of as players stop and definitely on sunday we — of as players stop and definitely on sunday we will be out there fighting for everything. and wanting to win that game — for everything. and wanting to win that game more than anything. what has gareth sent _ that game more than anything. what has gareth sent to _ that game more than anything. what has gareth sent to the _ that game more than anything. what has gareth sent to the squad? nothing — has gareth sent to the squad? nothing different. _ has gareth sent to the squad? nothing different. i— has gareth sent to the squad? nothing different. ithink- has gareth sent to the squad? nothing different. i think he i has gareth sent to the squad? i nothing different. i think he has has gareth sent to the squad? - nothing different. i think he has a unique _ nothing different. i think he has a unique quality of staying calm in situations. i think it passes through— situations. i think it passes through the team. i think the other day it— through the team. i think the other day it was— through the team. i think the other day it was the first time we had been _ day it was the first time we had been to— day it was the first time we had been to extra time, no one panicked or got— been to extra time, no one panicked or got ahead — been to extra time, no one panicked or got ahead of ourselves, we all stayed _ or got ahead of ourselves, we all stayed calm and stayed to the game plan. stayed calm and stayed to the game plan and _ stayed calm and stayed to the game plan. and it worked out well for us. and i— plan. and it worked out well for us. and i think— plan. and it worked out well for us. and i think keeping a clear head and going _ and i think keeping a clear head and going about our business as we have done and _ going about our business as we have done and i_ going about our business as we have done and i don't think we have to change _ done and i don't think we have to change anything, in respect of our preparation and the way we gear up to a game — preparation and the way we gear up to a game. it is so professional. i think— to a game. it is so professional. i think we — to a game. it is so professional. i think we cover every aspect of the game _ think we cover every aspect of the game and — think we cover every aspect of the game and what we can effect. and
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that is— game and what we can effect. and that is how— game and what we can effect. and that is how we have treated this game, — that is how we have treated this game, there is a big prize at the end of— game, there is a big prize at the end of it — game, there is a big prize at the end of it that we definitely want to be on _ end of it that we definitely want to be on the — end of it that we definitely want to be on the receiving end of. so more of the _ be on the receiving end of. so more of the same — be on the receiving end of. so more of the same and i think that calmness that he gives to everyone is coming _ calmness that he gives to everyone is coming through. it calmness that he gives to everyone is coming through.— is coming through. it strikes me that ou is coming through. it strikes me that you personally _ is coming through. it strikes me that you personally have - is coming through. it strikes me that you personally have grownl is coming through. it strikes me - that you personally have grown more resilient _ that you personally have grown more resilient in _ that you personally have grown more resilient in your— that you personally have grown more resilient in your career. _ that you personally have grown more resilient in your career. better- resilient in your career. better able _ resilient in your career. better able to— resilient in your career. better able to cope _ resilient in your career. better able to cope with _ resilient in your career. better able to cope with those - resilient in your career. betterl able to cope with those difficult moments _ able to cope with those difficult moments. and _ able to cope with those difficult moments. and after— able to cope with those difficult moments. and after those - able to cope with those difficult. moments. and after those times able to cope with those difficult - moments. and after those times when you have _ moments. and after those times when you have been — moments. and after those times when you have been criticised _ moments. and after those times when you have been criticised personally- you have been criticised personally or you _ you have been criticised personally or you have — you have been criticised personally or you have maybe _ you have been criticised personally or you have maybe had _ you have been criticised personally or you have maybe had to- you have been criticised personally or you have maybe had to wait - you have been criticised personallyl or you have maybe had to wait your turn to _ or you have maybe had to wait your turn to be _ or you have maybe had to wait your turn to be selected _ or you have maybe had to wait your turn to be selected for— or you have maybe had to wait your turn to be selected for club - or you have maybe had to wait your turn to be selected for club or- turn to be selected for club or country. — turn to be selected for club or country. i— turn to be selected for club or country. hust— turn to be selected for club or country, ijust wonder- turn to be selected for club ori country, ijust wonder whether turn to be selected for club or- country, ijust wonder whether you country, i just wonder whether you -et country, i just wonder whether you get to— country, i just wonder whether you get to the — country, ijust wonder whether you get to the stage _ country, ijust wonder whether you get to the stage on _ country, ijust wonder whether you get to the stage on the _ country, ijust wonder whether you get to the stage on the eve - country, ijust wonder whether you get to the stage on the eve of- country, ijust wonder whether you j get to the stage on the eve of such a big _ get to the stage on the eve of such a big game — get to the stage on the eve of such a big game and— get to the stage on the eve of such a big game and feel— get to the stage on the eve of such a big game and feel a _ get to the stage on the eve of such a big game and feel a vindication i a big game and feel a vindication for that — a big game and feel a vindication forthat~ like— a big game and feel a vindication for that. like you _ a big game and feel a vindication for that. like you have _ a big game and feel a vindication for that. like you have got- a big game and feel a vindication i for that. like you have got through it all and _ for that. like you have got through it all and you — for that. like you have got through it all and you are _ for that. like you have got through it all and you are where _ for that. like you have got through it all and you are where you - for that. like you have got through it all and you are where you are - it all and you are where you are now _ it all and you are where you are now i— it all and you are where you are now. ~' it all and you are where you are now. ~ ,., ~ ., .,, , now. i think so. all of those times have made — now. i think so. all of those times have made me — now. i think so. all of those times have made me who _ now. i think so. all of those times have made me who i— now. i think so. all of those times have made me who i am - now. i think so. all of those times have made me who i am now. - now. i think so. all of those times have made me who i am now. i. now. i think so. all of those times i have made me who i am now. i wish there _ have made me who i am now. iwish there was— have made me who i am now. i wish there was an — have made me who i am now. i wish there was an easier route, but that is footbalt — there was an easier route, but that is footbalt i— there was an easier route, but that is football. i think that is in any walk— is football. i think that is in any walk of— is football. i think that is in any walk of life, you have setbacks and things _ walk of life, you have setbacks and
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things like — walk of life, you have setbacks and things like that. i have tried to learn _ things like that. i have tried to learn from _ things like that. i have tried to learn from them and stay positive, stay true _ learn from them and stay positive, stay true to — learn from them and stay positive, stay true to myself. and i think on sunday. _ stay true to myself. and i think on sunday. if— stay true to myself. and i think on sunday, if selected, it is a massive moment— sunday, if selected, it is a massive moment for— sunday, if selected, it is a massive moment for me and my family. especially— moment for me and my family. especially going through tough times and things like that, you see all the hard — and things like that, you see all the hard work and all the dedication, all the after hours, things— dedication, all the after hours, things that people don't recognise coming _ things that people don't recognise coming to— things that people don't recognise coming to the forefront coming to my mind _ coming to the forefront coming to my mind and _ coming to the forefront coming to my mind and it — coming to the forefront coming to my mind. and it makes me realise why work— mind. and it makes me realise why work is _ mind. and it makes me realise why work is so — mind. and it makes me realise why work is so hard —— why i have worked so hard _ work is so hard —— why i have worked so hard to— work is so hard —— why i have worked so hard to be — work is so hard —— why i have worked so hard to be where i am. it is a proud— so hard to be where i am. it is a proud moment and hopefully i get to be in the _ proud moment and hopefully i get to be in the starting xi and experience what we _ be in the starting xi and experience what we have experienced already at wembley— what we have experienced already at wembley with the fans and everything surrounding it. it has been a special— surrounding it. it has been a special occasion.— surrounding it. it has been a special occasion. surrounding it. it has been a secial occasion. . , ., ., special occasion. last one for me. i will ask you — special occasion. last one for me. i will ask you about _ special occasion. last one for me. i will ask you about those _ special occasion. last one for me. i will ask you about those fans. - special occasion. last one for me. i will ask you about those fans. i - will ask you about those fans. i will ask you about those fans. i will ask— will ask you about those fans. i will ask you _ will ask you about those fans. i will ask you to _ will ask you about those fans. i will ask you to speak _ will ask you about those fans. i will ask you to speak directly i will ask you about those fans. i| will ask you to speak directly to them _ will ask you to speak directly to
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them now _ will ask you to speak directly to them now. there _ will ask you to speak directly to them now. there will— will ask you to speak directly to them now. there will be - will ask you to speak directly to. them now. there will be 50,000 will ask you to speak directly to - them now. there will be 50,000 plus inside _ them now. there will be 50,000 plus inside wembley. _ them now. there will be 50,000 plus inside wembley, 22— them now. there will be 50,000 plus inside wembley, 22 million— them now. there will be 50,000 plus inside wembley, 22 million plus - inside wembley, 22 million plus watching — inside wembley, 22 million plus watching on— inside wembley, 22 million plus watching on their— inside wembley, 22 million plus watching on their tv _ inside wembley, 22 million plus watching on their tv sets - inside wembley, 22 million plus watching on their tv sets and i watching on their tv sets and elsewhere _ watching on their tv sets and elsewhere at _ watching on their tv sets and elsewhere at home. - watching on their tv sets and elsewhere at home. what - watching on their tv sets and elsewhere at home. what is. watching on their tv sets and - elsewhere at home. what is your message — elsewhere at home. what is your message to — elsewhere at home. what is your message to the _ elsewhere at home. what is your message to the england - elsewhere at home. what is your. message to the england supporters? elsewhere at home. what is your- message to the england supporters? i think message to the england supporters? think it is difficult to put it into words. — think it is difficult to put it into words. to— think it is difficult to put it into words, to be honest. ithink think it is difficult to put it into words, to be honest. i think we have definitely— words, to be honest. i think we have definitely thrived off the fans. and i definitely thrived off the fans. and i suppose — definitely thrived off the fans. and i suppose we are living their dream, i’ilht i suppose we are living their dream, right at— i suppose we are living their dream, right at the — i suppose we are living their dream, right at the front out on the pitch. and we _ right at the front out on the pitch. and we can't thank them enough for all of— and we can't thank them enough for all of the _ and we can't thank them enough for all of the support through the tough times— all of the support through the tough times and _ all of the support through the tough times and the good times. yeah, they turn up _ times and the good times. yeah, they turn up every— times and the good times. yeah, they turn up every game, no matter where we are. _ turn up every game, no matter where we are. the _ turn up every game, no matter where we are. the support is deeply appreciated by us as players. we are proud _ appreciated by us as players. we are proud to— appreciated by us as players. we are proud to represent them, represent
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the country, and we hope we do them proud _ the country, and we hope we do them proud and _ the country, and we hope we do them proud and to— the country, and we hope we do them proud and to everybody proud on sunday — proud and to everybody proud on sunday. and turn up and make a lot of noise _ sunday. and turn up and make a lot of noise for— sunday. and turn up and make a lot of noise for us.— sunday. and turn up and make a lot| of noise for us._ good of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck. we of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck- we are — of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck. we are taking _ of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck. we are taking a _ of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck. we are taking a question - of noise for us. thanks, mate. good luck. we are taking a question from| luck. we are taking a question from italy on zouma. we are struggling to hear you, marco. flan italy on zouma. we are struggling to hear you, marco.— italy on zouma. we are struggling to hear you, marco. can you hear me? as chiellini especially _ hear you, marco. can you hear me? as chiellini especially or— hear you, marco. can you hear me? as chiellini especially or bonucci - hear you, marco. can you hear me? as chiellini especially or bonucci been - chiellini especially or bonucci been an inspiration— chiellini especially or bonucci been an inspiration for— chiellini especially or bonucci been an inspiration for you _ chiellini especially or bonucci been an inspiration for you in _ chiellini especially or bonucci been an inspiration for you in your- an inspiration for you in your career? _ an inspiration for you in your career? �* ., , ., ., career? i'm not sure about an inspiration. — career? i'm not sure about an inspiration. i _ career? i'm not sure about an inspiration, i do _ career? i'm not sure about an inspiration, i do admire - career? i'm not sure about an inspiration, i do admire whatl career? i'm not sure about an - inspiration, i do admire what they have _ inspiration, i do admire what they have done — inspiration, i do admire what they have done in their careers and how they go— have done in their careers and how they go about the game and play as professionals. this will be my first time _ professionals. this will be my first time coming up against them, and it
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will be— time coming up against them, and it will be a— time coming up against them, and it will be a special occasion. to play against _ will be a special occasion. to play against so — will be a special occasion. to play against so many good players, won a lot of— against so many good players, won a lot of great _ against so many good players, won a lot of great things in their career and to— lot of great things in their career and to still— lot of great things in their career and to still be playing at the age that they— and to still be playing at the age that they are at the highest level is something that i definitely admire — is something that i definitely admire about players. thanks, mate. ollie foster, — admire about players. thanks, mate. ollie foster, ssc — admire about players. thanks, mate. ollie foster, bbc news. _ admire about players. thanks, mate. ollie foster, bbc news. let's- admire about players. thanks, mate. ollie foster, bbc news. let's stay i ollie foster, bbc news. let�*s stay with the italian theme. you ollie foster, bbc news. let's stay with the italian theme.— with the italian theme. you will have watched _ with the italian theme. you will have watched plenty _ with the italian theme. you will have watched plenty of - with the italian theme. you will have watched plenty of games | with the italian theme. you will- have watched plenty of games early in the _ have watched plenty of games early in the tournament _ have watched plenty of games early in the tournament before _ have watched plenty of games early in the tournament before you - have watched plenty of games early in the tournament before you knewl in the tournament before you knew you would — in the tournament before you knew you would both _ in the tournament before you knew you would both get _ in the tournament before you knew you would both get this _ in the tournament before you knew you would both get this far. - in the tournament before you knew you would both get this far. i- in the tournament before you knewl you would both get this far. i mean, they hit— you would both get this far. i mean, they hit the — you would both get this far. i mean, they hit the ground _ you would both get this far. i mean, they hit the ground running. - you would both get this far. i mean, they hit the ground running. what. they hit the ground running. what have you — they hit the ground running. what have you made _ they hit the ground running. what have you made of _ they hit the ground running. what have you made of roberto - they hit the ground running. what. have you made of roberto mancini's team? _ have you made of roberto mancini's team? they— have you made of roberto mancini's team? they look— have you made of roberto mancini's team? they look frightening - have you made of roberto mancini's team? they look frightening at - team? they look frightening at times — team? they look frightening at times i— team? they look frightening at times. ., team? they look frightening at times. ~ ., , times. i think over the, may be the last decade, _ times. i think over the, may be the last decade, the _ times. i think over the, may be the last decade, the italian _ times. i think over the, may be the last decade, the italian teams - times. i think over the, may be thej last decade, the italian teams have always— last decade, the italian teams have always been very well organised, very defensive. defensively solid. this time, — very defensive. defensively solid. this time, i— very defensive. defensively solid. this time, i rememberthe very defensive. defensively solid. this time, i remember the last game against _ this time, i remember the last game against spain, it was a tight game
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and both— against spain, it was a tight game and both teams rode their luck. we have watched lots of games and clips and tries _ have watched lots of games and clips and tries not to over flood our minds — and tries not to over flood our minds and _ and tries not to over flood our minds and concentrate on ourselves. but they— minds and concentrate on ourselves. but they seem to be, as i say, very well organised and very defensively solid _ well organised and very defensively solid. obviously they have a lot of attacking — solid. obviously they have a lot of attacking flair with the players that they have got, they have some outstanding players. that is why they are — outstanding players. that is why they are in — outstanding players. that is why they are in the final. two great teams — they are in the final. two great teams that i believe deserve to be there _ teams that i believe deserve to be there. hopefully, i believe that we come _ there. hopefully, i believe that we come out — there. hopefully, i believe that we come out on the winning side on sunday — come out on the winning side on sunday to— come out on the winning side on sunda . ., . �* come out on the winning side on sunda . ., ., �* ., , sunday. to that end, i'm not sure if ou are a sunday. to that end, i'm not sure if you are a good _ sunday. to that end, i'm not sure if you are a good sleeper, _ sunday. to that end, i'm not sure if you are a good sleeper, are - sunday. to that end, i'm not sure if you are a good sleeper, are there i you are a good sleeper, are there sleepless— you are a good sleeper, are there sleepless nights? _ you are a good sleeper, are there sleepless nights? the _ you are a good sleeper, are there sleepless nights? the short- you are a good sleeper, are there sleepless nights? the short daysl sleepless nights? the short days that you — sleepless nights? the short days that you have _ sleepless nights? the short days that you have going _ sleepless nights? the short days that you have going into- sleepless nights? the short days that you have going into this - sleepless nights? the short days. that you have going into this final, when _ that you have going into this final, when you — that you have going into this final, when you think _ that you have going into this final, when you think about _ that you have going into this final, when you think about those - that you have going into this final, i when you think about those attacking threats _ when you think about those attacking threats you _ when you think about those attacking threats you mentioned? _ when you think about those attacking threats you mentioned?— threats you mentioned? definitely no sleeless threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights _ threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights for _ threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights for me. _ threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights for me. as - threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights for me. as i - threats you mentioned? definitely no sleepless nights for me. as i said, i sleepless nights for me. as i said, they have — sleepless nights for me. as i said, they have got some great attacking
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guality _ they have got some great attacking quality i_ they have got some great attacking quality. i have been fortunate enough — quality. i have been fortunate enough to play against some of the world's_ enough to play against some of the world's best players and test myself against _ world's best players and test myself against them. sunday is another game that i against them. sunday is another game that i can _ against them. sunday is another game that i can hopefully test myself against — that i can hopefully test myself against some of the best players. that is— against some of the best players. that is what you want as a footballer, as a professional, to be able to— footballer, as a professional, to be able to come up against these sorts of teams _ able to come up against these sorts of teams and prove to yourself that you can _ of teams and prove to yourself that you can outshine them all, of yourself— you can outshine them all, of yourself and be yourself in these bil yourself and be yourself in these big occasions. we definitely thrive off that, _ big occasions. we definitely thrive off that, i— big occasions. we definitely thrive off that, i definitely do. i'm really— off that, i definitely do. i'm really excited for sunday. you are back in the _ really excited for sunday. you are back in the routine _ really excited for sunday. you are back in the routine now, - really excited for sunday. you are back in the routine now, back - really excited for sunday. you are back in the routine now, back in . really excited for sunday. you are i back in the routine now, back in the knockout _ back in the routine now, back in the knockout stages _ back in the routine now, back in the knockout stages when _ back in the routine now, back in the knockout stages when you - back in the routine now, back in the knockout stages when you get - back in the routine now, back in the knockout stages when you get two i knockout stages when you get two full days _ knockout stages when you get two full days training. _ knockout stages when you get two full days training. there _ knockout stages when you get two full days training. there is - knockout stages when you get two full days training. there is the - full days training. there is the mantra — full days training. there is the mantra of— full days training. there is the mantra ofjust _ full days training. there is the mantra ofjust another- full days training. there is the mantra ofjust another game, | full days training. there is the. mantra ofjust another game, it full days training. there is the - mantra ofjust another game, it is the next _ mantra ofjust another game, it is the next one _ mantra ofjust another game, it is the next one. what _ mantra ofjust another game, it is the next one. what have - mantra ofjust another game, it is the next one. what have the - mantra ofjust another game, it is the next one. what have the lasti mantra ofjust another game, it is. the next one. what have the last two days been _ the next one. what have the last two days been like — the next one. what have the last two days been like since _ the next one. what have the last two days been like since coming - the next one. what have the last two days been like since coming out- the next one. what have the last two days been like since coming out of. days been like since coming out of that denmark— days been like since coming out of that denmark again? _ days been like since coming out of that denmark again?— that denmark again? really calm, actuall . that denmark again? really calm, actually- we _ that denmark again? really calm, actually- we got — that denmark again? really calm, actually. we got back _ that denmark again? really calm, actually. we got back here - that denmark again? really calm, actually. we got back here quite . actually. we got back here quite late after— actually. we got back here quite late after the last game, so we have
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'ust late after the last game, so we have just been— late after the last game, so we have just been trying to recover and get back to _ just been trying to recover and get back to our— just been trying to recover and get back to our normal selves as quickly as possible — back to our normal selves as quickly as possible. today we went and trained — as possible. today we went and trained a — as possible. today we went and trained a little bit, tomorrow will be a lot— trained a little bit, tomorrow will be a lot more full squad with full training — be a lot more full squad with full training i— be a lot more full squad with full training. ithink be a lot more full squad with full training. i think it has been like that all— training. i think it has been like that all tournament really. as i said before, we don't want to try to change _ said before, we don't want to try to change anything or try anything new. everything _ change anything or try anything new. everything that has got us to where we are _ everything that has got us to where we are now— everything that has got us to where we are now has worked, and it is about— we are now has worked, and it is about building on that and keeping improving as players. it was a great thrill after— improving as players. it was a great thrill after the game obviously to be in _ thrill after the game obviously to be in a _ thrill after the game obviously to be in a final. and to get where we are, _ be in a final. and to get where we are i_ be in a final. and to get where we are, i suppose. be in a final. and to get where we are, isuppose. it be in a final. and to get where we are, i suppose. it has been an incredible _ are, i suppose. it has been an incredible journey so far, and we don't _ incredible journey so far, and we don't want — incredible journey so far, and we don't want that to end. we have to put that— don't want that to end. we have to put that to — don't want that to end. we have to put that to the back of our mind now and concentrate on sunday and today and concentrate on sunday and today and tomorrow. two last preparation days for— and tomorrow. two last preparation days for sunday. they have gone
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really _ days for sunday. they have gone really well, and everyone is really excited _ really well, and everyone is really excited for — really well, and everyone is really excited for it.— really well, and everyone is really excited for it. you went to an under 20 world cup _ excited for it. you went to an under 20 world cup with _ excited for it. you went to an under 20 world cup with harry _ excited for it. you went to an under 20 world cup with harry kane - excited for it. you went to an under 20 world cup with harry kane and . excited for it. you went to an under. 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad. _ 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad. and _ 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad. and under— 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad, and under 20 _ 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad, and under 20 euros _ 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad, and under 20 euros as- 20 world cup with harry kane and the squad, and under 20 euros as well. i squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two _ squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys — squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys go _ squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys go back— squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys go back a _ squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys go back a bit, - squad, and under 20 euros as well. you two guys go back a bit, don't. you two guys go back a bit, don't you? _ you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did — you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did you— you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did you think— you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did you think then, - you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did you think then, "he - you two guys go back a bit, don't you? did you think then, "he is l you two guys go back a bit, don'tl you? did you think then, "he is an england _ you? did you think then, "he is an england captain— you? did you think then, "he is an england captain coming _ you? did you think then, "he is an england captain coming up?" - you? did you think then, "he is an| england captain coming up?" what kind of— england captain coming up?" what kind of leader— england captain coming up?" what kind of leader is _ england captain coming up?" what kind of leader is he _ england captain coming up?" what kind of leader is he now— england captain coming up?" what kind of leader is he now and - england captain coming up?" what kind of leader is he now and what. kind of leader is he now and what kind of leader is he now and what kind of— kind of leader is he now and what kind of development _ kind of leader is he now and what kind of development have - kind of leader is he now and what kind of development have you - kind of leader is he now and what. kind of development have you seen over the _ kind of development have you seen over the year— kind of development have you seen over the year from _ kind of development have you seen over the year from harry _ kind of development have you seen over the year from harry kane? - kind of development have you seen over the year from harry kane? i�*mu over the year from harry kane? i'm not iood over the year from harry kane? i'm not good at — over the year from harry kane? not good at predicting if people will be — not good at predicting if people will be captains. he is definitely a leaden _ will be captains. he is definitely a leaden it — will be captains. he is definitely a leader. it has been great to go through— leader. it has been great to go through so many moments with harry. and experience the things that we have done — and experience the things that we have done through youth level right the way— have done through youth level right the way through. i think he's an incredible — the way through. i think he's an incredible player, but definitely an incredible — incredible player, but definitely an incredible person of the pitch as well, _ incredible person of the pitch as well, which stands out more than his playing _ well, which stands out more than his playing ability. which i think speaks _ playing ability. which i think speaks for itself. i think harry would — speaks for itself. i think harry would say— speaks for itself. i think harry would say the same, i know he wears
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the armband, in the squad, there are so many— the armband, in the squad, there are so many leaders. and that is kind of, so many leaders. and that is kind of. um. _ so many leaders. and that is kind of, um, unheard of sometimes in a team _ of, um, unheard of sometimes in a team of— of, um, unheard of sometimes in a team of so— of, um, unheard of sometimes in a team of so many big stars or big players — team of so many big stars or big players or— team of so many big stars or big players or such big talent. to have the leaders — players or such big talent. to have the leaders that we do, it gives us a massive — the leaders that we do, it gives us a massive confidence and is only good _ a massive confidence and is only good for— a massive confidence and is only good for the team. and harry is one of those _ good for the team. and harry is one of those, and i'm sure he is super excited _ of those, and i'm sure he is super excited for— of those, and i'm sure he is super excited for sunday and will keep wearing — excited for sunday and will keep wearing the armband with pride as he does already. wearing the armband with pride as he does already-— does already. finally for me, i think you _ does already. finally for me, i think you would _ does already. finally for me, i think you would probably - does already. finally for me, i think you would probably put i does already. finally for me, i - think you would probably put harry maguire _ think you would probably put harry maguire in— think you would probably put harry maguire in that _ think you would probably put harry maguire in that bracket _ think you would probably put harry maguire in that bracket of - think you would probably put harry maguire in that bracket of leadersl maguire in that bracket of leaders as welt _ maguire in that bracket of leaders as welt he — maguire in that bracket of leaders as welt he was— maguire in that bracket of leaders as well. he was sitting _ maguire in that bracket of leaders as well. he was sitting where - maguire in that bracket of leaders as well. he was sitting where you| as well. he was sitting where you were _ as well. he was sitting where you were just — as well. he was sitting where you were just a — as well. he was sitting where you were just a few— as well. he was sitting where you were just a few days _ as well. he was sitting where you were just a few days ago. - as well. he was sitting where you were just a few days ago. you - as well. he was sitting where you| were just a few days ago. you are talking _ were just a few days ago. you are talking about _ were just a few days ago. you are talking about the _ were just a few days ago. you are talking about the balance - were just a few days ago. you are talking about the balance of- talking about the balance of blocking _ talking about the balance of blocking stuff _ talking about the balance of blocking stuff out _ talking about the balance of blocking stuff out and - talking about the balance of blocking stuff out and being inspired _ blocking stuff out and being inspired by— blocking stuff out and being inspired by what _ blocking stuff out and being inspired by what the - blocking stuff out and being inspired by what the nationi blocking stuff out and being. inspired by what the nation is blocking stuff out and being - inspired by what the nation is and that wave — inspired by what the nation is and that wave of— inspired by what the nation is and that wave of support, _ inspired by what the nation is and that wave of support, he - inspired by what the nation is and that wave of support, he says - inspired by what the nation is and that wave of support, he says the power _ that wave of support, he says the power of — that wave of support, he says the power of social _ that wave of support, he says the power of social media _ that wave of support, he says the power of social media is - that wave of support, he says the power of social media is coming i that wave of support, he says the | power of social media is coming to the fore _ power of social media is coming to the fore for— power of social media is coming to the fore for the _ power of social media is coming to the fore for the power— power of social media is coming to the fore for the power of— power of social media is coming to the fore for the power of good. - power of social media is coming to the fore for the power of good. hej the fore for the power of good. he says you _ the fore for the power of good. he says you are — the fore for the power of good. he says you are just _ the fore for the power of good. he says you are just loving _ the fore for the power of good. he says you are just loving seeing - the fore for the power of good. he. says you are just loving seeing what people _ says you are just loving seeing what people are — says you are just loving seeing what people are doing _ says you are just loving seeing what people are doing all— says you are just loving seeing what people are doing all around - says you are just loving seeing what people are doing all around these i people are doing all around these matches — people are doing all around these matches are _ people are doing all around these matches. are you _ people are doing all around these matches. are you feeding - people are doing all around these matches. are you feeding off- people are doing all around these i matches. are you feeding off that? what _ matches. are you feeding off that? what have — matches. are you feeding off that? what have you _
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matches. are you feeding off that? what have you enjoyed _ matches. are you feeding off that? what have you enjoyed the - matches. are you feeding off that? what have you enjoyed the most i matches. are you feeding off that? - what have you enjoyed the most about that? to _ what have you en'oyed the most about that? ., , ., , ., �* , that? to be honest, i don't see much. i that? to be honest, i don't see much- idon't— that? to be honest, i don't see much. i don't have _ that? to be honest, i don't see much. i don't have much - that? to be honest, i don't see much. i don't have much social| much. i don't have much social media — much. i don't have much social media the _ much. i don't have much social media. the lads are talking about it. media. the lads are talking about it we _ media. the lads are talking about it we see — media. the lads are talking about it. we see reactions after the games and the _ it. we see reactions after the games and the fans watching the big screens— and the fans watching the big screens around england. it has been incredible _ screens around england. it has been incredible. we get messages off friends — incredible. we get messages off friends and family, and the atmosphere that is around the nation — atmosphere that is around the nation, the buzz that everyone is getting. — nation, the buzz that everyone is getting. it — nation, the buzz that everyone is getting, it is so good to be able experience that will give that to our fans— experience that will give that to our fans and everyone in england. it is a special— our fans and everyone in england. it is a special feeling, i suppose i cannot— is a special feeling, i suppose i cannot really describe it. but hopefully on sunday, we can give everyone — hopefully on sunday, we can give everyone another memorable day and a -reat everyone another memorable day and a great occasion. two everyone another memorable day and a great occasion-— great occasion. two more sleeps, john. great occasion. two more sleeps, john- good _ great occasion. two more sleeps, john. good luck. _ great occasion. two more sleeps, john. good luck. we _ great occasion. two more sleeps, john. good luck. we go _ great occasion. two more sleeps, john. good luck. we go back- great occasion. two more sleeps, john. good luck. we go back to i great occasion. two more sleeps, - john. good luck. we go back to zoom and toksport- — john. good luck. we go back to zoom and toksport. you _ john. good luck. we go back to zoom and toksport. you have _ john. good luck. we go back to zoom and toksport. you have worked - john. good luck. we go back to zoom and toksport. you have worked with l and toksport. you have worked with
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the likes of — and toksport. you have worked with the likes of pep _ and toksport. you have worked with the likes of pep guardiola _ and toksport. you have worked with the likes of pep guardiola and - the likes of pep guardiola and roberto— the likes of pep guardiola and roberto martinez, _ the likes of pep guardiola and roberto martinez, what - the likes of pep guardiola and i roberto martinez, what makes the likes of pep guardiola and - roberto martinez, what makes gareth southgate _ roberto martinez, what makes gareth southgate different _ roberto martinez, what makes gareth southgate different other _ roberto martinez, what makes gareth southgate different other managers i southgate different other managers you have _ southgate different other managers you have played _ southgate different other managers you have played under? _ southgate different other managers you have played under? i— southgate different other managers you have played under?— southgate different other managers you have played under? i think every manaierl you have played under? i think every manager i have _ you have played under? i think every manager i have had _ you have played under? i think every manager i have had is _ you have played under? i think every manager i have had is definitely - manager i have had is definitely unique — manager i have had is definitely unique and has their own managing style and _ unique and has their own managing style and philosophy. personal characteristics, i think gareth has created _ characteristics, i think gareth has created an — characteristics, i think gareth has created an unbelievable culture within _ created an unbelievable culture within our squad. an unbelievable togetherness, calmness that is his unique _ togetherness, calmness that is his unique quality as a person. and as a manager~ _ unique quality as a person. and as a manager~ he — unique quality as a person. and as a manager. he has got great staff around — manager. he has got great staff around him and an incredible squad that he _ around him and an incredible squad that he has— around him and an incredible squad that he has put together with a lot of great _ that he has put together with a lot of great characters in that. i think for me _ of great characters in that. i think for me his — of great characters in that. i think for me his one of his best characteristics it is calmness under pressure — characteristics it is calmness under pressure. his willingness to win. i
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think— pressure. his willingness to win. i think that — pressure. his willingness to win. i think that shines through. when you have got— think that shines through. when you have got a _ think that shines through. when you have got a leader, a manager that has got _ have got a leader, a manager that has got that quality, it passes through— has got that quality, it passes through the team really quickly and you soon— through the team really quickly and you soonjump on board. it is special— you soonjump on board. it is special to— you soonjump on board. it is special to have.— you soonjump on board. it is special to have. thanks, james. there has _ special to have. thanks, james. there has been _ special to have. thanks, james. there has been a _ special to have. thanks, james. there has been a lot _ special to have. thanks, james. there has been a lot of - special to have. thanks, james. there has been a lot of games . specialto have. thanks, james. i there has been a lot of games and specialto have. thanks, james. - there has been a lot of games and i will cast— there has been a lot of games and i will cast your — there has been a lot of games and i will cast your mind _ there has been a lot of games and i will cast your mind all— there has been a lot of games and i will cast your mind all the _ there has been a lot of games and i will cast your mind all the way- there has been a lot of games and i will cast your mind all the way back| will cast your mind all the way back to the _ will cast your mind all the way back to the last — will cast your mind all the way back to the last friendly _ will cast your mind all the way back to the last friendly you _ will cast your mind all the way back to the last friendly you played - to the last friendly you played before — to the last friendly you played before the _ to the last friendly you played before the world _ to the last friendly you played before the world cup. - to the last friendly you played before the world cup. that i to the last friendly you played i before the world cup. that was against — before the world cup. that was against italy _ before the world cup. that was against italy. you _ before the world cup. that was against italy. you are _ before the world cup. that was against italy. you are part - before the world cup. that was against italy. you are part of i before the world cup. that was against italy. you are part of a i against italy. you are part of a three-man— against italy. you are part of a three—man defence. _ against italy. you are part of a three—man defence. you - against italy. you are part of a three—man defence. you are i against italy. you are part of a i three—man defence. you are on against italy. you are part of a - three—man defence. you are on course for a win _ three—man defence. you are on course fora win except— three—man defence. you are on course for a win except for— three—man defence. you are on course for a win, except for a _ for a win, except for a controversial- for a win, except for a | controversial decision, for a win, except for a i controversial decision, a for a win, except for a _ controversial decision, a penalty given— controversial decision, a penalty given to — controversial decision, a penalty given to chiesa. _ controversial decision, a penalty given to chiesa. it _ controversial decision, a penalty given to chiesa. it was _ controversial decision, a penalty given to chiesa. it was felt - controversial decision, a penalty given to chiesa. it was felt it - controversial decision, a penaltyl given to chiesa. it was felt it was an unfair— given to chiesa. it was felt it was an unfair penalty— given to chiesa. it was felt it was an unfair penalty decision. - given to chiesa. it was felt it was an unfair penalty decision. i- given to chiesa. it was felt it was an unfair penalty decision. i think it is art an unfair penalty decision. i think it is part and _ an unfair penalty decision. i think it is part and parcel _ an unfair penalty decision. i think it is part and parcel of _ an unfair penalty decision. i think it is part and parcel of football i it is part and parcel of football now that — it is part and parcel of football now that the decisions and everything that surrounds the game,
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with var _ everything that surrounds the game, with var and different referees that we are _ with var and different referees that we are not— with var and different referees that we are not used to seeing in the premier— we are not used to seeing in the premier league coming from different nations, _ premier league coming from different nations, different leagues that they play in _ nations, different leagues that they play in it— nations, different leagues that they play in. it is difficult and those sorts— play in. it is difficult and those sorts of— play in. it is difficult and those sorts of things happen and you have to blank— sorts of things happen and you have to blank it _ sorts of things happen and you have to blank it out and go ahead. i think— to blank it out and go ahead. i think i— to blank it out and go ahead. i think i can— to blank it out and go ahead. i think i can only refer it to the other— think i can only refer it to the other day _ think i can only refer it to the other day, ourfirst think i can only refer it to the other day, our first goal that we conceded — other day, our first goal that we conceded in the tournament. it was probably— conceded in the tournament. it was probably inevitable that it was going — probably inevitable that it was going to — probably inevitable that it was going to happen at some point, and i think how— going to happen at some point, and i think how we dealt with that situation and that deflation a bit was a _ situation and that deflation a bit was a sign of a real winning team. we got _ was a sign of a real winning team. we got the — was a sign of a real winning team. we got the ball straight out of the net, we got the ball straight out of the not we _ we got the ball straight out of the net, we ran back up to the halfway line and _ net, we ran back up to the halfway line and everyone seems to block it out and _ line and everyone seems to block it out and kept focused on what we needed _ out and kept focused on what we needed to— out and kept focused on what we needed to do. i think from that instant — needed to do. i think from that instant that you have told me about
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is progression and what we have learned — is progression and what we have learned from instances like that. and we _ learned from instances like that. and we can only keep improving and keep going — and we can only keep improving and keep going forward and trying to control— keep going forward and trying to control what we can control in the games _ control what we can control in the games it— control what we can control in the names. . , control what we can control in the tames. ., , ., ., control what we can control in the names. ., ., ., , ., control what we can control in the names. ., ., , ., ., ., games. it was a real strong italian side, games. it was a real strong italian side. raheem _ games. it was a real strong italian side, raheem sterling _ games. it was a real strong italian side, raheem sterling man - games. it was a real strong italian side, raheem sterling man of- games. it was a real strong italian side, raheem sterling man of the| side, raheem sterling man of the match _ side, raheem sterling man of the match his— side, raheem sterling man of the match. his direct _ side, raheem sterling man of the match. his direct ability, - side, raheem sterling man of the match. his direct ability, he - side, raheem sterling man of the match. his direct ability, he was i match. his direct ability, he was such— match. his direct ability, he was such a _ match. his direct ability, he was such a handful— match. his direct ability, he was such a handful for— match. his direct ability, he was such a handful for bonucci - match. his direct ability, he was such a handful for bonucci and i match. his direct ability, he wasl such a handful for bonucci and all of them — such a handful for bonucci and all of them he _ such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had _ such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had a _ such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had a bit _ such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had a bit of- such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had a bit of a - such a handful for bonucci and all of them. he had a bit of a toughl such a handful for bonucci and all. of them. he had a bit of a tough run into this _ of them. he had a bit of a tough run into this competition, _ of them. he had a bit of a tough run into this competition, is _ of them. he had a bit of a tough run into this competition, is your - into this competition, is your player— into this competition, is your player of— into this competition, is your player of the _ into this competition, is your player of the tournament? i into this competition, is your i player of the tournament? and into this competition, is your - player of the tournament? and how much _ player of the tournament? and how much of— player of the tournament? and how much of handful— player of the tournament? and how much of handful is _ player of the tournament? and how much of handful is he _ player of the tournament? and how much of handful is he going - player of the tournament? and how much of handful is he going to- player of the tournament? and how much of handful is he going to be i much of handful is he going to be for the _ much of handful is he going to be for the italians? _ much of handful is he going to be for the italians? [— much of handful is he going to be for the italians?— for the italians? i have said all alon: , for the italians? i have said all along. i'm _ for the italians? i have said all along. i'm a — for the italians? i have said all along. i'm a big _ for the italians? i have said all along, i'm a big fan _ for the italians? i have said all along, i'm a big fan of- for the italians? i have said all. along, i'm a big fan of raheem's. for the italians? i have said all- along, i'm a big fan of raheem's. i would _ along, i'm a big fan of raheem's. i would love — along, i'm a big fan of raheem's. i would love to see him get play of the tournament. i think what he has done _ the tournament. i think what he has done for— the tournament. i think what he has done for us, — the tournament. i think what he has done for us, the unselfish part of him kind — done for us, the unselfish part of him kind of— done for us, the unselfish part of him kind of goes unspoken about. but as players. _ him kind of goes unspoken about. but as players, we see it. he has been a greater— as players, we see it. he has been a greater threat going forward and how direct— greater threat going forward and how direct he _ greater threat going forward and how direct he has been in the games, he has been _ direct he has been in the games, he has been great to play with and i'm
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sure he _ has been great to play with and i'm sure he will— has been great to play with and i'm sure he will be giving everything on sunday. _ sure he will be giving everything on sunday, hopefully get another goal and see _ sunday, hopefully get another goal and see where it takes us. can sunday, hopefully get another goal and see where it takes us.- and see where it takes us. can you remember — and see where it takes us. can you remember much _ and see where it takes us. can you remember much of _ and see where it takes us. can you remember much of chiesa - and see where it takes us. can you remember much of chiesa from i and see where it takes us. can you. remember much of chiesa from that match? _ remember much of chiesa from that match? l— remember much of chiesa from that match? . . �* remember much of chiesa from that match? .. �* ., ~ ., match? i can't, no. ithink now we have that— match? i can't, no. ithink now we have that many — match? i can't, no. ithink now we have that many games, _ match? i can't, no. ithink now we have that many games, especially| have that many games, especially over the _ have that many games, especially over the last year, every three days, — over the last year, every three days, so— over the last year, every three days, so many games, different competitions, that is where we have -ot competitions, that is where we have got such— competitions, that is where we have got such good staff around us then we can— got such good staff around us then we can get— got such good staff around us then we can get those clips up. we have already— we can get those clips up. we have already been doing our homework and figuring _ already been doing our homework and figuring out— already been doing our homework and figuring out what are the best thing to do— figuring out what are the best thing to do is _ figuring out what are the best thing to do is it — figuring out what are the best thing to do is. it is that sort of time, that— to do is. it is that sort of time, that in— to do is. it is that sort of time, that in between time, from our previous— that in between time, from our previous game going into the next game _ previous game going into the next game where we can get those sorts of bits done _ game where we can get those sorts of bits done and concentrate on us and look ahead — bits done and concentrate on us and look ahead to sunday. and bits done and concentrate on us and look ahead to sunday.— look ahead to sunday. and for a bit offun, look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun. cast — look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun. cast your— look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun, cast your mind _ look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun, cast your mind back- look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun, cast your mind back to - look ahead to sunday. and for a bit of fun, cast your mind back to a i of fun, cast your mind back to a tool— of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i _ of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think— of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you _ of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you are _ of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you are 18 _ of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you are 18 or- of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you are 18 or 19, - of fun, cast your mind back to a tool i think you are 18 or 19, in. tool i think you are 18 or 19, in america — tool i think you are 18 or 19, in america against— tool i think you are 18 or 19, in america against juventus. - tool i think you are 18 or 19, in america against juventus. i i tool i think you are 18 or 19, in america against juventus. i know what is coming! _
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america against juventus. i know what is coming! and _ america against juventus. i know what is coming! and reappear i america against juventus. i know what is coming! and reappear on j america against juventus. i know - what is coming! and reappear on the itch, what is coming! and reappear on the pitch. bonucci. _ what is coming! and reappear on the pitch, bonucci, it— what is coming! and reappear on the pitch, bonucci, it went _ what is coming! and reappear on the pitch, bonucci, it went to _ pitch, bonucci, it went to penalties _ pitch, bonucci, it went to penalties. andrea - pitch, bonucci, it went to penalties. andrea pirloi pitch, bonucci, it went to - penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, remind _ penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, remind everyone _ penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, remind everyone what _ penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, remind everyone what you - penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, remind everyone what you did. - penalties. andrea pirlo missed his, i remind everyone what you did. here, ouni lad, remind everyone what you did. here, young lad. stepped — remind everyone what you did. here, young lad. stepped up- _ remind everyone what you did. here, young lad, stepped up. i— remind everyone what you did. here, young lad, stepped up. ithink- remind everyone what you did. here, young lad, stepped up. i think it- young lad, stepped up. i think it was in _ young lad, stepped up. i think it was in san — young lad, stepped up. i think it was in san francisco. i went and think— was in san francisco. i went and think that — was in san francisco. i went and think that one down the middle, i think— think that one down the middle, i think that — think that one down the middle, i think that was the naive john. —— i dinked _ think that was the naive john. —— i dinked down— think that was the naive john. —— i dinked down the middle. a full game after turning up to everton, it was after turning up to everton, it was a special— after turning up to everton, it was a special moment for me and one that i a special moment for me and one that i -et a special moment for me and one that i get reminded about a lot. it a special moment for me and one that i get reminded about a lot.— i get reminded about a lot. it was a panenka. yeah. _ i get reminded about a lot. it was a panenka. yeah. you _ i get reminded about a lot. it was a panenka. yeah. you played - i get reminded about a lot. it was a panenka. yeah. you played againstj panenka. yeah. you played against pirlo on that _ panenka. yeah. you played against pirlo on that night, _ panenka. yeah. you played against pirlo on that night, how _ panenka. yeah. you played against pirlo on that night, how does - panenka. yeah. you played against pirlo on that night, how does the i pirlo on that night, how does the yorkshire — pirlo on that night, how does the yorkshire pirlo compare? two different— yorkshire pirlo compare? two different players. i have had the
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opportunity to play with calvin, i hope _ opportunity to play with calvin, i hope it— opportunity to play with calvin, i hope it is— opportunity to play with calvin, i hope it is carbon that you are on about? — hope it is carbon that you are on about? he — hope it is carbon that you are on about? he has his own play and his own qualities. it is funny that he has been — own qualities. it is funny that he has been labelled the yorkshire pirlo _ has been labelled the yorkshire pirlo i— has been labelled the yorkshire pirlo. i will get on to him after this _ pirlo. i will get on to him after this an — pirlo. i will get on to him after this. an incredible player, to see him come — this. an incredible player, to see him come through and perform the way he has _ him come through and perform the way he has during this tournament, i think— he has during this tournament, i think it — he has during this tournament, i think it is — he has during this tournament, i think it is his first major tournament. i could not be happier for him. _ tournament. i could not be happier for him. he — tournament. i could not be happier for him, he has done himself so proud — for him, he has done himself so proud and _ for him, he has done himself so proud. and obviously everyone back home _ proud. and obviously everyone back home |_ proud. and obviously everyone back home. ., ., ., ., , home. i have to ask you about kyle walker as well. _ home. i have to ask you about kyle walker as well. club _ home. i have to ask you about kyle walker as well. club team-mate, . home. i have to ask you about kyle - walker as well. club team-mate, once walker as well. club team—mate, once again— walker as well. club team—mate, once againjust _ walker as well. club team—mate, once againjust outstanding _ walker as well. club team—mate, once again just outstanding performance - again just outstanding performance of his— again just outstanding performance of his life _ again just outstanding performance of his life again— again just outstanding performance of his life again and _ again just outstanding performance of his life again and again. - again just outstanding performance of his life again and again. how- of his life again and again. how much _ of his life again and again. how much are — of his life again and again. how much are you _ of his life again and again. how much are you going _ of his life again and again. how much are you going to - of his life again and again. how much are you going to miss- of his life again and again. how. much are you going to miss your team-mates? _ much are you going to miss your team—mates? because - much are you going to miss your team—mates? because i- much are you going to miss your team—mates? because i don't. much are you going to miss your. team—mates? because i don't think anyone _ team—mates? because i don't think anyone wants — team—mates? because i don't think anyone wants this _ team—mates? because i don't think
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anyone wants this to _ team—mates? because i don't think anyone wants this to come - team—mates? because i don't think anyone wants this to come to - team—mates? because i don't think anyone wants this to come to an . team—mates? because i don't think. anyone wants this to come to an end, is that— anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the _ anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the feeling _ anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the feeling for— anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the feeling for all— anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the feeling for all of— anyone wants this to come to an end, is that the feeling for all of you? - is that the feeling for all of you? definitely. — is that the feeling for all of you? definitely. i— is that the feeling for all of you? definitely, i think— is that the feeling for all of you? definitely, i think especially- is that the feeling for all of you? definitely, i think especially this| definitely, i think especially this past week. everything kind of speeds up, past week. everything kind of speeds up. games— past week. everything kind of speeds up, games come quicker. i think we have _ up, games come quicker. i think we have just _ up, games come quicker. i think we have just got — up, games come quicker. i think we have just got our mind set on doing the job— have just got our mind set on doing the job and — have just got our mind set on doing the job and are trying to get it over— the job and are trying to get it over the — the job and are trying to get it over the line. and make some more history— over the line. and make some more history for— over the line. and make some more history for the nation. i think i said _ history for the nation. i think i said it — history for the nation. i think i said it at — history for the nation. i think i said it at the start of the tournament, but we have got so many winners _ tournament, but we have got so many winners in _ tournament, but we have got so many winners in the team, and to have that winning mentality. we are so focused _ that winning mentality. we are so focused on — that winning mentality. we are so focused on trying to get a bit more silverware — focused on trying to get a bit more silverware and make history. yeah, it is kind _ silverware and make history. yeah, it is kind of— silverware and make history. yeah, it is kind of hard to put it into words — it is kind of hard to put it into words when you just have that one focus _ words when you just have that one focus and — words when you just have that one focus and it— words when you just have that one focus and it has kind of come quick. it is focus and it has kind of come quick. it is two _ focus and it has kind of come quick. it is two days — focus and it has kind of come quick. it is two days away now, and you 'ust it is two days away now, and you just want — it is two days away now, and you just want to _ it is two days away now, and you just want to get it over the line. thanks— just want to get it over the line. thanks stop we would take another question from italy on zoom. hello,
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john. i question from italy on zoom. hello, john- i have — question from italy on zoom. hello, john. i have two _ question from italy on zoom. hello, john. i have two questions. - question from italy on zoom. hello, john. i have two questions. the - john. i have two questions. the first— john. i have two questions. the first one — john. i have two questions. the first one is _ john. i have two questions. the first one is maybe _ john. i have two questions. the first one is maybe italy's - john. i have two questions. the. first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa — first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa and _ first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa and maybe _ first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa and maybe he - first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa and maybe he is- first one is maybe italy's sterling is chiesa and maybe he is the - first one is maybe italy's sterling i is chiesa and maybe he is the most dangerous— is chiesa and maybe he is the most dangerous player— is chiesa and maybe he is the most dangerous player in _ is chiesa and maybe he is the most dangerous player in this _ is chiesa and maybe he is the most dangerous player in this particularl dangerous player in this particular moment — dangerous player in this particular moment do — dangerous player in this particular moment do you _ dangerous player in this particular moment. do you agree _ dangerous player in this particular moment. do you agree with - dangerous player in this particular moment. do you agree with that? dangerous player in this particular- moment. do you agree with that? and secondly, _ moment. do you agree with that? and secondly you — moment. do you agree with that? and secondly, you mentioned _ moment. do you agree with that? and secondly, you mentioned the - moment. do you agree with that? and secondly, you mentioned the italian i secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality— secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality in — secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality in defence _ secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality in defence and _ secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality in defence and also, - secondly, you mentioned the italian mentality in defence and also, i - mentality in defence and also, i mean, _ mentality in defence and also, i mean we — mentality in defence and also, i mean we saw— mentality in defence and also, i mean we saw in— mentality in defence and also, i mean, we saw in these - mentality in defence and also, i mean, we saw in these games. | mentality in defence and also, i i mean, we saw in these games. do mentality in defence and also, i - mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe _ mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think— mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think that — mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think that it _ mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think that it is _ mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think that it is england - mean, we saw in these games. do you maybe think that it is england that - maybe think that it is england that this year— maybe think that it is england that this year has — maybe think that it is england that this year has the _ maybe think that it is england that this year has the defensive - this year has the defensive mentality— this year has the defensive mentality of— this year has the defensive mentality of italy? - this year has the defensive mentality of italy? like, i. this year has the defensive - mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in— mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in the — mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in the past _ mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in the past years. _ mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in the past years. i— mentality of italy? like, i mean, it was in the past years.— was in the past years. i think we kind of created _ was in the past years. i think we kind of created our _ was in the past years. i think we kind of created our own - was in the past years. i think we. kind of created our own mentality was in the past years. i think we - kind of created our own mentality in respect _ kind of created our own mentality in respect of _
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kind of created our own mentality in respect of defending. i think i could — respect of defending. i think i could be _ respect of defending. i think i could be wrong, we have the best defensive — could be wrong, we have the best defensive record in the competition. i defensive record in the competition. ithink— defensive record in the competition. i think it _ defensive record in the competition. i think it is _ defensive record in the competition. ithink it is a — defensive record in the competition. i think it is a major factor why we have _ i think it is a major factor why we have got— i think it is a major factor why we have got to — i think it is a major factor why we have got to the final. i said it all along _ have got to the final. i said it all along about us keeping clean sheets, that is— along about us keeping clean sheets, that is a _ along about us keeping clean sheets, that is a platform for us to go and win games — that is a platform for us to go and win games. and that is everyone playing _ win games. and that is everyone playing their part, not just win games. and that is everyone playing their part, notjust us as win games. and that is everyone playing their part, not just us as a back— playing their part, not just us as a back four, — playing their part, not just us as a back four, back five. it starts right — back four, back five. it starts right from _ back four, back five. it starts right from the top of the pitch. and how we _ right from the top of the pitch. and how we have pressed, and we have won the ball— how we have pressed, and we have won the ball back _ how we have pressed, and we have won the ball back. it has been a major part of— the ball back. it has been a major part of our— the ball back. it has been a major part of our game. in tournament football, _ part of our game. in tournament football, we learned that from russia — football, we learned that from russia. to keep clean sheets and have _ russia. to keep clean sheets and have that — russia. to keep clean sheets and have that good defensive balance about _ have that good defensive balance about our— have that good defensive balance about our game is a key part to us progressing — about our game is a key part to us progressing through the tournament and being _ progressing through the tournament and being a winning team. we are seeing— and being a winning team. we are seeing that— and being a winning team. we are seeing that over the years, the teams — seeing that over the years, the teams that have won tournaments have been so _ teams that have won tournaments have been so good defending set plays and attacking _ been so good defending set plays and attacking set plays. and also not
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conceding — attacking set plays. and also not conceding goals in big moments and managing _ conceding goals in big moments and managing the game with things like that. managing the game with things like that i_ managing the game with things like that. i think it has become a mentality— that. i think it has become a mentality of our own that we have created _ mentality of our own that we have created within our squad. hurkacz you what about chiesa? is he the italian raheem _ hurkacz you what about chiesa? is he the italian raheem sterling? - hurkacz you what about chiesa? is he the italian raheem sterling? is - hurkacz you what about chiesa? is he the italian raheem sterling? is he i the italian raheem sterling? is he the italian raheem sterling? is he the most — the italian raheem sterling? is he the most dangerous _ the italian raheem sterling? is he the most dangerous man - the italian raheem sterling? is he the most dangerous man for- the italian raheem sterling? is he the most dangerous man for you? | the italian raheem sterling? is he. the most dangerous man for you? i think the most dangerous man for you? think they have a great squad, as the most dangerous man for you?” think they have a great squad, as i said before — think they have a great squad, as i said before. i'm not going to liken anyone _ said before. i'm not going to liken anyone to — said before. i'm not going to liken anyone to raheem, i believe he is his own _ anyone to raheem, i believe he is his own player. they have so much quality _ his own player. they have so much quality and — his own player. they have so much quality and experience, and that's why they— quality and experience, and that's why they are in the final.- why they are in the final. thank ou. why they are in the final. thank you- itack _ why they are in the final. thank you- itack in — why they are in the final. thank you. back in the _ why they are in the final. thank you. back in the room, - why they are in the final. thank you. back in the room, dan - why they are in the final. thank- you. back in the room, dan salisbury jones, itv. hi. you. back in the room, dan salisbury jones. itv-— jones, itv. hi, you may have seen there is a — jones, itv. hi, you may have seen there is a campaign _ jones, itv. hi, you may have seen there is a campaign for— jones, itv. hi, you may have seen there is a campaign for an - jones, itv. hi, you may have seen there is a campaign for an extra i there is a campaign for an extra bank— there is a campaign for an extra bank holiday. _ there is a campaign for an extra bank holiday, should _ there is a campaign for an extra bank holiday, should you - there is a campaign for an extra bank holiday, should you win i there is a campaign for an extra| bank holiday, should you win on sunday — bank holiday, should you win on sunday do _ bank holiday, should you win on sunday do you _ bank holiday, should you win on sunday. do you welcome - bank holiday, should you win on sunday. do you welcome that, i bank holiday, should you win on. sunday. do you welcome that, or bank holiday, should you win on - sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find _ sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it _ sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it a — sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it a bit _ sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it a bit of— sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it a bit of an— sunday. do you welcome that, or do you find it a bit of an unnecessary. you find it a bit of an unnecessary
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added _ you find it a bit of an unnecessary added pressure? _ you find it a bit of an unnecessary added pressure? i— you find it a bit of an unnecessary added pressure?— you find it a bit of an unnecessary added pressure? i don't get involved in that sort of— added pressure? i don't get involved in that sort of stuff! _ added pressure? i don't get involved in that sort of stuff! it's _ added pressure? i don't get involved in that sort of stuff! it's not - added pressure? i don't get involved in that sort of stuff! it's not for - in that sort of stuff! it's not for me to — in that sort of stuff! it's not for me to decide. i can't control that. i me to decide. i can't control that. i can— me to decide. i can't control that. i can only— me to decide. i can't control that. i can only focus on what i can do. if it i can only focus on what i can do. if it happens _ i can only focus on what i can do. if it happens i'm sure it will make a lot— if it happens i'm sure it will make a lot of— if it happens i'm sure it will make a lot of people happy. i think if we win the _ a lot of people happy. i think if we win the euros that will make people even more — win the euros that will make people even more happy so i try and focus on what _ even more happy so i try and focus on what i _ even more happy so i try and focus on what i can— even more happy so i try and focus on what i can control and leave the rest to _ on what i can control and leave the rest to other people.— rest to other people. thanks. back on zoom to — rest to other people. thanks. back on zoom to don _ rest to other people. thanks. back on zoom to don smith, _ rest to other people. thanks. back on zoom to don smith, england i on zoom to don smith, england football .org.— on zoom to don smith, england football .org. two questions from me. football .org. two questions from me- when — football .org. two questions from me- when you — football .org. two questions from me. when you made _ football .org. two questions from me. when you made your - football .org. two questions from me. when you made your debut i football .org. two questions from - me. when you made your debut seven years— me. when you made your debut seven years ago— me. when you made your debut seven years ago against _ me. when you made your debut seven years ago against peru, _ me. when you made your debut seven years ago against peru, surely- me. when you made your debut seven years ago against peru, surely you - years ago against peru, surely you didn't— years ago against peru, surely you didn't think— years ago against peru, surely you didn't think that— years ago against peru, surely you didn't think that this _ years ago against peru, surely you didn't think that this came - years ago against peru, surely you didn't think that this came as - years ago against peru, surely you didn't think that this came as partl didn't think that this came as part of the _ didn't think that this came as part of the job, — didn't think that this came as part of the job, england _ didn't think that this came as part of the job, england in _ didn't think that this came as part of the job, england in a _ didn't think that this came as part of thejob, england in a major- of thejob, england in a major tournament— of thejob, england in a major tournament final. _ of thejob, england in a major tournament final. what - of thejob, england in a major tournament final. what are i of thejob, england in a major. tournament final. what are you of thejob, england in a major- tournament final. what are you most looking _ tournament final. what are you most looking forward — tournament final. what are you most looking forward to _ tournament final. what are you most looking forward to about _ tournament final. what are you most looking forward to about it? - tournament final. what are you most looking forward to about it? i - tournament final. what are you most looking forward to about it?- looking forward to about it? i think it's the unknown _ looking forward to about it? i think it's the unknown territory - looking forward to about it? i think it's the unknown territory that's i it's the unknown territory that's never _ it's the unknown territory that's never been done before, and being
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part of— never been done before, and being part of that — never been done before, and being part of that is something special and something i'm proud of. we have come _ and something i'm proud of. we have come so _ and something i'm proud of. we have come so far— and something i'm proud of. we have come so far as a and something i'm proud of. we have come so faras a team, and something i'm proud of. we have come so far as a team, made so many bil come so far as a team, made so many big steps. _ come so far as a team, made so many big steps, made a lot of history, and sunday is another chance for us to do— and sunday is another chance for us to do that — and sunday is another chance for us to do that. that's something that motivates— to do that. that's something that motivates me, sites and —— excites me. _ motivates me, sites and —— excites me. and _ motivates me, sites and —— excites me, and pushes me on. it's about being _ me, and pushes me on. it's about being as _ me, and pushes me on. it's about being as prepared as we can b and personally— being as prepared as we can b and personally as prepared as i can be and give _ personally as prepared as i can be and give everything for my team—mates, the shirt, the nation and getting — team—mates, the shirt, the nation and getting it over the line at the end of— and getting it over the line at the end of the — and getting it over the line at the end of the day.— and getting it over the line at the end of the day. well, hopefully you can. on end of the day. well, hopefully you can- 0n the — end of the day. well, hopefully you can. on the team _ end of the day. well, hopefully you can. on the team spirit, _ end of the day. well, hopefully you can. on the team spirit, does - end of the day. well, hopefully you can. on the team spirit, does the . can. on the team spirit, does the team _ can. on the team spirit, does the team spirit— can. on the team spirit, does the team spirit and _ can. on the team spirit, does the team spirit and closeness - can. on the team spirit, does the. team spirit and closeness between you all— team spirit and closeness between you all in— team spirit and closeness between you all in this _ team spirit and closeness between you all in this camp— team spirit and closeness between you all in this camp especially- team spirit and closeness between you all in this camp especially this| you all in this camp especially this year with— you all in this camp especially this year with not— you all in this camp especially this year with not being _ you all in this camp especially this year with not being able _ you all in this camp especially this year with not being able to - you all in this camp especially this year with not being able to see . you all in this camp especially this i year with not being able to see your family— year with not being able to see your family and _ year with not being able to see your familyand being _ year with not being able to see your family and being in— year with not being able to see your family and being in the _ year with not being able to see your family and being in the bubble - family and being in the bubble because — family and being in the bubble because of— family and being in the bubble because of covid? _ family and being in the bubble because of covid? do - family and being in the bubble because of covid? do you - family and being in the bubblel because of covid? do you think family and being in the bubble - because of covid? do you think that has helped? — because of covid? do you think that has helped? l— because of covid? do you think that has helped?— has helped? i think it depends how ou look has helped? i think it depends how you look at — has helped? i think it depends how you look at it- _ has helped? i think it depends how you look at it. i— has helped? i think it depends how you look at it. i think _ has helped? i think it depends how you look at it. i think we _ has helped? i think it depends how you look at it. i think we have - has helped? i think it depends how you look at it. i think we have all. you look at it. i think we have all been _ you look at it. i think we have all
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been so — you look at it. i think we have all been so focused on what has happened, not being able to see our families— happened, not being able to see our families has been difficult for everyone. not spending time with them, _ everyone. not spending time with them, or— everyone. not spending time with them, or getting that one or two days— them, or getting that one or two days which— them, or getting that one or two days which we have had previously and in _ days which we have had previously and in other tournaments, days which we have had previously and in othertournaments, but days which we have had previously and in other tournaments, but it is something — and in other tournaments, but it is something we have had to adapt to and we _ something we have had to adapt to and we have all done that really welt _ and we have all done that really welt we — and we have all done that really well. we are all here for one reason and that's— well. we are all here for one reason and that's to — well. we are all here for one reason and that's to try and win the euros on sunday — and that's to try and win the euros on sunday. we have given ourselves that opportunity. all the dedication, all the things we have sacrificed — dedication, all the things we have sacrificed to get us where we are right— sacrificed to get us where we are right now. — sacrificed to get us where we are right now, you could say everything is kind _ right now, you could say everything is kind of— right now, you could say everything is kind of come together at the right— is kind of come together at the right time. is kind of come together at the right time-— is kind of come together at the riiht time. . «a ., ., right time. thanks, we have time for two more, right time. thanks, we have time for two more. rob _ right time. thanks, we have time for two more, rob harris— right time. thanks, we have time for two more, rob harris in _ right time. thanks, we have time for two more, rob harris in the - right time. thanks, we have time for two more, rob harris in the room. i two more, rob harris in the room. hi, john. good luck for sunday. you talked _ hi, john. good luck for sunday. you talked about — hi, john. good luck for sunday. you talked about raheem _ hi, john. good luck for sunday. you talked about raheem sterling - hi, john. good luck for sunday. you talked about raheem sterling and l hi, john. good luck for sunday. you i talked about raheem sterling and you have seen _ talked about raheem sterling and you have seen his — talked about raheem sterling and you have seen his development _ talked about raheem sterling and you have seen his development up - talked about raheem sterling and you have seen his development up close. i have seen his development up close. how do _ have seen his development up close. how do you _ have seen his development up close. how do you see — have seen his development up close. how do you see him _ have seen his development up close. how do you see him developing - have seen his development up close. how do you see him developing as i have seen his development up close. how do you see him developing as a i how do you see him developing as a player— how do you see him developing as a player and _ how do you see him developing as a player and through _ how do you see him developing as a player and through things _ how do you see him developing as a player and through things like - player and through things like frustration _ player and through things like frustration last— player and through things like
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frustration last season, - player and through things like frustration last season, not i frustration last season, not starting _ frustration last season, not starting all _ frustration last season, not starting all the _ frustration last season, not starting all the time - frustration last season, not starting all the time and i frustration last season, not - starting all the time and growing into such — starting all the time and growing into such a — starting all the time and growing into such a key— starting all the time and growing into such a key figure _ starting all the time and growing into such a key figure for- starting all the time and growing into such a key figure for the - starting all the time and growing i into such a key figure for the team into such a key figure for the team in such— into such a key figure for the team in such a _ into such a key figure for the team in such a role _ into such a key figure for the team in such a role model— into such a key figure for the team in such a role model off— into such a key figure for the team in such a role model off the - into such a key figure for the team in such a role model off the pitch i in such a role model off the pitch as well? — in such a role model off the pitch as well? i— in such a role model off the pitch as well? .., �* , in such a role model off the pitch aswell? �* , ., ,, ., as well? i couldn't be happier for him. you know, _ as well? i couldn't be happier for him. you know, he _ as well? i couldn't be happier for him. you know, he has - as well? i couldn't be happier for him. you know, he has gone - as well? i couldn't be happier for- him. you know, he has gone through some _ him. you know, he has gone through some difficult times personally, and i can some difficult times personally, and i can only— some difficult times personally, and i can only kind of speak of it from my point— i can only kind of speak of it from my point of— i can only kind of speak of it from my point of view and what i have been _ my point of view and what i have been through. you can see it has motivated — been through. you can see it has motivated him and he has come out of the other— motivated him and he has come out of the other end a better player. that's — the other end a better player. that's what top players do, they find something, or they find a way when _ find something, or they find a way when things aren't going well, to succeed — when things aren't going well, to succeed and excel as a person and as a player~ _ succeed and excel as a person and as a player. raheem has done that on and off— a player. raheem has done that on and off the — a player. raheem has done that on and off the pitch and all i can say is he _ and off the pitch and all i can say is he really— and off the pitch and all i can say is he really deserves it. talking about refereeing, not in the last game but overall in the tournament have you noticed like fewer interruptions from the ar the game flow a bit? have you seen something you�*d like to keep for the premier league? t
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something you'd like to keep for the premier league?— something you'd like to keep for the premier league? i wouldn't say ma'or differences- — premier league? i wouldn't say ma'or differences. -- — premier league? i wouldn't say ma'or differences. -- interruptions- premier league? i wouldn't say ma'or differences. -- interruptions from i differences. —— interruptions from var~ _ differences. —— interruptions from var~ 0n— differences. —— interruptions from var~ on the — differences. —— interruptions from var. on the pitch, you are in your own little — var. on the pitch, you are in your own little bubble and the only thing is the _ own little bubble and the only thing is the time it has taken for var decisions — is the time it has taken for var decisions has been really quick. it seems _ decisions has been really quick. it seems that— decisions has been really quick. it seems that sometimes from our point of view— seems that sometimes from our point of view we _ seems that sometimes from our point of view we want it to be checked a little _ of view we want it to be checked a little bit _ of view we want it to be checked a little bit more. but, you know, i can't _ little bit more. but, you know, i can't control how they have done things. _ can't control how they have done things. or— can't control how they have done things, or criticise how they have done _ things, or criticise how they have done things. i think it is so difficult _ done things. i think it is so difficult to be a referee nowadays. i difficult to be a referee nowadays. i want _ difficult to be a referee nowadays. i want to _ difficult to be a referee nowadays. i want to try and get on with my own game _ i want to try and get on with my own game and _ i want to try and get on with my own game and influence what i can do. the referees in the games so far, i think— the referees in the games so far, i think they— the referees in the games so far, i think they have been on the ball and onto things, and i think probably from _ onto things, and i think probably from the — onto things, and i think probably
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from the outside they have wanted that through var, they have wanted everything to go quite swiftly and moving _ everything to go quite swiftly and moving and keep the game flowing. i definitely— moving and keep the game flowing. i definitely like to see that come into the — definitely like to see that come into the premier league next season, if we can— into the premier league next season, if we can kind of, not speed the game _ if we can kind of, not speed the game up. — if we can kind of, not speed the game up, but keep it flowing a bit more, _ game up, but keep it flowing a bit more. that— game up, but keep it flowing a bit more, that would be a good thing that has— more, that would be a good thing that has properly come out of this tournament. that has properly come out of this tournament-— that has properly come out of this tournament._ one i that has properly come out of this. tournament._ one last tournament. thanks a lot. one last one in this — tournament. thanks a lot. one last one in this section _ tournament. thanks a lot. one last one in this section on _ tournament. thanks a lot. one last one in this section on zoom - tournament. thanks a lot. one last one in this section on zoom from i one in this section on zoom from marcello on tv globa. itide one in this section on zoom from marcello on tv globa.— one in this section on zoom from marcello on tv globa. we have seen italian newspapers _ marcello on tv globa. we have seen italian newspapers on _ marcello on tv globa. we have seen italian newspapers on the _ marcello on tv globa. we have seen italian newspapers on the front - italian newspapers on the front pages — italian newspapers on the front pages with— italian newspapers on the front pages with pressure _ italian newspapers on the front pages with pressure on - italian newspapers on the front pages with pressure on the - pages with pressure on the officiating _ pages with pressure on the officiating team _ pages with pressure on the officiating team for- pages with pressure on the officiating team for sundayj officiating team for sunday reporting _ officiating team for sunday reporting that _ officiating team for sunday reporting that doubtful- officiating team for sunday - reporting that doubtful penalty kick .iven reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to _ reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to raheem. _ reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to raheem. is _ reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to raheem. is this _ reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to raheem. is this a - reporting that doubtful penalty kick given to raheem. is this a concernl given to raheem. is this a concern for you _ given to raheem. is this a concern for you guys? _ given to raheem. is this a concern for you guys?— for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? _
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for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is— for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is this _ for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is this sort _ for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is this sort of - for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is this sort of way - for you guys? sorry, could you say that again? is this sort of way to i that again? is this sort of way to treat the penalty _ that again? is this sort of way to treat the penalty kick _ that again? is this sort of way to treat the penalty kick given - that again? is this sort of way to treat the penalty kick given to i treat the penalty kick given to raheem — treat the penalty kick given to raheem sterling _ treat the penalty kick given to raheem sterling and - treat the penalty kick given to raheem sterling and england| treat the penalty kick given to - raheem sterling and england against denmark, _ raheem sterling and england against denmark, because _ raheem sterling and england against denmark, because italian _ raheem sterling and england against denmark, because italian press - raheem sterling and england against denmark, because italian press has i denmark, because italian press has been _ denmark, because italian press has been talking — denmark, because italian press has been talking a — denmark, because italian press has been talking a lot _ denmark, because italian press has been talking a lot about _ denmark, because italian press has been talking a lot about that - denmark, because italian press has been talking a lot about that and i been talking a lot about that and trying _ been talking a lot about that and trying to— been talking a lot about that and trying to put _ been talking a lot about that and trying to put some _ been talking a lot about that and trying to put some pressure - been talking a lot about that and trying to put some pressure on i been talking a lot about that and i trying to put some pressure on the officiating — trying to put some pressure on the officiating team _ trying to put some pressure on the officiating team for— trying to put some pressure on the officiating team for sunday. - trying to put some pressure on the officiating team for sunday. is - trying to put some pressure on the officiating team for sunday. is this| officiating team for sunday. is this a concern — officiating team for sunday. is this a concern for— officiating team for sunday. is this a concern for you _ officiating team for sunday. is this a concern for you guys? _ officiating team for sunday. is this a concern for you guys?— a concern for you guys? definitely not. i a concern for you guys? definitely not- i think _ a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it— a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it was _ a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it was a _ a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it was a penalty. - a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it was a penalty. i - a concern for you guys? definitely not. i think it was a penalty. i am| not. i think it was a penalty. i am biased _ not. i think it was a penalty. i am biased but— not. i think it was a penalty. i am biased but i— not. i think it was a penalty. i am biased but i saw it back and i think the referee — biased but i saw it back and i think the referee made the correct decision _ the referee made the correct decision, orvar the referee made the correct decision, or var made the correct decision — decision, or var made the correct decision it— decision, or var made the correct decision. it is something i don't want _ decision. it is something i don't want to— decision. it is something i don't want to get into or be swayed by, i suppose. _ want to get into or be swayed by, i suppose, from my opinion. it was the correct _ suppose, from my opinion. it was the correct decision and he has been bumped — correct decision and he has been bumped from two sides.- correct decision and he has been bumped from two sides. thank you, that concludes _ bumped from two sides. thank you, that concludes the _ bumped from two sides. thank you, that concludes the life _ bumped from two sides. thank you, that concludes the life section - bumped from two sides. thank you, that concludes the life section of.
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that concludes the life section of this. sorry to those people in the room being distilled by declan rice singing sweet caroline. itide room being distilled by declan rice singing sweet caroline.— singing sweet caroline. we can't listen to that _ singing sweet caroline. we can't listen to that because - singing sweet caroline. we can't listen to that because it - singing sweet caroline. we can't listen to that because it is - listen to that because it is embargoed but we will hear about it later. listening to the press conference with defenderjohn stones was my colleague austin halewood. a very composed performance, wasn�*t it? so measured, thinking ahead to what is coming in a few days�* time. no sign of nerves. what is coming in a few days' time. no sign of nerves.— no sign of nerves. that's what i thou:ht. no sign of nerves. that's what i thought- very — no sign of nerves. that's what i thought. very assured. - no sign of nerves. that's what i i thought. very assured. something gareth southgate has tried to instil in this squad, a sense of calm, we have heard it many times before, a sense ofjust have heard it many times before, a sense of just taking have heard it many times before, a sense ofjust taking one game at a time. something that has really served them so well over the last couple of seasons and years. i thought it was interesting he said he and the rest of the squad don�*t want it to be over. thatjust shows the togetherness of this team. it is
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something that hasn�*t always been there before with england players and squads stop sometimes players have stuck with their own club mates in england teams gone by. we have heard about that. but that could be what makes the difference this time around. let�*s hope so anyway. a very calm john stones there. it is the mantra gareth southgate has brought. but stones gave us a bit halfway through that. he said he doesn�*t dare think about the weight of history that is on his and the rest of the teen�*s shoulders. he said it was difficult to put into words what it means to them all. the full england squad is expected to take part in training at st georges park today. but not in front of the media. gareth southgate trying to keep his line—up and tactics under wraps, perhaps. some of the players, though, were put through a more stretching programme yesterday after the exertions of wednesday night�*s
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semifinal win over denmark. but they don�*t have long to recover with only two days now until kick off at wembley. as for the italians, they are still at their training base near florence but they fly over to london tomorrow ahead of the big one. , ~' london tomorrow ahead of the big one. , ~ , , ., ., one. this weekend sees the final of football's european _ one. this weekend sees the final of football's european championships| one. this weekend sees the final of i football's european championships as football�*s european championships as england play italy at wembley. the tournament has been played across europe, a commitment made before covid—19 came along. in 11 cities will have posted 51 games between them. —— hosted. dan roan has been speaking to the head of european football�*s governing body uefa, aleksander ceferin. and he also gave his opinion on the multi—country format. i will not support it any more, it is too challenging. in a way is not correct that some teams have to
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travel more than 10,000 kilometres and the others 1000, for example. it is not fair to the fans. some fans had to be in rome the next day, or in a couple of days they had to be in a couple of days they had to be in baku, fourand in a couple of days they had to be in baku, four and a half hour flight, so it�*s a difficult one. it's flight, so it�*s a difficult one. it�*s an interesting idea but hard to implement. it's an interesting idea but hard to implement-— it's an interesting idea but hard to imlement. . , , ~ implement. uefa president aleksander ceferin there- — the first of the men�*s semi—finals is well under way at wimbledon. italian matteo berretini is taking on poland�*s hubert hurkacz on centre court and after a briliant start from berretini — hercatch is pulling it back. berretini raced into the lead with the first two sets, but hurkacz has just won the third on a tie—break. neither player has reached the final
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of a grand slam before. they are are fighting for a spot in the final — where they�*ll face either world number one novak djokovic or denis shapovalov. what a prospect that is. the second semifinal follows this one on centre court a little bit later on. the olympic flame has arrived in tokyo but the public was kept away from a very low—key ceremony. the decision to ban spectators from events in the capital, was made after tokyo was placed in a state of emergency. that�*ll run throughout the games which start in two weeks�* time. there may be some fans allowed at venues outside tokyo and a decision on the paralympics will be made after the olympics. that�*s all the sport for now. austin, thank you so much. see you later. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens has pleaded guilty at the old bailey to the murder of sarah everard. the 33—year—old disappeared as she walked home in clapham in south london in march this year. her body was found a week later
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in woodland near ashford in kent. the head of the metropolitan police cressida dick said outside court she was �*sickened and angered�* by the crimes committed by couzens. our special correspondent lucy manning is at the old bailey, and she gave us an update on what happened in court today and what the reaction was. sarah everard�*s modo was one that chilled the entire country and resonated with women everywhere. but most importantly it devastated her family. herfamily were in court today to hear wayne couzens appear by video link from belmarsh prison and he said the word guilty when asked whether he murdered sarah everard. his lawyer said he felt genuine remorse and guilt, and that would be a burden for his whole life. but the real burden is for the everard family who have lost a daughter, sarah, who they said brought them so much joy. what happened to sarah everard is what every woman fears. the fear of
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walking home alone. sarah was just walking home alone. sarah was just walking home. that night, the life that she hadn�*t fully lived, the 33 years of bringing pride and joy to herfamily, ended. the man responsible, wayne couzens, a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer, abusing his police promise to uphold the law, he broke it in the most brutal way. far from protecting sarah, the only danger she faced last night was couzens himself. we can now report more about what happened to sarah. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. on the 3rd of march at 7am he finished his shift protecting embassies and collected the car. that same evening the last picture of sarah buying a bottle of
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wine before heading to herfriend�*s house in clapham. around 9pm that evening she started to walk home, calling her boyfriend on the way. just after 9:30pm on poynders road, a bus camera shows the vauxhall astra parked on the pavement with hazard lights flashing. two people were standing next to it. three minutes later, the car is pictured with the two front doors open, the hire car then heads out of london to kent and it is returned at 8:30am in the morning. this is where sarah was last seen. when couzens was arrested he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang for underpaying a prostitute. they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver another girl. he admitted to kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over alive and unharmed to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of
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london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside. so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he had kidnapped sarah, couzens had bought two builders�* bags at b&q. her body was found in one. couzens lived 30 miles away in deal, married with two children, a man who served in the territorial army, in the civil nuclear constabulary and two and a half years before killing sarah hejoined and a half years before killing sarah he joined the and a half years before killing sarah hejoined the met and a half years before killing sarah he joined the met police. and a half years before killing sarah hejoined the met police. —— deal. questions for the force, how could he have been cleared to carry a gun when he would go on to kill? and questions about what officers did when couzens was reported for
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exposing himself twice in a takeaway restaurant exposing himself twice in a takeaway restau ra nt just exposing himself twice in a takeaway restaurant just days before exposing himself twice in a takeaway restaurantjust days before the murder. could he have been stopped? the ashen faced metropolitan commissioner met with the everard family this morning to say how sorry she was for their loss. the]!!! family this morning to say how sorry she was for their loss.— she was for their loss. all of us in the met police — she was for their loss. all of us in the met police are _ she was for their loss. all of us in the met police are second, - she was for their loss. all of us in . the met police are second, angered and devastated by this man�*s crimes. they are dreadful. and everyone in policing feels betrayed. the murder of one woman _ policing feels betrayed. the murder of one woman resonated _ policing feels betrayed. the murder of one woman resonated with - of one woman resonated with thousands of others. demands that the streets must be safe. violence against women must stop. harassment and abuse must be taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish, that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took her future away. lucy manning, bbc news.
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the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken when she came out of court to make that statement. there are serious questions for her force and other officers as well. what exactly happened to the vetting of wayne couzens when he joined the met? we know he was vetted in his previous job guarding met? we know he was vetted in his previousjob guarding nuclear met? we know he was vetted in his previous job guarding nuclear power stations but was he vetted again when hejoined stations but was he vetted again when he joined the met? stations but was he vetted again when hejoined the met? serious questions about that indecent exposure. what happened to that investigation? it was three days before he kidnapped sarah. it was the very day that he booked his hire car. and we now understand from the police regulator that there was another indecent exposure allegation in 2015 in kent. so what did kent police do about that? more than anything, sarah everard�*s family want to know what happened to her because wayne couzens, although he has pleaded guilty, still hasn�*t given the police any information. he
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only told them a fake story. he will be sentenced in september. lucy manning reporting from the old bailey. following that guilty plea from wayne couzens — the independent office of police complaints has published an update in investigations into new police complaints connected to sarah everard�*s death. in total — the iopc has served 12 gross misconduct or misconduct notices on police officers from several forces. they include an investigation into alleged met police failures to investigate two allegations of indecent exposure linked to pc couzens in london in february 2021. an investigation into alleged kent police failures to investigate an indecent exposure incident linked to pc couzens in kent in 2015. and an investigation into allegations that officers from a number of forces breached standards of professional behaviour while sharing information linked to the prosecution of pc couzens via a messaging app.
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daniel machover is a solicitor who specialises in civil litigation on behalf of people who have suffered wrongs at the hands of the criminaljustice system — and is at the firm hickman & rose. daniel muchova, thank you for joining us. it must be said you have been involved in representing the family of the former footballer dalian atkinson, pc benjamin monk of west mercia police was jailed for his killing and today i believe there has been a development in that where he has been sacked by the force. it seems like a strange thing to do when he has already been jailed. tell us the implications of that and why it is significant. following his conviction he had to accept at a disciplinary hearing today that he was involved in discreditable conduct that brought the police into disrepute and it was the police into disrepute and it was the inevitable outcome of that disciplinary hearing that he would
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be dismissed that hadn�*t happened until the conviction and his sentencing recently. ithink until the conviction and his sentencing recently. i think what that case has raised and which is echoed by some of the concerns that you havejust echoed by some of the concerns that you have just expressed with the new investigations following mr couzens pleading guilty today is the vetting that goes on when police officers join the police force and what happens if that vetting is proved to have been faulty because pc monk, it emerged, following his conviction, had two criminal cautions before he joined the police which he had failed to disclose. they were discovered sometime later and instead of him being dismissed for gross misconduct at that point for failing to disclose those cautions, he was given a final warning so the atkinson family are very upset that he was even serving at the time that dalian atkinson died. he shouldn�*t
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have been on duty that night at all. he should have been dismissed several years before then. and a concern that i hear in this case of mr couzens is that the vetting is now going to be looked into, and what happens when the vetting is found to be faulty? our police forces ruthless when they discover a police officer has failed to disclose important information when joining the force? th disclose important information when joining the force?— joining the force? in your view, how ruthless are — joining the force? in your view, how ruthless are they? _ joining the force? in your view, how ruthless are they? there _ joining the force? in your view, how ruthless are they? there is - joining the force? in your view, how ruthless are they? there is this - ruthless are they? there is this idea of a lack of candour in public office. explain what that means, if you would. for office. explain what that means, if ou would. ., office. explain what that means, if you would-— you would. for me, if you are required _ you would. for me, if you are required to — you would. for me, if you are required to disclose _ you would. for me, if you are required to disclose any - you would. for me, if you are i required to disclose any relevant history when you join a police force, that has to be enforced ruthlessly. in the case of mr monk we know that wasn�*t the case, that the police force instead when they discovered he had failed to be candid when he joined discovered he had failed to be candid when hejoined the police force, although they put him through gross misconduct proceedings, the penalty did not fit the failure, his
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failures, his offence, if you like, because they issued him with a final warning. i don�*t think that�*s ruthless, i don�*t think it inspires public confidence and in this case he would not have served at the time in 2016 when dalian atkinson needed help instead of that he was killed by this police officer. we have to be clear, when police officers are required to disclose information on joining any police force, or moving between one force and another and the history that goes back to the simon harwood case, the officer who was involved in the death of mr tomlinson, again, in that case the officer had moved from police force to police force with a disciplinary record that was not disclosed. these are matters of grave public confidence and they have to be addressed properly by police forces. that was ian tomlinson, the newspaper seller who died in london
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some years ago. serious offences like this, thankfully, in this country by police officers are still rare. how viable is the argument, though, that when suspicions are raised, or reports, allegations are made against a police officer, that they should be suspended from duty while investigations take place, given that we believe in this country that you are innocent until proven guilty?— proven guilty? again, that is a iuestion proven guilty? again, that is a question of— proven guilty? again, that is a question of what _ proven guilty? again, that is a question of what an _ proven guilty? again, that is a question of what an employer| proven guilty? again, that is a - question of what an employer does when a serious allegation that shakes public confidence, especially in a public role, where police officers are given extraordinary powers under legislation. in my view, where a serious allegation like, for example, the allegation that i understand related to mr couzens just a few days before the events related to sarah everard, if the police failed to suspend him from duty when those allegations came to light in february, that is a
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serious failure in my view. if these kind of allegations are brought against police officers, public confidence demands that they are suspended from duty. that is not a finding of guilt, that is a showing of the significance of the fact that these are people empowered, given great powers by legislation, and they shouldn�*t be able to be on duty while they face serious allegations. daniel machover from the law firm hickman & rose, thank you for your time. now here is the weather with nick. count yourself lucky if you are seeing a sky that has more blue than grey. we have seen some big clouds developing today, a sign of further showers, some thundery, perhaps torrential downpours possible, but they are very hit and miss for the rest of the day across parts of the midlands, eastern england, north—east england and into scotland. light winds, they will hang around for a period of time, we could see quite a bit of rain out of these, but by no means everybody
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will. feeling quite warm and humid out there, particularly where you get to see some sunshine. quite pleasant if you stay dry. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, a bit of patchy rain out of that, more substantial rain moving on as we go deep into this evening and overnight as it begins to move eastwards across southern parts of england. elsewhere, still a few showers around them are becoming less intense, plenty of cloud, a rather muggy night to come. into tomorrow, one area of low pressure when the rain clears from south—east england, showers elsewhere. another weather system approaching from the west on sunday approaching with its rain and showers breaking out ahead of that, sunny spells also this weekend. a lot of cloud for saturday morning, gradually brightening up, but showers will break out again across parts of the midlands, north wales, northern england into scotland, especially into the west, parts of northern ireland possible too. the rain for the morning across south—east england into east anglia gradually clearing as the afternoon goes on, may be some showers following behind, high teens to low
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20s, in the south—east and east of england compared to today. scattered and thundery showers continue into the evening and flaring up again on sunday with some sunny spells too. areas most likely to see downpours on sunday, northern ireland, scotland, northern england, and increasing cloud for wales and south—west england as we see some areas of rain beginning to moving deeper into the day and that gradually pushing further east as we go through sunday evening. what does that mean for all the sport taking place? take wimbledon, for example. a shower cannot be ruled out today but some warm and fairly humid and sunny spells. saturday morning, rain clearing, still a chance of a shower later as it brightens up, loss of cloud on sunday, rain holding off until late in the day, although there may still be a shower. talking about later in the day on sunday, rain heading to wembley.
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this is bbc news. i�*m martine croxall. the headlines... metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard. he�*ll be sentenced in september. he had already admiited kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old, who went missing on a walk in south london. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man�*s crimes. they are dreadful. the killing of sarah everard prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely. and as anticipation continues to build for england�*s euro 2020 final against italy, defenderjohn stones says it�*s a massive occasion for the team. it is huge. i think with it being at
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wembley as well, it is even more special. i think something we could only have dreamt of really at the start of the tournament. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge. but as infections rise, the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england. a huge surge in bookings forforeign holidays as the government says fully vaccinated uk travellers coming back from amber list countries won�*t have to isolate afterjuly19. it says it�*s also captured a key border crossing with iran following an offensive launched as us troops pull out of afghanistan. the olympic flame arrives in tokyo, two weeks before the games, but no spectators are allowed.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens has pleaded guilty at the old bailey to the murder of sarah everard. the 33—year—old disappeared as she walked home in clapham in south london in march this year. her body was found a week later in woodland near ashford in kent. the head of the metropolitan police cressida dick said outside court she was �*sickened and angered�* by the crimes committed by couzens. our special correspondent lucy manning is at the old bailey, and she gave us an update on what happened in court today and what the reaction was. well, sarah everard�*s murder was one that chilled the entire country, and it resonated with women everywhere. but most importantly, it devastated her family. and her family were in court today to hear wayne couzens appear via video link from belmarsh prison.
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and he said the word guilty, when asked whether he murdered sarah everard. his lawyer said he felt genuine remorse and guilt, and that would be a burden for his whole life. but the real burden is for the everard family, who have lost a daughter, sarah, who they said brought them so much joy. what happened to sarah everard is what every woman fears — the fear of walking home alone. sarah was just walking home, and that night, the life that she hadn�*t fully lived, the 33 years of bringing pride and joy to herfamily, ended. the man responsible — wayne couzens, a policeman, also a kidnapper, rapist and murderer, abusing his police promise to uphold the law. he broke it in the most brutal way. farfrom protecting sarah, the only danger she faced that night was couzens himself.
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we can now report more about what happened to sarah. three days before she disappeared, wayne couzens reserved a vauxhall astra hire car in kent. on the 3rd of march, at 7am, he finished his shift protecting embassies and collected the car. that same evening, the last picture of sarah buying a bottle of wine before heading to herfriend�*s house in clapham. around nine that evening, she started to walk home, calling her boyfriend on the way. just after 9:30, on poynders road, a bus camera shows the vauxhall astra parked on the pavement with hazard lights flashing. two people are standing next to it. three minutes later, the car is pictured with the two front doors open. the hire car then heads out of london to kent, and it�*s returned at 8:30 in the morning. this is where sarah was last seen.
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when couzens was arrested, he lied and lied. he claimed he owed money to an eastern european gang for underpaying a prostitute, and they threatened his family and ordered him to deliver them another girl. he admitted kidnapping sarah but said he had handed her over, alive and unharmed, to the gang when they stopped his car on the way out of london. the truth was that couzens raped and murdered the 33—year—old, hiding her body deep in the kent countryside so it took a week to find her remains. as met police officers searched, the murderer was in their ranks. two days after he�*d kidnapped sarah, couzens had bought two builder�*s bags at b&q. her body was found in one. couzens lived 30 miles away in deal, married with two children —
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a man who served in the territorial army, in the civil nuclear constabulary. and two and a half years before killing sarah, he joined the met police. shame on you, shamel on you, shame on you! questions for the force — how could he have been cleared to carry a gun when he would go on to kill? and questions about what officers did when couzens was reported for exposing himself — twice, in a takeaway restaurant — just days before the murder. could he have been stopped? the ashen—faced metropolitan commissioner spoke to the everard family this morning to say how sorry she was for their loss. all of us in the met are sickened, angered and devastated by this man�*s crimes. they are dreadful. and everyone in policing feels betrayed.
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the murder of one woman resonated with thousands of others — demands that the streets must be safe, violence against women must stop, harassment and abuse must be taken more seriously. the everard family had one wish — that sarah would come home safely. but a policeman took her future away. lucy manning, bbc news. the metropolitan police commissioner looked shaken when she came out of court to make that statement. there are serious questions for her force and other officers as well. what exactly happened to that vetting of wayne couzens when he joined the met? we know he was vetted in his previousjob of guarding nuclear power stations. was he vetted again when he joined the met? and serious questions about that indecent exposure. what happened to that investigation?
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it was three days before he kidnapped sarah, it was the very day that he booked his hire car. and we now understand from the police regulator that there was another indecent exposure allegation in 2015 in kent. so, what did kent police do about that? more than anything, sarah everard�*s family want to know what happened to her, because wayne couzens, although he has pleaded guilty, still has not given the police any information. he only told them a fake story. he will be sentenced in september. that was lucy manning reporting there from the old bailey. following that guilty plea from wayne couzens, the independent office of police complaints has published an update in investigations into new police complaints connected to sarah everards death. to sarah everard�*s death. in total, the iopc has served 12 gross misconduct or misconduct notices on police officers from several forces. they include...
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our home affairs editor, mark easton, gave me this update about some of those notices. three officers have been served with gross misconduct notices over the sharing of what they call an inappropriate graphic on social media. in a way, i think that that allegation, and we don�*t know what this inappropriate graphic was, but clearly there has been a lot of pressure on the metropolitan police, and police more generally, over a culture of misogyny. a culture of racism, a culture of corruption, as we have heard.
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and i think that that is where the police are at their most vulnerable in relation to this. that their reputation, if it is thought that there is a culture that does not take things as seriously as they should, in this case. i would make the point that actually the investigation into sarah everard�*s murder was thorough and professional. they achieved... they saw through couzens�*s lies quickly and achieved a guilty plea on all charges. this was the relatively speedy conviction that everybody wanted. but as that list of investigations that the iopc has been doing illustrates, and indeed questions about the vetting of wayne couzens, who was a firearms officer with parliamentary and diplomatic protection duties, that is where the police are more vulnerable, in terms of the culture that goes on.
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were they treating the crime as seriously as they should have done? the two counts of indecent exposure that you mentioned, that matter still under investigation from february involving metropolitan police officers. did they take that seriously enough? to add insult to injury for many people, when women did go out protesting to try to reclaim these streets, as it was called, one of the movements involved, there was criticism of how the police managed those events. indeed, the sarah everard vigil on clapham common, indeed, the sarah everard vigil on clapham common, there was a lot of criticism for the way the metropolitan police arrested women and dragged them away in handcuffs. it was regarded as unnecessary use of force. the review into the operations of that did exonerate the metropolitan police. but for an awful lot of women, it seemed to be symptomatic of a force that did not take crimes
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against women seriously enough. the metropolitan police can say that this was one officer who did this, you cannot say that all officers are corrupt. and that has never been said. but when you add up the institutional corruption allegations or findings that came out of the daniel morgan report, when you look at the criticism of how the deaths of bibaa henry and nicole smallman — two black women — were investigated, compared with the murder investigation for sarah everard, it starts to build a picture that people will say there is a contextual problem here. ultimately, the most important thing is retaining public confidence and trust in the police. we have a system of policing by consent in this country, we don�*t generally have armed officers for instance, that is the way we like to do it. and that requires there to be a trusting relationship between the public and the police.
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in fact, there has been a decline in some measures of confidence and trust over the last few years, but nothing very, very significant. and i do think that that will be the real question — can the police retain broad public confidence and trust after, as you say, this raft of scandals and problems? because if they lose that, then we really are in deep trouble. mark easton, our home editor. we have the latest coronavirus figures now. according to government data, 29 deaths have been recorded today. that is of people who have tested positive within 28 days of covid—19. there were 35 people who died in the previous 24—hour period reported to have done so. in terms of the number of new cases today, 35,707. up by a
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few thousand compared with yesterday. over 3000 more new cases today. in terms of vaccines, 45.7 million people have had theirfirst dose. and that is 86.8% of the adult population. 34.4 million have had their second dose which is 65.3% of their second dose which is 65.3% of the adult population. the coronavirus reproduction number, or r value, in england has increased slightly and is between 1.2 to 1.5, according to the latest government figures. last week, it was between 1.1 and 1.3. r represents the average number of people each covid—19 positive person goes on to infect. when the figure is above one, an outbreak can grow exponentially but when it is below one, it means the epidemic is shrinking. the nhs covid contact tracing app
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used in england and wales may need to become less sensitive as restrictions change. the transport secretary grant shapps has said the end of social distancing on 19july may mean the app needs to change. there�*s been a huge rise in alerts as infections surge. our health correspondent jim reed reports. it�*s the alert you really don�*t want to get. 350,000 pings like this were sent in the last week ofjune, telling smartphone users in england they have been near someone who later tested positive for covid. this climbing centre in surrey had to close this week after 13 of its staff were pinged and couldn�*t come into work. it really just escalated to the point where we ended up with probably only two staff members that were available, so we had to act very quickly obviously. so what�*s been the knock—on effect for the business as a whole? i don�*t even know what�*s going to happen for the future, but as an immediate impact on the basis we�*re losing income again.
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and it�*s going to hurt. the nhs covid app uses bluetooth technology, a data signal that can work out roughly how far your phone is from another device and for what length of time. an algorithm then calculates how risky that contact is. above a certain level, and you get told so self—isolate for up to ten days. but unlike a call from test and trace, that instruction has always been advisory. an update to the app later this month could make that more explicit, then from mid—august anyone double jabbed in england will be able to avoid self—isolation completely. but the recent spike in covid cases is already leading to a sharp increase in smartphone alerts. ministers have suggested the app may be tweaked, perhaps allowing users to stay closer to a positive case for longer, before they are pinged. it's in the interest of us as a society to carry on doing
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the things which help protect each other. and we will make sure the app is reviewed so it is appropriate for the period of time we are living through, particularly now as we are getting into the majority of adults having been double vaccined. labour says any attempt to change the way the app works could be counterproductive. this feels like taking the batteries out of the smoke detector- and that is never a good idea, i that is an important protection. i'm equally worried by the fact that, driven, i think, - by the likely high numbers told to self—isolate, people, - the stories of people - deleting the app altogether. ministers say there is no real evidence that people are deleting the app en masse. a downing street source says people in england are still being encouraged to isolate if they get that ping. jim reed, bbc news. bookings for holidays and flights to amber list destinations have surged after it was announced yesterday that uk residents who are fully vaccinated will no longer need to quarantine
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on their return to england or northern ireland. immigration officials have said the government needs to warn passengers there will be long queues at the uk border as international travel continues to open up. meanwhile, malta, which is currently on the government�*s green list, says it will ban all visitors to the country from wednesday, unless they are double jabbed. our transport correspondent caroline davis reports. international travel is opening up — if you have been fully vaccinated in the uk. soon, you won�*t need to quarantine if you travel from an amber list country. the announcement seems to have been enough to persuade some to start booking. within an hour of the announcement, we saw a 53% increase in traffic to skyscanner, following the same time the day before. and that isjust, i mean, a clear sign of the huge appetite that there is for travel. the policy will start on the 19th ofjuly in england and the 26th ofjuly in northern ireland. scotland and wales are yet to say
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whether they will do the same thing. more passengers will be welcome for the travel industry, but there are worries about queues like these, seen early in the year, too. one union has warned it will be impossible to prevent even longer queues without more resources. the place to expect queues are at the airport you are coming the real backlog would potentially be at the place you leave from, rather than when you get back to the uk. people should expect, i think, more disruption than usual, but i know everyone is working very hard to minimise those queues. some will be left out — passengers will still need to buy tests, which will price some out of going abroad. many under—30s are still not fully vaccinated, and the policy currently only applies to those who have been jabbed in the uk. aria lives in the uk but had both of her vaccines in america, so the old rules, including the need to quarantine, will apply to her. i just want to see my family.
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it is frustrating because i have had both jabs at the pfizer vaccine which is an approved vaccine. butjust because they were administered in the us, i am treated completely differently. other countries have already started accepting vaccination certificates from around the world. how difficult would it be for the uk to accept other countries�* vaccination certificates? if we look at countries in the european bloc, we have digital vaccination certificates being issued. and we think it is also important that the uk is able to accept non—digital certificates as well, because there are many countries around the world issuing certification in paper form. and there are countries accepting that, so no reason the uk cannot in the early days. the government has said that it hopes to have some news on recognising people vaccinated in the eu in a couple of weeks. for some, foreign skies are a little closer. for others, they seem as far away as ever. caroline davies, bbc news. the england team is continuing preparations for sunday�*s euro 2020
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final against italy. the players have been training at st george�*s park in staffordshire. in the last hour, the england defenderjohn stones said the chance to play in the final was merely a dream at the start of the tournament. i think it�*s huge. with it being at wembley as well, it�*s even more special. i think it�*s something we could have only dreamt of, really, at the start of the tournament. we are here to try and win it and we have got this far now, and i think we have just grown and grown throughout the tournament. we have not put too much pressure on ourselves. i think we have overcome some tough tests over the past few years and learned a lot of things and gained a lot of experience from those games. and i think all the learning curves and experiences that we�*ve been through have got us to where we are on sunday. so it�*s a massive occasion.
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we have definitely thrived off the fans, and i suppose we�*re living their dream. right at the front, out on the pitch. and we can�*t thank them enough for all their support. england defenderjohn stones. in a major escalation since international troops started withdrawing from afghanistan, taliban fighters say they�*ve seized key border crossings with iran and turkmenistan. presidentjoe biden has defended the decision to speed up the withdrawal of us troops — by the end of august. taliban members say they have taken control of 85% of territory in afghanistan, a claim disputed by the afghan government. during talks in russia, the taliban�*s negotiation team have been outlining their goals. translation: we're giving everyone assurances that will prevent - daesh and other groups. they have no place in afghanistan.
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our land will not be used against our neighbours or other countries. we�*re not after power. we want everyone in afghanistan to work in the government based on their skills and hard work. based on islamic laws and afghan culture, we�*re in support of every afghan�*s education — whether they�*re a man or a woman. afghanistan�*s islamic emirates will allow men and women to continue education from primary school to doctorates. likewise, based on these laws, everyone, men and women, will have the right to work. with the taliban making gains in afghanistan, what is the mood in kabul?
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our chief international correspondent lyse doucest has been finding out. the city springs to life. kabul�*s oldest market, one of its busiest. painters, masons, plasterers, they all come here to find a day�*s work. it�*s always been tough, but much tougher now. translation: the . foreigners are leaving. we are worried about the war. it�*s everywhere. people are fleeing into the cities but there is no work here. we are under so much pressure. this fridge. and they sold all their crockery? yes. a street of second—hand goods. nusrat set up shop here when his job ended with the us military. lots of afghans were working with them, now they are jobless.
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a lot of them are planning to go out of afghanistan because of their security and because of a lack ofjobs. the americans said it�*s time to go, it�*s 20 years, that�*s enough. for what purpose did they come in for what purpose are they going? what is the conclusion? if they didn't gain something, they didn't build something for us, they didn't make the security for us, why are they coming? tea and treats in the city centre. sweet moments for afghans who can afford them. the kind of life many young afghans here, men and women, want to live. growing insecurity already threatens it. we are hurrying just coming - to the restaurant, coming to a cafe, meeting our friends, just go home. - the taliban say this is a western lifestyle. maybe they say we are acting - like europeans or american people. but i think it's not true. we have the right|
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to choose our life. a lot is being knocked out of afghan lives. at this popular bowling alley, we hear notjust worry about the taliban. the government is failing them too, even in promoting sports like this. munir ahmad assafi is a national champion. translation: fewer people are coming here now. - before we used to gather about 40 people, we would divide into teens and hold competitions, but that doesn�*t happen anymore. the changes over the past 20 years in afghanistan have brought new measures of freedom to many living in kabul. it�*s a life they want to hold onto and now feel they are losing. the departure of international forces is turning in to the departure of international forces is turning into the loss of so much more. for now, the walls keep rising to protect the most powerful, most privileged.
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the government under pressure to protect its own people. as the taliban make rapid gains beyond kabul, you feel the rising uncertainty on every street. lyse doucet, bbc news, kabul. the olympic flame has arrived in tokyo in a low—key ceremony without any crowds, two weeks before the opening of the games. yesterday, japanese officials announced there would be no spectators at olympic venues because of the rise in covid cases. our correspondent rupet wingfield—hayes reports. this should have been a moment of high excitement. the start of the final leg of the olympic torch relay. instead, the governor of tokyo this morning received the flame in an empty arena. there will be no torch relay in tokyo. as we found out last night, no spectators at the olympic games either.
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we are now faced with rising covid—19 infections, mrs hashimoto says, and we unfortunately had no other choice but to hold the games in a limited way. the problem now is the delta variant. it has become very apparent because of that new variant, the current covid measures in force here in tokyo are no longer working. add to that japan is still way behind on vaccinations and it is clear that another big wave of covid was going to strike here right about the time of the olympics if something drastic was not done. from the infection control perspective and also the ethical perspective, the spectators should not be allowed to come into the stadium. also because japan�*s government called for the state of emergency and asked people to be isolated or restrict their activities. so why the olympics would be the only one exception against it? but olympic fans with tickets
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told me this ban is an overreaction. i totally understand the situation is still dangerous for us to hold the olympic games. but at the same time, i think we should find a way to manage to hold a big event. we need to live with covid from now on, so we need to find a way and prove that we can do it. most japanese support the spectator ban, but tokyo�*s taxpayers will also have to foot the bill for refunding all those tickets, around £600 million. rupert wingfield—hayes, tokyo. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. just limited sunny spells around today. some big clouds developing too with a few showers, thunderstorms, could be some slow—moving torrential downpours in some places. you see them scattered around here, more towards central and eastern parts of england, into scotland as well.
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but a shower is possible just about anywhere. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, could see a bit of patchy rain out of that. fairly warm, fairly humid, of course, particularly where you get to see a few of those sunny spells. a few heavy, thundery downpours continuing to this evening before easing. another spell of rain pushing into south—west england, parts of wales as the night goes on. and as for temperatures tonight, they are holding up. it is a mild, muggy night to come. it could be a bit misty in places too. a lot of cloud around for tomorrow morning, some sunny spells developing. an area of rain pushing across south—east england to east anglia, gradually clearing during the afternoon. chance of a shower, and again, scattered about into the afternoon and evening will be some heavy and perhaps thundery downpours. hello this is bbc news.
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the headlines. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard — he�*ll be sentenced in september — he had already admiited kidnapping and raping the 33 year old — who went missing on a walk in south london. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge. but as infections rise — the nhs covid contact tracing app could be made less sensitive when restrictions ease in england. the taliban claims it�*s in control of 85% of afghan territory, and that it�*s captured a key border crossing with iran following an offensive launched as us troops pull out of afghanistan. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we will be back in the england camp
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shortly but first, breaking news, mark cavendish has just won his fourth stage win of this year�*s tour de france, meaning he has equalled eddy merckx�*s all—time record of 34 stage winds at the tour de france. these are the closing stages a few moments ago, cavendish in the green jersey riding into cycling�*s history books after the 219 kilometre stage from nimes to carcassonne. it was a late call—up for the duke only quick stick team, only a few weeks before the race started. incredible scenes in france. meanwhile, the countdown continues to england against italy on sunday night in the final of euro 2020. it�*s, of course, england�*s first major tournament final since 1966. now with just over 48 hours to go, the squad have been continuing their preperations at st george�*s park — olly foster is there for us. olly, we�*ve heard from defender john stones in the last hour. what did he have to say? any sign of nerves?
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none whatsoever. i said to him two more sleeps, having any sleepless nights when you think about insigne, keays, how they have lit up this tournament, and he said not really, just another match, what about facing bonucci and chiellini, being on the same pitch as those italian greats at the heart of their defence with over 200 caps between them? not really. —— chiesa. italy arejust a pretty good team. it is calm, they are back on their routine, all 26 train this morning including john stones who has started every match for england. they are backing themselves to come good against italy. they are just going through the motions as they have done all the motions as they have done all the way through this tournament. so, what doesjohn stones make of this italian team? we have watched lots of games and clips and _ we have watched lots of games and clips and tried not to over flood
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our minds — clips and tried not to over flood our minds and concentrated on ourselves _ our minds and concentrated on ourselves. but they seem to be and defensively solid and obviously have a lot of— defensively solid and obviously have a lot of attacking flair with the players — a lot of attacking flair with the players they have got and they have outstanding players as well. and that's _ outstanding players as well. and that's why they are in the final. two _ that's why they are in the final. two great — that's why they are in the final. two great teams i believe deserve to be there _ two great teams i believe deserve to be there. hopefully, i believe we come _ be there. hopefully, i believe we come out — be there. hopefully, i believe we come out on the winning side on sunday — come out on the winning side on sunda . g ., come out on the winning side on sunda ., ., ,, ., , come out on the winning side on sunda .,., ,, ., , .,, come out on the winning side on sunda ,, ., , sunday. john stones was so measured durin: his sunday. john stones was so measured during his media _ sunday. john stones was so measured during his media conference. - sunday. john stones was so measured during his media conference. he - during his media conference. he talked about the fans. it says they are thriving off all the scenes they have been watching on social media, and he says they as players are living the fans�* dream, and they desperately want to deliver on sunday. one more training session tomorrow, they get on the bus, go to london and get themselves in position on the eve of that euro final on sunday. we will be following them all the way, austin.
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absolutely, not long to go. olly foster, thank you very much. matteo berettini is the first man into the wimbledon final. he�*s beaten poland�*s hubert hurkacz in four sets within the last half hour. it�*s the italian�*s first grand slam final. and he�*ll face either novak djokovic or denis shapovalov there — they have just stepped onto centre court now. well, we can go live to wimbledon and speak to chetan pathak there for us. a first major final for berretini chetan — but it�*s not too much of a surprise given the form he�*s been in? he has been outstanding of late, he came into these championships having won the queens title, much talked about, the seventh seed, but he had to get the job done this afternoon pretty much went his way. hubert hurkacz had battled back to win that third set but the strong berrettini serve, the powerhouse of a forehand was too good for the polish player as berrettini makes history as the first italian man to play in a wimbledon final, and he was a really
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efficient today. i thought he didn�*t let the sense of occasion get to him. there may have been some wayward errors early on but he�*s got that under control winning the second set 6—0, and then seeing out the match in the fourth set, holding his serve and playing with great poise and control. as you say, austin, in the last few minutes we have seen novak djokovic, defending champion, playing in his tenth wimbledon semifinal, about to play denis shapovalov, the canadian playing in his first grand slam semifinal. great all—round game, shapovalov. he is a junior champion here as well and understands how to play on grass, but it�*s the biggest of his life that awaits novak djokovic. i willjust tell you that in the wheelchair singles we have had some good results for britain today. andy lapthorne has won the final of the men�*s quad wheelchair doubles and the british former champion gordon reid is into the final as well. a good weekend to look forward to for british tennis fans as well. djokovic against
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shapovalov should get under way shortly and you can watch it live on the bbc. ., ., ., ~ ., ~ shortly and you can watch it live on the sac. . ., ., ~ ., ~ , ., the bbc. chetan pathak, thank you ve much the bbc. chetan pathak, thank you very much indeed. _ very much indeed. that is all your support, and i will have more in the next half an hour. i�*m sure, there is tonnes about. thank you! let�*s get more now on the news that metpolice officer wayne couzens, has pleaded guilty to the murder of sarah everard. harriet wistrich has been a solicitor for 25 years and is the founder and director of the centre for women�*s justice. thank you forjoining us. we have seen further scrutiny this week of police conduct surrounding sarah everard�*s murder, but also the murders of the sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman. what, in your view, should happen now in terms of looking at police ok. view, should happen now in terms of looking at polic— looking at police ok, specifically deafini looking at police ok, specifically dealing with _ looking at police ok, specifically dealing with the _ looking at police ok, specifically dealing with the issues - looking at police ok, specifically dealing with the issues of - looking at police ok, specifically dealing with the issues of police | dealing with the issues of police misconduct, there must be a much more robust and independent system.
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we have lodged what is known as a police super complaint looking at police super complaint looking at police perpetrated abuse and one of the key complaints there is that officers are investigating their colleagues and officers are not being sufficiently held accountable in terms of disciplinary procedures and referrals to criminal charging. so there needs to be a really major cultural change, ora so there needs to be a really major cultural change, or a cultural revolution, almost, in relation to the way in which police offending, if you like, is dealt with. we know in relation to issues of sexual misconduct that so—called lesser crimes of sexual misconduct like indecent exposure are often indicators of far more serious offending, orare indicators of far more serious offending, or are indicators of a likely escalation to more serious
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offending if perpetrators are not held accountable. so more generally speaking it is actually incumbent on our criminaljustice speaking it is actually incumbent on our criminal justice system speaking it is actually incumbent on our criminaljustice system to deal with those lesser offences, particularly those types of sexual offences, before they escalate to these kind of very alarming levels. more generally, i would say what these really awful murders indicate, as well as issues of police misconduct, isjust, you know, the level of violence against women which led to so many women coming out onto the streets back in march when sarah everard went missing. we need to start treating this as a public health epidemic. it is something which needs really serious addressing, more resources putting
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on, more education around misogyny, and a kind of sea change in terms of our criminaljustice and a kind of sea change in terms of our criminal justice system and a kind of sea change in terms of our criminaljustice system so it becomes more effective. hagar our criminaljustice system so it becomes more effective. how do you brini that becomes more effective. how do you bring that about? _ becomes more effective. how do you bring that about? you _ becomes more effective. how do you bring that about? you talk _ becomes more effective. how do you bring that about? you talk to - becomes more effective. how do you bring that about? you talk to girls i bring that about? you talk to girls even as young as ten or 11, who will say they get unwanted attention from boys at school, they don�*t know how to deal with that. it seems to be, at times, systemic. tt to deal with that. it seems to be, at times, systemic.— at times, systemic. it is, i'm afraid. at times, systemic. it is, i'm afraid- and _ at times, systemic. it is, i'm afraid. and certainly - at times, systemic. it is, i'm afraid. and certainly as - at times, systemic. it is, i'm afraid. and certainly as far. at times, systemic. it is, i'm| afraid. and certainly as far as schoolgirls are concerned, i think the very widespread availability of hard—core pornography on mobile devices is encouraging really, really dangerous attitudes towards women and girls and this is being played out in the school playground. clearly schools have a huge role to play. we have also done work around issues of lack of accountability and
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lack of protection for girls reporting crimes of sexual violence by boys. and again, that needs to start right at the beginning. we need to start treating teaching children and adults, to treat each other with respect, to stop blaming girls and women for crimes committed against them and to start holding perpetrators, boys and men, usually, to account. ., perpetrators, boys and men, usually, to account. . . , . to account. harriet wistrich, director for _ to account. harriet wistrich, director for the _ to account. harriet wistrich, director for the centre - to account. harriet wistrich, director for the centre for i to account. harriet wistrich, - director for the centre for women's director for the centre for women�*s justice, thank you very much. director for the centre for women's justice, thank you very much. thank ou. at least 52 people have died in a fire at a food factory near the bangladeshi capital dhaka, with many still missing. the blaze broke out yesterday and was still burning 24 hours later. about 30 people were injured after leaping from the upper floors of the complex. here�*s the bbc�*s akbar hossain in dhaka.
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this is a huge factory which employs more than 7,000 workers and fire broke out in one of the buildings in the factory compound were more than 1,000 workers were on duty yesterday evening. the firefighters told us that they have entered into the building of the gutted building, in search of dead bodies, trying to find out whether anyone is alive or not. so they are hinting that the death toll might increase significantly because many people are still unaccounted for. akbar hossain in dhaka. about 30 people were injured in the fire, and hundreds
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the charity, community integrated care, says says pay gap makes it difficult to recruit staff. the government says it hopes to give an update of its plans to reform social care quite soon. here�*s our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. it is tony�*s birthday today and with his family unable to be with him it is a support worker amy who will be at his side throughout the day. t at his side throughout the day. i love myjob, iabsolutely love at his side throughout the day. t love myjob, iabsolutely love my love myjob, i absolutely love my job and i always say to work in care you have to care because you do. tony has epilepsy and cerebral palsy and struggles to swallow. amy has to monitor him closely and act quickly if needed. itide monitor him closely and act quickly if needed. ~ ., . , ., ,., if needed. we need to celebrate, you can't celebrate _ if needed. we need to celebrate, you can't celebrate if _ if needed. we need to celebrate, you can't celebrate if you _ if needed. we need to celebrate, you can't celebrate if you are _ if needed. we need to celebrate, you can't celebrate if you are asleep. - can�*t celebrate if you are asleep. she has great responsibilities, but as a 22—year—old is paid just £8.88 per hour. t as a 22-year-old is paid 'ust £8.88 er hour. ., as a 22-year-old is paid 'ust £8.88 er hour. . , ., ~ per hour. i have friends working in retail that are _ per hour. i have friends working in retail that are getting _ per hour. i have friends working in retail that are getting upwards - per hour. i have friends working in retail that are getting upwards of. retail that are getting upwards of £9 or £10 an hour and we�*re not asking for, you know, rainbows and unicorns. we arejust asking for, you know, rainbows and unicorns. we are just asking to be and for our pay to reflect it. today�*s report underlines the pay gap between care staff and other
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jobs with equivalent demands. it found care workers were paid an average ofjust under £17,700 per year, compared with the £24,600 average pay for similar roles like senior teaching assistants and police community support officers. the charity that commissioned the research says that differences wrong. but its boss maintains to change it more money has to be spent by government on funding care. people find the work in social care are incredibly rewarding and they enjoy what they are asked to do but they just find that they can�*t survive and look after their own families on less than £18,000 a year, and certainly that�*s the case if you are the main earner in the family. if you are the main earner in the famil . ., ., , family. the government has said it will publish — family. the government has said it will publish a _ family. the government has said it will publish a plan _ family. the government has said it will publish a plan for _ family. the government has said it will publish a plan for reform - family. the government has said it will publish a plan for reform of. will publish a plan for reform of the adult social care system by the end of the year. alison holt, bbc news. the department of health and social care spokesperson has said the social care sector has been an essential and valued part of the
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front—line response to the pandemic and we have sought to protect the workforce in those receiving social care, providing over £2 billion for the sector including infection, prevention and control measures, free ppe and regular testing, and we prioritise staff for the vaccine. the headlines on bbc news. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard. he�*ll be sentenced in september — he had already admiited kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old — who went missing on a walk in south london. the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases continue to surge. and as anticipation continues to build for england�*s euro 2020 final against italy on sunday, defenderjohn stones says reaching the final is something he could only have dreamt of at the start of the tournament. it�*s emerged that the conservative candidate who was barred from becoming the police commissioner for wiltshire in may
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because of an old conviction actually has a second conviction which would also have prevented him taking up thejob. jonathon seed won the election but as he was disbarred a new vote�*s being held in august. from swindon, dan o�*brien reports. we already knew that conservative jonathan seed had a 30—year—old conviction for drink—driving. that is what threw this election into disarray. you see, the rules to be police commissioner are much stricter than for other politicians. if you have ever been convicted of an imprisonable offence, you cannot do the job. he was never sent to prison, but the fact he could have been this he was never sent to prison, but the fact he could have been disbars him from doing it even though he won the vote. what is new today is we have learned that there was notjust one but two offences which prevented him from taking up the role. at the same time as he was convicted for drink—driving, he was also convicted of failing to stop at the scene of a crash.
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the key question is who knew what and when about all of this? i spoke tojonathan seed last night, he has again said in a statement that he did declare this to the conservative party. something that the tory party head office disputes. but a source close tojonathan seed has insisted there is documentary evidence to show that he did tell them. the police investigation into this continues, and in the meantime, the rerun of the wiltshire police and crime commissioner election will be held in august at a cost to taxpayers of over £1 million. dan o�*brien reporting. the extent of financial pressures facing councils across the uk as they emerge from the pandemic has been revealed in a special bbc investigation. the shared data unit�*s analysis of 171 authorities has found that councils hit by falling income and increased costs are set to make at least £1.7 billion worth of savings in the next year while also using more than £500 million worth of reserves to balance their books. ten struggling
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councils in england are set to offset or borrow £290 million after being given exceptional permission from the ministry of housing, communities & local government to try to remedy what it called their �*unmanageable pressures�*. but despite making savings, local authorities are currently predicting a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets by 2022 to �*24. earlier we heard from three political reporters from across the regions in england — starting with joanne gallagher in shrewsbury. shropshire council is actually predicting a shortfall of nearly £49 million in the next three years. where that money will be saved from, what cuts will be made, theyjust don�*t know. i have been speaking to lezley picton who is the leader of the council. she has only been in post for two months and says she has no idea how this money will be saved. the former actress may have to pull out the performance of her life if she is to find this money from somewhere. what she does want to look towards is bringing more money in.
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they own a theatre, theatre seven in shrewsbury. they have car parks, they have spent over £50 million on three shopping centres in shrewsbury. she is hoping that that will claw back some money through business rates, getting more shops and hotels and leisure facilities there in the centre of shrewsbury. but the biggest amount of their money is going on looking after vulnerable adults and children. more than 70% of their budget goes on looking after those youngsters and the elderly. and it does not really cut through with the taxpayers, because for the majority of people, they may not need those services at the moment. they are more concerned about getting their bins collected. so it is a real concern at the moment, and where she thinks they can make a real difference is if they were to get fairer funding from the government. it is something that has been looked at for a long time. she thinks that if rural areas were funded in the way cities are, with more weighting coming in, they would get 30 million extra per year. my colleague claire hamilton has the situation in liverpool. well, here on merseyside,
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all six councils have talked for the last almost decade about the strains on their finances. how they have all reduced services, they have all raised council tax by the highest amount that they have been permitted. and in order to increase their income, they have all invested in commercial deals for things like shopping centres, a cinema, and in the case of liverpool city council, everton's finch farm training ground, which they have rented back to the club to generate an income. now, in wirral, which isjust over the river mersey behind me, like many councils, it has seen its spending really squeezed by the pandemic. they have had to support a lot of vulnerable residents they have of vulnerable residents, they have had to put money into projects delivering food and buying ppe staff members. and they have also seen their revenue drop as well because people have not been going to the shopping centre that they have bought. they have not been parking their cars in the town centre. council tax revenue has dropped as well. and wirral council put forward a budget at the beginning of this
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year which would have seen some really drastic cuts to services. it would have seen two museums close, it would have seen swimming pools and golf courses shut, and it would also have seen things like bin collections go to once every three weeks, and school crossing patrols as well be cut. but the government has stepped in with a £9 million loan to the council, because otherwise they would be dipping even deeper into its reserves. a position which an audit report says was unsustainable. now let's go to the walton in newcastle for the picture there. councils across the north east i and cumbria say they are having to find a savings of around £95 million in the current. financial year. the worst hit council here, newcastle, they are facingj a £30 million cut. newcastle's labour leader says a combination of covid—relatedl extra spending and a fall in income is worsening an already _ perilous situation.
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and the big loser here, as in so many places, i adult social care. we are seeing a situation| where eligibility for social care is being tightened, i many families facing extra charges, and there is also a cut to supported accommodation i for people with disabilities. the library service also a loser, and we have seen a situation. where many libraries across this |area have seen a real reductionj in the number of opening hours. the government says in response it has given an extra £79 million - to newcastle council in covid support including £3 - million for social care. but what is clear from councils - across the region is they are facing a long—term challenge, - including what they say will be a budget black hole between them iof around £190 million by 2024.. this is clearly a process and debate which has a long way to run. - a spokesman for the ministry of housing, communities and local government pointed to £12 billion given to local
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authorities during the pandemic, and said in coming months the government would take stock of the demands they faced and decide a timetable for funding changes. council budgets, already under pressure before the pandemic, were made worse by a combination of extra costs to support communities, and a loss of income from things like parking and business rates. in many cases, councils have also lost revenue from private investments. westiminster and the devolved governments have given local authorities extra funding, but bbc analysis shows many are in a precarious position. across the uk, £1.7 billion of savings are planned for this year, which could mean bus services scrapped, childrens centres closed or limits on care services for disabled or elderly people in parts. despite the cuts, councils are still facing a shortfall in coming years. there are calls for the demolition of buildings to be recognised as an environmental problem. the royal institute of british architects says making materials such as cement, steel and bricks for new buildings is increasing carbon emissions. it wants ministers to tell developers to refurbish rather than demolish
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properties wherever possible. our environment analyst roger harrabin has more. another one gone. and another one gone. and another one bites the dust. we can�*t keep knocking buildings down. in the uk, we currently demolish around 50,000 buildings a year and we really must stop doing this. why�*s that? well, the answer is in this brick. it started life as a lump of clay. imagine how much heat was needed to make the brick and the emissions created in the process. now look behind me. how many bricks there? hundreds, thousands, tens of thousands, maybe. who knows? but imagine the emissions created to make those bricks, to create a building from them and then to knock them down and start again.
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london�*s hoover building shows what can happen instead of demolition. the vacuum cleaner factory was transformed into apartments by architects, including maria smith. it takes so long to design a building, to create a building, to operate it. but we don�*t have that kind of time to make the changes that we need to in order to reduce our carbon footprint. it�*s so urgent that we act right now and that means changing the way we design things, the way we build things the way we procure things. right now. we have to stop demolishing things without being really, really careful about it. if we are going to demolish something, how are we going to reuse every single part of that? but still, developers often choose the wrecking ball rather than the refurbishment. architects want a different approach. we need to think about it is an asset, what canj we do with that asset? if we can't do anything, _ then there may be a case to rebuild. and if we do rebuild, _
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we have got to bear in mind that what we rebuild needs to be adaptable for future - generations to reuse. demolition firms say "don�*t blame us, blame the architects themselves." they could benefit from the input that we�*ve had over x number of years to determine whether we can do anything or not with that building. and equally, what cost there is to actually do what it is that they might suggest. in hastings, this building has been rescued from the bulldozer. a former newspaper office being turned into flats and workspaces. the government will publish a strategy on buildings soon. but it hasn�*t yet said whether it will put a halt to the wrecking ball. roger harrabin, bbc news. victoria is with you next at five o�*clock. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. not a huge amount of sunshine out there today. so count yourself lucky if you�*re seeing a sky which has more blue in it than grey. we�*ve already been seeing some big clouds developing today. a sign of further showers, some thundery, perhaps torrential downpours possible.
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they are very hit and miss across the rest of the day, across parts of the midlands, eastern england, north—east england and into scotland. light winds so they will hang around for a period of time. you could see a bit of rain out of these. and again, by no means everybody will. getting quite warm and humid out there, particularly where you get to see some of that sunshine. quite pleasant if you stay dry. a lot of cloud in wales and south—west england, a bit of patchy rain out of that. more substantial rain into this evening, and overnight as it begins to move eastwards across southern parts of england. elsewhere, still a few showers around, becoming less intense. plenty of cloud. a rather muggy night to come. into tomorrow, one area of low pressure with its rain close away from south—east england, showers elsewhere. on sunday, another weather system approaching from the west, but it�*s rain, showers breaking out ahead of that. there will also be some sunny spells at times this weekend too. a lot of cloud on saturday morning, gradually brightening up. but showers will break out again over parts of the midlands, north wales, north england, parts of scotland, especially into the west, parts of northern ireland, too. rain in the morning into east anglia gradually clearing as the afternoon goes on.
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there may be a few showers following on behind. we are looking at high teens to low 20s. a cooler day across the east and south—east of england compared with today. some of these scattered with heavy and thundery showers continuing into the evening, and then flaring up again on sunday, with some sunny spells, too. areas most likely to see the downpours downpours, northern ireland, scotland, northern england. and increasing cloud for wales and south—west england as we see some areas of rain beginning to move in deeper into the day. that is gradually pushing east as we go on through sunday evening. what does that mean for all the sport taking place? take wimbledon, showers cannot be ruled out today, but some warm, fairly humid sunny spells. saturday morning, rain gradually clearing. still a chance of a shower later as it brightens up. a lot of cloud on sunday, rain probably holding off until later in the day, though there may still be a shower. and talking about later in the day on sunday, rain heading in to wembley.
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hello, it�*s five o clock. this is bbc news, i�*m vic d. here are your headlines. metropolitan police officer wayne couzens pleads guilty to the murder of sarah everard — he�*ll be sentenced in september. he had already admitted kidnapping and raping the 33—year—old — who went missing as she walked home in south london. sarah everard�*s killing prompted demands from women everywhere to be able to walk home safely excitment�*s building ahead of england�*s euro 2020 final against italy on sunday. defenderjohn stones says it�*s a �*massive occasion�* for the team. it is huge. i think with it being at wembley as well, it is even more special. i think something we could only have dreamt of really at the start of the tournament.
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the coronavirus reproduction rate rises in england as cases

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