Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

9:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines: airlines and travel companies report a huge surge in demand for foreign holidays as quarantine rules for those returning to england are relaxed. we're saying that if you have been fully vaccinated, that means two vaccinations plus waiting two weeks, 1a days, then you can go away, including for holidays. so that will change. at 12:30 in your questions answered, we'll be joined by wanderlust travel magazine editor lyn hughes, and lisa francesca nand from the big travel podcast. they'll be answering your questions on how the new travel rules impact your plans. get in touch using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk.
9:01 am
health officials consider making the nhs covid app less sensitive, to avoid millions of people having to self—isolate this summer. new research confirms that for children, there's an �*extremely low�* risk of severe illness or death from covid—19. authors of a new report say that front line care workers supporting elderly or disabled people in england, are underpaid by £7,000 per year. local authorities across the uk say they face a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets over the next three years as the country emerges from the pandemic. and at 9:30, bbc sport looks ahead to today's wimbledon semi—final clash between novak djokovic and denis shapovalov.
9:02 am
good morning. holiday companies are reporting a surge in bookings following the decision to allow fully vaccinated uk residents to return to england from amber—list countries without having to self—isolate. but there are warnings from immigration officials of lengthy delays at the uk border, as international travel continues to open up. the rule change comes into force on the 19th ofjuly, ending the ten day quarantine requirement for those with two jabs. airlines say there has been a rapid rise in ticket purchases since the announcement was made yesterday, with easyjet seeing a 400% increase in bookings to amber—list destinations. analysts say they do not expect flight and holiday prices to rise. currently, only those returning from green list destinations are not obliged to self—isolate.
9:03 am
but now, if you ve had two vaccines, those rules will also apply to amber list destinations. countries like spain, portugal and france are on the amber list — though each will have their own varying entry requirements for uk travellers. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has this report. remember this? a foreign holiday may soon be a reality. travel companies say bookings to amber list countries have taken off following the relaxation of rules on quarantine. it's a life—saver for them. traffic on our website had a huge spike at lunchtime, straight after the announcement was there. there is a huge amount of demand for people to go on holiday, people do want to get away, they've wanted to go away. within an hour of the announcement, skyscanner saw a 53% increase in traffic to our site following the same time the day before. and that'sjust, i mean, a clear sign of the huge appetite that there is for travel.
9:04 am
jet2 says mediterranean hotspots like spain, the balearics, canaries, greece and the greek islands are the most popular. easyjet says, after the government announcement, bookings were up 400%. it's not plain sailing yet. there will be extra costs because travellers have to pay for covid tests before and after their return. also, they'll still have to quarantine if they've been jabbed outside the uk, and rules may be different in northern ireland, scotland and wales. some have questioned why travel restrictions are easing now, just as the number of coronavirus cases in the uk is soaring. it's the highest in europe. but cases are starting to rise thereto, particularly in popular holiday destinations like spain, portugal and greece. that could mean a sudden changes to travel rules imposed by other countries. also, whatever the uk nations decide, a number of countries like italy still won't allow uk travellers in without a period of isolation. and some amber countries won't let
9:05 am
uk holiday—makers in at all. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the transport secretary grant shapps, has said that the government was no longer "encouraging nor discouraging" people to travel to amber list countries for holiday purposes. we're saying that, you know, if you've been fully vaccinated — that means two vaccinations plus waiting two weeks, 14 days then you can go away, including for holidays. so that will change, because, as you rightly say, we werer saying to people please don't go to amber countries for holiday purposes. that will change. but you will still need to take a test before you leave that country and you will need to take a day two pcr test when you come home. so there's still additional checks in place as well. stephanie boyle from skyscanner, the holiday booking website, who featured in our report, joins me now. thank you for being with us. what
9:06 am
sort of change have you noticed since that announcement? trier? sort of change have you noticed since that announcement? very nice to be here this— since that announcement? very nice to be here this morning. _ since that announcement? very nice to be here this morning. we - since that announcement? very nice to be here this morning. we have i to be here this morning. we have seen a huge increase in traffic to the site following the announcement, it was up by 53%, which is quite a big lift right after an announcement like that. but to be honest, we're not surprised because every time there has been a change the corridor announcements or another destination added to the greenest, we have seen added to the greenest, we have seen a huge spike in interest in searches and both in searches and bookings. weekly search volumes for parma rose by 65% following majorca and the balearics added to the green list a couple of weeks ago. thatjust goes to show people are desperate to get back out there and there is a huge interest in being able to take a trip, travel and feel safe when they are doing it. this news is incredibly welcome.
9:07 am
are doing it. this news is incredibl welcome. , ., ., incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be — incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be a _ incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be a surge _ incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be a surge in _ incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be a surge in prices? - incredibly welcome. does that mean there will be a surge in prices? notl there will be a surge in prices? not necessarily. _ there will be a surge in prices? iirrt necessarily, that is the great thing. it has been difficult for the airline industry to do their pricing this year, to be honest with you. normally this is something predictable, they can base it on seasonal patterns. 0ver predictable, they can base it on seasonal patterns. over the course of the last year their data and what they would usually use to predict has gone out of the window. they have been using data like skyscanner, to see whether search is coming and when bookings are coming and when you announcements come into play and when restrictions are lifted. they can add capacity as soon as they can. not all of their aeroplanes are in the sky right now but once the routes are reopened and we get a sense of what the demand is for specific groups, airlines can address that by adding capacity. then the prices will level out. you can put a price alert on a specific route if you want to keep an eye on what the prices look like, that is something you can do on skyscanner
9:08 am
as well. it gives people a sense that there are deals to be had, great prices and they are all happening for the school summer holidays, which is great news for those families who are keen for a change of scene.— those families who are keen for a change of scene. what places our brits looking _ change of scene. what places our brits looking to _ change of scene. what places our brits looking to go _ change of scene. what places our brits looking to go to? _ change of scene. what places our brits looking to go to? good - brits looking to go to? good question- — brits looking to go to? good question- it _ brits looking to go to? good question. it is, _ brits looking to go to? good question. it is, to _ brits looking to go to? good question. it is, to some - brits looking to go to? good . question. it is, to some extent, brits looking to go to? good - question. it is, to some extent, the traditional hot spots. a lot of people still interested in spain and in the last 2a hours we have seen destinations like ids, parma, malaga but also madeira, jumping up in interest. also a lot of interest in the greek islands and in the united states with people looking to potentially visit friends, relatives who they haven't seen in a long time and this is the first chance they can do that without needing to quarantine in return. hopefully that will mean translation into a number of bookings and people getting away and rediscovering the joys of travel. and rediscovering the 'oys of travel. ., , ., ., ,, and rediscovering the 'oys of travel. ., , travel. people are making bookings,
9:09 am
but i travel. people are making bookings, but i wonder— travel. people are making bookings, but i wonder how _ travel. people are making bookings, but i wonder how nervous _ travel. people are making bookings, but i wonder how nervous they - travel. people are making bookings, but i wonder how nervous they are l but i wonder how nervous they are that everything might change because things have changed so much in the last few months. nobody is 100% certain what things will be like in a few weeks or a few months�* time? absolutely. i think grant shapps talked about it, the government had to make decisions about this. they are hoping not to have to walk anything back any more and with the traffic light system, some destinations have been coming off the green list and onto amber, so the green list and onto amber, so the fact this means there is a number of additional destinations that people who are doubly vaccinated can go to, should make this a little bit more consistent going forward. it is definitely something that people are going to want to keep an eye on. a lot of the airlines as well as skyscanner have features that allow you to check what the restrictions are in place for where you are coming from and where you are going. so there was great ways to make sure you are keeping an eye on the changing
9:10 am
restrictions. but this will allow double vaccinated travellers to travel more freely. it is notjust the uk, the us is doing that, europe are allowing a lot more freedom of travel. we have high hopes that this means it is a consistent new thing, we are reopening travel and the success of the vaccination roll—out will mean people can feel confident booking trips, notjust for the booking trips, not just for the summer booking trips, notjust for the summer but further afield. booking trips, not just for the summer but further afield. thank you so much, stephanie. _ and coming up — we�*ll be looking to answer your questions on all things travel at 12:30 today. we�*ll be joined by wanderlust travel magazine editor lyn hughes, and lisa francesca nand from the big travel podcast — send in your questions using the hashtag — bbcyourquestions the nhs covid app for england and wales could be updated to make it less sensitive. in the last week ofjune, more than 300,000 people were �*pinged�* and asked to self—isolate, the highest weekly figure this year
9:11 am
by a considerable margin. the department of health says "it is vital people are aware of their personal risk so they can make informed decisions on their behaviour." let�*s talk to our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. does it seem the art has been too sensitive? it does it seem the art has been too sensitive? , , ., , ., ., sensitive? it depends what you mean b too sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. _ sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. but _ sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. but we _ sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. but we do _ sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. but we do know - sensitive? it depends what you mean by too sensitive. but we do know it . by too sensitive. but we do know it has been sending out more alerts, because there have been more cases. the department of health itself says the app is doing thejob it was designed for. all along, there have been questions about whether it is working. it is working, but working too well for many people. remember also that is a change coming to the app, but not until the middle of august, when people who are double vaccinated will be told, you will get an alert saying you have got to
9:12 am
go to isolation unless you are double vaccinated. you will be able to tell the app evolve double vaccinated and don�*t need to isolate. the other thing which is important to remember, it is effectively voluntary. they don�*t know that you have got this, it is very anonymous and it is up to people trusting the app. some people will be wondering whether the government is undermining trust in the app about all this talk about tweaking its sensitivity.- the app about all this talk about tweaking its sensitivity. there have been fears amongst _ tweaking its sensitivity. there have been fears amongst government i been fears amongst government ministers that because so many people have been alerted, a lot are just deleting it and abandoning it altogether? just deleting it and abandoning it alto . ether? just deleting it and abandoning it altouether? ., , �* , ., , altogether? there doesn't seem to be altogether? there doesn't seem to be a lot of hard — altogether? there doesn't seem to be a lot of hard evidence _ altogether? there doesn't seem to be a lot of hard evidence for _ altogether? there doesn't seem to be a lot of hard evidence for that. - altogether? there doesn't seem to be a lot of hard evidence for that. the . a lot of hard evidence for that. the latest figures we have for the last week in june latest figures we have for the last week injune where there were more than 300,000 new downloads of the app bringing it to a total of over 26 million. we don�*t know how many of those are still going and the dissatisfaction, if that�*s what it is, with the app has emerged in the
9:13 am
last week or so. we do know a lot of people are still using it as a lot of people appear to be taking it seriously. a lot of people are getting alerts that may annoy them but they are reluctantly going into isolation. i but they are reluctantly going into isolation. ., �* ~ ., but they are reluctantly going into isolation. ~' ., but they are reluctantly going into isolation. ~ ., ~ ., isolation. i don't know if you know the answer. _ isolation. i don't know if you know the answer, but _ isolation. i don't know if you know the answer, but how— isolation. i don't know if you know the answer, but how easy - isolation. i don't know if you know i the answer, but how easy technically is it to turn down the sensitivity of the app?— is it to turn down the sensitivity oftheau? , ., i, of the app? this has actually been auoin on of the app? this has actually been going on throughout. _ of the app? this has actually been going on throughout. it _ of the app? this has actually been going on throughout. it is - of the app? this has actually been going on throughout. it is a i of the app? this has actually been going on throughout. it is a prettyj going on throughout. it is a pretty novel form of technology, they are using bluetooth to measure the distance you are from another person and the length of time you are that close. if that person, a few days later tests positive then you get the alert. they have been tweaking the alert. they have been tweaking the algorithm and it is a very complex business and very imprecise. they can adjust it but my sources at the developers say they haven�*t been told to do that yet, they have been told to do that yet, they have been told to do that yet, they have been
9:14 am
told to bring out this new release in mid august that tells you can basically ignore the alert if you have been double jabbed. but they haven�*t been told to tweak the algorithm as yet. i haven't been told to tweak the algorithm as yet.— haven't been told to tweak the algorithm as yet. i love the euro 2020 plan _ algorithm as yet. i love the euro 2020 plan i _ algorithm as yet. i love the euro 2020 plan ijust— algorithm as yet. i love the euro 2020 plan ijust behind - algorithm as yet. i love the euro 2020 plan ijust behind have i algorithm as yet. i love the euro j 2020 plan ijust behind have you algorithm as yet. i love the euro i 2020 plan ijust behind have you put in that it is italy and england in the final? ., ., , ., ., , the final? no, i was going to put in encland the final? no, i was going to put in england and _ the final? no, i was going to put in england and italy _ the final? no, i was going to put in england and italy and _ the final? no, i was going to put in england and italy and put - the final? no, i was going to put in england and italy and put in - the final? no, i was going to put in england and italy and put in a i england and italy and put in a score, but i thought i would be tempting fate. i score, but i thought i would be tempting fate-— score, but i thought i would be tem-utin fate. , ., ., tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy. _ tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy, it _ tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy, it is _ tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy, it is that _ tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy, it is that you i tempting fate. i used to have those as a schoolboy, it is that you have i as a schoolboy, it is that you have that hanging in your room. thank you so much, rory cellan—jones. you are watching bbc news. the risk of severe illness or death from covid—i9 is "extremely low" in children, according to new research by leading academics. data from the first 12 months of the pandemic in england shows 25 under—18s died from covid. the scientists behind the research say their studies of children are the most comprehensive yet anywhere in the world. 0ur health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more.
9:15 am
every day, we are learning more about covid—i9 and the latest research by four english universities throws light on how likely children are to suffer serious illness. the researchers looked back at the cases of 61 children who had died with a positive covid test in the first year of the pandemic. they found that of those, 25 children actually died directly from covid—i9 rather than their infection being coincidental. the most vulnerable children were those with complex neuro disabilities. but, as with adults, other risk factors were identified in children who�*d been hospitalised, such as being obese, having comorbidities like cardiovascular problems, or coming from non—white ethnic backgrounds. the researchers suggest the overall risk of children and teenagers dying from covid—i9 is around one in half a million. we didn�*t see any deaths in children
9:16 am
and young people who are often perceived to be at higher risk from respiratory infections, so there were no deaths in children who had asthma as a single diagnosis, no deaths in children who had cystic fibrosis, no deaths in children who had trisomy 21 or down syndrome. and no deaths in children who had type one diabetes. the government is expected to announce soon whether it intends to vaccinate children. currently advisers are studying data from the us and israel which have already decided to do that. naomi grimley, bbc news. let�*s speak to dr elizabeth whittaker, senior clinical lecturer in pediatric infectious diseases and immunology at imperial college london. tell us more about the evidence on children, what do you think the findings suggest? this children, what do you think the findings suggest?— children, what do you think the findings suggest? this is a great iece of findings suggest? this is a great piece of work. — findings suggest? this is a great piece of work, there _ findings suggest? this is a great piece of work, there are - findings suggest? this is a great piece of work, there are three i piece of work, there are three papers we have worked on to look at this data. because we have been
9:17 am
talking about what we have seen on the ground in hospitals, having the real numbers to be really confident about that makes a huge difference to families, i think. what we found was very few children are admitted, so about 800,000 children were admitted with the covid test in the 12 months to the end of february this year and that probably include children who were admitted with things like a broken arm and a broken leg and had a positive covid test. the risk factors in those children, those children who have multiple and complex comorbidities, the ones that get the most severe illness. as the report mentions, other 61 children were identified as having a positive covid pcl swap, when we looked at close detail on how they died, tragically there were 25 you could say the virus caused or led to their death, which is a small
9:18 am
number in the total number of deaths out of the last year. in number in the total number of deaths out of the last year.— out of the last year. in adults, ethnicity and _ out of the last year. in adults, ethnicity and obesity - out of the last year. in adults, ethnicity and obesity can i out of the last year. in adults, ethnicity and obesity can be i ethnicity and obesity can be factors, is that the same with children? although you have been saying it is incredibly rare, death or serious illness in children, but when there is that, is obesity and ethnicity effective?— when there is that, is obesity and ethnicity effective? yes, it appears these risk factors _ ethnicity effective? yes, it appears these risk factors we _ ethnicity effective? yes, it appears these risk factors we have - ethnicity effective? yes, it appears these risk factors we have clearly l these risk factors we have clearly seenin these risk factors we have clearly seen in adults which are comorbidities and obesity, social deprivation seems to be exacerbated in adults. that signals, we have not had the opportunity to have looked so closely so these are areas that we really need to work on as a population and all we can say is that covid exacerbates previous problems, it makes everything more obvious and they are areas that needed work anyway.— obvious and they are areas that needed work anyway. what do you think of the _ needed work anyway. what do you think of the implications _ needed work anyway. what do you think of the implications of - needed work anyway. what do you think of the implications of this i think of the implications of this research? especially in terms of whether or not we should vaccinate
9:19 am
children? we whether or not we should vaccinate children? ~ ., whether or not we should vaccinate children? ~ . , ., , whether or not we should vaccinate children? . . , . , ., ., children? we are sharing this data with the jcvi _ children? we are sharing this data with the ch and _ children? we are sharing this data with the jcvi and also _ children? we are sharing this data with the jcvi and also the - children? we are sharing this data with the jcvi and also the chief i with thejcvi and also the chief medical officers, who will then be able to use it as part of their decisions around policy for which children are most vulnerable and whether any children would need to shield, if shielding became a thing again. but also identify those children who should be prioritised for vaccination when decisions are made about vaccinations. there is some evidence that some comorbidities, multiple comorbidities, multiple comorbidities would be betterfor vaccination even if other children don�*t warrant it. vaccination even if other children don't warrant it.— vaccination even if other children don't warrant it. thank you for your time. new research suggests that front line care workers, supporting elderly or disabled people in england, require the same skills as teaching assistants and police community support officers — and yet they�*re paid £7,000 per year less.
9:20 am
the charity integrated care says says pay gap makes it difficult to recruit staff. the government says it hopes to give an update of its plans to reform social care quite soon. here s our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. shall we open some presents? it�*s tony�*s birthday today, and with his family unable to be with him, it�*s his support worker amy who will be at his side throughout the day. i love myjob, i absolutely love myjob. and i always say to work in care you have to care, because you do. tony has epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and he struggles to swallow. amy has to monitor him closely and act quickly if needed. stay awake. we need to celebrate, you can�*t celebrate if you�*re asleep. she has great responsibilities but as a 22—year—old, is paid just £8.88 an hour. i�*ve got friends that work in retail that are getting upwards of £9, £10 per hour. and we�*re not asking for, you know, rainbows and unicorns, we�*re just asking to be appreciated
9:21 am
and for our pay to reflect it. and today�*s report underlines the pay gap between care staff and otherjobs with equivalent demands. it found care workers were paid an average ofjust under £17,700 per year. compared with the 24,600 average pay for similar roles like senior teaching assistants, and police community support officers. the charity that commissioned the research says that difference is wrong. but its boss maintains to change it, more money has to be spent by government on funding care. people find the work in social care incredibly rewarding, and they enjoy what they're asked to do. but theyjust find that they can't survive and look after their own families on less than £18,000 per year and certainly that's the case if you are the main earner in the family. the government has said it will publish a plan for reform of the adult social care system by the end of the year. alison holt, bbc news.
9:22 am
with me now is social care worker peter henderson. good morning, thank you for being with us. do you feel underpaid and undervalued? i with us. do you feel underpaid and undervalued?— with us. do you feel underpaid and undervalued? i am certainly a little better aid undervalued? i am certainly a little better paid than _ undervalued? i am certainly a little better paid than the _ undervalued? i am certainly a little better paid than the support i undervalued? i am certainly a little | better paid than the support worker we just heard from. i better paid than the support worker wejust heard from. i am a better paid than the support worker we just heard from. i am a recovery work in a supported housing unit for vulnerable adults with mental health problems. but, yes, iam in full—time employment and i struggle at the end of the month. you know, the whole system is very underfunded and i am amazed it is such a news item because it has been this way for many years. in a item because it has been this way for many years-— item because it has been this way for many years. in a way, perhaps that is a good _ for many years. in a way, perhaps that is a good thing, _ for many years. in a way, perhaps that is a good thing, a _ for many years. in a way, perhaps that is a good thing, a light i for many years. in a way, perhaps that is a good thing, a light is i that is a good thing, a light is being shown on under pay amongst people who work very, very hard, in difficult conditions. give us an idea of how hard it has been for you over the last few months? i idea of how hard it has been for you over the last few months?— over the last few months? i have worked all _
9:23 am
over the last few months? i have worked all the _ over the last few months? i have worked all the way _ over the last few months? i have worked all the way through i over the last few months? i have worked all the way through the i worked all the way through the pandemic. you know, i didn�*t feel like particularly to be a front line hero, i wasjust like particularly to be a front line hero, i was just getting like particularly to be a front line hero, i wasjust getting paid and do myjob. it was nice to be clapped on a thursday night and the government decided the clapping had to stop and the very next week, my over 60s travel pass was taken away or was changed so i didn�*t get free transport in the morning. it felt like a kick in the teeth. i am being uploaded per minute and the next minute i have to put my hand in my pocket. minute i have to put my hand in my ocket. , , , _ pocket. this report says, 'ust by wa of pocket. this report says, 'ust by way of comparison i pocket. this report says, 'ust by way of comparison that i pocket. this report says, just by way of comparison that you i pocket. this report says, just by way of comparison that you are l pocket. this report says, just by i way of comparison that you are doing the same sort of work as police community support officers, for example, teaching assistants and being paid £7,000 a year less, that is a big differential, a very big pay gap, isn�*t it? it is
9:24 am
is a big differential, a very big pay gap. isn't it?— pay gap, isn't it? it is and i resent the _ pay gap, isn't it? it is and i resent the insinuation i pay gap, isn't it? it is and i resent the insinuation that | pay gap, isn't it? it is and i. resent the insinuation that we pay gap, isn't it? it is and i- resent the insinuation that we are unskilled. it is dealing with challenging individuals. iam not going to pretend they are always challenging, some nights are very quiet, but i have been assaulted three or four times quiet, but i have been assaulted three orfour times and i quiet, but i have been assaulted three or four times and i helped give birth. i am not a midwife, three or four times and i helped give birth. iam not a midwife, but i had to cope with that situation and with individuals with mental health problems, you don�*t know what is going to happen next time. thea;r is going to happen next time. they will be hard _ is going to happen next time. they will be hard to _ is going to happen next time. they will be hard to make _ is going to happen next time. they will be hard to make up the pay gap very quickly, but what would you like to see happen? would you like to see a gradual increase in pay for care workers so that in time, there may be a better balance? yes. care workers so that in time, there may be a better balance? yes, there should be a — may be a better balance? yes, there should be a better— may be a better balance? yes, there should be a better balance. - may be a better balance? yes, there should be a better balance. it - may be a better balance? yes, there should be a better balance. it is i should be a better balance. it is notjust wages. there is an awful lot of lone working going on for the company i am working for. i work nights and i am on my own. most of
9:25 am
the services in my area and the same. it is not ideal to be working alone, but it is a and the council his supply the service that we grants, their way forward is to cut all the service users in individual self—contained flats and just have floating support, which saves money. it is all about money.— it is all about money. everyone is underfunded. _ it is all about money. everyone is underfunded. you _ it is all about money. everyone is underfunded. you have _ it is all about money. everyone is underfunded. you have been i it is all about money. everyone is. underfunded. you have been doing great work and thank you very much forjoining us and talking about your role. peter henderson, a social care worker. thank you very much for your time. care worker. thank you very much for yourtime. let�*s care worker. thank you very much for your time. let�*s read you a statement we have from the department of health and social care. "the social care sector has been an essential and valued part
9:26 am
of the front line response to the pandemic. we have sought to protect the workforce and those receiving social care, providing over £2 billion for the sector including infection prevention and control measures, free ppe and regular testing, and we prioritised staff for the vaccine." a row has broken out in spain over eating meat. 0ne spanish government minister said people should eat less meat for their own health — and the planet�*s. well, that�*s caused a row with other senior government figures, as sophia tran—thomson reports. it isa it is a country famed for its dry cured ham and sausages. spaniards love their meat than any other eu country. slaughtering 70 million pigs, cows, sheep, goats, horses and birds every year. so many spaniards were surprised to hear the consumer
9:27 am
affairs minister saying this... translation:— affairs minister saying this... translation: ~ ., ., , ., 4' translation: what would you think if i told ou translation: what would you think if i told you excessive _ translation: what would you think if i told you excessive meat _ i told you excessive meat consumption harms our health and the planet? without the planet we have no life, without the planet we have no life, without the planet we have no salaries, no economy and we are destroying it and we have a direct impact on one of the parts we are destroying. we can change our diets and improve the state of the planet. his comments came underfire and improve the state of the planet. his comments came under fire from the country�*s agricultural minister, who said it denigrated the work of spain�*s farmers. then the prime minister, pedro sanchez, interrupted a trip to lithuania to comment. translation: in a trip to lithuania to comment. translation:— a trip to lithuania to comment. translation: , _, ., ,, translation: in this controversy, i will ut it translation: in this controversy, i will put it in — translation: in this controversy, i will put it in personal— translation: in this controversy, i will put it in personalterms... i translation: in this controversy, i will put it in personalterms... for. will put it in personal terms... for me, there is nothing that beats a well done t—bone steak. the me, there is nothing that beats a well done t-bone steak. the average saniard well done t-bone steak. the average spaniard consumes _ well done t-bone steak. the average spaniard consumes more _ well done t-bone steak. the average spaniard consumes more than - well done t-bone steak. the average spaniard consumes more than one i spaniard consumes more than one kilogram of meat every ten each kilogram of meat every ten each kilogram takes around 15,000 litres
9:28 am
of water to produce. in a country facing rapid expansion of its deserts, at the very least, it is food for thought. a teenager has become the first african american to win the national spelling bee in the united states. the word is "murraya". it�*s a genius of tropical, asiatic and australian trees having pinnate leaves and flowers with indicated petals. "murraya". m-u-r-r-a-y-a. that is correct! applause. i cannot believe she knew that, that is extraordinary. zaila avant—garde, a 14—year—old from new orleans, claimed the $50,000 prize after correctly spelling the word "murraya", a type of tropical tree. never heard of it myself, wouldn�*t
9:29 am
have a clue how to spell it, but she did. zaila practiced for up to seven hours a day for the competition but says spelling is a side hobby — she really wants to become a basketball pro. she already holds three world records for her ball dribbling skills. what a multitalented teenager, puts us all to shame. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. there will be rain clouds for some of you turning down for parts of cornwall, south—west wales later and our sunshine breaks out across the country, some showers and thunderstorms in central and south—eastern scotland, central and eastern scotland. some of you will avoid the showers altogether and stick with pleasant spells of warm sunshine. temperatures into the low 20s. the showers where they do fall will be slow moving. through the night we see more persistent rain developed across south—west england
9:30 am
and southern most areas of wales. and for all, it will be of all night, 12 to 15 degrees. but for saturday, wet weather will be spreading across southern counties of england from west to east, brightening up through the afternoon across many western areas and away from that, there will be a story of sunshine and showers. showers mainly to the north and west of the country and more of those to come on sunday. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: airlines and travel companies report
9:31 am
a huge surge in demand for foreign holidays as quarantine rules for uk nationals returning to england are relaxed. we�*re saying that if you have been fully vaccinated, that means two vaccinations plus waiting two weeks, 1a days, then you can go away, including for holidays. so that will change. health officials consider making the nhs covid app less sensitive, to avoid millions of people having to self—isolate this summer. new research confirms that for children there�*s an extremely low risk of severe illness or death from covid—19. authors of a new report say that frontline care workers supporting elderly or disabled people in england are underpaid by £7,000 per year. local authorities across the uk say they face a £3 billion shortfall in their budgets over the next three years as the country emerges from the pandemic. and coming up...
9:32 am
don�*t demolish old buildings, plead architects — instead they say structures should be protected — to fight climate change. sport, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. i wonder what we might be talking about! yes, ithink i wonder what we might be talking about! yes, i think you have guessed correctly because we are starting to talk about england. the full england squad is expected to take part in training at st george�*s park later today, as the countdown continues to sunday�*s european championship final. some of the players were put through a more gentle stretching programme, after the exertions of wednesday night�*s semi—final win over denmark. just getting rid of the muscle tension. a little bit of yoga or pilates. they�*ll need all the freshness they can get into those legs, when they face italy at wembley. the italians are still at their base near florence, before they fly to london tomorrow.
9:33 am
world number one novak djokovic has already won the australian and french open titles this season, but he says he�*ll have to be at his best to beat denis shapovalov when they take to centre court later. there are two players in their first wimbledon semi—finals — matteo berretini and hubert hurkasz. and we know now that it�*s ash barty who�*ll take on karolina pliskova in tomorrow�*s women�*s final asjoe wilson reports. the trophies get bigger as you get older. take a look at the wimbledon girls champion from ten years ago. well, she�*s 25 now. ash barty, world number one, top of your screen. commentator: incredible. barty was born in ipswich, queensland. well, thank for your support. don�*t they sell australian flags in london? there�*s one. against angelique kerber, barty had to be at her best. she was. oh, that�*s gorgeous. first set, 6—3. but what do you see in kerber�*s eyes? the german player is 33.
9:34 am
her tenacity is legendary. she forced mistakes. it�*s a break! the second set went to a tie—break and kerber was fighting to the end. not quite enough. it was a measure of the quality of this match that nobody on centre really wanted it to end, except, perhaps, the winner. ash barty is into the final. i think this is as close to as good a tennis match as i'll ever play. i think angie definitely brought the best out of me today. i'm incredibly proud of myself, my team and now we get a chance on saturday to try to live out a childhood dream. the second semifinal was played between two women pushing themselves to new heights in there. actually, you can almost hear it out here. she grunts. facing aryna sabalenka�*s serve can seem thankless. karolina pliskova tried and lost the first set 7—5. most points in this match
9:35 am
were fierce and short but some rallies did break free. fa ntastic stuff! pliskova took the second set 6—4. seeded eight, the czech player has power and control. she can serve, too. third set, 6—4. at 29, pliskova is through to her first wimbledon final. her approach, she says, is super positive. that�*s her husband. this is what it is all for. so to the men�*s semifinalists. matteo berrettini, seventh seed with a powerful game for the grass versus hubert hurkacz, conqueror of roger federer. well, can anybody here beat novak djokovic? today, he takes on denis shapovalov, a worthy opponent, in theory. he�*s got an all—round game. he is very flashy. he has got a big serve, great forehand and he has nothing to lose. nothing to lose, a semifinal to win. today�*s the day, denis. joe wilson, bbc news, wimbledon.
9:36 am
tyson fury�*s third fight against deontay wilder has been postponed after the boxer tested positive for coronavirus. they were due to meet in las vegas in two weeks�* time but fury returned the positive test on thursday and, after discussions with medical experts, the decision was made to call off the fight. it�*s likely to be rearranged for october. fury beat wilder to become wbc champion in february last year, 1a months after the pair shared a thrilling draw in los angeles. england�*s makeshift one—day side comfortably beat pakistan in their first international in cardiff — that�*s despite an entirely new set of players having to be brought in just two days ago, after a covid outbreak in the original england squad. they got off to the perfect start. they had pakistan 26—4, with saqib mahmood the pick of the bowlers. pakistan were all out for 1a! and england chased that down for the loss ofjust one wicket.
9:37 am
the second of three matches is at lord�*s tomorrow. there will be no spectators at the olympics in tokyo, due to rising cases of coronavirus — after it was announced that the state of emergency in the city will run throughout the games. the olympic flame has arrived in the capital, but the public was kept away from a low—key ceremony. however, there may be some fans allowed at venues outside tokyo. the games start in two weeks�* time and a decision on the paralympics will be made after the olympics. there are more details on the bbc sport website. that�*s all the sport for now. we will be playing a medley of england football anthems for you before the top of the other soul stage for that. the uk�*s economy grew by 0.8% in may as coronavirus restrictions eased to allow pubs and restaurants to serve indoors.
9:38 am
this marked the fourth consecutive month of growth, but it was a slower rate than analysts had expected. it was also a slowdown from april, when the economy grew 2% as restrictions eased for non—essential retailers and hospitality firms could serve outside. the economy is still 3.1% below pre—pandemic levels. with me now is rebecca harding, an independent economist specialising in trade and trade finance and ceo of coriolis technologies. how do you read these figures? good news or not? it is how do you read these figures? good news or not?— news or not? it is good that the economy is _ news or not? it is good that the economy is still _ news or not? it is good that the economy is still growing. i news or not? it is good that the economy is still growing. we i news or not? it is good that the | economy is still growing. we are still below pre—pandemic levels of output so we are 3% below where we were at the start of the pandemic and there are a lot of things quite temporarily so we saw a 37% increase
9:39 am
in restaurants and pubs�* outfit which is not surprising because people could go out more, so there are things which are good there. we also saw production well so there are things which are really good but there are underlying things that are more concerning.— there are underlying things that are more concerning. what in particular is concerning _ more concerning. what in particular is concerning you _ more concerning. what in particular is concerning you when _ more concerning. what in particular is concerning you when you - more concerning. what in particular is concerning you when you delve i is concerning you when you delve down deeper into these figures? 0utput is slower so we are expecting growth to slow over the course of the summer because a lot of this is catch up but underneath there�*s something bothering the whole global economy. two supply chain shortages. a lot of supply chains, particularly in the car sector, being affected by semiconductor shortages at the moment and it is affecting the economy across the whole world and that has had an impact on uk gdp this time around so we have to be wary of that. this time around there was a 16.5% drop in output so that is a worry. construction output is
9:40 am
slowing as well. it is still above pre—pandemic levels but it is slowing. trade growth is slowing as well so there are things that are beginning to keeping where we are thinking we have gone beyond the catch up phase. i think the biggest thing of all this we do not know how other economies will react to the new delta variant, whether growth will be somewhere around the world, and that is going to have an effect on us. it and that is going to have an effect on us. , , ., ., on us. it is still a time of enormous _ on us. it is still a time of. enormous unpredictability on us. it is still a time of- enormous unpredictability as you mentioned with those different variants potentially keeping an eye get the population has been largely double vaccinated now. how much difference does all of that make in terms of business confidence? we are seeinr terms of business confidence? we are seeing business _ terms of business confidence? we are seeing business confidence _ terms of business confidence? we are seeing business confidence rise. i terms of business confidence? we are seeing business confidence rise. we l seeing business confidence rise. we have also got through the pattern earlier in this year, so january, february, where a lot of exporters were holding back from the market because they were scared or they were finding difficulties with
9:41 am
filling in forms for example to trade with the eu and one of the interesting things is actually trade has gone up with the eu and non—eu so that is something that is actually very positive to take away from all of this and there will be a feel—good factor. there is already a feel—good factor. there is already a feel—good factor. there is already a feel—good factor. we are beginning to see the end of lockdown restrictions, euro 2020 is making a big difference to people�*s sentiment so we may see our way through this with some spending increase, but markets had a bit of a bubble yesterday. there are concerns globally about the delta variant and it is one to watch.— it is one to watch. good to talk to ou. it is one to watch. good to talk to you- thank _ it is one to watch. good to talk to you- thank you — it is one to watch. good to talk to you. thank you for _ it is one to watch. good to talk to you. thank you for your _ it is one to watch. good to talk to you. thank you for your analysis. | it is one to watch. good to talk to i you. thank you for your analysis. an independent economist specialising independent economist specialising in trade and trade finance. a senior local leader in helmand province has told the bbc he believes the lasting legacy of the uk�*s military mission in that part of afghanistan is war. the head of helmand�*s provincial
9:42 am
council, ataqallah afghan, was speaking after borisjohnson announced that the uk had followed the us in withdrawing most of its troops. today taliban militants claimed to have captured a key border crossing with iran. last night presidentjoe biden defended the decision to withdraw us troops. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in the capital kabul and she explained the president�*s key motivation behind the withdrawal. it is very emotional forjoe biden. it was always said that he always carried around a card in his pocket which had the exact number of us forces, it was updated every day, who had died in iraq and in afghanistan. and in that speech last night he said we have been there so long that even our sons and daughters of the troops who first served are now serving on front lines. what we heard from president joe biden last night is what we know that vice presidentjoe biden thought and what senator joe biden thought.
9:43 am
in other words, he has always felt that afghanistan was a quagmire, america should bring its men and women home. he talked about nation build. he said we are not here to nation build. but then afghans say, what were you doing in the last 20 years? you have been building schools, talking about democracy and helping to support our women�*s activists, you helped to build a different kind of society and you are leaving us just as the taliban are at their biggest strength since 2001. and there is a real palpable fear here that women even tell us they are scared, they can�*t even go into coffee shops, having a cup of coffee with a male friend, because the taliban will not allow it. that is what it comes down to here. sometimes in afghanistan it is a big issue of security, of terrorism threats, but sometimes it�*s simply whether you can go out and safely have a cup of coffee with a friend. it is such a painful time, you know.
9:44 am
my pain doesn�*t matter compared to the pain of afghans, but i�*ve been coming here for more than 30 years but i have been coming regularly over the past few months and even the mood now at the beginning ofjuly is different than the mood was in may. everyone you talk to, whether it is a shopkeeper trying to get some sales for the day, whether you get a government minister who is charged with trying to bring peace to this country, they are all worried about themselves, what will happen to them, what will happen to theirfamilies. what will be the fate of their country? they often say in wars that the narrative of what is happening on the ground is as consequential as the events on the ground. and there is this narrative now that the taliban are advancing, and they are. they are rapidly taking over the districts. it doesn�*t mean they are going to overrun the capitals or even overrun kabul, but even afghans who said to me for months, i am not leaving, iam not leaving, i am going to stay here,
9:45 am
now they are saying to me, well, i�*m thinking about it now. and that�*ll be the loss of the biggest achievement of the presence of international troops in afghanistan. they have created the kind of society here, the best and the brightest of afghans have taken these educational opportunities the world had to offer, the work experience. and just when they are poised to play a role in their country�*s future, already play, they now feel they have no choice but to go wherever will take them. the headlines on bbc news: airlines and travel companies report a huge surge in demand for foreign holidays as quarantine rules for those returning to england are relaxed. health officials consider making the nhs covid app less sensitive, to avoid millions of people having to self—isolate this summer. new research shows that for children there�*s an extremely low risk of severe illness
9:46 am
or death from covid—19. the uk�*s first national database of child deaths has identified strong links between infant mortality, smoking and deprivation. the uk has the second highest number of deaths of children underfive in europe, after malta. the department of health says it will publish a new tobacco control plan later this year, to protect babies from the harms of smoking. our health correspondent deborah cohen reports. hi. this is maddie. she is healthy and happy, despite covid among her peers currently forcing her to isolate for a third time this nursery term. but her mother had been smoking for years when she fell pregnant, starting at just 1a. at the time, not far off a quarter of rochdale�*s adult population smoked. smoking is strongly linked to deprivation. everyone, really, was smoking.
9:47 am
i come from an area where a lot of young people do smoke as well, so the likes of my friends in school and, if i�*m honest, you know, it wasn�*t discouraged not to smoke. you know, the adults weren�*t, "don�*t smoke." it was all "go round the back of the bike sheds," sort of thing. smoking in a child�*s household is contributing to the uk having the second highest rate of deaths for children under five in western europe. now the country�*s first—ever national database of child deaths has been created. our experts are trying to work out why so many children are dying and it�*s becoming clear that there is one word that cannot be ignored. that word is deprivation. this graph shows the poorer the background of a child the more likely they are to die. the correlation is unmistakable and it�*s costing huge numbers of young lives. 23% of deaths are potentially
9:48 am
avoidable, preventable, if we can eliminate social deprivation, and that translates to 700 additional deaths per year that could be avoided. smoking in the household was identified as a factor in 226 child deaths studied. that is more than any other modifiable factor. exposure to passive smoke is linked to low birth weights and premature delivery and the impact of parental smoking can lead to other childhood illnesses that run throughout life. currently 9.5% of women in england are smoking when they give birth. far more than the 6% target. pre—pandemic analysis shows that while 62 councils saw a fall in the number smoking when a baby was born compared to four years earlier, 73 saw little change and 16 saw an increase in the rate of smoking.
9:49 am
new figures covering the pandemic suggest fewer women smoking at birth but how reliable these data are and whether they are anything more than a blip is unclear. around one in ten women smoke now, just the same as three or four years ago, and the government�*s target was to reduce it to 6% or less by 2022, and we are nowhere near achieving that. it is midwife nicola pearson�*sjob to visit pregnant women in sheffield who are smokers. she will give everything to help them give up but it�*s not simple. if you use an example of a pregnant woman, so she lives maybe here, she�*s got housing issues, so we might consider a team around the family, let�*s bring in her housing officer, let�*s think about how she can access tobacco, thinking about cheap and illicit tobacco availability, so let�*s make sure trading standards are out there squashing down on that availability. what is clear, smoking is more
9:50 am
than about personal responsibility. the government say they want a new office for health promotion to make smoking in pregnancy a focus. deborah cohen, bbc news. today will be a big day for many people in france — as nightclubs will be allowed to reopen. for nearly 18 months — ever since the pandemic began — they�*ve had to remain shut. but not all clubs will be reopening their doors. just a warning — this report from the bbc�*s tim allman contains flashing images. back where he belongs, dj vinz behind the decks at le duplex in paris. no—one is dancing yet but it�*s only a matter of time. soon this nightclub will be full, or at least mostly full, of party—goers. "it is going to be a special night," he says. "it�*s always great to see people so we are really looking forward to it."
9:51 am
this was le duplex before the pandemic, a premiere hotspot on the paris nightclub scene, its owners desperate to get the party started as soon as possible. translation: | think - what matters most is to open, making profit is important but it will be secondary. i think we�*re really eager for this wind of freedom because we know that, maybe, in august or september, we may be told to close our doors again. it�*s believed only around a quarter of clubs will actually reopen, and only then with reduced capacity. the trade body that represents the industry says around 400 nightclubs have been forced to close permanently or are in deep financial trouble and this grand reopening coincides with the spread of the delta variant. translation: so, it's true i that the timing is probably not the best, because we still have a very high incidence rate, and insufficient vaccination rate, so we
9:52 am
consider that our businesses will not be ready from a health standpoint. anyone hoping to get in will need proof of vaccination or a recent negative test but, as one potential customer put it, "we haven�*t had fun in a long time, and we need to have fun." tim allman, bbc news. we will be playing your some of those england football songs in a moment. after the england football team�*s historic semifinal win in the euros, one fan was more excited than most when her hero mason mount gave her his match shirt. the clip of belle receiving the shirt has been watched more than two million times. she told the bbc how surprised she was to get it. i didn�*t realise it until the last moment because when he walked over he was coming in my direction but he was looking the other way so i didn�*t expect it.
9:53 am
so, when he came over and stood right in front of me that was when i finally realised i had it in my hands and it was just crazy. what you don't see in the video was we did a lot of work before the game, from kick—off. she's small but she's very mouthy and she was shouting mason mount as he was warming up and she managed to catch his eye in the warm up and he saw her flag, so luckily made an impression, and was hoping after the game ended we could catch his eye and be maybe a lucky recipient of the shirt and, yeah, the plan worked perfectly. when i went to the first euro england game me and my dad got there early and we saw the euros coach and i actually saw him and he waved to me and he smiled at me so i thought i would make a flag for him on the denmark game semifinal, and then that caught his eye and now i�*ve actually got his shirt. i�*m probably going to put it in a frame or keep it somewhere safe because i don�*t want to sell it or i don�*t want to wash it.
9:54 am
when i went to school everybody knew. it was very crazy because when i walked down the road the other day to pick my brother up there was someone shouting, "superstar," and ijust didn�*t know, and when we went to mcdonald�*s there was someone like, "it's belle." and it�*s just crazy because i�*ve never had that before. it is crazy that england are in the final on sunday. the further the england team have progressed in the euros, the more we have heard three songs which have become the sound track to the three lions journey to the final. the tunes have all re—entered the charts on the back of the team�*s success and, just as a warning, if they aren�*t already stuck in your head, they will be shortly! # three lions on a shirt # jules rimet still gleaming # it's coming home, it's coming home
9:55 am
# it's coming # football's coming home # it's coming home, it's coming home # it's coming # football's coming home # sweet caroline # bah, bah, bah! # good times never seemed so good _ # so good, so good # sweet caroline # bah, bah, bah! # good times never seemed so good # so good, so good, so good # looking back on where we first met # i cannot escape and i cannot forget # southgate, you�*re the one # you still turn me on # football�*s coming home again # southgate, you�*re the one # you still turn me on # football�*s coming home again.#
9:56 am
football definitely is coming home again on sunday. sweet caroline is stuck in my head. a special song, especially when sung by england fans. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. there will be some sunshine around but there will be some showers cropping up, becoming heavy and fun as we go into the second half of the afternoon and evening. we have thick cloud pushing back into south west england and south wales as we go through the afternoon which could bring more in the way of widespread patchy rain and drizzle. sprightly skies in northern ireland but it is through eastern parts of england and the midlands where we could see some of those heavy and thundery showers develop. light winds where the showers and storms form that could be with us for some time and a fair
9:57 am
bit of rain. more persistent rain working through said wales and south west england heading towards the channel islands as we going through the start of the weekend. temperature 15 or 16 degrees for one or two of you. tomorrow will bring the most persistent of the days rain. southernmost counties of england particularly. mainly the south of the m4 will see the heavier bursts pushing towards the london area and then that will clear and the sunshine will come out. different sorts of areas for showers tomorrow, the heaviest in north wales and north—west england and some parts of western scotland. temperatures down a degree or so on today. another weather system is set today. another weather system is set to push on for a sunday which will take on the cloud and bring longer spells of rain towards the west. some showers here and there, heavy thundery showers most likely across parts of scotland and north—east
9:58 am
england. the best of the brightness in the morning, starting to glide over into the afternoon. down towards the south—west it could develop into something more significant as we go through the night and into monday. it could potentially bring a fair bit of rain if it develops as we see at the moment and that could bring some minorflooding. summer is absent from the chart but there is a good deal of sport. it is women�*s final is the most likely to see the wettest weather particularly towards the afternoon and men�*s final day should be dry. rainbow reach the capital into the evening. typical british weather to see in england against italy at wembley.
9:59 am
10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. airlines and travel companies report a huge surge in demand forforeign holidays as quarantine rules for uk nationals returning to england and northern ireland are relaxed. the uk government says it now wants to work on recognising vaccinations from other countries as quickly as possible. ido want i do want to move in quick order to recognise vaccinations from other countries that use world health organization approved vaccines. the 0rganization approved vaccines. the eu being obvious countries so we will work on that as quickly as possible. the olympic flame arrives in tokyo,
10:01 am
two weeks before the games — but no spectators are allowed.

31 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on