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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri. our top stories: the olympic torch arrives in tokyo, two weeks before the games, but no spectators are allowed. president biden says he won't send another generation of americans to afghanistan as he confirms the us will end its mission next month, even as the taliban gains ground. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms thatjust one more year fighting in afghanistan is not a solution. a plea to eat less meat causes beef in spain, as a minister suggests spaniards should cut their meat consumption and help save the planet. and it was women's semifinals day at wimbledon, so who is through to
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the finals? we'll bring you all the latest from the all england club. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the olympic torch relay has reached tokyo, two weeks before the games begin. two weeks before the games begin. but the 2020 olympics are already very clearly unlike any 0lympics before them. no crowds were allowed in to watch as the flame was carried on stage in a lantern and handed to the governor of tokyo, yuriko koike. and there'll be no spectators at the arenas in the city hosting the bulk of olympic events. the organising committee has shut them out,
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after a state of emergency was declared in tokyo, our correspondent mariko 0i is in tokyo. the government announced a fourth state of emergency landing on the 22nd of august, covering the entire duration of the olympics. we heard from the organisers that as a result, they are not going to allow any spectators inside the stadium, making these the first ever 0lympics making these the first ever olympics to be held behind closed doors. the situation keeps getting more difficult for the organisers but i guess it is not exactly surprising because of the strong opposition and with the state
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of emergency you cannot tell people to stay at home but you can still go and watch the olympics. very concerned that 0lympics. very concerned that people were going to watch competitions and that could potentially spread the virus even further. 0f potentially spread the virus even further. of course businesses argue the financial implications, not serving alcohol in errors, is demonstrating that they have been repeatedly saying they want the olympic games to be held in a safe and secure manner. this means after spending some $25 billion, including building that brand—new stadium, it is going to be empty and the japanese government will see pretty much no financial benefit from tourism. what exactly is the covered situation injapan? are the figures high? compared to other parts of the world? the
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figure that the government sighting was 920 new infections in tokyo on wednesday which resulted or fronted the government to declare this state of emergency. 920 might not seem as high compared to what the uk and the us experienced during the height of the pandemic but from the government point of view, they were afraid for that number to go above 1000 and medical experts have been wanting that if they allow people to go out and watched the olympic games and watched the olympic games and start going out for drinks, that number could easily go above 2000 and easily get out of control very soon and that is why we have been hearing from the top medical advisor in the country saying it is not normal for an event like the olympics to go ahead during the
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pandemic so that has been a lot of strong opposition notjust from the public but also from doctors. president biden has defended the withdrawal of us forces from afghanistan, saying he wasn't prepared to send another generation of americans to fight there. mr biden said washington had achieved its initial goal of punishing those who launched the september 11th attacks, but admitted the taliban's growing strength caused uncertainty. mr biden said that there was no sence in prolonging the us stay in afghanistan beyond the end of next month. in 2011, the nato allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. in 2014, some argued one more year. so we kept fighting, we kept taking casualties. in 2015, the same — and on and on. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year fighting in afghanistan
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is not a solution but a recipe for being there indefinitely. it is up to the afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis, says there are questions around the speed of the withdrawal. it has, of course, been brought forward. we were led to believe september the 11th would be the date but now it will be by the end of august, president biden said today. he also made the point that the united states could no longer afford as the human cost nor the strategic distraction of maintaining large numbers of us forces in afghanistan. he said the us had done what it sought to achieve when it went in. that was the killing of a 0sama bin laden and the rooting out of terrorist cells in that country, and now, basically, it was up
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to the afghans to sort out what sort of country they wanted going forward. he said we could go for another year, then another year, then another year — what more would we achieve? it is, of course, somewhat controversial, given the fact that now the taliban seems to be forming quite a considerable force and by all accounts may have the afghan capital, kabul, in its site imminently. what about us public opinion, david? well, it is interesting. support for remaining in afghanistan has been higher actually amongst democrats than it has republicans, but americans, of course, do not worry too much generally about foreign matters and i think a lot of people here have become somewhat ambivalent to what is going on overseas, especially given the problems that this country has experienced by itself domestically, in recent months and years.
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i think that there are signs anyway that a lot of people simply really do not care now and many would like to see the troops come home. and of course this all began at 9/11, didn't it so many years ago? indeed, yes, going in after 9/11 attacks and seeking to basically root out 0sama bin laden, to combat the taliban, which of course us forces were successful in doing but now they have regrouped and president biden made the point today or conceded at least, that the taliban is as strong now as it was when the mission began, as far as the us was concerned. he said, numerically of course, that the afghan government troops had the advantage — what, 300,000 of them compared to 75,000 members of the taliban —
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but the simple truth of the matter is that many of those afghan government troops have started to defect, some to leave for other countries, fearing the violence and the bloodshed that could lay ahead, following the withdrawal of american forces. david willis there. haiti's acting prime minister claudejoseph says he believes presidentjovenel moise may have been killed because he'd taken on what he called haiti's oligarchs. the chief of police thanks 28 people were involved. mrjoseph said six members of the gang that attacked moise�*s house had been captured and seven shot dead. africa has experienced its most devestating week so far of the coronavirus pandemic, with worse yet to come according to the world health organisation. confirmed cases have already passed january's peak and are doubling every eighteen days with deaths
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not far behind. it's likely that actual cases are much higher than this however, due to poor levels of testing. this comes as only about one percent of the continent's population is fully vaccinated. an african director at the world health organization alluded to the delta variant feeling more cases. figs alluded to the delta variant feeling more cases.- feeling more cases. as it spreads _ feeling more cases. as it spreads to _ feeling more cases. as it spreads to more - feeling more cases. as it i spreads to more countries, feeling more cases. as it - spreads to more countries, they will also take off in terms of the speed, increase and a number of cases and i think we are in for some weeks of a very difficult situation. i'm joined now by ingrid katz, associate professor of medicine at harvard university. how serious and worrying is a situation in africa right now? thank you so much for having me. i remain incredibly
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concerned about africa. we know that new cases have been increasing for over seven weeks, rising on average 28% weeks, rising on average 28% week upon week and just this week upon week and just this week alone, it has been the most dire in terms of the pandemic in africa.- pandemic in africa. what countries _ pandemic in africa. what countries in _ pandemic in africa. what countries in particular . pandemic in africa. what i countries in particular other ones hardest hit?— countries in particular other ones hardest hit? certainly we have the most _ ones hardest hit? certainly we have the most information - ones hardest hit? certainly we i have the most information about south africa where certainly the country has been devastated throughout sub—saharan africa throughout sub—sa ha ran africa we throughout sub—saharan africa we are seeing cases continuing to rise. g we are seeing cases continuing to rise. , , to rise. tell me why? during the first wave, _ to rise. tell me why? during the first wave, if _ to rise. tell me why? during the first wave, if you - to rise. tell me why? during the first wave, if you like, i the first wave, if you like, around the world, it seemed a lot of countries in africa did not get hit as badly as other countries like in europe or latin america. i countries like in europe or latin america.— countries like in europe or latin america. i think that was an interesting _ latin america. i think that was
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an interesting situation - an interesting situation earlier on and it was puzzling for many people because to be quite honest, people really thought that would be the seat of the epidemic but fortunately for most of sub—saharan africa they managed to move through that time relatively well. what we are seeing right now is essentially due to the delta variant, while it has been isolated in 16 countries, it is more widespread than that and we know it is 30— 60% more transmissible than the prior variant that was in south africa. we have a tremendously transmissible virus under the continent right now and that combined with fatigue from social isolation and lockdowns, it is combining to be a potent and deadly mix. find it is combining to be a potent and deadly mix.— it is combining to be a potent and deadly mix. and key to all of this and _ and deadly mix. and key to all of this and the _ and deadly mix. and key to all of this and the way _ and deadly mix. and key to all of this and the way out - and deadly mix. and key to all of this and the way out of- and deadly mix. and key to all of this and the way out of this | of this and the way out of this is the vaccination programme which is not seen as a this —
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effective in africa as in other parts of the world?— effective in africa as in other parts of the world? right now only slightly _ parts of the world? right now only slightly over _ parts of the world? right now only slightly over 1% - parts of the world? right now only slightly over 1% of- parts of the world? right now only slightly over 1% of the i only slightly over 1% of the continent has received full vaccination and even one vaccine is under 2% so we are looking at a situation where there has been gross vaccine in equity and a population of people throughout the continent that are not getting access to the vaccine at this point. what is the answer? _ the vaccine at this point. what is the answer? where - the vaccine at this point. what is the answer? where does i the vaccine at this point. what| is the answer? where does the responsibility lie in helping countries in africa that do not have access and to get it and get it quickly?— get it quickly? certainly, the kovacs programme - get it quickly? certainly, the kovacs programme from i get it quickly? certainly, the kovacs programme from the j get it quickly? certainly, the i kovacs programme from the world health organization is a critical piece of this —— covax they have pledged to deliver to billion doses by the end of the year. the us and other nations are stepping up but as of now,
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they are not really beginning to achieve these estimates and when you think about vaccinating countries throughout the world, we are going to need something like 11 million doses to fully vaccinate 70% of the world and really, right now, 85% of those doses are going to upper and upper middle income countries. it has been really interesting to talk to you. thank you so much for your time and inside. thank you for having me. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: getting ready to hit the dancefloor again as nightclubs in france prepare to reopen their doors for the first time in more than a year. central london has been rocked by a series of terrorist attacks. police say there have been many casualties, and there is growing
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speculation that al-qaeda was responsible. germany will be the hosts of the 2006 football world cup. they pipped the favourite, south africa, by a single vote. in south africa, the possibility of losing hadn't even been contemplated. celebration parties were cancelled. a man entered the palace i through a downstairs window and made his way— to the queen's private bedroom, then he asked her for a cigarette and, i on the pretext for arranging for some to be bought, i summoned a footman _ on duty who took the man away. cheering and applause. one child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. education is the only solution. this is bbc news,
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the latest headlines: as the olympic torch arrives in tokyo organisers ban all spectators at the games. brazil's president bolsonaro is under growing pressure over his handling of the covid pandemic, with protests on the street. more than half a million people have died with the virus in brazil — the world's second highest death toll after the us. only 13% percent of the population is fully vaccinated and around 2,000 people are still dying with the virus every day. now there fears that the highly contagious delta variant could also take hold. our international correspondent orla guerin reports from sao paulo. brazil's agony. carved into the soil. fresh graves in sao paulo away to the new covid dead. the virus is still reaching many here long before vaccines do.
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giseiro dimora died of covid in mayjust days after this action was taken and days before he was taken and days before he was due to get a job. the father of five was the heart of his family. his son felipe joined the recent street protests seeking justice for his dad. for those who have come out on the streets here, this isn'tjust about grief come out on the streets here, this isn't just about grief and angen this isn't just about grief and anger, it's about political responsibility. they believe that many of the dead are the limbs of bolsonaro, his policies and his inaction as well as victims of covid—19,
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and the pressure on the president is growing. the focus is here, heated parliamentary enquiry which has become must watch tv. it has already uncovered that pfizer offered to supply vaccines to the government last year and, for months, was ignored. we met the opposition senator, omar aziz, leading the enquiry. his own brother is among the dead. president bolsonaro continues to set this kind of example,
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not wearing a mask while thronged by diehard supporters last month. he was fined. and in the midst of a pandemic, leading a bikers rally. he insists the wheels of the economy must keep turning and says staying home is for idiots. the president actually guaranteed that covid would spread, according to pedro halal, the epidemiologist leading brazil's largest study in the virus.— in the virus. our president said, in the virus. our president said. oh. _ in the virus. our president said, oh, it's— in the virus. our president said, oh, it's coming i in the virus. our president said, oh, it's coming to i in the virus. our president said, oh, it's coming to an in the virus. our president i said, oh, it's coming to an end in april last year. then he said the vaccines were not safe. the statement from the president himself were, they produce damage in a kill people and this is what needs to be said. , ., , , ., . said. the protesters go much further, accusing _ said. the protesters go much further, accusing the - said. the protesters go much| further, accusing the brazilian leader of genocide. they want him out. for now, he is going
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nowhere, but the bereaved are hoping there will be a reckoning. orla guerin, bbc news, brasilia. a row has broken out in spain — over meat consumption. one spanish government minister suggested his fellow countrymen should eat less meat for their own health — and the planet's. well, that's caused beef with other senior government figures, as courtney bembridge reports. it is a country famed for its dry cured ham, chorizo and sausages. spaniards love their meat more than any other eu country, slaughtering 17 million pigs, cows, sheep, goats, horses and birds every year. so many spaniards were surprised to hear their consumer affairs minister, alberto garzon, saying this... translation: what would you think if i told you that l excessive meat consumption harms our health and also our planet? without the planet, we have no life, without the planet we have no salaries, no economy, and we are destroying it and we have a direct impact on one of the parts that we are destroying it.
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we can change our diets and improve the state of the planet. his comments came underfire from, you guessed it, the agriculture minister who said it denigrated the work of the country's farmers. then the prime minister pedro sanchez interrupted a trip to lithuania to weight—in. translation: on this | controversy, i will put it in very personal terms — for me, there is nothing that beats a well done t—bone steak. the average spaniard puts away more than one kilogram of meat a week and each kilogram takes around 15,000 litres of water to produce. in a country that's facing a rapid expansion of its deserts, at the very least it is food for thought. courtney bembridge, bbc news. now to wimbledon where the top seed, ashleigh barty, has reached her
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first women's singles final with a straight—sets win over the former champion angelique kerber. she'll play karolina pliskova on saturday. here's chetan pathak — at the all england club. but still, barty, when she needed to, was able to slice and dice her way to victory in the moments when it mattered the most. it was tight at a tie—break, but barty getting herself over the line — a player who's got better and better, round after round at these championships. and awaiting her in the final will be the czech eighth seed
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karolina pliskova who, at 29, many had written off from reaching this stage of a grand slam again. but pliskova, the 2016 us open runner—up, was too good for aryna sabalenka, the number—two seed in the end. and, despite losing that first set, pliskova fought back in the second and third, winning them 6—4, 6—4. she'd reached the semifinals of all the other grand slams before these wimbledon championships. now she's into the final here, but barty perhaps the big favourite for that one on saturday. as for friday, its men's semifinals day — the defending champion and, without a doubt, the overwhelming favourite, novak djokovic, takes on canada's denis shapovalov. whilst in the other match, the big—hitting matteo berrettini from italy faces roger federer�*s conqueror, hubert hurkacz. friday will be a big day for many people in france — as nightclubs will be allowed to reopen. for nearly eighteen months — ever since the pandemic began — they've had to remain shut. but not all clubs will be re—opening their doors. just a warning — this report from the bbc�*s tim allman contains flashing images.
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back where he belongs, this dj behind the decks at duplex in paris. soon this nightclub will be full or at least mostly full of party—goers. it is going to be a special night, he says. it's always great to see people so we are really looking forward to it. this was le duplex before the pandemic, hotspot and the paris night club scene, its owners desperate to get the party started as soon as possible. translation: i think what matters most is to open, making properties important but it will be secondary. i think we are really eagerfor this will be secondary. i think we are really eager for this wind of freedom because we know that, maybe, in august or september, we may be told to
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close our doors again. it’s close our doors again. it's believed _ close our doors again. it's believed only _ close our doors again. it's believed only around a quarter of clubs will actually reopen and only then with reduced capacity. the trade body that represents the industry says around 400 nightclubs have been forced to close permanently or are in deep financial trouble and this grand reopening coincides with the spread of the delta variant. translation: so it's true _ the delta variant. translation: so it's true that _ the delta variant. translation: so it's true that the _ the delta variant. translation: so it's true that the timing i the delta variant. translation: so it's true that the timing is i so it's true that the timing is probably not the best, because we still have a very high incidence rate, and insufficient vaccination rate, so we consider that our businesses will not be ready from a health standpoint. anyone hoping to get in will need proof of vaccination or a recent negative test but as one potential customer put it, we haven't had fun in a long time, and we need to have one. you can reach me on twitter —
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i'm @ bbcmaryam. hello there. the next few days look pretty unsettled, with low pressure always nearby, so we're likely to see sunshine and showers notjust for friday, but into the weekend and into the start of next week, too. so, for today, these showers will be heavy, much like they were on thursday, and you'll see on the pressure charts we're in between systems, and there's barely any isobars, so the winds are light and the showers will be slow—moving again. so, quite a bit of cloud to start this morning, particularly across scotland, where we'll see some patchy rain in the northeast. the sunshine will get going, though, the best of it in central and eastern areas — and this is where we'll see most of the heavy showers into the afternoon, again, some with hail and thunder mixed in. an area of more persistent rain will push into the southwest later in the day.
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temperature—wise, 20—24 celsius. now, for wimbledon for friday and into the weekend, there'll be a lot of dry weather around with some sunshine, but there's always the chance of catching a heavy shower. now, as we move through friday night, those heavy showers across central and eastern areas will tend to fade away, many places will turn dry with variable cloud and clear spells. but this weather front will bring in persistent rain to south wales and the southwest of england, slowly moving its way eastwards. temperature—wise, most places sticking in double figures. so, for this weekend, again, it's one of sunny spells and scattered showers, though we'll have that area of rain across southern areas for a while, but that will clear away during the course of saturday, then all areas will see sunny spells and showers. that area of rain could bring some persistent, fairly heavy rain to central and southern england through the morning, eventually clearing away. elsewhere, after a rather cloudy start, the sunshine will appear, and then, these showers will get going — and again, some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder, they'll be relatively slow—moving.
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temperature—wise, 17—22 celsius. as we move out of saturday into sunday, a new area of low pressure pushes into western parts of the uk — that'll bring enhanced showers to the northern and western areas in particular. again, some of them will be heavy and merge together to produce longer spells of rain in places. probably the better area to see the driest conditions will be central and eastern parts of england, where we'll see the best temperatures, 22—23 celsius — otherwise, the high teens further north and west. very unsettled into the start of next week, as well, particularly england and wales could see some very wet weatherfor a while. then from midweek onwards, it looks like high pressure wants to build in. that'll settle things down with increasing sunshine.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: as the olympic torch arrives in tokyo, the japanese government has said that spectators will not be allowed to attend events at venues in the capital. the government is placing tokyo under a new state of emergency from next week because of rising coronavirus infections. president biden has defended the withdrawal of us forces from afghanistan at the end of august, saying he could not send another generation of americans to fight there. mr biden said washington had achieved its initial goal of punishing the perpetrators of the september 11th attacks. but he admitted there was uncertainty with the taliban continuing to gain ground. a row has broken out in spain over meat consumption after one spanish government minister suggested his fellow countrymen should eat less meat for their own health — and the planet's. the feud has exposed political differences between parties within spain's ruling coalition. now on bbc news,
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the week in parliament.

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