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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 8, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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in afghanistan will end on the last day of august. he said continuing to fight in afghanistan was not an option, as it would mean us troops staying there indefinitely. the japanese government has said that spectators will not be allowed to attend olympic games events at venues in the capital. the government is placing tokyo under a new state of emergency from next week because of rising coronavirus infections. a haitian minister says one of the men arrested on suspicion of involvement in the assassination of presidentjovenel moise in a pre—dawn raid on his residence on wednesday is a us citizen. the european parliament has approved a resolution condemning hungary for a recent law forbidding the depiction of homosexuality and gender change to under—18s. the parliament called on the european commission to take urgent steps against the hungarian government.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. i promise this will be a little bit of a brieferfrom i promise this will be a little bit of a briefer from the football. with me are rachel shabi, author and journalist and james lewer, broadcaster and journalist. —— a breather. the relaxation of uk travel quarantine rules is the lead for the guardian, with the paper pointing out that while the changes benefit those living in england, they do not benefit brits living abroad. the telegraph reports on rishi sunak�*s call for people to head back to the office as soon as the government's work—from—home advice is lifted. the paper also shows an image of the last union flag being taken down in afghanistan as troops depart. the ft carries the decision by the japanese olympics authorities to hold events at the tokyo games behind closed doors, due to rising covid infections. the queen's visit to
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the rover�*s return is featured on the front of the yorkshire post. her majesty visited the coronation street set to mark 60 years of the soap. the times leads on government plans for a financial incentive to get households to switch to greener energy. the paper also says the government is considering a bank holiday in england. should the three lions beat italy in their euro 2020 we're going to start not with the romans, not with the football, but with quarantine for the holidays. let's look at the times. britain rushed to brooke quarantine free
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holidays. i'm struck by the fact that we did this last hour, the guardian said 100 countries opening up. the time says 140 destinations where people allowed to go? lats up. the time says 140 destinations where people allowed to go? lots of countries are — where people allowed to go? lots of countries are available _ where people allowed to go? lots of countries are available at _ where people allowed to go? lots of countries are available at the - countries are available at the moment. plenty of countries on the amber list and green list as well. i think one of the most interesting things is grand chaps has said 30 countries are recognising the nhs app “ countries are recognising the nhs app —— grant schaap �*s. that'll be really good thing. people travelling to the countries, and that's a really positive thing about this as well. this announcement made by the transport secretary is something we've been waiting for, and it's going to be a really positive thing for the travel industry. i think the only thing, the big stumbling block and the thing that makes it
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difficult for families with children is pcr tests on the way back into the uk. they cost a lot of money and grant shapps is working on bringing the cost down, but that is going to make a difficult for families to go abroad. w make a difficult for families to go abroad. .. ., .,, make a difficult for families to go abroad. .. ., , ., , ., abroad. rachel, it almost adds to the cost of _ abroad. rachel, it almost adds to the cost of another _ abroad. rachel, it almost adds to the cost of another holiday - abroad. rachel, it almost adds to the cost of another holiday to - abroad. rachel, it almost adds to the cost of another holiday to any holiday people wanting to book. we should also say this is onlyjust the uk side. what other countries decide to do in terms of isolation and quarantine still doesn't mean that anyone can guarantee a restriction free for an holiday. you're absolutely right. of course, that is _ you're absolutely right. of course, that is the — you're absolutely right. of course, that is the other cost. it's correct that is the other cost. it's correct that the — that is the other cost. it's correct that the pcr tests are going to add an additional perhaps out of reach cost for— an additional perhaps out of reach cost for many people, but so is what potentially _ cost for many people, but so is what potentially happens on the other side _ potentially happens on the other side it's— potentially happens on the other side. it's all very well for the uk
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government to say, "look at all these _ government to say, "look at all these countries you can go into," but those — these countries you can go into," but those very same countries might look at _ but those very same countries might look at the _ but those very same countries might look at the uk with its surge in infections _ look at the uk with its surge in infections and go "you know what? we're _ infections and go "you know what? we're still— infections and go "you know what? we're still going to quarantine for anything — we're still going to quarantine for anything up to two weeks." of course that is— anything up to two weeks." of course that is an _ anything up to two weeks." of course that is an intentional cost. some people _ that is an intentional cost. some people simply won't be able to take that time _ people simply won't be able to take that time off. it's completely unavailable to the majority in this country— unavailable to the majority in this country to— unavailable to the majority in this country to have that kind of holiday on top _ country to have that kind of holiday on top of _ country to have that kind of holiday on top of that. i seem to be fighting _ on top of that. i seem to be fighting a _ on top of that. i seem to be fighting a losing battle, but i think— fighting a losing battle, but i think there is something fundamentally unfair opening this up only to _ fundamentally unfair opening this up only to the vaccinated with so many young _ only to the vaccinated with so many young people not vaccinated, and that's— young people not vaccinated, and that'sjust — young people not vaccinated, and that'sjust because they young people not vaccinated, and that's just because they are young. they have — that's just because they are young. they have not done anything other than he _ they have not done anything other than be young to exclude themselves from this— than be young to exclude themselves from this opportunity to travel, and i do from this opportunity to travel, and i do think— from this opportunity to travel, and i do think there is a fundamental injustice — i do think there is a fundamental injustice to that.— injustice to that. james, did you want to come —
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injustice to that. james, did you want to come back _ injustice to that. james, did you want to come back in? - injustice to that. james, did you want to come back in? i - injustice to that. james, did you - want to come back in? i understand what rachel— want to come back in? i understand what rachel is _ want to come back in? i understand what rachel is saying _ want to come back in? i understand what rachel is saying about - want to come back in? i understand what rachel is saying about young i what rachel is saying about young people, but i don't feel any envy towards people that can now go and travel. probably more so than i can. we have to start somewhere, we have to stagger this a little bit because if we try and rush it to quickly, i think it'll make it more difficult. there has to be a balance with this, in my opinion. there has to be a balance with this, in my opinion-— in my opinion. talking about those countries might _ in my opinion. talking about those countries might be _ in my opinion. talking about those countries might be allowed - in my opinion. talking about those countries might be allowed to - in my opinion. talking about those countries might be allowed to go l in my opinion. talking about those l countries might be allowed to go to, other countries will look at these 30,000 cases and say perhaps they'll be a bit cautious. it might be reducing notjust gibraltar, but if you want to rent a boat and get to the south sandwich islands, you're in have a really good time if there are no restrictions. that shows the limitations that there were. another thing people are trying to deal with, notjust the limitations or difference between single and double jabs, but as the daily mail shows us, thousands of spent isolation madness.
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the controversial system will be watered down within days and their fears it will cripple the economy and public services this summer. do you know how it works and if people you know how it works and if people you know how it works and if people you know think it's mad? first you know how it works and if people you know think it's mad?— you know think it's mad? first of all, you know think it's mad? first of all. that's _ you know think it's mad? first of all, that's not _ you know think it's mad? first of all, that's not the _ you know think it's mad? first of all, that's not the first _ you know think it's mad? first of all, that's not the first dome - you know think it's mad? first of all, that's not the first dome and irresponsible headline i've seen in the daiiy— irresponsible headline i've seen in the daily mail. it's one of the very lon- the daily mail. it's one of the very long list — the daily mail. it's one of the very long list. self—isolation is not in itsetf— long list. self—isolation is not in itself madness. it's a necessary public— itself madness. it's a necessary public health measure in controlling a virus _ public health measure in controlling a virus so. — public health measure in controlling a virus. so, this isjust dumb as i had _ a virus. so, this isjust dumb as i had lied — a virus. so, this isjust dumb as i had tied it — a virus. so, this isjust dumb as i had tied it is _ a virus. so, this isjust dumb as i had lied. it is definitely true that lots of— had lied. it is definitely true that lots of people are deleting the nhs app lots of people are deleting the nhs app -- _ lots of people are deleting the nhs app —— dumb as a headline. i think something — app —— dumb as a headline. i think something like 60% increase in the last week, — something like 60% increase in the last week, so people are just turning — last week, so people are just turning the thing off. it seems like there _ turning the thing off. it seems like there may— turning the thing off. it seems like there may be measures now to alter there may be measures now to alter the app _ there may be measures now to alter the app so _ there may be measures now to alter the app so that, for instance, it takes _ the app so that, for instance, it takes into— the app so that, for instance, it takes into consideration whether
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you've _ takes into consideration whether you've had your vaccines, but also it might _ you've had your vaccines, but also it might advice people. it is only advisory — it might advice people. it is only advisory~ it— it might advice people. it is only advisory. it may shift to advising people _ advisory. it may shift to advising people to — advisory. it may shift to advising people to take tests rather than self—isolate, so that's an option i heiievem — self—isolate, so that's an option i heiievem |f— self-isolate, so that's an option i irelieve- - -— believe... if self-isolation is fine in order not _ believe... if self-isolation is fine in order not to _ believe... if self-isolation is fine in order not to spread _ believe... if self-isolation is fine in order not to spread the - believe... if self-isolation is fine in order not to spread the virus, | in order not to spread the virus, why is it the problem to tell the single jabs that they also need to self—isolate? those young people, they need to self—isolate after travelling because they might spread the jam back. is travelling because they might spread the jam back-— the 'am back. is not a problem to tell the jam back. is not a problem to tell peeple _ the jam back. is not a problem to tell peeple to _ the jam back. is not a problem to tell people to self-isolate. - the jam back. is not a problem to tell people to self-isolate. the i tell people to self—isolate. the problem — tell people to self—isolate. the problem arises when the government does not _ problem arises when the government does not support people. we have the lowest _ does not support people. we have the lowest bilateral support in the world — lowest bilateral support in the world for— lowest bilateral support in the world for people who are ill and need _ world for people who are ill and need to— world for people who are ill and need to self—isolate, which means people _ need to self—isolate, which means people simply do not do that. one of the biggest failures of this past year has — the biggest failures of this past year has been that the government has not _ year has been that the government has not implemented an effective
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isolate _ has not implemented an effective isolate system. it's given it to private — isolate system. it's given it to private companies who have been worse _ private companies who have been worse than — private companies who have been worse than useless when it's the most _ worse than useless when it's the most fundamental public health measure, and certainly could have been _ measure, and certainly could have been avoided this time. we had numbers— been avoided this time. we had numbers in the hundreds in august, so it's— numbers in the hundreds in august, so it's been— numbers in the hundreds in august, so it's been one of the biggest failings — so it's been one of the biggest failings this government. there's a really fascinating _ failings this government. there's a really fascinating part _ failings this government. there's a really fascinating part about - failings this government. there's a really fascinating part about this. l really fascinating part about this. the out�*s sensitivity will be reduced... i did not know an app could be desensitized like that. the covid a- - could be desensitized like that. tue: covid app needs could be desensitized like that. tte: covid app needs to could be desensitized like that. t"t2 covid app needs to be could be desensitized like that. tt2 covid app needs to be researched completely. we've been talking about school bubbles for the last few weeks in terms of the impacts on one person in a class testing positive, than the whole class has to go into isolation. this needs to be researched completely, and also, people are deleting the apple. it's
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clearly not working, so it needs to be changed. this is the start of some alterations to the app. the daily telegraph said on the front page, rishi sunak tells workers to get back to the office. i'm slightly scratching my head to see this is 2021. i could've sworn i saw this last year.— saw this last year. definitely de'a vu with this i saw this last year. definitely de'a vu with this headline. i saw this last year. definitely de'a vu with this headline. rishi i saw this last year. definitely deja | vu with this headline. rishi sunak is rightiy— vu with this headline. rishi sunak is rightly pointing out that working from home has penalised young people. — from home has penalised young people, people at the start of their careers, _ people, people at the start of their careers, where it is necessary to show— careers, where it is necessary to show uu — careers, where it is necessary to show up. there is a learning there and there's— show up. there is a learning there and there's alsojust being present. it and there's alsojust being present. it can— and there's alsojust being present. it can have — and there's alsojust being present. it can have advantages, and you get to disadvantaged if you're not showing — to disadvantaged if you're not showing up in that way. the idea that this — showing up in that way. the idea that this government which is
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constantly penalised young people, slap them with student debt, insecure _ slap them with student debt, insecure jobs, zero—hour contracts, unaffordable housing, the idea that this government suddenly cares about young _ this government suddenly cares about young people, give me a break. i do think— young people, give me a break. i do think it _ young people, give me a break. i do think it is _ young people, give me a break. i do think it is completely out of touch with the _ think it is completely out of touch with the way the workplace has evolved — with the way the workplace has evolved. the way that lots of organisations are looking at flexible _ organisations are looking at flexible working, there are many advantages for many people to working — advantages for many people to working from home, at least some of the time, _ working from home, at least some of the time, and it does seem to be the direction _ the time, and it does seem to be the direction that businesses are moving in. ., ., 4' ., direction that businesses are moving in. ., ., ~ ., ., ~ ., ithink in. homework or work work? i think there's a balance _ in. homework or work work? i think there's a balance to _ in. homework or work work? i think there's a balance to this. _ in. homework or work work? i think there's a balance to this. i - in. homework or work work? i think there's a balance to this. i think - there's a balance to this. i think people going into the workplace in that social interaction, having a one—on—one with someone, going to the coffee machine and having a chat, little things people miss out on and getting that personal touch, that personal feedback on things, especially those who are new into a job. i think this is important. we
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have to be aware that industries are changing, the world is different than what it was, and i think it has to be a balance between the two. there's nothing wrong with the world now where you go into the office two days a week and the other three, you work from home, but it depends on what industry you work in. t work from home, but it depends on what industry you work in.- what industry you work in. i wonder if ou can what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go _ what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go in _ what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go in for _ what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go in for ten _ what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go in for ten minutes - what industry you work in. i wonder if you can go in for ten minutes to l if you can go in for ten minutes to have that chat at the coffee machine, get that out interaction and then go back home. the next paper focuses on the situation in afghanistan. if we look on the front page, you'll see on the left, taliban on the march. it has been a deployment of almost 20 years. it was designed to get rid of the taliban because they were hosting al-qaeda, now the uk and the us are leaving, and the taliban is researching. tt’s us are leaving, and the taliban is researching-— researching. it's hard to see this as anything _ researching. it's hard to see this as anything other _ researching. it's hard to see this as anything other than _ researching. it's hard to see this as anything other than a - researching. it's hard to see this| as anything other than a terrible, terrible _
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as anything other than a terrible, terrible failure that's come as a huge _ terrible failure that's come as a huge cost~ _ terrible failure that's come as a huge cost. not only counting the lives _ huge cost. not only counting the lives of— huge cost. not only counting the lives of the us and uk soldiers who lost their— lives of the us and uk soldiers who lost their lives in that war, but also _ lost their lives in that war, but also tens— lost their lives in that war, but also tens and thousands of afghan people _ also tens and thousands of afghan people who have lost their lives by this war. _ people who have lost their lives by this war, all have been made refugees— this war, all have been made refugees by this war, and we do have a terrible _ refugees by this war, and we do have a terrible problem globally with many, — a terrible problem globally with many, many people trying to seek asylum _ many, many people trying to seek asylum because of the impact of that war. something priti patel might like to— war. something priti patel might like to take in mind when she imposes— like to take in mind when she imposes her draconian and unjust asylum _ imposes her draconian and unjust asylum system. so, it is very hard to see, _ asylum system. so, it is very hard to see, as— asylum system. so, it is very hard to see, as you say. the taliban is resurgent — to see, as you say. the taliban is resurgent in _ to see, as you say. the taliban is resurgent in that region. it that the control around half of the region. — the control around half of the region, and that has all sorts of terrible — region, and that has all sorts of terrible consequences in afghanistan as well _
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terrible consequences in afghanistan as well. across a variety of issues, humans _ as well. across a variety of issues, humans rights, and women's rights and more — humans rights, and women's rights and more. it's very difficult to see this anything other than the giant mistake — this anything other than the giant mistake. is this anything other than the giant mistake. , ,.,,, , ., this anything other than the giant mistake. , , ., ., mistake. is it possible to say to the families _ mistake. is it possible to say to the families of— mistake. is it possible to say to the families of the _ mistake. is it possible to say to the families of the 457 - mistake. is it possible to say to the families of the 457 british l the families of the 457 british soldiers who died in afghanistan what those soldiers died for? well. what those soldiers died for? well, i think one what those soldiers died for? well, i think one of _ what those soldiers died for? well, i think one of the _ what those soldiers died for? well, i think one of the biggest _ what those soldiers died for? -tt i think one of the biggest takes that borisjohnson in the house earlier was that he felt military intervention isn't the way forward. we need a difficult linux solution to this, but many years ago, —— diplomatic to solution. it's very difficult because there needs to be a public inquiry. i know today, tobias ellwood was one of those that spoke on that. i think the families of those troops need to know what
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happened and what the failings were and how we can learn from this. because there have been a lot of things that have gone wrong. i think the reasons why we went in were there were good reasons, but i think there's been a lot of mistakes along there's been a lot of mistakes along the way. this needs to be look at it again and these mistakes can happen again and these mistakes can happen again in the future. an inquiry has to happen, in my view, and i think the prime minister should announce that sooner rather than later. let's look at the financial times next, which looks forward to those wrong delayed —— a long—delayed 0lympic wrong delayed —— a long—delayed olympic games, but those games are going to be going ahead behind closed doors. the crowds are banned. i was following the story a few weeks ago. the authorities are saying we can allow up to 10,000 fans, but they're not allowed to cheer. theyjust have to sit there in silence and watch the games. that
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would be a safer way to everyone and watch. now, 10,000 violent people will get refunds. == watch. now, 10,000 violent people will get refunds.— will get refunds. -- silent people. it's really hard _ will get refunds. -- silent people. it's really hard to _ will get refunds. -- silent people. it's really hard to conceptualize i it's really hard to conceptualize the idea — it's really hard to conceptualize the idea of a silent sex baiters. —— spectators — the idea of a silent sex baiters. —— spectators. you mentioned in the early— spectators. you mentioned in the early segment the contrast with the approach _ early segment the contrast with the approach taken in tokyo to that way of the _ approach taken in tokyo to that way of the euro— approach taken in tokyo to that way of the euro football and the approach taken in the uk. it is very different. _ approach taken in the uk. it is very different. so— approach taken in the uk. it is very different, so japan has said look, we cannot— different, so japan has said look, we cannot do this. we absolutely cannot— we cannot do this. we absolutely cannot have spectators. the delta variant— cannot have spectators. the delta variant is— cannot have spectators. the delta variant is surging, the vaccine roll-out — variant is surging, the vaccine roll-out is _ variant is surging, the vaccine roll—out is not the same speed as the uk, _ roll—out is not the same speed as the uk, only a quarter of roll—out is not the same speed as the uk, onlya quarter ofjapan roll—out is not the same speed as the uk, only a quarter ofjapan is vaccinated — the uk, only a quarter ofjapan is vaccinated. this is the way it has to be _ vaccinated. this is the way it has to be this — vaccinated. this is the way it has to be this year. just vaccinated. this is the way it has to be this year.— to be this year. just to reiterate those numbers, _ to be this year. just to reiterate those numbers, japan - to be this year. just to reiterate those numbers, japan has- to be this year. just to reiterate
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those numbers, japan hasjustl those numbers, japan has just reported those numbers, japan hasjust reported 2180 new cases. that led it to conclude there should be zero spectators. the uk's latest figure is 32,500, and still going on with 60,000 spectators. the difference in approach, could it be explained possibly by the vastly different vaccination rate between the uk and japan? vaccination rate between the uk and ja an? . vaccination rate between the uk and ja . an? ., ., vaccination rate between the uk and jaan? ., ., japan? yeah, for me, those discussions _ japan? yeah, for me, those discussions about _ japan? yeah, for me, those discussions about whether i japan? yeah, for me, those i discussions about whether the olympics should be moved to a 0lympics should be moved to a different country or city, i feel why that was not taken into consideration more since we're at this point where's tokyo is in a state of emergency, ijust feel like it's not going to be 0lympic state of emergency, ijust feel like it's not going to be olympic games that people can enjoy in the right way. the people of tokyo won't be able to enjoy it either. it's just a very strange thing because this is meant to be the sporting spectacle. ijust think meant to be the sporting spectacle. i just think it's meant to be the sporting spectacle. ijust think it's really meant to be the sporting spectacle. i just think it's really sad. meant to be the sporting spectacle. ijust think it's really sad. a lot of it comes with money and a lot of it with the sponsorships, but ijust
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feel like it's really sad. but going back to what you said, i think the vaccination programme is one of the uk, and that's a reason why the approaches are slightly different between tokyo and london. talking about the approach, _ between tokyo and london. talking about the approach, let's _ between tokyo and london. talking about the approach, let's look - between tokyo and london. talking about the approach, let's look at i about the approach, let's look at one of our last newspapers, the times. it has a picture of gareth southgate shooting a basketball. i don't me of why he needs to learn a new sport —— i don't know why. could win the country a day off. i'm fascinated by this. it's not the day after the final, but in eight days' time, so will people not want to come to work next monday? tt’s will people not want to come to work next monday?— next monday? it's a really good ruestion next monday? it's a really good question because, _ next monday? it's a really good question because, is _ next monday? it's a really good question because, is it- next monday? it's a really good question because, is it not - next monday? it's a really good question because, is it not thel next monday? it's a really good - question because, is it not the next day.
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question because, is it not the next day it— question because, is it not the next day it was— question because, is it not the next day. it wasjust question because, is it not the next day. it was just assumed that by default. — day. it was just assumed that by default, that's what it would be, but it— default, that's what it would be, but it seems that organisation is 'ust but it seems that organisation is just too— but it seems that organisation is just too difficult to co—ordinate. it's actually going to be a week later~ — it's actually going to be a week later. ,., it's actually going to be a week later. , ., ~ it's actually going to be a week later. ,, ~' 3 it's actually going to be a week later. ~ �*, , ., later. do you think it's 'ust going to be an official_ later. do you think it's 'ust going to be an official bank_ later. do you think it'sjust going to be an official bank holiday - later. do you think it'sjust going to be an official bank holiday of i to be an official bank holiday of england win?— to be an official bank holiday of encland win? ~ _, ., , england win? well, it could to be. i was listening _ england win? well, it could to be. i was listening to _ england win? well, it could to be. i was listening to the _ england win? well, it could to be. i was listening to the commentator, | was listening to the commentator, and he was calling for people not to turn up at work, which i thought was quite remarkable. i wonder if certain people did that! gareth southgate, what a man, what a leader. i think the great thing is, you talk about him falling basketball, but it seems a lot of the time the players are playing matches, they're doing different sports. we saw it from the... thea;r sports. we saw it from the... they were playing _ sports. we saw it from the... they were playing unicorns _ sports. we saw it from the... they were playing unicorns the - sports. we saw it from the... they were playing unicorns the other day and a swimming pool. i must admit, as an amateur basketball fan, gareth southgate's form is depressingly
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good. he actually turns out to be quite bullied as basketball as well —— quite good. thank you both so much. that is it for the papers this evening. goodbye. hello, i'm marc edwards with your sports news. the lineup for the women's final at wimbledon on saturday is set. world number one ashleigh barty will play czech eighth seed karolina pliskova. the australian beat former champion angelique kerber in straight sets 6—3, 7—6 on centre court. so, the 2019 french open champion is on the hunt for a second major title, and it's the one she really wants. this is incredible. i think this is as good a tennis match i'll ever play, and i think angie definitely brought the best out of me and it was a hell of a match right
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from the first ball. i'm incredibly proud of myself and my team, and now we get a chance on saturday to try and live out our childhood dream. and standing in the way of that childhood dream will be the 2016 us open runner—up, karolina pliskova. the czech former world number one is also into her first final at the all england club. she did it the hard way, though, coming from a set down to see off second seed aryna sabalenka 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. and after losing his men's doubles earlier on in the day, joe salisbury is into the mixed—doubles semifinals with fellow brit harriet dart. they beat compatriot naomi broady and her french partner, jeremy chardy. a quick reminder, if you needed it, that it's the men's semifinal day tomorrow. world number one and reigning champion novak djokovic will play the tenth seed canadian denis shapovalov — while queens champion matteo berrettini goes head—to—head with poland's hubert hurkacz. the countdown is already on to the euro 2020 final, and for england, there isn't a lot
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of time to prepare. there'll be just two days of full training before the game against italy back at wembley on sunday night. 0lly foster has been at their base, st george's park. day of rest and recuperation for the squad today. that's the routine after a match. the 11 that started against the danes, they go off and do their own thing, just some recovery work. what we saw today were 13 out on the training pitch, substitutes, the rest of the squad. there was nojordan industry and or jack grealish. we've seen their separate programmes. but it was a great session to witness —— jordan henderson. they were at it from the very awe. you soon realise just watching from the first 15 minutes when you see jaden sancho and the rest of the them as well. most likely to oust 0saka in that line alongside harry kane. there are
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places still at stake here. everybody desperate to get into this england team, and that is one of the hallmarks of it. but everybody working together towards the same thing, and that is of course winning theirfirst majorfinal thing, and that is of course winning their first major final in 55 years. meanwhile, england have been charged by uefa after a laser was directed at denmark keeper kasper schmeichel during the match. cameras showed a green light on schmeichel�*s face just before harry kane took his penalty in extra time. schmeichel did save it, but kane went on to score the rebound. england have also been charged with causing a "disturbance" during denmark's national anthem and for setting off fireworks. eddiejones has described gareth southgate as a "great example to every coach", with his england football counterpart continuing to make history with his team. jones has developed a relationship with southgate during the time he's been in charge of the england rugby side, and says he's been most impressed with the football manager's team selection. jones himself named four new caps
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in the starting 15 for england's match against canada at twickenham on saturday. most of his first choice players are with the lions, whose tour of south africa continues to be hampered by covid. their next tour match is set to be against the sharks, the team they beat 54—7 last night after their original opposition, the bulls, had to pull out of the game on saturday due to a number of positive tests. england's make—shift one day side have beaten pakistan by nine wickets in their first international in cardiff. an entirely new set of players had to be brought in just two days ago, after a covid outbreak in the original england squad. but they got off to the perfect start. they had pakistan 26 for 4, with saqib mahmood the pick of the bowlers with four wickets. pakistan were all out for 141 and england knocked it off for the loss ofjust one wicket — david malan top scoring with 68. england play the second of their three—match series at lords on saturday. all tokyo—based events at the olympics will take place without fans after a state of emergency was put
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in place injapan's capital for the duration of the games. the japanese government are trying to combat the rising cases of coronavirus in the country, but there had been hope that a limited number of local fans could attend. 0rganisers have apologised to those who have bought tickets, with only those events outside of tokyo retaining the possibility of having people watching. the trilogy fight between tyson fury and deontay wilder is still set to take place on the 24th ofjuly, despite a coronavirus case in fury�*s camp. wbc world heavyweight champion fury has been training in las vegas to prepare for the eagerly awaited bout. but a confirmed covid—19 case within his team had led to some reports the date of the encounter may be pushed back. jack senior has the club house lead on the opening round of the scottish open at the renaissance club in north berwick. the englishman is ranked 353rd in the world, but he's one shot ahead of lee westwood and americanjustin thomas. there was no record—equalling 34th
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stage win of the tour de france for mark cavendish today, sadly. cavendish, still wearing the green jersey, was never really in contention on the flat 159 kilometre stage. it was won by the german nils pollitt. tadej pogacia maintains his overall race lead. and that's all the sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello there. the next few days look pretty unsettled, with low pressure always nearby, so we're likely to see sunshine and showers notjust for friday, but into the weekend and into the start of next week, too. so, for today, these showers will be heavy, much like they were on thursday, and you'll see on the pressure charts we're in between systems, and there's barely any isobars, so the winds are light and the showers will be slow—moving again. so, quite a bit of cloud to start this morning, particularly across scotland, where we'll see some patchy rain in the northeast. the sunshine will get going, though, the best of it
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in central and eastern areas — and this is where we'll see most of the heavy showers into the afternoon, again, some with hail and thunder mixed in. an area of more persistent rain will push into the southwest later in the day. temperature—wise, 20—24 celsius. now, for wimbledon for friday and into the weekend, there'll be a lot of dry weather around with some sunshine, but there's always the chance of catching a heavy shower. now, as we move through friday night, those heavy showers across central and eastern areas will tend to fade away, many places will turn dry with variable cloud and clear spells. but this weather front will bring in persistent rain to south wales and the southwest of england, slowly moving its way eastwards. temperature—wise, most places sticking in double figures. so, for this weekend, again, it's one of sunny spells and scattered showers, though we'll have that area of rain across southern areas for a while, but that will clear away during the course of saturday, then all areas will see sunny spells and showers. that area of rain could bring some persistent, fairly heavy rain to central and southern england through the morning, eventually clearing away.
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elsewhere, after a rather cloudy start, the sunshine will appear, and then, these showers will get going — and again, some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder, they'll be relatively slow—moving. temperature—wise, 17—22 celsius. as we move out of saturday into sunday, a new area of low pressure pushes into western parts of the uk — that'll bring enhanced showers to the northern and western areas in particular. again, some of them will be heavy and merge together to produce longer spells of rain in places. probably the better area to see the driest conditions will be central and eastern parts of england, where we'll see the best temperatures, 22—23 celsius — otherwise, the high teens further north and west. very unsettled into the start of next week, as well, particularly england and wales could see some very wet weatherfor a while. then from midweek onwards, it looks like high pressure wants to build in. that'll settle things down with increasing sunshine.
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this is bbc news, i'mjames reynolds with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. president biden confirms the us will end its mission in afghanistan at the end of august, even as the taliban gains ground. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in afghanistan is not a solution. spectators are banned from the olympics, after a state of emergency is declared in tokyo to combat a surge in covid cases. public anger rising in brazil, over the president's handling of the covid crisis. around 2,000 people are still dying every day. and, the double—vaccinated in england can travel this summer, as the uk government changes travel rules.

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