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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 8, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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in afghanistan willl end on the last day of august. he said continuing to fight in afghanistan was not an option, as it would mean us troops staying there indefinitely. the japanese government has said that spectators will not be allowed to attend olympic games events at venues in the capital. the government is placing tokyo under a new state of emergency from next week because of rising coronavirus infections. a haitian minister says one of the men arrested on suspicion of involvement in the assasination of presidentjovenel moise in a pre—dawn raid on his residence on wednesday is a us citizen. the european parliament has approved a resolution condemning hungary for a recent law forbidding the depiction of homosexuality and gender change to under—18s. the parliament called on the european commission to take urgent steps against the hungarian government.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. we will only talk about the euros for a little bit. with me are rachel shabi, author and journalist and james lewer, broadcaster and journalist. tomorrow's front pages... the relaxation of uk travel quarantine rules is the lead for the guardian, with the paper pointing out that while the changes benefit those living in england, they do not benefit brits living abroad. the telegraph reports on rishi sunak�*s call for people to head back to the office as soon as the government's work from home advice is lifted. the paper also shows an image of the last union flag being taken down in afghanistan. the ft carries the decision by the japanese olympics authorities to hold events at the tokyo games behind closed doors due to rising covid infections.
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the queen's visit to the rover�*s return is featured on the front of the yorkshire post. her majesty visited the coronation street set to mark 60 years of the soap. the metro is counting down the hours until england's euro 2020 final clash against italy on sunday at wembley. and as we build up to the game, the star asks what the romans have ever done for us — quite a lot, actually, as the paper suggests decent wine, aqueducts and pizza are just a few examples. including the roads. where do we start with that. we're not going to talk about the euros all the time. we're going to segment that at the end. let's begin by looking at the guardian and talking about the other story that people are thinking about, easing of quarantine rules opens summer travel to 100 countries. rachel, iwonder
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opens summer travel to 100 countries. rachel, i wonder if that's optimistic saying 100 countries. the uk government controls the uk side of it. what happens when you come back here, at heath's... it doesn't control other countries at the moment. many other countries at the moment. many other countries don'tjust let uk tourists in. is countries don'tjust let uk tourists in. 15100 right? i countries don'tjust let uk tourists in. is100 right?— countries don'tjust let uk tourists in. is100 right? i think you make a ve aood in. is100 right? i think you make a very good point _ in. is100 right? i think you make a very good point there _ in. is100 right? i think you make a very good point there that - in. is100 right? i think you make a very good point there that while . in. is100 right? i think you make a| very good point there that while the uk might be saying, yes, you can now travel into all these countries, the reality is exactly that you point out. those under countries might say sure thing, but you still need to quarantine while you come in, and of course that will put that prospect out of reach for many, many people who simply won't be able to afford that extra time and extra cost. so, while there has apparently been a surge in people looking for bookings, particularly to countries such as spain and the us apparently, i think the reality of the cost of
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doing that will quite soon become clear. of course it's worth pointing out, first of all, these aren't all simply holidays in the sun. there's a lot of people who've been waiting a lot of people who've been waiting a very, very long time to see family who live in another country. the other thing is that this is not open to a big chunk of the population who haven't yet had vaccines, so i think there's something fundamentally unfair about this process of having a two tier system just by age or where you happen to be in the country. there's something not quite right about that. that country. there's something not quite right about that.— right about that. that is based on what ou right about that. that is based on what you have — right about that. that is based on what you have to _ right about that. that is based on what you have to jabs _ right about that. that is based on what you have to jabs or- right about that. that is based on what you have to jabs or not, - what you have to jabs or not, there's a principal —— two jabs at. but if a chunk is the yet to be
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vaccinated just because they happen to be younger, it doesn't seem fair. we're all supposed to be pulling together, and i don't think younger people are any less deserving of going away than i, who's had the good fortune to be jabs twice. james. i good fortune to be 'abs twice. james. ~' ., ., good fortune to be 'abs twice. james. ~ ., ., , james. i think one of the big reasons why _ james. i think one of the big reasons why the _ james. i think one of the big | reasons why the government james. i think one of the big i reasons why the government is james. i think one of the big _ reasons why the government is making this announcement, i think it's to encourage — this announcement, i think it's to encourage those people that haven't have those first jabs or even second 'abs have those first jabs or even second jabs yet _ have those first jabs or even second jabs yet to — have those first jabs or even second jabs yet to go and get them. that's the incentive the government are hoping _ the incentive the government are hoping will give to lots of people, lots of _ hoping will give to lots of people, lots of young people over the last couple _ lots of young people over the last couple of — lots of young people over the last couple of weeks. we've been told that the _ couple of weeks. we've been told that the update is plateauing, so i think— that the update is plateauing, so i think this — that the update is plateauing, so i think this is part of it. they want to encourage as many people as possible — to encourage as many people as possible to go and get those jabs that haven't already. even possible to go and get those 'abs that haven't already. even though if the 're that haven't already. even though if they're trying _ that haven't already. even though if they're trying to _ that haven't already. even though if they're trying to get _ that haven't already. even though if they're trying to get the _ that haven't already. even though if they're trying to get the first - that haven't already. even though if they're trying to get the first jab - they're trying to get the firstjab now, by the time they get the second
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one, summer holidays will be over. that is true. i think the other thing — that is true. i think the other thing that— that is true. i think the other thing that happens as well, the government obviously haven't commented on this in terms of how they want— commented on this in terms of how they want to maybe decrease the gap between _ they want to maybe decrease the gap between the first in the second jabs _ between the first in the second jabs at— between the first in the second jabs. at the moment, you can probably— jabs. at the moment, you can probably have an eight week gap. they pushed it back and there are suggestions we should be trying to push that— suggestions we should be trying to push that back even more to try and not waste _ push that back even more to try and not waste doses as well.— not waste doses as well. among ounuer not waste doses as well. among younger people _ not waste doses as well. among younger people i _ not waste doses as well. among younger people i speak - not waste doses as well. among younger people i speak to, - not waste doses as well. among younger people i speak to, and l not waste doses as well. among . younger people i speak to, and now i'm getting older, many more people count in that category, there would be unless conversations about whether they might get their second one quicker than the eight week gap to take advantage of the summer holidays. you are talking about the two tier system. america allows people who are of double vaccinated to do many more things than simply saying one rule for all, but you think one rule for all is about right? i think one rule for all is about riuht? ., �* ~' think one rule for all is about riuht? ., �* ~ ~ think one rule for all is about riuht? .,�* w , think one rule for all is about riuht? .,�* w right? i don't think america is a model example _ right? i don't think america is a model example of _ right? i don't think america is a
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model example of an _ right? i don't think america is a model example of an equal - right? i don't think america is a model example of an equal and right? i don't think america is a - model example of an equal and fair society, so i wouldn't necessarily take my cues from there. i think you're right. i've seen twitter feeds full of young people alerting each other of various pop up vaccine centres where they can go and get the jabs sooner than that eight week 931)- the jabs sooner than that eight week gap. ijust don't think it's right that it should be available to a section of the population and not to others. i think itjust sets up all kinds of resentment. this has been a really difficult period for all of us, and it makes sense that pulling out of it should be equally distributed among us. let's look at the financial times. james, you canjump in with an answer. we decided to go with a smaller story. there it is. it's a pause.
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smaller story. there it is. it's a -ause. , , smaller story. there it is. it's a ause. , , , ., , , pause. very interesting. obviously, the prime minister _ pause. very interesting. obviously, the prime minister has _ pause. very interesting. obviously, the prime minister has come - pause. very interesting. obviously, the prime minister has come out i pause. very interesting. obviously, l the prime minister has come out and said he _ the prime minister has come out and said he would not pledge to discard it, said he would not pledge to discard it. whereas — said he would not pledge to discard it, whereas wristy sunak is now making — it, whereas wristy sunak is now making hint that the 80% rise, he might— making hint that the 80% rise, he might not— making hint that the 80% rise, he might not want to go along with it -- rishi— might not want to go along with it —— rishi sunak. he wants of fairness between _ —— rishi sunak. he wants of fairness between the — —— rishi sunak. he wants of fairness between the taxpayer and pensioners. it's between the taxpayer and pensioners. it's going _ between the taxpayer and pensioners. it's going to be very interesting to see how— it's going to be very interesting to see how this comes through over the next few_ see how this comes through over the next few months as well especially. the biggest hint yet from the chancellor that this might not stay as it is _ chancellor that this might not stay as it is. �* , ., chancellor that this might not stay as it is. �*, ., ., chancellor that this might not stay asitis. �*, ., ., ._ as it is. he's got that really new encland as it is. he's got that really new england shirt — as it is. he's got that really new england shirt that _ as it is. he's got that really new england shirt that he _ as it is. he's got that really new england shirt that he was - as it is. he's got that really new l england shirt that he was pictured wearing the other day with the tags still on it, which no doubt he will bear on sunday. at the financial times says as he struggles to contain public spending pressures arising from the pandemic. we have seenin arising from the pandemic. we have seen in the past almost inevitably crashes between number 10 downing
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street and number 11 downing st. do you think there might be daylight between the two approaches as we approach decisions?— between the two approaches as we approach decisions? yeah, there are re orts approach decisions? yeah, there are reports that — approach decisions? yeah, there are reports that seem _ approach decisions? yeah, there are reports that seem to _ approach decisions? yeah, there are reports that seem to be _ approach decisions? yeah, there are reports that seem to be ideological i reports that seem to be ideological and philosophical between the two over this, and philosophical between the two overthis, but and philosophical between the two over this, but it is worrying. it's worth remembering that this was a conservative manifesto pledged not to touch the ark. they did win on that basis. but also, this is another theme of intergenerational divide. i don't think it's really fair to go back on promises made to older people. many of whom are struggling with poverty and insecurity in that old age when you think they deserve to have a bit of a respite from all of that. but at the same time, young people will end “p the same time, young people will end up being pensioners as well. thea;r
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up being pensioners as well. they can't aet up being pensioners as well. they can't get out _ up being pensioners as well. they can't get out of — up being pensioners as well. they can't get out of quarantine. so, i up being pensioners as well. they. can't get out of quarantine. so, the thin that can't get out of quarantine. so, the thing that affects _ can't get out of quarantine. so, the thing that affects all— can't get out of quarantine. so, the thing that affects all people - can't get out of quarantine. so, the thing that affects all people now. thing that affects all people now will affect all of us in years to come, and i do think that that pledges should be honoured and maintained. let's look at the daily telegraph, which captures quite an iconic photograph on the front page there. flag goes down for the final time in afghanistan. the last union flag is taken down in a secret ceremony on june the 24th, after which it was handed to brigadier, and then to the ambassador. britain has withdrawn a majority of its personnel. jonathan beale did a report earlier saying 457 beale did a report earlier saying a57 british troops had died during this 20 year deployment. what did they die for?— they die for? well, i think one of they die for? well, i think one of the most interesting _ they die for? well, i think one of the most interesting takes - they die for? well, i think one of the most interesting takes i've . they die for? well, i think one of i the most interesting takes i've seen today— the most interesting takes i've seen today is— the most interesting takes i've seen today is the one that's come from
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tobias _ today is the one that's come from tobias ellwood, the former judgements minister, who was calling for a public— judgements minister, who was calling for a public inquiry and i'm sure judgements minister, who was calling fora public inquiry and i'm sure he will he_ fora public inquiry and i'm sure he will he the — fora public inquiry and i'm sure he will be the only one —— defence minister~ — will be the only one —— defence minister. this conflict has gone on for two _ minister. this conflict has gone on for two decades, and hundreds of lives _ for two decades, and hundreds of lives have — for two decades, and hundreds of lives have been lost. it's obviously hard to _ lives have been lost. it's obviously hard to put — lives have been lost. it's obviously hard to put into scale how much at all cost _ hard to put into scale how much at all cost as — hard to put into scale how much at all cost as well. i think for me, i feel like — all cost as well. i think for me, i feel like an _ all cost as well. i think for me, i feel like an inquiry has to happen because — feel like an inquiry has to happen because we have to sort of give justification for those families for the conflict we started in the first place _ the conflict we started in the first place it's— the conflict we started in the first place. it's going to be interesting to see _ place. it's going to be interesting to see what happens. i think boris and we _ to see what happens. i think boris and we didn't want to commit and that _ and we didn't want to commit and that. hillary been put a question to him asking — that. hillary been put a question to him asking what will happen if the taliban— him asking what will happen if the taliban forces regroup and go into territories — taliban forces regroup and go into territories which the troops currently out in afghanistan currently out in afghanistan currently are looking to protect. once _ currently are looking to protect. once they've gone away, what's going to happen? _ once they've gone away, what's going to happen? this is the biggest concern — to happen? this is the biggest concern. all the work that the troops — concern. all the work that the troops have gone by going in there and saving —
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troops have gone by going in there and saving lives and protecting the afghan _ and saving lives and protecting the afghan people and putting their lives on — afghan people and putting their lives on the line, what would it all before? _ lives on the line, what would it all before? i— lives on the line, what would it all before? i think that's why we need an inquiry— before? i think that's why we need an inquiry for sure.— before? i think that's why we need an inquiry for sure. every day when i come an inquiry for sure. every day when i come into — an inquiry for sure. every day when i come into work, _ an inquiry for sure. every day when i come into work, we _ an inquiry for sure. every day when i come into work, we reported - an inquiry for sure. every day when i come into work, we reported on | i come into work, we reported on further taliban advances, afghan troops crossing the border to try to save their own lives, to show —— started to make comparisons with south vietnam. a very fragile statement after american withdrawal, which did not last long. is that a fair comparison to make? i’zre which did not last long. is that a fair comparison to make? i've seen that comparison _ fair comparison to make? i've seen that comparison made _ fair comparison to make? i've seen that comparison made a _ fair comparison to make? i've seen that comparison made a few - fair comparison to make? i've seen that comparison made a few times| fair comparison to make? i've seen i that comparison made a few times as well, and i do think it's a fair one. the sense of it being a futile war and also a graveyard, for us soldiers and uk soldiers, but i think the other piece in this picture of course is the tens of thousands of lives in afghanistan that were lost in these two decades.
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the tens of thousands of people in afghanistan who were affected by this decades long war, and you have to wonder what was it all for? as you just said, taliban are resurgent in the country. there are reports they now have control over at least half of the country, so the same fears about the same consequences and being in control are still there, just as they were 20 years ago. yes, you do have to wonder what was it all for? and i do think we do need an inquiry. was it all for? and i do think we do need an inquiry-— need an inquiry. james, for years after 9/11, _ need an inquiry. james, for years after 9/11, there _ need an inquiry. james, for years after 9/11, there was _ need an inquiry. james, for years | after 9/11, there was interventions in both afghanistan and iraq. now that 9/11 is almost a generation ago, do you sense in britain that that era of interventions is now over? there are still military deployments in some countries. that
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overwhelming deployment that we saw in afghanistan and iraq, do you see any more of that? if in afghanistan and iraq, do you see any more of that?— any more of that? if we listen to the words _ any more of that? if we listen to the words of _ any more of that? if we listen to the words of boris _ any more of that? if we listen to the words of boris johnson - any more of that? if we listen to the words of boris johnson in i any more of that? if we listen to| the words of boris johnson in the house _ the words of boris johnson in the house of— the words of boris johnson in the house of commons this afternoon, then you _ house of commons this afternoon, then you think so. he says military intervention— then you think so. he says military intervention is not the way forward and we _ intervention is not the way forward and we have to try and diplomatically... that's a basis to id diplomatically... that's a basis to go on _ diplomatically... that's a basis to go on. again, it doesn't take away from _ go on. again, it doesn't take away from what — go on. again, it doesn't take away from what we need to look back on an inquiry— from what we need to look back on an inquiry has _ from what we need to look back on an inquiry has to— from what we need to look back on an inquiry has to happen. there are some _ inquiry has to happen. there are some people who say the inquiry into iraq some people who say the inquiry into iraq was— some people who say the inquiry into iraq was something that's been long and drawn— iraq was something that's been long and drawn out. it often hasn't may be given— and drawn out. it often hasn't may be given the results some people would _ be given the results some people would like. but i feel like it would be would like. but i feel like it would he an— would like. but i feel like it would be an injustice to those families who lost— be an injustice to those families who lost troops in afghanistan if he didn't— who lost troops in afghanistan if he didn't give — who lost troops in afghanistan if he didn't give them an inquiry. back to the financial times and picking all the tour they've written. —— stories. tokyo no go.
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crowds band as we open the paper, with a picture of tokyo, one woman walking in the rain. rachel, remember what last year when the games were originally delayed? japan were saying don't worry, and 2021, will have the celebration games. we're all going to come together in tokyo to celebrate the end of the pandemic. the question really is how can you have a celebration games if there is no one in the stadiums to celebrate?— there is no one in the stadiums to celebrate? ., �* ., , ,., , celebrate? you're absolutely right. it's a very painful _ celebrate? you're absolutely right. it's a very painful reminder- celebrate? you're absolutely right. it's a very painful reminder of- celebrate? you're absolutely right. it's a very painful reminder of whatj it's a very painful reminder of what people's hopes were a year ago, the situation we would be in today. i don't think they could've done anything else, though. in tokyo, the delta variant is beginning to take hold. there are real concerns over the rates of infection in that country, and itjust seems like it's

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