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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. joe biden tells the american public the us can no longer afford the human cost or strategic distraction of fighting a war in afghanistan. in a national address the president argued us forces had achieved their initial objective — routeing out al-qaeda and hunting down osama bin laden. 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms thatjust one more year of fighting in afghanistan is not a solution. the olympic games injapan will be held without spectators at venues in and around the capital. a state of emergency in tokyo will run throughout the games, to combat coronavirus. the un says it will recognise haiti's interim prime minister claudejoseph as the leader of the country until elections are held. six people have been arrested
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in connection with yesterdays assassination of president moise. yes, the good times never seemed so good. england fans are looking forward to a sunday final with italy, so big it might even be a shot in the arm for the uk economy. joe biden has defended the united states decision to withdraw most of the us troops from afghanistan, two months earlier than the september deadline. the president said he had been advised by commanders that the safety of the us troops depended on the speed of the exit. more than 90% of the troops have already left the country but president biden said the withdrawal will not be entirely concluded until august 31st. a small contingent of troops he said will remain in the country to defend
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the international airport and the us diplomatic mission in kabul. the fact president biden felt it necessary to hold a special press conference this afternoon speaks of the concerns mounting within congress at the speed of taliban advances. but mr biden said staying indefinitely was not an option. in 2011, the nato allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. in 2014, some argued one more year. so we kept fighting, we kept taking casualties. in 2015, the same, and on and on. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms thatjust one more year of fighting in afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. it's up to the afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. here in the uk prime minister boris johnson made a similar announcement
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on the withdrawal of uk troops, which he confirmed is almost complete. but likejoe biden, he maintains the uk has not abandoned the afghan government. i hope that no one will leap to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away, nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. i'm joined now by admiraljames stavridis — he is a former nato supreme allied commander, his new book, just out is 2034 a novel of the next world war. we should focus on this wire for a second. i want to take you back to the speech this afternoon. joe biden said we achieved our objectives, we did not go to nation build. united states spent $2 trillion in afghanistan. that's a lot of money to root out al-qaeda and osama bin
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laden. , ., ., laden. indeed it is. iwould argue that we accomplished _ laden. indeed it is. iwould argue that we accomplished one - laden. indeed it is. iwould argue that we accomplished one major. laden. indeed it is. i would argue . that we accomplished one major part of the mission which was to prevent another attack emanating from afghanistan from what was an ungoverned space before became after 9/11. no attacks came back to the united states from afghanistan nor to any of our allies from al-qaeda. so we accomplished that part of it. could we have done it better? differently? less expensive for? i think we perhaps could have. i think the important thing about the president's speech is really not to debate at the president's speech is really not to debate a good deal or a bad deal pulling out, we would say in american english, it's a done deal. he heard it from your prime minister, he is what should we be doing going forward? that minister, he is what should we be doing going forward?— doing going forward? that is the cuestion. doing going forward? that is the question. yes, _ doing going forward? that is the question. yes, it _ doing going forward? that is the question. yes, it is _ doing going forward? that is the question. yes, it is a _ doing going forward? that is the question. yes, it is a done - doing going forward? that is the question. yes, it is a done deal, j question. yes, it is a done deal, but i know from my early years in
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afghanistan and plenty of press conferences since over the last 20 years that nation—building was part of the objective. we went there to build roads to build schools, to get girls and women into schools, to build infrastructure and government, and the question right now is was it worth it with all of these taliban advances? what is the best of the taliban and rolling over kabul and removing the government we put in place? i removing the government we put in lace? ., ., ., , removing the government we put in lace? ., ., .,, ., place? i would argue it was worth it aaain in place? i would argue it was worth it again in the — place? i would argue it was worth it again in the sense _ place? i would argue it was worth it again in the sense that _ place? i would argue it was worth it again in the sense that we - place? i would argue it was worth it again in the sense that we prevent l again in the sense that we prevent other attacks. 0ne analyst's nation—building is another analystcounterinsurgency. i commanded that mission for four years and we very focused on conducting all of that, notjust years and we very focused on conducting all of that, not just for the altruistic reasons, but because we felt in most study of counterinsurgency people tell you that that kind of activity reduces the chances of an insurgency in any event. what will happen next? i
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would say there is a one in three chance that the vision the president outlined comes to pass, which is to say the afghan security forces maintain reasonable control over the big population centres that they continue to drive for taliban toward the negotiating table. at the moment, you are seeing some advances by the taliban, partially in provinces that are not critical or as important as the big population centres. the time will tell. i would say there is a one in three chance it lands in a relatively benign way. unfortunately, at two and three chance that the wheels come off and we are looking at a civil war post—vietnam post afghanistan with the soviets kind of scenario. so what happens if that two and three chance comes to pass, and koppel falls to the taliban and the islamic state find refuge inside afghanistan is? what is left for the united
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states to stop the terrace and gaining a foothold again? nothing in the country. — gaining a foothold again? nothing in the country. and _ gaining a foothold again? nothing in the country, and therefore, - gaining a foothold again? nothing in the country, and therefore, as - gaining a foothold again? nothing in the country, and therefore, as he i the country, and therefore, as he heard president biden say, take at his word that the united states is developing significant plans to conduct plans, as the expression goes, over the horizon. conduct plans, as the expression goes, overthe horizon. i conduct plans, as the expression goes, over the horizon. i can tell you having commanded that mission and having commanded aircraft carrier strike groups at sea and it's a pretty long horizon to get over. afghanistan is hundreds of miles from the sea, and we don't have major bases nearby, because the united states that all of its and capability go back to my strike again? yes, but let's hope it doesn't come to that. it’s doesn't come to that. it's interesting _ doesn't come to that. it's interesting you _ doesn't come to that. it's interesting you say - doesn't come to that. it's interesting you say that. they were saying just at the beacon that there are no rules of engagement in afghanistan. what rules are going to govern the cia and the department of defence that they spot people on the ground? are they going to be able to mount that drone attacks that we signed the 20 years? two
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mount that drone attacks that we signed the 20 years?— signed the 20 years? two very different missions, _ signed the 20 years? two very different missions, they - signed the 20 years? two very different missions, they are i different missions, they are governed by different levels of us laws. i am quite certain what ever the approach we take going forward, it will be in accordance with the laws of the united states and with international law, but your point is well taken. it's going to be very situation going forward. i do not envy the task of our cia officers who i think will be remaining as our eyes, ears and potentially directing strikes if that becomes absolutely necessary. strikes if that becomes absolutely necessa . �* . strikes if that becomes absolutely necessa . ~ . ., , strikes if that becomes absolutely necessa .~ . ., ., necessary. admiral, always good to net our necessary. admiral, always good to get your perspective. _ necessary. admiral, always good to get your perspective. thank - necessary. admiral, always good to get your perspective. thank you - necessary. admiral, always good to | get your perspective. thank you very much. mt; get your perspective. thank you very much. ~ , , . , things injapan aren't looking great. with the olympics set to start in just over two weeks, the country's exponential rise in covid cases has brought about an extended state of emergency in tokyo, that will last through the games. today the government reversed an earlier decision to allow spectators into stadiums — they will now be banned from all 0lympic venues
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in the japanese capital. there has been widespread opposition injapan to the games going ahead this month. in fact ioc president thomas bach, was met with protests as he arrived injapan today. many say the decision to press on, is driven by corporate greed. here's our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield hayes. i met with ticket holders for the olympics a couple of days ago here and they were getting really excited to be going to the games. they will now be very disappointed. for the athletes, it's going to be very strange. we've never had an 0lympics before held in stadiums that will essentially be mostly empty, but i think the reason for this is because of the delta variant. japan's current regulations to try and control the spread of the virus are simply not working, and case rates are rising very rapidly here in tokyo. in addition, japan's vaccination rate is still very low, only around 15% of the population have been fully vaccinated so far. so the government really has had no choice but to impose a new state of emergency from next week,
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and i think it's untenable for them to go ahead with the state of emergency and have tens of thousands of spectators going to stadiums to watch the olympics, so this is reallyjust bowing to the inevitable. here's japan's tokyo 2020 president seiko hashimoto making the announcement this afternoon about tokyos state of emergency. translation: we have no other choice but to hold - the games in a limited way. there are many people who are looking forward to the games, those people who purchased a ticket, as well as the local community people. we are very sorry we are able to deliver only a limited version of the games, but we really want to have a fair operation to ensure a safe and secure games so that that people world over will be able to find the olympic and paralympic ideals. i sincerely solicit your kind cooperation. thank you.
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one of those competing is british triplejump champion ben williams. bam, it is lovely to see you. i am interested to know what your state of mind at the moment. we are going throughout the preparations ahead of the games. i am sure you are training to come to a peak. is that slightly off—putting without the uncertainty that the games? for slightly off-putting without the uncertainty that the games? for me, no, not at uncertainty that the games? for me, no. not at all- _ uncertainty that the games? for me, no. not at all- i _ uncertainty that the games? for me, no, not at all. i have _ uncertainty that the games? for me, no, not at all. i have worked - uncertainty that the games? for me, no, not at all. i have worked my - no, not at all. i have worked my entire athletic or beer to get to this point. so i am trying to not let anything damp and main mood going into the games. i want to be in high spirits because i know that i perform best when i am in high spirits. of course, it's going to be very strange having a crowd there. i'm a showman, and i like to get the crowd clapping coming it's going to be really broad and surveilled without them being there, but i think it also sort of columns me knowing that it is that biggest competition of my life, but it won't
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feel that way, so maybe i will go into it relaxed and in high spirits. that is a good way to look at it. i have seen you. i know you are the showman. 0bviously, have seen you. i know you are the showman. obviously, the clapping, especially in your event, the triple jump, especially in your event, the triple jump, it is part of the brethren, isn't it? it is almost an essential part of the competition, isn't it? it is. although, you say it is, quite often, have to get the crowd clapping again, because they get far too eager, but they can't run that fast, they need to slow down. it really does get you going as an athlete knowing that the crowd are behind you, all the eyes are on you, all the eyes are still going to be on me, but it'sjust going to be through screens, so it's going to be slightly different. i just want to go out there and see if the crowd were there. go out there and see if the crowd were there-— go out there and see if the crowd were there. how paranoid are you about covid _ were there. how paranoid are you about covid right _ were there. how paranoid are you about covid right now— were there. how paranoid are you about covid right now because - were there. how paranoid are you i
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about covid right now because delta is spreading, and of course, it is spreading injapan. nobody wants to get infected just before they compete. {iii get infected 'ust before they comete. , . compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier _ compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on _ compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on in _ compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on in the _ compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on in the year, - compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on in the year, and i compete. of course. i actually had covid earlier on in the year, and it| covid earlier on in the year, and it really wasn't fun. i wouldn't wish upon anybody. i was very much ill with that. but believe that the organise areas has put a lot of things in place to ensure that all the athletes are safe, and therefore, the general public out in tokyo, the duty of care, you know, the government is trying to ensure the government is trying to ensure the safety of the japanese people. i think that's what they are doing thereby not allowing any crowds into thereby not allowing any crowds into the stadium. i think that is first and foremost the most important thing is the safety of the japanese people and then following that, the athletes going into the country. have you been told by our own team organise areas what you will be
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expected to do out there and how things will run? is there a very set number of rules that you have to follow? shill number of rules that you have to follow? �* ., , number of rules that you have to follow? �* . , ., ., follow? all i have been told that the minutes. — follow? all i have been told that the minutes, but— follow? all i have been told that the minutes, but all— follow? all i have been told that the minutes, but all i _ follow? all i have been told that the minutes, but all i know - follow? all i have been told that the minutes, but alli know is, l follow? all i have been told that i the minutes, but alli know is, you the minutes, but all i know is, you know, we won't be able to explore tokyo, we want to be able to leave the olympic village which is such a shame. i am a huge fan at that japanese culture. i was really looking forward to experiencing that, but this is my first 0lympics that, but this is my first olympics and it's not my last, but i'm not going to take that for granted, and i want to experience every moment. a lot of hard work has gone into this. i've got sponsors who have helped me train the entire time through lockdown which was a key part to me making the games. you know, jcb really helped me, you know, get to these games, and ijust really want to go there and not let anything get
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in my way of performing and, yeah, hopefully we can come back with a really good results and no covet. so to be. we hope it goes well. we want to be. we hope it goes well. we want to be. we hope it goes well. we want to be in the stadium, but we will be reading for you, at least in england anyway. i reading for you, at least in england an a . ., , reading for you, at least in england an a. . anyway. i really appreciate that, chairs made- — best of luck. stay with us on news, still to come: i'll be speaking to a republican strategist about why donald trump is suing some of america's biggest tech companies the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, has suggested that he could rule out a predicted 8% rise in the state pension from next april. here's our economics editor faisal islam. and we got the strongest hand this morning from the chancellor that in fact, the way in which that triple log works may be looks at it again and we maybe won't see that. this is what the chancellor said this morning. i do recognise people's concerns on this, i think they are completely legitimate and fair concerns to raise, and what i would say, when we look at this properly
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at the appropriate time, your would is the right word, fairness, that will absolutely be driving what we do, and we want to make sure that the decisions we make and the systems we have our fair, both for pensioners and for taxpayers. so stressing there, the chancellor, fairness for taxpayers, which means, perhaps that three billion pound bill, public sector pay, other parts of the budget, stressing fairness for taxpayers means that they are looking at ways to make sure this £3 billion belt doesn't become a reality. this is bbc news. haiti's police chief says his forces have captured six of the men who they believe were involved in the assassination of presidentjovenel moise and are now hunting the masterminds behind it. video circulating online, which the bbc can't independly verify, purports to show the early part of the attack. it shows the ease with which the gunmen penetrated the perimeter of the president's home. seemingly posing as us drug enforcement agents.
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the united nations said they recognise the interim prime minister claudejoseph as the new leader. he has pledged to hold fresh elections in september. but amid the violence that already exists in haiti, the poverty, the political division, these next few weeks will be tense. here's the un special envoy for haiti — helen la lime. haiti's prime minister has explained that the government that is in place under his leadership continues to govern until such time as there is an election. if there are to be any changes in that procedure, it would have to be the result of a political agreement. i'm joined now by luis moreno — a former acting us ambassador in haiti. good to happy with us. how capable do you think this man is for
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bringing the country together? i think he has got an incredible against him and it's even in dispute if you should actually be in charge right now because before he was killed, president was supposed to appoint henry as the prime minister, but remember, the current prime minister who has been serving for a couple of months, this is something i haven't for a few months, so his mandate technically is over, the whole situation that he got himself involved with. there is no parliament. it was dissolved in january of 2020. there is no senate. the guy who is supposed to succeed as the president of the supreme court. he died of covid last week, so you have haiti which is always an sma state of gas, now has the potential to be a total state of anarchy, which is when people
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finally start paying attention to it. ., ._ ., finally start paying attention to it. the un said today that he is in charue it. the un said today that he is in charge until _ it. the un said today that he is in charge until the _ it. the un said today that he is in charge until the elections - it. the un said today that he is in charge until the elections come i it. the un said today that he is in | charge until the elections come in first round of elections in september, but you need stability for an election, how likely is it that they will be able to state elections in two months? it’s that they will be able to state elections in two months? it's quite a challenge- _ elections in two months? it's quite a challenge. some _ elections in two months? it's quite a challenge. some people - elections in two months? it's quite a challenge. some people say - elections in two months? it's quite | a challenge. some people say there shouldn't be a collection, but there is not really, love, no president haiti has been inactivated against covid, sometimes come at the beginning because the international community didn't come through, and them in international immunity is ready to come there, it wasn'tjust any infrastructure, so for the election people to get things together for the security for essays as divided into different factions as divided into different factions as they are, the games, the nine games to actually run port—au—prince are running amok in the streets, judicial killings, all sorts of things, so it is so challenging, and i maintain that the —— unless the
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international community steps up in a big way, that might be some kind of stabilising force, haiti really difficult time ahead. irate of stabilising force, haiti really difficult time ahead.— of stabilising force, haiti really difficult time ahead. we don't have a aood difficult time ahead. we don't have a good record _ difficult time ahead. we don't have a good record on _ difficult time ahead. we don't have a good record on peacekeeping - difficult time ahead. we don't have a good record on peacekeeping in i a good record on peacekeeping in haiti, glass and pulled out in 2019 and it is still in chaos. we spent 13 billion pat dollars in aid, so i don't know how much more help you can pour and, don't know how much more help you can pourand, but don't know how much more help you can pour and, but i want to focus on what happened yesterday. he talked about the nine games. when i watch that video that was shown, if that says that video of the beginning of the attack, i mean, they turn up in four by four is. they get and remarkably easy. they might be from outside the country, but they have not done all that without some interior help.— not done all that without some interior help. undoubtably. this has, i interior help. undoubtably. this has. i don't _ interior help. undoubtably. this has, i don't know— interior help. undoubtably. this has, i don't know who _ interior help. undoubtably. this has, i don't know who is - interior help. undoubtably. this has, i don't know who is behind | interior help. undoubtably. this i has, i don't know who is behind it, i hope that these guys they capture it don't get extrajudicial punishments. i hope they are allowed to talk, because it has a lot of the
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hallmarks of... the way they approached it seemed to be professionals. 0ne approached it seemed to be professionals. one of the surviving quys professionals. one of the surviving guys was a bodyguard for the canadian embassy. they supposedly were speaking spanish and english. they identified themselves as drug enforcement administration officers, but i don't understand how these guys didn't have a better escape plan for undoubtedly the inside assistance, but if these guys are so professional, how come they didn't have an escape plan? how come they were on the street and hiding in houses with four hostages? as often in haiti, there is a lot of mystery and who knows if people will ever get to the bottom of things there. but it is very complex. thea;r get to the bottom of things there. but it is very complex.— but it is very complex. they are indeed the _ but it is very complex. they are indeed the pertinent _ but it is very complex. they are indeed the pertinent questions. j indeed the pertinent questions. thank you very much for being with us. my pleasure, thank ou much for being with us. my pleasure, thank you very _ much for being with us. my pleasure, thank you very much. _ the former president donald trump is suing facebook, twitter and google, in an attempt to restore his online profile, after he was suspended from social—media platforms after the capitol riot. mr trump claims he has been wrongly
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censored by the tech companies in violation of his first amendment rights. the america first policy institute, a pro—trump group is backing the lawsuit and sent out this video to his supporters. you to be except our fate or we stand firm. but its odds on the lawsuit will fail — the first amendment refers to governments censoring free speech, not private companies. in fact companies like twitter, facebook, and google are actually protected by the first amendment, which gives them the freedom determine what speech is promoted on their own platforms. but then maybe this is about something other than the law — because behind that video on the america first website is a fundraising page, where you are invited to support donald trump's lawsuit with a contribution. lets bring in ron bongene, a republican strategist and former leadership aide. it is great to seal. i mean, donald trump 202 strategy over recent years has been to deny and deflect. how much of this do you think was
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designed to deflect from the indictment of his company last week? that's a great question. i didn't think this was designed to keep the attention on the fact that he is not allowed on the social platforms, that the other issue is receiving plenty of attention from us i don't know how much deflection that would be. but, ithink know how much deflection that would be. but, i think it is a smart political play for a donald trump to do it because the attention keeps on hand regarding this issue. he is really coming out, it is very concerning to a lot of people, a lot of conservatives that he has been banned from social media platforms. people, you know, there are a lot of people on the other side of the aisle that do not like what donald trump has to say, and trump also says a lot of incendiary things, but he does have a first amendment right to say but he thinks. at the same time committees are private companies, they are not government institutions, so it is unlikely that this lawsuit will go anywhere. it’s this lawsuit will go anywhere. it's an important point you make, though,
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about this fight against cancel culture, and it's a vote for the rights, and one man who is not banned, mike pompeo, he has been tweeting today, he says our resistance to the web cancel culture... this is the point though, isn't it? because he look at those running in local federal state elections across the country, and cancel culture is right at the top of the list. it is consenting _ right at the top of the list. it is consenting to _ right at the top of the list. it is consenting to a _ right at the top of the list. it is consenting to a lot _ right at the top of the list. it is consenting to a lot of - right at the top of the list. it 3 consenting to a lot of people across the board, cancel culture, and it keeps the trump motorists fired up. it keeps them jazzed up, and face i can go to the border, they have seen them do rallies in ohio, and now he is doing this lawsuit. this is all part of a communications plan designed to keep trump at the forefront of voters cannot be so much and he is no longer president,
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it is hard to get that megaphone back, but he is around, and you know, it's interesting to me to watch. , , ., know, it's interesting to me to watch. , ., ., , ., watch. just one last one, 'ust a minute left i watch. just one last one, 'ust a minute left before i watch. just one last one, 'ust a minute left before the _ watch. just one last one, just a minute left before the break, l watch. just one last one, just a i minute left before the break, but how concerned are you, i mean, cancel culture is one issue to campaign on, but those people running in primaries, third of them, we are told, and are running on the big lie, because they know they believe what donald trump is telling them. is that the platform? i believe what donald trump is telling them. is that the platform?- them. is that the platform? i hope not, them. is that the platform? i hope not. because _ them. is that the platform? i hope not, because trump _ them. is that the platform? i hope not, because trump did _ them. is that the platform? i hope not, because trump did lose - them. is that the platform? i hope not, because trump did lose the i not, because trump did lose the election in november, and, you know, to keep campaigning on an election, that's not going to solve people's problems, it's not going to get voters to the polls. that's the thing. he got to talk about terry going to sell people's problems in the future? how are you going to put food on the table? you have to create jobs. food on the table? you have to createjobs. how are food on the table? you have to create jobs. how are you going to get rid of coronavirus? how are you going to get things back to normal for people? that is what they want to care. now, the cancel culture thing is a big thing across the
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board. i thank you have to go to where people are really concerned about it, and the election is, you know, the election is eight months old. i know, the election is eight months old. ., ., ., know, the election is eight months old. . ., ., ., know, the election is eight months old. ., ., ., ., , ., old. i have got to get to the breaks come around. _ old. i have got to get to the breaks come around, get _ old. i have got to get to the breaks come around, get to _ old. i have got to get to the breaks come around, get to see _ old. i have got to get to the breaks come around, get to see it, - old. i have got to get to the breaks come around, get to see it, thanks very much. stay with us here on bbc news. good evening. thursday brought us another day of some sunny spells, but some really active showers around too, in fact, our weather watchers spotted plenty of funnel clouds across parts of eastern england from essex through cambridgeshire, towards lincolnshire as well. over the next few days, we keep those active showers. there will be that mix of sunny spells and scattered showers bubbling up through the course of the day. so, low pressure not far away, bringing us to unsettled theme, but a ridge of higher pressure trying to build in from the west for a time on friday. so, as we head to the course of tonight, then, clear spells for most areas a little bit of patchy and showery rain for eastern scotland. cloudier skies in general for scotland, northern ireland and western fridges of england and wales. central and eastern areas looking largely clear overnight, temperatures holding up between 12—14 degrees. so, a mild start to friday morning,
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and for some of us, there will be some sunshine from the word go. it is going to be something of an east—west split, so for central and eastern england and eastern scotland, sunny spells developing, but scattered showers that could be heavy and slow moving, bringing hail, thunderstorms and perhaps some localised flooding. further west, slightly cloudier, mostly dry but a bit more rain working far into the southwest later in the day, most of us around 15—23 celsius on friday. if you do suffer from hay fever, you will probably notice that pollen levels are going to be high or very high for much of the uk. moderate for central and northern scotland. during friday evening, we are going to keep these heavy showers in the east going for a time, some thunder and lightning, and quite a bit of surface water if you do catch one of those heavy showers, but they will ease away overnight friday into the early hours of saturday, as this next system approaches the south. so things are staying very changeable, very unsettled, so this area of rain could be quite heavy and persistent across southern england and wales first thing saturday. slowly clears eastwards. then it's going to be another day of of sunny spells and scattered heavy showers and thunderstorms.
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again, probably eastern areas seeing the bulk of that, a littler bit drier for the likes of northern ireland. temperatures a touch cooler than recent days, about 16—22 on saturday. and then as we head into sunday, of course, the euros final at wembley, likely that the weather at wembley should stay dry if somewhat cloudy, but not the same picture everywhere in the uk as we head into sunday. still quite unsettled, futher showers, more unsettled showery weather into the first part of the working week. something a little bit drier on the horizon from midweek onwards. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. joe biden has announced america's military mission in afghanistan will end on the last day of august. in a national address the president argued us forces had achieved their initial objective — and staying any longer would have risked more american lives. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms thatjust one more year of fighting in afghanistan is not a solution. questions over a chinese prenatal test, taken by millions of pregnant women around the world. we'll talk to a reuters journalist about their report suggesting it's being used to collect genetic data. summer holidays are back on for fully vaccinated people in england, as the government changes its foreign travel rules. and... no longer the butt ofjokes?
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we will speak to the england fan who had gareth southgate inked on his backsidejust hours before his team were eliminated from the last world cup. a prenatal test, that is taken by millions of pregnant women around the world, was developed by a chinese gene company that worked in collaboration with the chinese military. the news agency reuters reports that data collected by the b61 group is available to the people's liberation army and has in the past been used for population research. there is no suggestion bgi has violated privacy agreements or regulations. but reuters say the company's privacy policy, states that data can be shared when it is "directly relevant to national security or national �*defence' security".
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lets talk to the reporter who broke this story kirsty needham, who is in sydney. tell us about this test and how the results are stored. this tell us about this test and how the results are stored.— results are stored. this prenatal test is taken _ results are stored. this prenatal test is taken by _ results are stored. this prenatal test is taken by women - results are stored. this prenatal test is taken by women ten - results are stored. this prenatal i test is taken by women ten weeks into their pregnancy. it is become quite common now. they give ten mils of their blood, that is —— a sense of their blood, that is —— a sense of their blood, that is —— a sense of the b61 lab in hong kong and jean machines take this blood and look at the mother prospect genome. now, we know the science that the dna of a baby can be picked up and a pregnant woman prospect blood and this is how they can screen the features for abnormalities like down syndrome. but what bgi has found issue can also get a lot of genetic data and information about the mother from this test. so that is what they have been storing both the leftover blood
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sample and the genetic sequence of the mother before the secondary research. ., ., , ., the mother before the secondary research. ., ., ~ ., , research. how do you know this com an research. how do you know this company is _ research. how do you know this company is working _ research. how do you know this company is working in - research. how do you know this - company is working in collaboration with the chinese military? that company is working in collaboration with the chinese military?— with the chinese military? that is the one thing _ with the chinese military? that is the one thing we _ with the chinese military? that is the one thing we really _ with the chinese military? that is the one thing we really wanted i with the chinese military? that isj the one thing we really wanted to find out a lot more about this company. we found that prenatal test was being used by women right around the world but not much that was not known about the background of b61. looking at science papers, there is a least a dozen science papers published in peer—reviewed journals in china and internationally by peer researchers and b61 that look at this test. from 2010, the pla medical institutions were doing clinical trials on this test with the bgi and write to the last decade they have made new discoveries, they've expanded the types of abnormalities in the foetus that can be screened, so these are co—authored papers with 20 pla
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researchers and the bgi researchers. we also found hospital documents with joint laboratories been set up at two of these pla medical institutions in the pla and bgi are also involved in a birth defects foundation in china i guess you can say it is a kind of state eugenics project now that one of the key figures who have been involved in the one child policy and had come up with a formula of one child per person perfamily would bring china's population into line, so long ago, they are not leading this foundation which is looking at using genetic technology to improve the population quality to spread out both defects in the pla general hospital to my particular has been involved in this programme and bgi and they technology has been involved. ,, ., ., ., involved. the us national counterintelligence - involved. the us national counterintelligence and i involved. the us national- counterintelligence and security centre said they had warned about chinese firms collecting health data but i want to read the statement was it comes from bgi. they say...
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it says it is sure samples after five years. so after that statement, why are you so concerned? == five years. so after that statement, why are you so concerned?- why are you so concerned? -- it destroys — why are you so concerned? -- it destroys samples. _ why are you so concerned? -- it destroys samples. the - why are you so concerned? -- it destroys samples. the concern l why are you so concerned? -- it i destroys samples. the concern has come back from scientists and genome experts, some of the us national security agencies like you mentioned, and also there's been several reports now to the us government the past 18 months looking at the huge amount of data that china and the company in particular have been i'm amassing. it is not about names was up bgi have said to us and we spoke into a number of european labs that work with them, and they say we take the woman in's name. therefore is not identifiable. at the real concern about united data is a lot more about united data is a lot more about you and your future in your
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life and what diseases you are likely to come down with later in life. —— take the woman's name. it is more than a name and address. there's a lot of research now that suggest that it can be re—identified from a genetic sequence in a bio bank even without your name because it is so intrinsic to you, much more sensitive than a name and address. which is the traditional process by which a medical research would be identified patient�*s data before he goesin identified patient�*s data before he goes in for a secondary research but with genetic data, the information that bgi are using our population scale research, it is notjust about one woman and her genetic sequence but if we take millions of these genetic sequences and they know the country that the woman is from when with a no other personal data
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without computer code that bgi uses to process these, like the womanage and height and weight, some of the medical data are all there and they are able to use this demographic data to trend ai are able to use this demographic data to trend al to use the algorithms to look for links between the woman prospect genome and her physical characteristics or behaviours and characteristics of the disease. we have to leave it there. ., ,. ., the disease. we have to leave it there. . ,. ., ., ,, the disease. we have to leave it there. . ,. . . ~' i., there. fascinating report. thank you so much for — there. fascinating report. thank you so much for coming _ there. fascinating report. thank you so much for coming on. _ it has been a roller coaster of a day on wall street, this morning shares were plummeting, until they bounced later in the day. among the big decliners: chinese tech stocks over those concerns of beijing's crackdown on foreign—listed chinese firms. the chinese ride—hailing giant didi is at the centre of the sell—off after its app was taken down by beijing over the weeklend. so what does it all mean for chinese firms listing in new york? let's cross to new york and our business correspondent michelle fleury: hello. people had a lot of things
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this they about whether it should've been allowed to be floated the stock exchange. i think if you were an american investor who bought shares in didi. ~ ., american investor who bought shares in didi. ~ . .,, american investor who bought shares in didi. ~ . ., american investor who bought shares indidi. . , .. ,, american investor who bought shares indidi. . ,, , in didi. what was a successful first da of in didi. what was a successful first day of trading. _ in didi. what was a successful first day of trading, they _ in didi. what was a successful first day of trading, they listed - in didi. what was a successful first day of trading, they listed and - in didi. what was a successful first day of trading, they listed and sellj day of trading, they listed and sell their shares at $14 a pop given the company a valuation of $4.4 billion, thatis company a valuation of $4.4 billion, that is how much they were able to raise. i think the take away at the time was what a huge success, this is another chinese company having a very successful debut and tapping american financial markets. but within days, all of that seem to fall apart. chinese authorities suddenly cracked down on the company, they weren't able to exempt any new users, they were on sunday when the app stores in china were no longer allowed to even carry the app at all. then we discovered from a report in the wall streetjournal that perhaps the company had been warned ahead of time by the cybersecurity regulator in china that there were issues with how i
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handle data. so understandably you now have american investors feeling initially bemused and now angry and initially bemused and now angry and in some cases they filed a lawsuit. 0bviously in some cases they filed a lawsuit. obviously this is a struggle between chinese companies who are raising money, earning big money on foreign markets, and the communist party at home and who has the power. but also there's an element here of china shooting yourself in the foot because of course these companies depend on the money they raise from stock markets.— stock markets. welcome i think it was a way traditionally _ stock markets. welcome i think it was a way traditionally in - stock markets. welcome i think it was a way traditionally in the - stock markets. welcome i think it| was a way traditionally in the past, chinese leaders looked at firms listing in america and doing well as good for the country at reputation, good for the country at reputation, good for the country at reputation, good for a standing and global financial circles. now i think what saying is a change in the leadership of china and how they view this. that it is created some huge mobile spec at home, business leaders that
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perhaps maybe they felt threatened by. —— huge leaders back at home. they are taking a tougher line putting them back and check in with this threatens to do any bigger since it is this the coupling of that closeness we signed the financial markets where you saw a rush of chinese firms trying to tap into the financial markets which is worth pointing out in the first place in many instances is not strictly allowed because there are rules about foreign ownership. in that led to all sorts of convoluted ways in which investors were able to get around that but again you are starting to see objection from the chinese government and also objections from the us side. michelle, thank you very much. in 11 days' time, anyone in england who is fully vaccinated against covid—19 can travel to an amber country without needing to quarantine on return. under 18s won't have to self—isolate either meaning families can — should they wish — travel abroad this summer. the relaxation of rules will mean
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a big boost for the travel industry as people rush to book last minute summer holidays. although a number of countries — like italy — still won't allow british travellers in without a period of isolation. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. the empty aircraft and quiet departure halls may soon be full of noise again. the announcement is the most significant change seen this year. from the 19thjuly, anyone vaccinated doesn't need to quarantine when they travel to an amber country. but they will need to take another test on arrival. under 18s won't need to quarantine. five to 11—year—olds need to take a pcr test after they arrive. for now, this is only open to those jabbed in the uk. northern ireland has said it will do
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the same from 26thjuly. scotland and wales are yet to announce whether they will adopt the policy. it is the news many were desperate for. a week ago we had less than ten destinations that we could sell, now we have 85 destinations. we believe that testing needs to be the next thing that needs to be removed and there should be restriction free travel, similar to how europe operates. some are delighted that they can get away, including shay and herfamily. it is really good in terms of the fact that we are not going to have to self—isolate on our way back, which is good, as that means we can go straight back into work after our holiday. but it is not great that we are going to have to take a pcr test. for some the change does not help.
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joanna won't have her second vaccine for weeks and her mother can't come to see her, because she was double jabbed in bulgaria. it is making a lot of, _ notjust for me, a lot of people are wanting to see their families - and be reunited and they were making plans and that is not happening now. the government will look at whether it is possible to phase in other countries. what are you going to say to young people that will be left behind? children will be able to travel as if they were double vaccinated, although they haven't been vaccinated. we have a choice of saying people will never be able to travel until everyone is vaccinated, or starting to open up so people can see friends and family and travel for business. some are still worried about opening up. we can open travel, but we have to have the right safety measures, such as a good testing regime
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to capture people who bring the virus back from their holidays. the policy is just about what happens entering the uk, whether other countries will let uk travellers in is a different matter. the outlook is sunnier, but travel this summer could still be rocky. lebanon is on the brink of economic collapse. the currency has lost 90% of its value, the un estimates three quarters of the country's households are without enough food, and there are severe medical shortages. lebanon has been without a fully functioning government since that enormous explosion at beirut�*s port last year, which killed over 200 people. i have been speaking with bbc arabic reporter carine torbey who is in beirut. everything in lebanon turned upside down. lifestyle, the country,
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the economy, the finances, and the people thought they were living under an illusion of prosperity and they found themselves overnight in bankruptcy with no money. and even then, their savings, money in the bank, they were confiscated, all of their lifestyle was completely shattered and the purchasing power, the value of the currency was completely thrown out of the window overnight, at the moment the evaluation of the local currency is so huge there, people fear that it has absolutely no value. the prime minister, the interim prime minister, thinks the country is now in the tipping point. how far away is that? things seem to be going from bad to worse. the prime minister, he is a caretaker prime minister. he has not been managing
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the country properly fully for almost a year now because he resigned last august and ever since the country wasn't able to put together a new cabinet. the leaders of this country haven't been able to agree on a government at this very delicate time in the history of the country. so all of it is making the situation very difficult and at the same time, it seems that time is not in favour of the lebanese. no magic solution is coming, no reforms are put in place and things are going really bad. there's been an appeal to diplomats and ambassadors in beirut. how much effort is going into finding a solution? what are the americans and french doing? there have been a lot of calls of initiatives launched towards this but so far nothing has proven
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to be somehow effective. there are serious problems in the country, one of the problems is the fact that the country is composed of a variety of communities and a variety of political parties, and the system in this country is a consensual system. everybody has to agree together to be able to rule the country. and this is not happening at the moment. the differences, even they squabble over shares of the new government, over clout in the new cabinet, all of these are making things extremely hard. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. the good times never seemed so good. and a victory for england in the euro 2020 final on sunday could even mean a shot in the arm for the uk economy.
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record numbers of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england. last month five point three million patients had yet to be seen according to figures from nhs england. this is the highest number since records began in august 2007. a total of 207,188 urgent cancer referrals were made by gps in england in may, nearly double the number in may last year. and nearly 300,000 patients in england had been waiting more than six weeks for a key diagnostic test in may. 0ur health correspondent, katherine da costa, has been giving us more details. yes, planned operations have been badly affected as hospitals have rapidly had to expand capacity to deal with a surge in covid patients, but there is some good news for waiting lists. the number of patients waiting more than a year fell by 50,000 for the second month in a row, but there are still more than 330,000 patients waiting more than 52 weeks — compare that to 1,600 who were waiting that long before the start of the pandemic.
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now, nhs staff are working flat out to clear the backlog. at the same time, they're seeing very busy a&e departments. 0verall, units are seeing as many patients as they did before the pandemic. more than 2.1 million patients visited injune, similar to levels seen injune 2019. major a&e units recorded the busiest month on record, and nhs england has urged people to call 111 first so that they get the right service. now, the vaccine roll—out means not as many people are being admitted to hospital with covid in this wave, but nhs providers, which represents hospital bosses, has warned the rising infection rate, which is predicted could reach 100,000 cases a day, could slow efforts to tackle the backlog. the organisation says a combination of more staff needing to self—isolate, the need for annual leave and more beds being taken out for covid patients means real challenges for the health service.
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27 million people here in england watched the national team beat denmark on wednesday night, to win a place in the european championship final. it's estimated that together, they consumed sonme 50,000 pints of beer a minute. which tells you the hospitality industry has been getting a much needed shot in the arm. and should england win the euros on sunday, one forecaster says the economy could grow by as much as £10 billion, that around 14—billion dollars. our business correspondent ramzan karmali has more. not only english football fans but hundreds of publicans. 9.7 million pints were rumoured to have been pulled during the day and that is set to be even higherfor sunday. euro 2020 has given a much—needed boost to the pub trade but restrictions are still in place and sales could have been even higher. the british beer and pub association
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save a further 1.7 million pints could have been pulled, possible hit two takings of £6.5 million. supermarkets have also seen sales rise in the back of euro 2020, with many people celebrating at home rather than the pub. the co—op supermarket expects a million drinks to be sold on sunday alone, but it isn'tjust alcohol sales that are on the rise. anything to do with people getting together with friends and family, so things like sharing bags of snacks, up 30% at the moment, pizzas, massively up, burgers, hugely up. disposable barbecues, i'm sure over the weekend will be huge. it's all about, as i say, that get—together occasion. before a ball was even kicked economists had predicted the economy would benefit, even with restrictions in place. with estimates of around £150 million more being spent by consumers. it was quite the drive home last night. they were singing in the streets, dancing on the buses,
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it was a night of national euphoria. and the man at the centre of it all? gareth southgate. the england manager whose penalty miss at euro's 96 has been wiped from history, and replaced by the unsparing gratitude of a country, that's not experienced a final since 1966. so what to do with all that adulation. there is this. a tattoo that is now a permanent feature on the backside of england super fan alex smith. who is with us. that is quite a tattoo. when did you haveit that is quite a tattoo. when did you have it done? the that is quite a tattoo. when did you have it done?— that is quite a tattoo. when did you have it done? the middle of 2019. it was 'ust have it done? the middle of 2019. it was just before _ have it done? the middle of 2019. it wasjust before we _ have it done? the middle of 2019. it wasjust before we beat _ have it done? the middle of 2019. it wasjust before we beat sweden - have it done? the middle of 2019. it wasjust before we beat sweden in l was just before we beat sweden in the quarterfinals of the world cup. then we went out and the semifinal to osha. ., . ~ , to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had — to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it _ to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it done _ to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it done was _ to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it done was i - to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it done was i was - to osha. correct. laughter. the reason i had it done was i was on | reason i had it done was i was on out with my mate. i lost a bet. ——
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semifinal to croatia. they got to choose a tattoo for me. i had to get it done. did choose a tattoo for me. i had to get it done. , , . it done. did they choose where it had to be done? _ it done. did they choose where it had to be done? it _ it done. did they choose where it had to be done? it is _ it done. did they choose where it had to be done? it is on - it done. did they choose where it had to be done? it is on your - had to be done? it is on your backside. had to be done? it is on your backside-— had to be done? it is on your backside. , . �* , we got knocked out but as all right now. it we got knocked out but as all right now. , , ., . " we got knocked out but as all right now. , ,, ., ., now. it is back confession now. i notice you've — now. it is back confession now. i notice you've gone _ now. it is back confession now. i notice you've gone with - now. it is back confession now. i notice you've gone with the - now. it is back confession now. i notice you've gone with the suit | now. it is back confession now. i. notice you've gone with the suit and tie a not the cardigan. yes. notice you've gone with the suit and tie a not the cardigan.— tie a not the cardigan. yes. it was 'ust the tie a not the cardigan. yes. it was just the image — tie a not the cardigan. yes. it was just the image they _ tie a not the cardigan. yes. it was just the image they found - tie a not the cardigan. yes. it was just the image they found online. | just the image they found online. there was no thought behind that process at all. we just found it online to have it done.- process at all. we just found it online to have it done. where did ou watch online to have it done. where did you watch the _ online to have it done. where did you watch the game _ online to have it done. where did you watch the game last - online to have it done. where did you watch the game last night? l online to have it done. where did you watch the game last night? i | you watch the game last night? i watched it and bought a whole bar which is where the we try to get all the labs some tickets for the finals but it was just impossible, the prices people are charging the
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tickets. did prices people are charging the tickets. , , ., ., ., ., prices people are charging the tickets. , , ., ., ., tickets. did you get the tattoo out after the game? _ tickets. did you get the tattoo out after the game? i _ tickets. did you get the tattoo out after the game? i didn't. - tickets. did you get the tattoo out after the game? i didn't. i - tickets. did you get the tattoo out after the game? i didn't. i will. after the game? i didn't. i will wait to see — after the game? i didn't. i will wait to see if _ after the game? i didn't. i will wait to see if we _ after the game? i didn't. i will wait to see if we win. - after the game? i didn't. i will wait to see if we win. does - after the game? i didn't. i will. wait to see if we win. does gareth south . ate wait to see if we win. does gareth southgate know? _ wait to see if we win. does gareth southgate know? i— wait to see if we win. does gareth southgate know? i don't- wait to see if we win. does gareth southgate know? i don't think - wait to see if we win. does gareth southgate know? i don't think so. j wait to see if we win. does gareth l southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea _ southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea if _ southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea if he _ southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea if he knows _ southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea if he knows about - southgate know? i don't think so. i have no idea if he knows about it. i have no idea if he knows about it. he might know now. he might be watching. maybe you'll a ticket that way. predictions for sunday? score draw and went _ way. predictions for sunday? score draw and went to _ way. predictions for sunday? score draw and went to on _ way. predictions for sunday? score draw and went to on penalties. - way. predictions for sunday? score i draw and went to on penalties. where will ou be draw and went to on penalties. where will you be watching _ draw and went to on penalties. where will you be watching the? _ draw and went to on penalties. where will you be watching the? the - draw and went to on penalties. where will you be watching the? the bar- will you be watching the? the bar aaain. will you be watching the? the bar again- keeping — will you be watching the? the bar again. keeping the _ will you be watching the? the bar again. keeping the same - will you be watching the? the bar| again. keeping the same routine? same clothes. _ again. keeping the same routine? same clothes, same _ again. keeping the same routine? same clothes, same underpants, | same clothes, same underpants, everything. same routine and the morning tomorrow.— everything. same routine and the morning tomorrow. same breakfast. fantastic and — morning tomorrow. same breakfast. fantastic and well _ morning tomorrow. same breakfast. fantastic and well done. _ morning tomorrow. same breakfast. fantastic and well done. great - fantastic and well done. great tattoo. don't let anybody tell you otherwise. i like it in is in the right spot. nice and discreet. it's i hope you enjoy sunday. thank you
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for coming on. england and italy on sunday. i'm not working. it'll be the first game i've seen of the your championships. —— in the championships. hello there. we're heading well towards the middle of summer now, and the weather is certainly rather changeable at the moment. we have got some summerlike sunshine around, but equally, some showers as well. so, still changeable over the next five days or so. sunny spells, heavy downpours around. temperatures at the moment fairly average for the time of year. but low pressure never far away for the next few days. into the weekend, we've got an area of low pressure moving its way eastwards across much of the uk, followed by another one, heading in on sunday from the atlantic. so, lots going on with the weather over the few days. for friday itself, a day of sunshine and showers, but it will be the eastern half of england and parts of eastern scotland that will see the bulk of those showers. if you do catch one, it could be slow—moving, torrential, some localised flooding, and some thunderstorms
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possible here in the east. fewer showers further west, cloudier skies here, but more rain moving in to the far south—west later in the day. and in terms of pollen levels, they're high or very high across much of the uk, just moderate for central and northern parts of scotland. but let's take a look at the weather as we head into the evening hours. these heavy downpours in the east will persist for a time, only slowly easing away through the course of the night, but you may well hear the odd rumble of thunder. and then heading in to saturday morning, here's this frontal system in the south. now, that's going to push through the english channel, it's going to bring some pretty wet, persistent rain, in fact, through parts of southern england first thing. that area of more persistent rain slowly clearing to the south—east and then we're left with a day of sunny spells and again, scattered heavy showers and downpours. could be some thunderstorms, some hail, and some really torrential rain. so a lot of lying surface water. a touch cooler than recent days, with temperatures round about 19 to 22 degrees for most of us. into sunday, and the next area of low pressure approaches from the atlantic. i think it will be a bit of an improved day on sunday
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for some of us across central, southern and eastern parts of england. here, some drier weather in store. it should probably remain dry into sunday evening at wembley as well. but then more showers packing in from the north and the west through the course of the day, so still very unsettled. and temperatures around about 18 to 21 degrees for most of us on sunday. then, moving through into the new working week, we've still got low pressure dominating our weather into monday, so here it is in the south. again, it's parts of southern england i think that will see the most persistent rain through monday. could be some gusty winds on the southern edge of this system as well. some showers further north as well, but the bulk of the heavy downpours most likely for southern and eastern england, and it's not going to be particularly warm, with all those showers around. temperatures around about 17 to 20 degrees on monday. looking a bit further ahead, and very gradually we'll start to see low pressure just easing away towards the east into tuesday, but it's still close enough to bring another wet day for much of england, perhaps into wales as well. blustery winds. it's not going to feel particularly warm.
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the driest of the weather will be for scotland and for northern ireland as well, so higher pressure trying to nudge in here. temperatures here are at 19 to 21 degrees, only about 20 in the south—east, with all that wet weather to come. now, as we look through the second half of next week, eventually the jet stream, this kink in thejet stream to the south, will start to move away, taking low pressure with it. that will allow higher pressure to dominate across the uk later next week, with the jet stream then sitting out most likely towards the far north—west. so, all of that means, as thatjet stream is not as close to the uk, higher pressure builds and the weather eventually will start to settle down for most of us, particularly in the south, as we head through the second half of next week, and those temperatures will be on the rise. bye— bye.
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tonight at ten — the double jabbed can jet off this summer, as the government changes the travel restrictions for england. from july 19th anyone who is fully vaccinated can travel to an amber country without having to quarantine on return. it's take—off for the travel industry, with a flood of last—minute bookings abroad now expected. we'll have all the details. also tonight... the number of patients in hospital with coronavirus is at its highest for three months — amid warnings of significant pressure ahead on the nhs. a final withdrawal from afghanistan for british troops — but some who lost loved ones question whether it was worth it. i'd like to see with my eyes what did we achieve? what was their sacrifice for? because it's too high a price to pay.

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