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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm james reynolds. the headlines at eight o'clock. delight for the travel industry as double jabbed uk residents will no longer have to quarantine on their return from amber list countries this summer. at his massive news, and we should see a great pick—up and bookings and many customers who are looking forward to going up either on holiday or to the z family can finally realise that and get away in time for summer holidays. warnings of significant pressure ahead on the nhs as the uk's daily covid cases double in a fortnight to levels not seen since january. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan amid warnings that the country could slide into civil war once troop withdrawals are complete. celebrating all the way to the final
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as england prepare to make history in their first major final in 55 years. the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set to mark 60 years of the soap. good evening. in 11 days�* time anyone in england who is fully vaccinated against covid 19 will be able to travel to an amber list country without needing to quarantine on return. under 18s won't have to self—isolate either. that means that families will be able to consider travelling abroad this summer. the relaxation of rules will mean a big boost for the travel industry. but expensive covid tests are still needed on return to england.
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and a number of countries like italy still won't allow british travellers in without a period of isolation upon arrival. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. the empty aircraft and quiet departure halls may soon be full of noise again. the announcement is the most significant change seen this year. from the 19thjuly, anyone vaccinated doesn't need to quarantine when they travel to an amber country. but they will need to take another test on arrival. under 18s won't need to quarantine. five to 11—year—olds need to take a pcr test after they arrive. for now, this is only open to those jabbed in the uk. northern ireland has said it will do the same from 26thjuly. scotland and wales are yet
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to announce whether they will adopt the policy. at the moment, most countries in the brother on the amber list. and its needs many in the travel industry desperate for. a week ago we had less than ten destinations that we could sell, now we have 85 destinations. we believe that testing needs to be the next thing that needs to be removed and there should be restriction free travel, similar to how europe operates. some are delighted that this means they can get away, including shay and herfamily. it is really good in terms of the fact that we are not going to have to self—isolate on our way back, which is good, as that means we can go straight back into work after our holiday. but it is not great that we are going to have to take a pcr test.
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for some the change does not help. joanna won't have her second vaccine for weeks and her mother can't come to see her, because she was double jabbed in bulgaria. it is making a lot of, _ notjust for me, a lot of people are wanting to see their families - and be reunited and they were making plans and that is not happening now. the government has said it will look at whether it is possible to phase in others jabbed in other countries. what are you going to say that they will be left behind? children will be able to travel as if they were double vaccinated, although they haven't been vaccinated. we have a choice of saying people will never be able to travel until everyone is vaccinated, or starting to open up so people can see friends and family and travel for business. some are still worried about opening up. we can open travel, but we have to have the right safety measures,
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such as a good testing regime to capture people who bring the virus back from their holidays. the policy is just about what happens entering the uk, whether other countries will let uk travellers in is a different matter. the outlook is sunnier, but travel this summer could still be rocky. david child is head of brand for travel company thomas cook hejoins me now. the outlook is sunnier caroline just said, do you agree? the outlook is sunnier caroline “ust said, do you agree?i the outlook is sunnier caroline 'ust said, do you agree?i said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. _ said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. it _ said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. it is _ said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. it is such _ said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. it is such a - said, do you agree? indeed, this is fantastic news. it is such a relief i fantastic news. it is such a relief for our customers to book their summer holidays months ago to greece, tender beef, canals recommend to know that they can now go on holiday, relax, safe in the knowledge that they can return home, take just one test as a family each because they are vaccinated and not have to isolate. i think for those of us who perhaps haven't booked somewhere yes, it gives you the
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confidence that whenever your second job as, 14 days after that is your first day that you can head out, and i think it is a great point of stability for us all, travel restrictions have changed so much over this past year. it feels like now we are reaching the point at which things will become more stable. we will be able to plan with greater confidence, holidays will be able to happen, and frankly, that first step of sangria poolside in spain i think we well forget some of the stresses and the anxiety of the past year and just relax and take a big deep breath, a big sigh of relief that we have been able to enjoy some time in the sign. i think we are all desperate for that right now. ., _ we are all desperate for that right now. ., , ., ., now. you say people can relax and thins now. you say people can relax and things should _ now. you say people can relax and things should be _ now. you say people can relax and things should be more _ now. you say people can relax and things should be more stable, - now. you say people can relax and things should be more stable, but| things should be more stable, but the pandemic is raging in a number of countries at the moment which remain on the red list. the
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regulations just apply to half a journey, they apply to everything on the uk side. this has nothing to do with what destination countries may decide, as we sat, italy has restrictions and the united states won't let in people, only under certain conditions. people cannot relax because they have no ability to know what destination country might do, and that is important given the fact that the delta variant, which is sweeping this country, is also sweeping european countries, they might need to change their own policies within a minute. i think that we have learned in the past year that as countries vaccinates, their rules and regulations around travel start to become more stable. i think we are one of the first countries that are able to do that. you have seen that in the states, for example, and i am sure you will see that across europe. the eu last last week introduced passports for citizens to travel freely around the eu once
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they have had their second vaccine. so i think totally you need a degree in some way to take a holiday at the moment. it is so complex. our agents on the phone have had to learn so much and learn fast and keep up—to—date all the time. so we are helping customers understand those rules. they do change, it is difficult. ithink rules. they do change, it is difficult. i think right now what we are seeing is traffic today on our website had a huge spike at lunchtime straight after the announcement. there is a huge amount of demand for people to go on holiday. people do want to get away and they have wanted to go away. i must say can everyone does understand that, but restrictions do go both ways. israel reimposed masking updates. people were able to go to the champions league final in portugal, but then restrictions were imposed after that. that's despite the fact that everyday vaccinations go up. we havejust read the fact that everyday vaccinations go up. we have just read from the olympic games, they are not having spectators. there is no way at the moment that anyone can say, i can
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guarantee you a restriction free holiday abroad, surely. nothing in our lives abroad _ holiday abroad, surely. nothing in our lives abroad or _ holiday abroad, surely. nothing in our lives abroad or at _ holiday abroad, surely. nothing in our lives abroad or at home - holiday abroad, surely. nothing in our lives abroad or at home is - our lives abroad or at home is guaranteed. there are no guarantees right now. but what we can say is we have significantly more confidence that if you are double jabs from the chances are higher that you can get away. and i think the asking customers responding to that. they are bucking quite last—minute, they say, write them i am putting some time off work and six to eight weeks' time, i'm going to wait until a couple of weeks before i become a holiday and frankly, prices right now are so great, fantastic value that people are able to book a class in it and get a fantastic deal. so i hear you, in it and get a fantastic deal. so i hearyou, but in it and get a fantastic deal. so i hear you, but it it is not straightforward, it is not simple just yet, but itjust got a whole lot simpler. just yet, but it 'ust got a whole lot simpler.— just yet, but it 'ust got a whole lot simpler. just yet, but it 'ust got a whole lot simler. . ~' . ., lot simpler. thank you so much for “oininu lot simpler. thank you so much for joining us- — lot simpler. thank you so much for joining us. thank _ lot simpler. thank you so much for joining us. thank you. _ and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening
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in the papers our guestsjoining me tonight are the author and journalist rachel shabi and broadcasterjames lewer. the number of people in hospital with coronavirus in the uk is at its highest level for three months though deaths remain low. the boss of nhs providers chris hopson says he sees risks to relaxing lockdown restrictions saying the decision will put "very significant" pressure on the nhs. the latest figures show that the overall number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high of 5.3 million people. our health editor, hugh pym reports. roz from leeds is finding that everyday life and work is a struggle because of her arthritis. she was referred for treatment by her gp in september and now it seems she would have waited for at least a year before getting a hip replacement. i am in pain all the time and sitting down for any length of time is difficult which is very challenging for me because i am working at home in an administrative role.
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nhs england said the pandemic had caused huge disruption to routine care but the numbers like roz waiting more than a year had fallen back. overall hospital waiting lists are still rising. here they have drawn up plans to boost the number of operations they carry out. we are starting to make inroads into our backlog and we have seen our clinical teams step up and put on additional lists and work weekends and longer days. hospitals are doing all they tend to reduce waiting lists but they are very busy in most other departments as well and in some cases there are more patients coming through the door of a&e then there were before the pandemic. it all adds up to intense pressure on hospitals, just as covid—19 patient numbers are going up again, and there are warnings that though these are likely to be a lot less
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than at the peak injanuary, other types of care could be affected. if the numbers of patients who are covid—19 positive continue to go up, i can see a situation where we end up canceling planned elective operations again to make sure that we look after those infectious covid—19 patients properly. non—urgent operations have already been postponed at the aberdeen royal infirmary and 2 other scottish hospitals, that's because of mounting covid pressure and staff absences due to self isolation. the first minister said case numbers could be leveling off though she added that there could be some easing onjuly 19 that would not be the end of all restrictions. many of the baseline measures we use, things like face coverings and physical distancing, rigorous hand hygiene and good ventilation, these are going to continue to be important mitigations in protecting ourselves and others from the virus perhaps for some time yet. as well as in scotland,
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case numbers have been rising rapidly in newcastle and some other areas of the northeast, now ahead of the northwest as the main hotspots in england. euro 2020 football has been suggested as a factor, after research showing men were nearly a third more likely than women to test positive. whatever the reason, the data will be watched closely ahead of final decision on ending restrictions in england. hugh pym, bbc news. ministers in northern ireland have opted for a cautious route out of lockdown. the devolved government will ease many restrictions on july 26th including opening theatres and conference venues, and allowing people to not wear masks in places of worship but social gatherings will still be limited to 15 people in private gardens. from the 26th fully vaccinated people will also be able to travel to amber countries without quarantining on return. stormont will consider easing all other measures next month. the latest official figures show that in the past 2a hours 35 deaths were reported and 32,551 new infections were recorded
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across the uk, meaning an average of 28,209 new cases per day in the past week. almost 87 thousand people received a first dose of the vaccine in the latest 2a hour period. more than 45.6 million people have now had theirfirstjab that's 86.6% of uk adults. more than 171,000 people have had their second dose. so more than 3a million people are now fully vaccinated that's 64.9% of uk adults. there'll be no spectators at the olympics games in tokyo after organisers decided to ban them because of rising coronavirus cases. the games which have already been delayed by a year start in two weeks' time. our correspodent rupert wingfield—hayes is in tokyo and explained the background to today's decision. i met with ticket holders for the olympics a couple of days ago here and they were getting really excited to be
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going to the games. they will now be very disappointed. for the athletes, it's going to be very strange. we've never had an olympics before held in stadiums that will essentially be mostly empty, but i think the reason for this is because of the delta variant. japan's current regulations to try and control the spread of the virus are simply not working, and case rates are rising very rapidly here in tokyo. in addition, japan's vaccination rate is still very low, only around 15% of the population have been fully vaccinated so far. so the government really has had no choice but to impose a new state of emergency from next week, and i think it's untenable for them to go ahead with the state of emergency and have tens of thousands of spectators going to stadiums to watch the olympics, so this is reallyjust bowing to the inevitable. the headlines on bbc news... no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabs when they returned to england from amber list
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countries that summer like portugal and greece. warnings of significant pressure is ahead on the nhs has the uk's daily covid cases double in a fortnight to levels not seen since january. borisjohnson says most british troops have been pulled out of afghanistan i made warnings that the country could slide into civil war once troop withdrawals are complete. sport now, and for a full round up the bbc sport centre, here is mark edwards. hi, mark. hi, james. good evening. the women's final at wimbledon is set. ash barty will meet karolina pliskova on saturday. joe wilson was watching for us. that trophies get bigger as you get older, take a look at the wimbledon girls champion from ten years ago. well, she's 25 now, world number
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one, top of your screen. she was born in ipswich, queensland. well, thanks for your support, born in ipswich, queensland. well, thanks foryoursupport, do born in ipswich, queensland. well, thanks for your support, do they sell australian flags in london? there's one. she had to be at her best, she was. first set 6—3. but what you see in her eyes, the german's player is 33, her tenacity is legendary. she forced mistakes. the second set went to a tie—breaker and she was fighting until the end, not quite enough. it was a measure of the quality of this match that no one on centerville he wanted it to and except perhaps the winner. i think this is as close to get a tennis match as i will ever play, and i think angie definitely brought the best out of me today. i'm incredibly proud of myself and my team, and i geta incredibly proud of myself and my team, and i get a chance on saturday to try to live out a childhood
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dream. , . ., , ., to try to live out a childhood dream. , _, , ., .,, dream. the second semi final was -la ed dream. the second semi final was played between — dream. the second semi final was played between two _ dream. the second semi final was played between two women - dream. the second semi final was l played between two women pushing themselves to new heights in the air. actually, you could almost hear it out here. facing her serve can seem thankless. she tried, but lost the first set 7—5. most points in this match were fierce and short, but some rallies did break free. this match were fierce and short, but some rallies did breakfree. she took the second sex 6—4. the check player has power and control. she can serve as well. third set 6—4. she is through to her first wimbledon final. herapproach, she is through to her first wimbledon final. her approach, she says, is super positive, well, that's her husband, and this is what it's all for. joe wilson, bbc news, wimbledon. the countdown is already on to the euro 2020 final. and for england there isn't a lot of time to prepare. there'll be just two days of full training before the game
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against italy back at wembley on sunday night. olly foster has been at their base — st george's park. a day of rest and recuperation for most of the squad today. that's a routine after a match. the 11 that started against the danes, they go off and do their own thing, just some recovery work, but what we did say today where 13 out on the training pitch, substitutes, the rest of the squad, there was no jordan henderson are jack relation in there, they have their own separate fitness programmes. we saw that at the very start of this tournament. it was a great session tournament. it was a great session to actually witness because they were added from the very off. and you soon realise watching when you see jaden sancho and the rest of them there as well, phil folden, the two that are most likely to oust that forward line alongside harry cain, and resume sterling is that there are places still at stake here. everybody desperate to get
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into this england team, and that is one of the hallmarks of it, the competition for places, but everybody working together towards the same thing. and that is, of course, winning theirfirst the same thing. and that is, of course, winning their first major final in 55 years. course, winning their first ma'or final in 55 years.�* final in 55 years. went that in mind, -- _ final in 55 years. went that in mind, -- with _ final in 55 years. went that in mind, -- with that _ final in 55 years. went that in mind, -- with that in - final in 55 years. went that in mind, -- with that in mind, l eddiejones has described gareth southgate as a "great example to every coach". as his england football counterpart continues to make history with his team. jones has developed a relationship with southgate during the time he's been in charge of the england rugby side, and says he's been most impressed with the football manager's team selection. jones himself named four new caps in the starting 15 for engalnd's match against canada at twickenham on saturday. most of his first choice players are with the lions, who's tour of sout africa continues to be hampered by covid. their next tour match will be against the sharks, who they beat last night after their original opposition had to pull out of the game on saturday becuase of a number of positive tests. england are cruising towards a modest target of 142
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to win the first one day international against pakistan in cardiff. it's an entirely new team from their last game after the original squad had to isolate because of a number of positive covid tests, but it hasn't affected them too much. to pick up the bowlers went for wickets. pakistan allowed for one england knocking off at the loss of just one wickets. top scoring with 68. england paid the second of the three match series at lourdes on saturday. 34th stage when of the tour de france —— there was no record—equalling 34th stage win of the tour de france for mark cavendish today. cavendish, still wearing the green jersey, was never really in contention on todays very fast 160 kilometre stage. it was won by the german nils pollitt. tadej pogacar maintains his overall race lead.
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jack senior has the club house lead on the opening round of the scottish open at the renaissance club, in north berwick. the englishman is ranked 3—hundred and 53rd in the world. he's one shot ahead of lee westwood and americanjustin thomas. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. back to you, james. the prime minister has set out details of britain's final military withdrawal from afghanistan. it's nearly 20 years since the uk and other foreign forces entered the country, in the wake of the nine 11 terror attacks on the united states which were planned by al-qaeda which was given shelter by the taliban in afghanistan. there are concerns that the departure led by the us will leave the afghan government vulnerable to the taliban, who have been making gains in recent months. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale reports at one of the few nato bases left in kabul, the lowering of the union flag signalled the end of the mission. most of the 750 british troops who remained in the country have now returned home.
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time to reflect on the sacrifices made and to assess what they've achieved. no—one should doubt the gains of the last 20 years, but nor can we shrink from the hard reality of the situation today. the taliban are already advancing. but the prime minister still insisted britain wasn't abandoning afghanistan. i hope that no—one will leap to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. millions more afghan children, including girls, are now in school. after 9/11, the government also says, the world is now safer — the legacy of the last 20 years. gunfire. but the afghan security forces are now on their own, and the taliban already control nearly half of the country. a57 british troops lost their lives, most here in helmand.
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12 years ago was one of the bloodiest. these are some of the faces of five soldiers who went out on one patrol and never came back. among them william aldridge, who'd just turned 18. his mother is still asking why. show me what we did achieve. i'd like to see with my eyes, what did we achieve? what was the sacrifice for? cos it is too high a price to pay. we had five killed and 35 wounded. in the company group, it was a total of ten killed and 50 wounded. richard steatfield also served in sangin in 2010. he fears the exit of nato forces will open the floodgates of violence. anyone who looks at afghanistan, looks at the future of afghanistan, cannot see a situation where removing the forces that have kept the balance of peace in afghanistan is a good idea.
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it means that there will be bloodshed, and it is difficult not to see this as a strategic disaster. britain will retain a very small military presence to protect its embassy. but their war is now over — it's not for afghanistan. jonathan beale, bbc news. in the past hour, president biden has said the time is right for allied troop withdrawal from afghanistan. the united states did what we went to deal in afghanistan, to get the terrorists who attacked us on 911 and to deliverjustice to osama bin laden, and degrade the terrorist threat to keep afghanistan from becoming a base in which attacks could be continued against the united states. we achieved those objectives. that's why we went. he did not go to afghanistan to nation
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build. and it's the right and responsibility of the afghan people alone to decide their future and how they want to run their country. joining me is ben barry he's a senior fellow for land warfare at the royal united services institute. he was also a commander with the british army in bosnia, and former director of british army staff at the ministry of defence thank you so much forjoining us. you saw the president they are saying that they had achieved the objective. i would like to read the original objective from president bachchan october the 7th 2001, he launched the war. military action is part of our campaign against terrorism given the nature and reach of our enemies, we well when this conflict by the patient accumulation of successes. 20 years later was that original 18 achieved?- of successes. 20 years later was that original 18 achieved? well, not in the ambitious _ that original 18 achieved? well, not in the ambitious terms _ that original 18 achieved? well, not in the ambitious terms in _ that original 18 achieved? well, not in the ambitious terms in which - in the ambitious terms in which president bush stated it. although, he did succeed in preventing any
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attacks by international terrorists from afghan soil, but what you side during the war was a steady ratcheting back at the ambitious nation—building aims that the us and its allies set out early on in the conflict in afghanistan. either way, i am from the rail united service institutes, i am from the international institute for studies. apologies for that. looking at the tally band, and it is moving forward since the withdrawal from us forces the other day since mrjohnson announced the british withdrawal. do you expect the taliban to take kabul and the entire country? so you expect the taliban to take kabul and the entire country?— and the entire country? so far, the tall band and the entire country? so far, the tally band has _ and the entire country? so far, the tally band has had _ and the entire country? so far, the tally band has had much _ and the entire country? so far, the tally band has had much success i and the entire country? so far, the tally band has had much success in rural areas where there is a majority population. that shouldn't surprise anybody, and the afghan sources position in rural areas is likely to worsen with the withdrawal of us air support, leaving him supported by a much smaller afghan
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air force. i think capturing kabul would be a much more difficult proposition. it's a large urban area with a 3 million population. it's well defended by the afghan security forces, some of their most capable forces, some of their most capable for essays, and also, it has a far lower preparation and then areas currently controlled by the tally band. �* , ,, band. 457 british troops were killed. band. 457 british troops were killed- he _ band. 457 british troops were killed. he spoke _ band. 457 british troops were killed. he spoke to _ band. 457 british troops were killed. he spoke to some - band. 457 british troops were killed. he spoke to some of. band. 457 british troops were - killed. he spoke to some of their relatives. what did those british soldiers die for?— soldiers die for? well, to put it lainl in soldiers die for? well, to put it plainly in response _ soldiers die for? well, to put it plainly in response to - soldiers die for? well, to put it plainly in response to jonathan | soldiers die for? well, to put it i plainly in response to jonathan be plainly in response tojonathan be a's very balanced and moving reports, they died conducting a nation that the british government had set them, which was to stabilise afghanistan sufficiently to allow for political progress, also to build the capability of the afghan security forces and they certainly made a significant difference in
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that regard both in helmand and more widely. the problem was that the political progress was not as great as the west aimed for, and that's not just the west's fault, it's also due to weaknesses of the president and his government. for example, and its failure to eradicate corruption. how far did the uk in the us and other nato allies get in nation—building then? other nato allies get in nation-building then? other nato allies get in nation-buildinu then? ~ nation-building then? well, right now, it nation-building then? well, right now. it looks _ nation-building then? well, right now, it looks like _ nation-building then? well, right now, it looks like they _ nation-building then? well, right now, it looks like they are - now, it looks like they are partially succeeded. they didn't completely succeed. but i think we must take a long view. you can see several different possible features, one in which the afghan government and its bar holdouts in and around kabul, another one in which a deal is done between the kabul government, the tally band and the factions that were represented by the northern alliance, and you could see that being up british stable
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settlements, bikes, of course, there is a third scenario, doomsday scenario at the centripetal forces present in afghanistan tier the country apart and we see a reversion to a terrible civil war that's happened in the 90s.- to a terrible civil war that's happened in the 90s. to a terrible civil war that's ha ened in the 90s. ., ~ ~ ,, happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should — happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should say. _ happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should say, thank _ happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should say, thank you _ happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should say, thank you so - happened in the 90s. from the w iws, as we should say, thank you so much l as we should say, thank you so much forjoining us. the author of a criminal review of nhs treatment caused by them or their babies arms as she is angry that not enough progress to prevent future damage has been made. last year the report made nine recommendations to support victims, but on the two of those recommendations have been fully implemented. our health correspondent reports. three health treatments that ruined women's lives. last year a review rule that changes were needed. there are the women living with debilitating pain after having pelvic mesh fitted to treat incontinence. its use on the nhs is paused.
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the pain i would be in tears with, it was so severe. there are the mothers whose epilepsy drug harm to their babies. i felt guilty for so long. and the hormonal pregnancy test whose manufacturer denies any links with birth defects, but hundreds of families disagree. nine recommendations were made to help victims, but one year on, most have not happened. mps debated the lack of action this afternoon. until we implement the recommendations in this report, there will notjust to be a lack ofjustice, there will be a risk of repeat. help, including financial support for victims, is still being considered, but there are no guarantees. these three children were born with health and learning problems after their mum took sodium valproate while pregnant.
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what prospects are they going to do? you know, as soon as you put down on a cv that you have got multiple medical conditions, who is going to employ you? the government argues that progress has been made, they have apologised to victims, and a voice for the public in the form of patient safety commissioners are due to be appointed in england and scotland. but the women who led last year's review has called the pace glacial. i am always conscious of the people whose harm is going undetected, and if we had a patient safety commissioner, if that person had been appointed by now, then we know we would be much further down the road. those who fought for decades to be heard fear they will not get the support they deserve. it will be, how much will it cost,
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what can we get away with? that is betraying future patients of the nhs, which is a disgrace. a year ago today, the government apologised to the victims of these three scandals, but mps and campaigners say, without action, that apology means nothing. anna collinson, bbc news. the government and if they are scrapping the six month rule and replacing it with a 12 month rule. justin thomas income of the minister for disabled people means that people can so they only have 12 months if you are to live will get quick, easy access to financial support. quick, easy access to financial su ort. , , ., quick, easy access to financial su--ort. , , . ., quick, easy access to financial su--ort. , , ., ., support. firstly i want to pay tribute to — support. firstly i want to pay tribute to all— support. firstly i want to pay tribute to all of— support. firstly i want to pay tribute to all of the - support. firstly i want to pay tribute to all of the different| tribute to all of the different health and disability stakeholders who help the support these to your review. and we had a commitment to scrap the six—month rule and we had set out our plans to improve awareness, of the fashion scheme come to improve consistency and to scrap the six—month rule. and this
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is a system that for those they get that devastating news around terminal illness, they can have a fast track access to five different dwp benefits, which is much quicker and where time is precious, that is absolutely essential. what we will be doing is looking to match the nhs definition of terminal illness and so moving from the six—month definition to 12 months. i’m so moving from the six-month definition to 12 months. i'm “oined b mark definition to 12 months. i'm “oined by mark jks * definition to 12 months. i'm “oined by mark jackson, policy h definition to 12 months. i'm “oined by mark jackson, policy andh definition to 12 months. i'mjoined by mark jackson, policy and public affair manager. thank you for joining us. my practical difference will this rule make to patients and theirfamilies? i will this rule make to patients and their families?— their families? i think the come of this is a significant _ their families? i think the come of this is a significant step _ their families? i think the come of this is a significant step forward i this is a significant step forward for a term in ill people and their families. what practical difference and will make is that there will be many more people who have received the devastating news of their condition is terminal, there will be able to exit the financial support they need from the benefit system without having to go through the standard benefits process without
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facing delays and issues of medical assessments. filling along forms which i'm sure you can imagine when you have a terminal condition isjust about imagine when you have a terminal condition is just about the last thing you want to be doing. condition isjust about the last thing you want to be doing. when the covernment thing you want to be doing. when the government talks _ thing you want to be doing. when the government talks about _ thing you want to be doing. when the government talks about fast-track, . government talks about fast—track, for people who have only if you months left, that is really important. does that mean days, a week or two? when every day is so important. week or two? when every day is so im ortant. ~ ,,., , week or two? when every day is so imortant. ~ ,,., , ~ week or two? when every day is so important-— important. absolutely. we have a terminal condition, _ important. absolutely. we have a terminal condition, every - important. absolutely. we have a| terminal condition, every moment matters. on average, a claim under the special role for terminal and is in five days. for a normal claim, or personal independence payments, that could take up to 16 weeks. you can see there is a big difference for many families.— many families. what kind of experiences _ many families. what kind of experiences have _ many families. what kind of experiences have you - many families. what kind of experiences have you heard| many families. what kind of - experiences have you heard of? i mean, there are too many to name. being sent letters from the department for work and pensions telling them benefits have been stopped because we have loved longer than the diagnosis.—
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than the diagnosis. people being called into review _ than the diagnosis. people being called into review and _ than the diagnosis. people being l called into review and assessment than the diagnosis. people being - called into review and assessment on the day they die, the stories are really horrendous. and we very much welcome the decision the department has taking today to scrap the six—month rule. has taking today to scrap the six-month rule.— has taking today to scrap the six-month rule. what about when dia . nosis six-month rule. what about when diagnosis are _ six-month rule. what about when diagnosis are not _ six-month rule. what about when diagnosis are not so _ six-month rule. what about when diagnosis are not so clear? - six-month rule. what about when diagnosis are not so clear? do - six-month rule. what about when | diagnosis are not so clear? do you need that specific 12 months or less diagnosis from a doctor? yes. need that specific 12 months or less diagnosis from a doctor?— diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i think there's _ diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i think there's more _ diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i think there's more to _ diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i think there's more to do - diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i think there's more to do and i diagnosis from a doctor? yes. i | think there's more to do and not least among them is making the process easier for those people who cannot meet a 12 month rule or a role. trying to remove unnecessary assessments from the system, we look forward to seeing the proposals the department for work and pensions will put forward in his forthcoming green paper and we look forward to working with them on those but for now we welcome the announcement they had me today. you now we welcome the announcement they had me today-— had me today. you set for now. what other reforms — had me today. you set for now. what other reforms would _ had me today. you set for now. what other reforms would you _ had me today. you set for now. what other reforms would you suggest? i had me today. you set for now. what| other reforms would you suggest? -- ou other reforms would you suggest? » you said for now. certainly, trying to remove unnecessary assessments
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from the system. if somebody has a no from their command saying they have motor neurone disease, which is a condition that is always terminal, we think that should be considered suitable evidence, that lesson should then have to go through an assessment even if the clinician cannot give them a diagnosis. there are various things like that. ways the system can be improved for people with a terminal condition to come even if they may have more than a year to live. but we are a warmly welcoming the decision they made today. welcoming the decision they made toda . . .. welcoming the decision they made toda . ., ,, i. welcoming the decision they made toda. ., ,, . ., welcoming the decision they made toda. ., . ., ., today. thank you so much for “oining us. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has suggested that he could rule out a predicted eight per cent rise in the state pension from next april. official forecasts this week pointed to the unusually large increase because of the link to earnings growth contained in the conservatives' so—called triple—lock pledge. campaign groups have said the government should keep its promise to older people. here's our economics editor faisal islam. we got the stronger sent this morning from the chancellor. the way
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in which the triple lock works may be looked at again and we want to see that 80%. i be looked at again and we want to see that 8096-— see that 80%. i recognise people ass m see that 80%. i recognise people pass my concerns. _ see that 80%. i recognise people pass my concerns. they - see that 80%. i recognise people pass my concerns. they are - pass my concerns. they are completely legitimate and fair concerns to raise. what i would say when _ concerns to raise. what i would say when we _ concerns to raise. what i would say when we look at this properly at the appropriate time, your word is the right— appropriate time, your word is the right work— appropriate time, your word is the right work and my fairness. that will he _ right work and my fairness. that will be absolutely driving what we want to _ will be absolutely driving what we want to make sure the decisions we make _ want to make sure the decisions we make in_ want to make sure the decisions we make in the — want to make sure the decisions we make in the systems we have our fair, _ make in the systems we have our fair, both— make in the systems we have our fair, both for pensioners and for taxuayers — fair, both for pensioners and for taxoayem-_ fair, both for pensioners and for taxa ers. ,, ,, ., ,, taxpayers. stressing their fairness for taxoayers _ taxpayers. stressing their fairness for taxpayers which _ taxpayers. stressing their fairness for taxpayers which means - taxpayers. stressing their fairness for taxpayers which means £3 - taxpayers. stressing their fairness i for taxpayers which means £3 billion bill, and other pressures, public—sector pay, other parts of the budget, stressing fairness for taxpayers means they are looking at ways to make sure the £3 billion build doesn't become a reality. let's get more on our top story this evening — the announcement that fully vaccinated uk residents arriving in england from amber list countries will no longer have to quarantine, from the 19th july. the news is something of a relief to many — not least to travel agents, whose businesses have struggled since the pandemic began.
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we'll talk to someone from the travel industry shortly, but first let's speak to zacjenkins — a holiday—maker who is frustrated by the latest changes to travel rules. i will try to explain what i think is your frustration and then you can go into it. you have a family holiday coming up to greece. when you get back, your parents would have to quarantine, they are double jabbed into her younger siblings won't have to. you are 19, you have to quarantine when they will be out and about. how is that fair? i to quarantine when they will be out and about. how is that fair?- and about. how is that fair? i don't think it is fair. — and about. how is that fair? i don't think it is fair. -- _ and about. how is that fair? i don't think it is fair. -- your _ and about. how is that fair? i don't think it is fair. -- your younger - think it is fair. —— your younger siblings will have to. it is splitting the family. i come back, and i will have to quarantine for another two weeks on top of the two weeks i would be off. they get to go and be free and do as they wish. it will take a lot of time from me, and therefore from work as well, which if i would be paying too if i go away with friends on a holiday, and
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take time off work, which i would need to pay for the test that i would take to go and return back to the country. would take to go and return back to the country-— the country. there is a scientific reason for _ the country. there is a scientific reason for it. _ the country. there is a scientific reason for it. older— the country. there is a scientific reason for it. older adults - reason for it. older adults including her parents have had time to be double vaccinated. that protects them against transmitting it. you've only had time to be single vaccinated and i didn't think a second job is in september. that makes you more vulnerable not to getting sickness but to passing it on. which is why that rule says that the single jab have to quarantine. do you get the science behind that? of course. i do understand the science behind it. i think it is of course within reason people should take caution. it is always fair. remember the drop due to the brilliantjob the remember the drop due to the brilliant job the vaccinations remember the drop due to the brilliantjob the vaccinations are doing in the country but i have a problem with the time period between first and second vaccinations because me personally i don't understand if there is a medical
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side effect between having the first in the second done it reasonably quickly between two days or if there is something the difference between one week in eight weeks later. which is why i believe we should be reducing the time between the two. at the moment your time gap is eight weeks? it should've been eight weeks. �* . , , ., ., weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th of— weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th ofjune. _ weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th ofjune. the _ weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th of june. the 19th - weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th of june. the 19th of- weeks. but i have my first one on the 9th ofjune. the 19th ofjune. | the 9th ofjune. the 19th ofjune. my the 9th ofjune. the 19th ofjune. my next point is on the 9th of september, which is many months away. september, which is many months awa . �* september, which is many months awa . ~ september, which is many months awa . �* . y september, which is many months awa. ., , away. are you really considering auoin on away. are you really considering going on the _ away. are you really considering going on the holiday? _ away. are you really considering going on the holiday? do - away. are you really considering going on the holiday? do you i away. are you really considering i going on the holiday? do you think away. are you really considering - going on the holiday? do you think a family should go somewhere else where all the quarantine rules will be the same? like devon. ida. where all the quarantine rules will be the same? like devon.- be the same? like devon. no. i believe that _ be the same? like devon. no. i believe that people _ be the same? like devon. no. i believe that people need - be the same? like devon. iir>. i believe that people need holidays. holidays are a brilliant way of escaping the hectic few years that we've had under quarantine come as a country, and i believe that holidays is a good way of expressing how we can get away from having a bit of relaxation from this quite hard and
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very damning time we've just been through. it’s very damning time we've 'ust been throu~h. �* . . very damning time we've 'ust been throu~h. �*, , ., very damning time we've 'ust been throu~h. h , ., ., very damning time we've 'ust been throu~h. . ., , through. it's been a real pleasure s-ueakin through. it's been a real pleasure speaking to _ through. it's been a real pleasure speaking to you- _ through. it's been a real pleasure speaking to you. thank— through. it's been a real pleasure speaking to you. thank you - through. it's been a real pleasure speaking to you. thank you so i through. it's been a real pleasure - speaking to you. thank you so much. i'm joined now byjulia lo buesaid, ceo of advantage travel partnership, which represents independent travel agents. i don't know if you are able to listen to that little loophole that zach has found himself in the fact that his family holiday, the older adults on have to quarantine. are you finding other loopholes and quirks inside of the system from your client?— your client? good evening. the examle your client? good evening. the example zach _ your client? good evening. the example zach had _ your client? good evening. the example zach had is _ your client? good evening. the example zach had is many - your client? good evening. the - example zach had is many families, mine included will find ourselves in. on that story, we might find that by the time he goes to greece, i didn't catch when he is going, greece may turn to green which means he might need to self—isolate. but going through this, there will be loose and there will be new winces that do not catch for every traveller. —— nuances. we have to work with the government are there.
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this is a step in the right direction and it is a way forward but of course it is not going to capture every single person as we start to restart the travel industry. start to restart the travel industry-— start to restart the travel indust . ~ ., . , industry. where are your clients wantin: industry. where are your clients wanting to _ industry. where are your clients wanting to travel _ industry. where are your clients wanting to travel to _ industry. where are your clients wanting to travel to coachella . industry. where are your clients - wanting to travel to coachella when you look at on the leisure side, grain, sleaze, turkey, turkey is to read but the court destinations are mainstream. == read but the court destinations are mainstream-— mainstream. -- greece, spain, turke . mainstream. -- greece, spain, turkey- we _ mainstream. -- greece, spain, turkey. we saw _ mainstream. -- greece, spain, turkey. we saw a _ mainstream. -- greece, spain, turkey. we saw a real- mainstream. -- greece, spain, turkey. we saw a real interest | mainstream. -- greece, spain,| turkey. we saw a real interest in the blood lyrics a few weeks ago. it is really important we see some more fascinations of volume moving through. —— in the baltics a few weeks ago. through. -- in the baltics a few weeks ago-— through. -- in the baltics a few weeks ago. through. -- in the baltics a few weeksaao. ., , .,, ., weeks ago. the uk only controls half of a holiday- — weeks ago. the uk only controls half of a holiday- it _ weeks ago. the uk only controls half of a holiday. it controls _ weeks ago. the uk only controls half of a holiday. it controls the - weeks ago. the uk only controls half of a holiday. it controls the bit - of a holiday. it controls the bit when you come back saying you don't have to quarantine. what the uk government cannot control in your industry can control is what destination countries to. with the spread of the delta variant in europe and in other countries, there is no reassurance that restrictions
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won't suddenly have to be introduced in the end of those destinations for travellers want to go to. absolutely. to be really clear, the travel industry does not control the traffic light system. we have to comply with the government restrictions but it is not something with control or set. we have to work with control or set. we have to work with that policy. but absolutely. we have to be compliant with what the destination countries are we have no control over the at all. with the travel industry can do however actually try and help families like sacking of the people who want a holiday and are desperate to travel and to meet family and friends for business and make sure we can make the process as easy as easy as we can. considering the restrictions that were in place. it’s can. considering the restrictions that were in place.— that were in place. it's been a pleasure _ that were in place. it's been a pleasure speaking _ that were in place. it's been a pleasure speaking to - that were in place. it's been a pleasure speaking to you. - that were in place. it's been a i pleasure speaking to you. thank that were in place. it's been a - pleasure speaking to you. thank you so much. the prime minister has been criticised for not giving a prompt explanation about who paid for his holiday to the caribbean island of mustique in 2019. but mps on the standards committee cleared boris johnson of breaking the rules.
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the founder of carphone warehouse and conservative donor, david ross, had contributed fifteen thousand pounds for mrjohnson's luxury villa accommodation. the headlines on bbc news... no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. warnings of significant pressure ahead on the nhs — as the uk's daily covid cases double in a fortnight — to levels not seen since january. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan — amid warnings that the country could slide into civil war once troop withdrawals are complete. last night's victory over denmark marked another high point for england's squad of young, emerging superstars. this talented and diverse team of players have quickly established
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themselves as role models for millions of supporters. ashleyjohn—baptiste has been speaking to some of the fans about what the team represents to them. for england fans, last night's win was nothing short of euphoric. and for supporters from ethnic minority backgrounds, the diversity of the england squad is proving a symbol of unity and pride. seeing saka, seeing sterling start, representing our culture, i think it's incredible. to see immigrant black players play at the euros, i feel like it makes me really proud, because i know that it could be of us. but with the jubilation of yesterday's historic result, for some, it's bittersweet. i feel like every black and minority player is one bad game away from racial abuse. footballers, the only way they can shut people up is on the pitch. and performing on the pitch isjust what england's been doing.
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for these fans, the significance of this england squad is in seeing players that look like them. my parents came from nigeria, my parents never came from england, i was just born here, so it makes me feel proud. it's given us something to relate to as well. it's a very diverse country, - so we're seeing that there's a lot of diverse players on the team, it's given us something - to be proud of. but with that pride also comes frustration. i think it's not right that people are booing the players for taking the knee, because after, if sterling or saka score, they will all be screaming their names. but when the down taking the knee for something that really matters, they're screaming boo, boo, boo. some people think it's bringing a political issue into football. what's political about it if they're standing for something that really matters? the issue of racism in football is not new. england 1980 striker luther blissett, like raheem sterling, moved to london from jamaica as a child and admires how sterling and other players have navigated this age—old problem. i think all you can ever do is tell people honestly about how it
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affected you and the way that you see it, and he's done that, and by him coming out and saying it, it shows the way he has matured as a young man. yeah. and almost within him and marcus rashford, i see how those two, they're like a newer version of what i had to go through, and one or two others like me. yet despite concerns, the reality that football may be coming home is a reason for everyone to be hopeful. come on, england! ashleyjohn—baptiste, bbc news. the searing heat that scorched western canada and the us at the end ofjune would never have occured without climate change, say scientists. in their study, the team of researchers says that the deadly heatwave was a one—in—a—1,000—year event. but we can expect extreme events such as this to become more common as the world heats up due to climate change. if humans hadn't influenced the climate to the extent
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that they have, the scientists say the event would have been 150 times less likely. our environment correspondent matt mcgrath has this report. as temperatures soared in the last days ofjune, people living in western canada and parts of the us sought refuge from the heat where ever they could find it. the prolonged heatwave saw a spike in sudden deaths, with homeless people particularly vulnerable to the searing temperatures. the heat smashed temperature records, with many cities passing 40 celsius. in british columbia, the village of lytton almost reached 50 degrees, shortly before it was largely destroyed by wildfire. governments and citizens were quick to question the role of climate change in the heatwave. now researchers say that without all of the carbon from cars and other human activities, it would have been virtually impossible for the deadly heat to occur. a big worry for climate researchers is that their models do not predict
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heat on the scales seen in canada for many decades to come. they are concerned that the climate might have passed a threshold where small amounts of extra carbon will trigger big temperature rises. while the situation in canada injune was extreme, but it was not the only place to endure intense heat. india and pakistan both saw soaring temperatures and deadly outcomes for many. scientists believe the global nature of warming means that every heatwave occurring today is made more likely and more intense by climate change. it is little wonder that heat topped the charts of deadliest disasters in both 2019 and 2020, according to the red cross. the rising tide of scientific evidence on the impacts of climate change will put added pressure on the world's political leaders, who will meet in glasgow in the uk in november. they will try to agree new measures to rapidly cut emissions of carbon.
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even if they succeed, extreme heat events like those seen in canada and the us in recent weeks will likely recur, with greater frequency and increasing intensity. matt mcgrath, bbc news. a 98—year—old british woman has been awarded france's highest honour for her top secret wartime work. betty webb was stationed at bletchley park during the second world war — decrypting enemy messages. she's now received the legion d'honneur for her services asjoanne writtle reports. i'd never heard of bletchley and i certainly didn't know what went on there. it was a complete surprise to me. bletchley park, secret home of the world war ii code breakers was where betty webb went aged 18. her mother had taught her to speak german as a child. when she joined up in wartime, it was to become a valuable skill. i was taken into the mansion to sign the official secrets act, which as you can imagine
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was a very formidable document. and i realised that from then on there was no way i was going to be able to tell even my parents where i was and what i was doing. until 1975. in fact, she was playing a critical role in intercepting and deciphering enemy messages and now she has been given france's highest accolade for her work. describe the atmosphere between you and your colleagues at bletchley park. i remember it being very friendly. we were all doing a job which we knew had to be done. but we were all very much in the dark. bearing in mind that we had signed the official secrets act, we could not talk about anything outside our own room. it was that strict. betty has since written her memoirs and received an mbe. when she lodged with a family near bletchley park, her lips remained sealed. ijust said i was doing a boring secretaryjob.
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that was my answer. i believe a lot of people adopted that attitude. later, she crossed the atlantic to serve at the pentagon. working was wonderful. i was one of 32,000 people in the pentagon. the working conditions were very modern and very pleasant. in the main, i got on very well with the americans. post—war, she became a school secretary at ludlow in shropshire for a boss who knew not to ask questions. the head happened to be an ex bletchley man himself so he didn't ask me any awkward questions. which was a godsend because a lot of prospective employers couldn't understand why i couldn't tell them what i'd been doing. in case you're wondering, betty is 98. her recollections are razor—sharp and her conversation compelling.
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we'll do it to her. that —— well done it to her. the queen visited the set of coronation street today to help celebrate the soap's diamond jubilee. she was given a tour of the studios in salford meeting staff and crew, as ian haslam reports. it's not every day britain's most famous fictional street gets a royal visit, so needless to say, they made the most of it. she's always smiling, always ready for a laugh, she listens. she is absolutely unique in the world and we have got to look after her. yes, this was actual royalty meeting so property, and it was smiles all round. adorable. we all know her age and she chose to come here, see us. we bored her to death. she was so lovely. then she went somewhere else.
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awesome, because at the show has been going for 60 years, so it was a wonderful celebration for that as well. her majesty was then greeted by more cast members, but the big question remains. does the queen watch coronation street? princess diana did, her butler told me. we asked prince philip, but they will not give an answer. they have a policy of not saying what theirfavourite programme is. it might even be north west tonight, but we will never know. and then she was on her way. from the cobbles of weatherfield, it was the fairly short ride into manchester and the cathedral. here, the queen was welcome by the dean of manchester. coronation street, 60 years. the cathedral, 600 years. different kind of celebration. i think it's just brilliant. i'm so pleased the weather held out. because of covid, the queen has not been able to come
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into the cathedral, so it has been outside. which is where she unveiled a plaque. it was just in the recognition of the work that st john's volunteers have done. what was it like? it was overwhelming, but she does put you at ease. it was a wonderful honour. there was still time for a musical interlude. of the songs we do in i the choir are songs that represent lgbt+ community. we had some george michael in there, a bit of kylie minogue, _ and one of them was a queen medley as well. _ she said she very much enjoyed it. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. good evening. thursday brought us
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another day of sunny spells but really active showers of to. our weather watchers spotted plenty of funnel clouds across parts of eastern england from essex to cambridgeshire and towards lincolnshire. over the next few days we keep those active showers come the mix of sunny spells and scattered showers bubbling up through the course of the day, so low pressure not far away, bring es unsettled weather but a ridge of high pressure trying to build in from the west for a time on friday. heading to the course of tonight, clear spells for most areas, patchy showers and rainy, cloudy skies in generalfor showers and rainy, cloudy skies in general for scotland showers and rainy, cloudy skies in generalfor scotland and showers and rainy, cloudy skies in general for scotland and northern ireland and western fringes of england and wales in central and eastern areas looking largely clearing and the temperatures holding between 12 to 14 degrees. and i'll start to friday morning and for some of us some sunshine from the word go. it will be something of an east—west split. for central and eastern england and scotland, sunny spells developing scattered showers that could be heavy and slow moving bringing hail, thunderstorms and
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localised flooding. further was slightly cloudier and mostly dry but a bit more rain from the far southwest later in the day. most of us around 15 to 23 degrees. if you suffer from us around 15 to 23 degrees. if you sufferfrom hay us around 15 to 23 degrees. if you suffer from hay fever, us around 15 to 23 degrees. if you sufferfrom hay fever, you'll probably notice pollen levels will be high or very high for much of the uk. moderate for central and northern scotland. during friday evening, we will keep these heavy showers in the east going for a time, thunder and lightning come in quite a bit of surface. they will use away overnight. this next system approaches the south. things they very changeable and unsettled. this area rain could be heavy and persistent across southern england and wales on saturday, slowly clearing a source and then another day of sunny spells and scattered heavy showers and thunderstorms again probably eastern areas seeing the bulk of them and the little bit drier for northern ireland. temperature is cooler than recent days at about 16 to 22 degrees on saturday. and then as we head into sunday come of course, the euros
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final at wimberly, likely the weather at wembley should stay dry of somewhat cloudy but not the same picture everywhere in the uk heading into sunday. quite unsettled, further showers, into sunday. quite unsettled, furthershowers, more into sunday. quite unsettled, further showers, more unsubtle shower your brother into the first part of the working week, something a little bit dry on the horizon from the midweek onward. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. joe biden tells the american public the us can no longer afford the human cost or strategic distraction of fighting a war in afghanistan. in a national address the president argued us forces had achieved their initial objective — routeing out al-qaeda and hunting down osama bin laden. 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms thatjust one more year of fighting in afghanistan is not a solution. the olympic games injapan will be held without spectators at venues in and around the capital. a state of emergency in tokyo will run throughout the games, to combat coronavirus. the un says it will recognise haiti's interim prime minister claudejoseph as the leader of the country until elections are held. six people have been arrested
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in connection with yesterdays assassination of president moise.

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