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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 8, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. president biden to address americans on the us withdraw from afghanistan. america has already brought home over 90% of its voices and more than 10,000 coalition troops have died in afghanistan over 20 years. the uk pending at the borisjohnson also today announced the and of its mission. 1 today announced the and of its mission. ., , ., ., ., today announced the and of its mission. ., .,., , ., mission. i hope that no one comes to the false conclusion _ mission. i hope that no one comes to the false conclusion that _ mission. i hope that no one comes to the false conclusion that there - the false conclusion that there withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not turning away. in commitment to afghanistan. we are not turning away-— commitment to afghanistan. we are not turning away. in other news, the euro ean not turning away. in other news, the european parliament _ not turning away. in other news, the european parliament voted - not turning away. in other news, the european parliament voted to - not turning away. in other news, the | european parliament voted to censor hungary over allow a pass over what
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he considers the promotion of gay and lesbian relationships. these people have taken to the streets in budapest against that hungarian law and the eu can move to cut hungary's budget that it received from the eu. all spectators are now going to be banned from 0lympic events in tokyo. it is because the city is under a state of emergency because of a search of coronavirus infections. joe biden is about to speak about the us troop withdrawal from afghanistan. the uk already announced all of its troops left... ending nearly 20 years of military operations in afghanistan. in april, joe biden all us troops would leave afghanistan by september 11 — when all foreign troops who make up the nato defence alliance will be gone. 2,500 us troops were left in afghanistan.
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many of them were stationed at the bagram airbase — the key command centre for anti—taliban operations. at the peak of us involvement over 100,000 us and nato troops passed through it. by friday — the troops were gone. according to afghan officials they left in the middle of the night — deserting this huge compound and passing control of security to afghan forces. that was on friday, then on tuesday, the us said 90% of troops were gone. so the afghan military is now in sole charge of security across the country. the task is enormous and the taliban is gaining ground at rapid pace. injust over 2 months the taliban has taken at least 150 out of a21 districts across afghanistan. and they're moving from rural areas into major cities. yesterday the taliban launched its most brazen attack since the us stepped
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up its withdrawal of troops — entering a key city in the northwest and taking government buildings. the assault continued today. 3s this was inside qala—e—naw city in badghis state today. thousands are reportedly fleeing their homes. and these are afghan troops inside the city. afghan's special forces say they have so far fended off the attack — however the situation is fluid. we knew this withdrawal was approaching its end but what do we know about what the president is about to do? what is the form? we know about to do? what is the form? - know that he is going to mark what is a momentous day. also a very sombre day if you look back at the last 20 years, america's longest
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wire, the loss of life, more than 2000 us troops and we expect the president to some extent but all of that into perspective and to confirm that into perspective and to confirm that this is essentially all but the end of the wire. they will be some troops remaining to guard the us embassy and the airports in afghanistan but to all intents and purposes, this is the end of the wire. the president likely also should face some tough questions about the future and america's role in afghanistan not with forces in that country but supporting their humanitarian efforts and perhaps the safety of a worker is in that country. there are many issues still hanging on of course as you have been describing the rise of the taliban in recent days and weeks. so the question is hanging, has this been a successful 20 years for the involvement of the united states and
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other countries of course in afghanistan and i think the president is expected to tackle some of those issues and to try to explain perhaps than any of his critics, some critics from within the republican party that now simply is not the most appropriate time at us and other forces to pull out. is not the most appropriate time at us and otherforces to pull out. i us and other forces to pull out. i was going to ask you about that because joe was going to ask you about that becausejoe biden's peters sa, donald trump talked about ending america's involvement in afghanistan. he was the republican president. how is this playing out politically? president. how is this playing out oliticall ? ., , , ., politically? politically it is a com - lex politically? politically it is a complex issue. _ politically? politically it is a complex issue. the - politically? politically it is a - complex issue. the republicans are quite divided on this issue. but there is a large body of opinion that agrees with say sammy president trump and by creation, what president biden is doing well and president biden is doing well and president trump wanted that withdrawal to happen sooner and much faster. but, eventually they both agreed that us forces to be pulled out of afghanistan but there are others, especially republicans in
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this country that say that it could lead to a catastrophic situation in afghanistan. mitch mcconnell, the leader of republicans and snap is a very quick, several weeks agojoe biden outlined his plan. he was quick to criticise. we have been a republican from south carolina, lindsey graham a couple of days ago suggesting that withdrawal of us troops could lead to terrorist groups regrouping as he phrased it, perhaps plucking another scenario similar to 9/11. so there is a lot of criticism on the other side there are plenty of people who would agree with joe are plenty of people who would agree withjoe biden and by default by agreeing with the former president as well and now is the most appropriate time for nato forces to pull out and leave it to the afghans to, in effect, decide their own pace and try to pull the country together. and try to pull the country together-— and try to pull the country touether. ., ., ., ~ , ., together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping — together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping a _
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together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping a close _ together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping a close eye _ together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping a close eye out - together. for the moment, thank you, we are keeping a close eye out for- we are keeping a close eye out for joe biden as soon as he starts speaking you will see that here on outside source. this is notjust a theory impacting america and afghanistan, it is paying out for a number of other countries as well. one of them is the uk. earlier boris johnson announced all of its troops assigned to them nato defence alliance in afghanistan are returning home. this was earlier in parliament. i hope that no one will leap to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. 0ver a50 british soldiers have died in conflict with taliban since it was deployed to afghanistan in 2001. and there's been lots of reaction to this announcement. this is the oppositoin labour party. we have some pointed improvements in
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security and economic development and as the prime minister said in advancing the rights of women and education for girls. yes,...- education for girls. yes,... cutting away from — education for girls. yes,... cutting away from the _ education for girls. yes,... cutting away from the opposition - education for girls. yes,... cutting away from the opposition labour. away from the opposition labour party because joe away from the opposition labour party becausejoe biden is stepping out to make a statement on the us withdraw from afghanistan. national security leaders on the status of the joint out of that place afghanistan. when i announced tojoin out in place afghanistan. when i announced to join out in april place afghanistan. when i announced tojoin out in april i said we place afghanistan. when i announced to join out in april i said we would be out by september. and we are on track to meet that target. the military mission in afghanistan will conclude on august 31. the drawing out is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritising the safety of our troops as they depart. the military commanders advised me that once i make the decision to end the war, we need to move swiftly to induct the maintenance of the draw out in this context, speed is
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safety. and, thanks to the way in which we have managed withdrawal, no one us forces are any forces have been lost. conducting i would draw out different would have come with an increased risk of safety to our personnel. to me, those risks are unacceptable. and there was never any doubt that the military perform this task efficiently and with the highest level of professionalism. that's what they do. and the same is true of our nato allies and partners who have supported, we are supporting us as loud as they conclude they are retrograde. i want to be clear, the us military mission in afghanistan continues to the end of august. we retain personnel and capacities in the country and we maintain some authority, the same authority under which we have been operating for some time. as i said
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in april, the united states did what we want to do in afghanistan, to get the terrorists that attacked us on 9/11 and deliverjustice to 0sama bin laden and degrade the terrorist threat to keep afghanistan from becoming a worse state we attacks can be continued against the united states. we achieved those objectives. that's why we rang. he did not go to afghanistan to nation build. and it's the right and the spontaneity of afghan people to decide the future and how they want to run their country. together, with our nato allies and partners, we have trained and equipped over nearly 300,000 current setting members of the military and the afghan national security force and plenty beyond that who are no longer serving. after that, hundreds of thousands more afghan national defence and security forces trained over the last two decades and he
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provided our afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasise, all the tools, training and equipment of any modern military. he provided advanced weaponry and we are going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we will ensure they have the capacity to maintain their air force. but, most critically, as i stressed in my meeting two weeks ago it to the president and chairman abdullah, afghan leaders have to come together and drive toward a future that the afghan people want and they deserve. in our meeting, i also assured him that us support for the people of afghanistan with the mbr. we will continue to provide civilian and humanitarian assistance including speaking out for the rights of women and girls. i intend to maintain our diplomatic presence in afghanistan and we are coordinating closely with the international partners in order to continue to secure the international airport. we are going to engage in a
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determined diplomacy to pursue peace and a peace agreement that live and be senseless violence. i have asked the secretary of state and la special representatives for afghanistan reconciliation to work vigorously with the parties in afghanistan as well as the regional and international stakeholders for a negotiated solution. to be clear, countries in the region have a role to play in supporting a peaceful settlement. work with them and patient help step up their efforts as well. we will continue to work for the release of detained americans including, i want to pronounce the name correctly, i misspelled, so he can return to his family safely. they're also going to continue to make sure that we take on afghan nationalists who work side by side with us voices including
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interpreters and translators seem to we are no longer going to have military their activities and we will not meet them and anyone else that will be vital to our efforts and he had been very vital and a families are not exposed to danger as well. we have already dramatically accelerated the procedure of time for a special immigrant visas. to bring to the united states. since i was inaugurated onjanuary united states. since i was inaugurated on january 20, united states. since i was inaugurated onjanuary 20, have already approved 2500 special immigrant visas to come to the united states. up to now, fewer than half had exercised the right to do that. i have gotten an aircraft and commercial flights and the other half believe thus far. working closely with congress to change the other education legislation that we can streamline the process of approving those behaviours. and those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate thousands of afghans and their families before the us military mission concludes, so that if they
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choose, they can wait safely outside of afghanistan while their direct visas are being processed. the operation has identified us facilities in the continental united states as well as in countries to host our afghan allies if they choose. and we will begin relocation flights for afghanistan applicants and theirfamilies who flights for afghanistan applicants and their families who choose to leave. we have a point person on the state department led task force coordinating all these efforts. but our message to those in man and man is clear, there is a home for you in the united states if you so choose and we will stand with you just as you stay with us. when we made the decision to end the us military involvement in afghanistan, ijudged that it was not international
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interest of the united states of america to continue fighting this war indefinitely. i made the decision with clear eyes. and i am briefed on the battlefield updates. for those that argue that we should stay for six more months when just one more year, i asked him to consider the lessons of recent history. in 2011, the nato allies and partners agreed with and our combat mission in 2014. in 2014, some argued one more year. so we kept fighting. we kept taking casualties. in 2015, the same. and on and on. nearly 20 years of experience has shown us. the current security situation only confirms that just one security situation only confirms thatjust one more year fighting afghanistan is not a solution. but a recipe for being there indefinitely. it's up to the afghans to make a decision about the future of their country. 0thers decision about the future of their country. others are more direct. the
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argument we should stay with afghan indefinitely and in doing so, they point to the fact that we have not taken point to the fact that we have not ta ken classes point to the fact that we have not taken classes in this last year. so they claim that the cost ofjust maintaining the status quo is minimal. but that ignores the reality. 0n the facts that already present on the ground in afghanistan when i took office. fed teledyne was and is at its strongest military since 2001. a number of us forces in afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. in the united states in the last administration made an agreement that with the taliban to remove all our forces by may one of this past, of this year. that's what i inherited. that agreement was the reason the taliban had ceased major attacks against us forces. in april, i had an ounce the united states was going to back by going back on that agreement made better last administration, the united states
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and allied forces would remain in afghanistan for the foreseeable future. the taliban would have become to target our forces. the status quo was not an option. staying would have meant us troops taking casualties. american men and women back in the neck —— middle of a civil war. and we would run the risk of having to send my troops backin risk of having to send my troops back in afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. 0nce back in afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. once that agreement of the teledyne have been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. so that we ask those who want us to stay, how many more, how many thousand more americans, daughters, and sons, are you willing to risk. how long would you have them stay? already we have members of our military parents fought in afghanistan 20 years ago. would you send their children and grandchildren as well? would you send your own son or daughter? after
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20 years, $1 trillion spent training and equipping hundreds of thousands of national security defence forces. 2448 americans killed. 20,000 more wounded. and untold thousands coming home with unseen trauma today mental health. i will not send another generation of americans to warrant afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. united states cannot afford to remain competitive policies creating a response to the world as it was eight years ago. we need to meet the threats where they are today. today a terrorist threat has metastasize beyond afghanistan. so, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now. significantly higher
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in south asia and the middle east, and africa. but make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident, they have the capabilities to protect the homeland, and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge in emerging aura emanating from afghanistan. we are developing a counterterrorism programme the horizon capability and it would allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed in any direct threats to the united states in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. there also need to focus on sharing up there also need to focus on sharing up america's core strengths timmy the strategic competition with china and other nations that is really going to determine our future. we have to defeat covid—19 at home and around the world. make sure we are better prepared for the next pandemic or biological threat. we need to establish international norms for cyberspace. and the use of
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emerging technologies. we need to take concerted action to fight existential threats of climate change. and we will be more formidable to our adversaries and competitors over the long run if we fight the battles of the next 20 years, not the last 20 years. finally, i want to recognise the incredible sacrifice and dedication that the us military and civilian personnel serving alongside our allies and partners have made over the last two decades in afghanistan. and they want to honour the significance of what they have accomplished and the great personal risk they encountered. and the incredible cost to their families. pursuing the terrorist threat with some of the most unforgiving terrain on the planet. i've been almost throughout the entire country. ensuring there has not been another attack the homeland from afghanistan
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for the last 20 years. taking out bin laden, i want to thank you all for your service and the dedication to the nation so many of you had given. and to the sacrifices that you and your families have given. and to the sacrifices that you and yourfamilies have made given. and to the sacrifices that you and your families have made over the long course of this war. he will never forget those who gave the last full measure of devotion for their country in afghanistan. those whose have been immeasurably altered by the stained and service to their country. we are and america's longest war but we will always honour the bravery of the american patriots who served in it. may god bless you all, and may god protect our troops. thank you. it is bless you all, and may god protect our troops. thank you.— our troops. thank you. it is a taliban takeover— our troops. thank you. it is a taliban takeover of _ our troops. thank you. it is a i taliban takeover of afghanistan our troops. thank you. it is a - taliban takeover of afghanistan now
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inevitable? no, taliban takeover of afghanistan now inevitable? ., , ., �* , inevitable? no, it is not. because ou have inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the _ inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the afghan _ inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the afghan troops - inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the afghan troops at - you have the afghan troops at 300,000, well—equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the world. and then air force against something like 75,000 taliban. it is not inevitable. d0 something like 75,000 taliban. it is not inevitable.— not inevitable. do you trust that taliban sarah? _ not inevitable. do you trust that taliban sarah? is _ not inevitable. do you trust that taliban sarah? is that _ not inevitable. do you trust that taliban sarah? is that a - not inevitable. do you trust that taliban sarah? is that a serious| taliban sarah? is that a serious question? _ taliban sarah? is that a serious question? it — taliban sarah? is that a serious question? it is _ taliban sarah? is that a serious question? it is absolutely - taliban sarah? is that a serious question? it is absolutely a - taliban sarah? is that a serious - question? it is absolutely a serious cuestion, question? it is absolutely a serious question. do _ question? it is absolutely a serious question. do you — question? it is absolutely a serious question, do you trust _ question? it is absolutely a serious question, do you trust the - question? it is absolutely a serious| question, do you trust the taliban? no, i_ question, do you trust the taliban? no, i did _ question, do you trust the taliban? no, i did not— question, do you trust the taliban? no, i did not trust the taliban. will you amplify your answer? it is will you amplify your answer? it is a silly question. _ will you amplify your answer? it is a silly question. i _ will you amplify your answer? it 3 a silly question. i trust the capacity of the afghan military who is that trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting wire. yes ma'am? thank
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ou mr conducting wire. yes ma'am? thank you mr president, _ conducting wire. yes ma'am? thank you mr president, given _ conducting wire. yes ma'am? thank you mr president, given the - conducting wire. yes ma'am? thank you mr president, given the amount of money— you mr president, given the amount of money that has been spent and the number— of money that has been spent and the number of— of money that has been spent and the number of lives that have been lost, in your— number of lives that have been lost, in your view— number of lives that have been lost, in your view with making this decision, _ in your view with making this decision, where the last 20 years worth_ decision, where the last 20 years worth it? — decision, where the last 20 years worth it? ., ,, ., , worth it? you know my record, i can tell by the — worth it? you know my record, i can tell by the way _ worth it? you know my record, i can tell by the way you _ worth it? you know my record, i can tell by the way you asked _ worth it? you know my record, i can tell by the way you asked the - tell by the way you asked the question, i opposed permanently having american forces in afghanistan. i argued from the beginning as you may recall if tonight after the administration was over. no nation has ever unified afghanistan. no nation. empires have gone there and not done it. the focus we have, and a strongly support it, you may remember i physically went to afghanistan. i was up in that past where 0sama bin
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laden was allegedly escaped out of harms way. we went for two reasons, one was to... bring some of laden to the gates of hell. as i said at the time. the second reason was to eliminate al-qaeda's capacity to deal with more attacks in the united states from that territory. we accomplished both of those objectives. that is what i believe from the beginning why we should be whereby we should have gone to afghanistan. thatjob had been over for some time. and that's why i believe that this is the right decision and quite frankly over deal. nashville radio.
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your own intelligence community has assets _ your own intelligence community has assets that— your own intelligence community has assets that the afghan government into a _ assets that the afghan government into a likely collapse. that assets that the afghan government into a likely collapse.— into a likely collapse. that is not true. into a likely collapse. that is not true- can — into a likely collapse. that is not true- can you — into a likely collapse. that is not true. can you please _ into a likely collapse. that is not true. can you please clarify - into a likely collapse. that is not. true. can you please clarify whether the told true. can you please clarify whether they told you _ true. can you please clarify whether they told you that _ true. can you please clarify whether they told you that will _ true. can you please clarify whether they told you that will happen - true. can you please clarify whether they told you that will happen or - they told you that will happen or not? _ they told you that will happen or not? ., , they told you that will happen or not? . , ., , ., not? that is not true. they did not reach that — not? that is not true. they did not reach that conclusion. _ not? that is not true. they did not reach that conclusion. so, - not? that is not true. they did not reach that conclusion. so, what. not? that is not true. they did not reach that conclusion. so, what is| reach that conclusion. so, what is the level of— reach that conclusion. so, what is the level of confidence _ reach that conclusion. so, what is the level of confidence they - reach that conclusion. so, what is the level of confidence they have | the level of confidence they have that it _ the level of confidence they have that it will not collapse? the aft han that it will not collapse? tie: afghan government that it will not collapse? tte: afghan government and leadership has to come together. they clearly have the capacity to sustain that governance in place. the question is, where they generate the kind of cohesion to do it? not a question of whether they have the capacity, they have the capacity, they have the forces, a heavy equipment, the question is will they do it? i want to make clear what i made clear to connie,... to make clear what i made clear to connie,..-—
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connie,... you are watching president — connie,... you are watching president by _ connie,... you are watching president by again - connie,... you are watching president by again affirming connie,... you are watching - president by again affirming that the american withdrawal from afghanistan is complete and explaining why. that evening. thursday brought us another day of sunshine but active showers around as well. our weather watchers spotted plenty of funnel clouds across the england and essex towards lincolnshire as well. 0ver across the england and essex towards lincolnshire as well. over the next few days we keep those active showers and be able to be that makes of sunshine and scattered showers coming up through the course of the day. no pressure is not far away. a range of high—pressure is trying to come in from the west on friday. as we head into tonight, claire spelled in most areas. patchy rain for east cotton. cloudy skies in generalfor scotland and northern ireland and western fringes of england and wales and eastern areas looking clear overnight. temperature is holding up
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between 12 and i4 overnight. temperature is holding up between 12 and 14 degrees. a mild start to friday morning and for some of us there will be sunshine. it will be something of an east—west street. sunshine developing but scattered showers that could be heavy and slow moving ringing here and thunderstorms and localised flooding. in the west it's cloudy here and try with my rain working into the southwest later in the day. around 15 to 23 degrees on friday. if you suffer from hay fever you will notice parling levels will be high or very high for much of the uk. moderate presidential and northern scotland. friday evening we will have the heavy showers in the east going for a time. thunder and lightning and surface water if you catch that heavy showers. they were go away overnight into the early hours of saturday. this next system is approaching the south. things will stay unsettled. this rain could be heavy and persistent across southern england and wales saturday. but then it will be another day of
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sunshine and scattered showers and thunderstorms. eastern areas staying in the bulk and dry. temperatures are cooler than recent days. 16 through 22 degrees on saturday. as we head into sunday of course the url is final at wembley. the weather at wembley should stay dry if not cloudy but not the same picture everywhere in the uk as we head into sunday. stay unsettled. further showers and unsettled weather into the first part of the week. i bit my dry on the horizon. goodbye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. ' long �*long mission in afghanistan will end in august. ' long mission in afghanistan will end in august-— end in august. once i made the decision to _ end in august. once i made the decision to end _ end in august. once i made the decision to end the _ end in august. once i made the decision to end the war, - end in august. once i made the decision to end the war, we - end in august. once i made the - decision to end the war, we needed to move swiftly to enact the main elements of the drawdown. the military mission in afghanistan will conclude in august to 30,000. more than 2000 us _ conclude in august to 30,000. more than 2000 us troops _ conclude in august to 30,000. more than 2000 us troops died in afghanistan over 20 years, the president said the us achieved its objectives there, but as it leaves, the taliban is gaining new territory from the afghan government.
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let�*s continue our coverage ofjoe biden announcing that all us troops will be withdrawn from afghanistan in august, and in america�*s longest war. 90% of american troops have already left, and fighting between afghan troops and taliban fighters is escalating. let�*s bring you the bbc�*s chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, in kabul. you cover to the american deployment 20 years ago, you are now covering the americans confirming they are leaving. what are your thoughts as you listen tojoe biden? well, joe biden has a point, no—one expected that, 20 years on, the united states and other nato armies would now be pulling out, and even more, nobody expected that afghanistan would look like this, most of all the generation of young educated afghans who came of age after the us led invasion in the
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beginning of this extraordinary international engagement. but certain messages came through it so clear, this was classicjoe biden. what he said as a senator, said as a vice president, and now what he is saying as a president of the united states of america, we are staying too long in afghanistan. his emphasis tonight was, we are getting our troops home safely. nothing has happened to them during this orderly pull—out, none of them died. he reiterated, we came to find 0sama bin laden, to destroy the al-qaeda threat, and to bring down the taliban — we achieved that objective, and he was emphatic in saying that. many will disagree, and was america and other nations there for nation building, he said no. particularly emphatic, a message he has drilled through time and again, that it has drilled through time and again, thatitis has drilled through time and again, that it is up to the afghans. he said, we have trained more than
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300,000 soldiers, given them all the tools they need, it is up to them now, and he believes, contrary to what the intelligence assessments coming out of the united states have been saying, he believes it is not inevitable that the taliban will come to power. if the afghan leadership and the afghan national army get themselves together, they will be able to defeat the taliban. so he was categorical. many will disagree with the statement about the afghan national army, whether the afghan national army, whether the leaders can do something about it, but in the questions he was takenjust it, but in the questions he was taken just before we started speaking, ros, a journalist asked, what if kabul falls to the taliban? and they have decided that even if the taliban comes to power, the threat to the united states is minimal, it will be the region and the afghans who will have to take care of that, although he emphasised, we will still continue to support over the horizon, with financial aid. to support over the horizon, with financialaid.i to support over the horizon, with financial aid.— financial aid. i was going to ask ou financial aid. i was going to ask
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you about _ financial aid. i was going to ask you about that _ financial aid. i was going to ask you about that final _ financial aid. i was going to ask you about that final point, - financial aid. i was going to ask- you about that final point, because president biden talked about financial support for afghanistan enduring, but what does that mean in practical terms?— practical terms? there was an interesting — practical terms? there was an interesting echo _ practical terms? there was an interesting echo here, - practical terms? there was an interesting echo here, it - practical terms? there was an interesting echo here, it is - practical terms? there was an i interesting echo here, it is often said, ros, history comes up all the time, that when soviet troops left in 1989, it didn't time, that when soviet troops left in 1989, it didn�*t bring about the fall of the government, it was in 1992 when the soviet union fell apart and boris yeltsin pulled the plug on the food, fuel and aid going to the government, and that set in train a process where afghans turned on each other. so the general mantra is, pull out the troops but don�*t pull out the money, and the united states has been emphasising that humanitarian support. even mentioned they will continue to try to speak up they will continue to try to speak up for the rights of women and girls. it is hard to do from a long way away, but there will be economic and financial support. they will continue to pay for the afghan national army, and that is a huge bill. they say they will continue to
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train the afghan national army outside the country, and they will continue to try to provide some kind of support, as they put it, over the horizon, from us military bases around the region. this is really a pivotal turning point, and every afghan watching and listening to the speech, it will affirm the fears they have about this very uncertain future. , , . ., , ., future. lyse doucet, “oining us late into the night_ future. lyse doucet, “oining us late into the night in _ future. lyse doucet, joining us late into the night in kabul, _ future. lyse doucet, joining us late into the night in kabul, thank- future. lyse doucet, joining us late into the night in kabul, thank you | into the night in kabul, thank you very much. now, the european parliament has just approved a resolution condemning hungary for a recent law that restricts the depictions of homosexuality. specifically, the law bans schools from using materials deemed to promote homosexuality to under—18s. it also bans normalised lgbtq relationships from being shown on television before 10pm. hundary�*s prime minister, viktor 0rban, says the new law is about child protection. here he is speaking earlier.
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translation: the european parliament and the european commission _ want us to allow lbgtq activisits into kindergarten and schools. hungary does not want it. the debate is about who should decide how to raise our children. in frame of basic treaties of the eu, this is inevitably a matter of national competence. brussels bureaucrats have no business here. no matter what they will do, we are not going to allow lbgtq activists around our children and kindergarten and schools. most eu leaders don�*t agree with mr 0rban. last month, dutch prime minister mark rutte argued that hungary "has no business being in the european union any more" over this law. while xavier bettel, the prime minister of luxembourg, who is gay, said, "i didn�*t get up one morning after having seen an advert on the tv of some brand and say �*i�*m gay�*." "that�*s not how life works." and here�*s what eu chief ursula von der leyen said about hungary�*s new law yesterday.
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translation: this law puts homosexuality - and gender reassignment on par with pornography. this law uses the protection of children, to which we are all committed, as an excuse to severely discriminate against people because of their sexual orientation. this law is disgraceful. inside hungary, protests against the new law have been taking place, like this one in budapest. and today this heart—shaped rainbow balloon was set up outside hungary�*s parliament. this is one hungarian teacher who is transgender. translation: we did notj want to adhere to the law. whatever it means, we will not change a thing in the way we work. the school i work at has already assured me that as long as it can exist, i have a place there. so standing by me and lgbt students. nick thorpe is in budapest with more on that law.
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this was a law passed by the hungarian parliamentjust three hungarian parliament just three weeks hungarian parliamentjust three weeks ago, initially designed as an anti paedophile law, with no controversial content as such. at the last minute, the governing feeders party added a new grief into it, including transgender people and homosexuality, that neither the promotional depiction of those people could take place for children, for those under 18, and effectively human rights groups, domestic and international critics of this law, and of the hungarian government have rounded on it and said that it is strongly discriminatory and will endanger people, especially young people in hungary. let�*s look at what the eu will do with this resolution. up until recently, all it could do was pass what it calls infringement proceedings against member states who are deemed to have flouted the eu�*s basic values. however, these have been criticised for lacking impact.
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but now the eu has a new tool. the rule of law conditionality came into force in january this year. it gives the eu the power to reduce budget allocations to a member state seen to have breached the standards. a power that hungary and poland have contested. here�*s nick thorpe again. hungary and poland have challenged that link between the rule of law and financial disbursement by the eu in the european court ofjustice and they�*re only expecting a verdict in that case probably sometime this autumn. some legal scholars argue, however, that it could be brought in now in relation to this and other laws, while other legal scholars are more cautious. so after today�*s resolution, all eyes will be on the european commission to see what it decides. the latest developments from haiti
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now, and the latest developments into the assassination of the president, shot by men who raided his residence in the early hours of the morning. the un special envoy has this update.— has this update. reports that members _ has this update. reports that members of _ has this update. reports that members of the _ has this update. reports that members of the group - has this update. reports that members of the group who . has this update. reports that - members of the group who raided the presidential compound have been killed by police and another six are in custody. i am also aware that a larger group of perpetrators have taken refuge in the city and that they are now surrounded by the police. 36 they are now surrounded by the olice. 5: ~ ., , ., ~ police. 36 hours after the killing, some of the _ police. 36 hours after the killing, some of the suspected _ police. 36 hours after the killing, i some of the suspected perpetrators are holed up in a building, going through a shoot—out with the police. but at the crime scene, police continue to look for clues. 0ne continue to look for clues. one question is how the attackers managed to get past the president�*s security detail. the government is saying the assassins were professionals from outside the country. professionals from outside the count . , , , ., ,, professionals from outside the count . , ,, , country. they were speaking spanish and represented _ country. they were speaking spanish and represented themselves - country. they were speaking spanish and represented themselves as - country. they were speaking spanish and represented themselves as dea| and represented themselves as dea agents. _ and represented themselves as dea agents, and as we know, this is not
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the waym — agents, and as we know, this is not the way... whenever they dealt with the way... whenever they dealt with the embassy, they were haitian police — the embassy, they were haitian police i— the embassy, they were haitian police. i believe they were fake agents. — police. i believe they were fake agents, they were speaking spanish. a new_ agents, they were speaking spanish. a new development in the story, here is the washington post reporting that the us citizen of haitian descent has been arrested in connection with the assassination, thatis connection with the assassination, that is a senior official speaking to the post on thursday. the report continues, the us citizen is among the six people arrested and it quotes a government ministers who told the newspaper that at least one other detainee is believed to be a haitian american. we will keep you up—to—date on that story as it develops. stay with me on 0utside source. in a few moments, they gamble that borisjohnson is taking as he looks ahead to lifting all covid restrictions in england later
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this month. now, from the 19th ofjuly, anyone in england he was fully vaccinated against covid—i9 can travel to countries on the amber list without needing to quarantine on return. under won�*t have to self—isolate either. the relaxation of the rules will bring a big boost to the travel industry, but despite no quarantine, tests are still needed on return to england. here is caroline davies. this is the most significant change to international travel scene this year. from the 19th ofjuly, anyone fully vaccinated doesn�*t need to quarantine when they travel from an amber list country to england, but they will still need to take a test before they travel.
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for now, this is only open to those jabbed in the uk. northern ireland has said it will do the same from 26thjuly. scotland and wales are yet to announce whether they will adopt the policy. at the moment, most country is in the world on the amber list, and it is the news the travel industry was desperate for. a week ago we had less than ten destinations that we could sell, now we have 85 destinations. we believe that testing needs to be the next thing that needs to be removed and there should be restriction free travel, similar to how europe operates. the policy is just about what happens entering the uk. the outlook
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is sunnier, but travel this summer could still be rocky. caroline davies, bbc news. iam i am ross atkins here on the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead stories from washington, president biden says that us�*s mission in afghanistan will end in august. if you are a regular viewer, you will know we weekly produce an in—depth look at one of the main stories for the bbc news website, and iplayer. this week we turn to covid and what some consider to be the gamble that boris johnson is taking with his confidence that all restrictions in england will be lifted later this month. borisjohnson is not averse to taking risks, and not for the first time he is leading the uk into
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new territory. a watching world is asking, is that the best thing to do? this time, it is about covid. if do? this time, it is about covid. tt we can't reopen our society in the we can�*t reopen our society in the next few weeks, when we will be helped by the arrival of summer and by the school holidays, then we must ask ourselves, when will we be able to return to normal? collide very soonin to return to normal? collide very soon in england there will be no obligation to wear a mask, to socially distance, to avoid large gatherings- _ socially distance, to avoid large gatherings. and _ socially distance, to avoid large gatherings. and all— socially distance, to avoid large gatherings. and all of _ socially distance, to avoid large gatherings. and all of this - socially distance, to avoid large gatherings. and all of this is . gatherings. and all of this is happening while the uk�*s infection rate looks like this. and with the certainty that numbers will rise. b5 certainty that numbers will rise. as we certainty that numbers will rise. is we predicted in the road map in february, we are seeing cases rise fairly rapidly, there could be 50,000 cases detected per day by the 19th. the 50,000 cases detected per day by the 19th. , ., , 50,000 cases detected per day by the 19th. ,., ,.,,, 50,000 cases detected per day by the 19th. ,., _,, 19th. the strategy raises many questions- _ 19th. the strategy raises many questions. let's _ 19th. the strategy raises many questions. let's work - 19th. the strategy raises many questions. let's work through | 19th. the strategy raises many - questions. let's work through them, questions. let�*s work through them, starting with why you would ease restrictions at this moment. it is
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restrictions at this moment. it is very unusual _ restrictions at this moment. it is very unusual to _ restrictions at this moment. it is very unusual to basically unlock a situation — very unusual to basically unlock a situation and resort to having no measures— situation and resort to having no measures in place to prevent the escalation— measures in place to prevent the escalation of an infectious disease epidemic— escalation of an infectious disease epidemic or pandemic at a time when you have _ epidemic or pandemic at a time when you have increasing numbers of cases in the _ you have increasing numbers of cases in the country. this you have increasing numbers of cases in the country-— in the country. this doctor calls it unusual, in the country. this doctor calls it unusual. the _ in the country. this doctor calls it unusual, the opposition - in the country. this doctor calls it unusual, the opposition has - in the country. this doctor calls it i unusual, the opposition has another word for it. to unusual, the opposition has another word for it. ., ., q unusual, the opposition has another word for it. ., ., ., word for it. to throw off all protections _ word for it. to throw off all protections at _ word for it. to throw off all protections at the - word for it. to throw off all protections at the same . word for it. to throw off all i protections at the same time, word for it. to throw off all - protections at the same time, when the infection rate is still going up, is reckless. put the infection rate is still going up, is reckless.— the infection rate is still going u, is reckless. up, is reckless. put the government has an answer— up, is reckless. put the government has an answer to _ up, is reckless. put the government has an answer to this, _ up, is reckless. put the government has an answer to this, and - up, is reckless. put the government has an answer to this, and it - up, is reckless. put the government has an answer to this, and it lies - has an answer to this, and it lies in this graph. it shows rates of hospitalisation during the second wife, before the vaccine, and right now, with many people vaccinated. as you can say, hospitalisation rates are far lower, as the government points out. are far lower, as the government points out-— points out. our vaccines are buildin: points out. our vaccines are building a — points out. our vaccines are building a wall _ points out. our vaccines are building a wall of _ points out. our vaccines are building a wall of protection j building a wall of protection against hospitalisation and jab by jab, brick by brick, that wall is
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getting higher. jab, brick by brick, that wall is getting higher-— getting higher. ok, but if the vaccine is _ getting higher. ok, but if the vaccine is radically _ getting higher. ok, but if the vaccine is radically reducing l vaccine is radically reducing hospitalisations and if 65% of adults are fully vaccinated, the next question is, why not finish the job first? taste next question is, why not finish the 'ob first? ~ ., next question is, why not finish the 'ob first? ~ . ., job first? we are about three uuarters job first? we are about three quarters of — job first? we are about three quarters of the _ job first? we are about three quarters of the way - job first? we are about three quarters of the way through l job first? we are about three i quarters of the way through the vaccination programme, i would like to finish— vaccination programme, i would like to finish it _ vaccination programme, i would like to finish it before we go all the way to— to finish it before we go all the way to opening. gn to finish it before we go all the way to opening-— to finish it before we go all the wa tooeninu. , , way to opening. on this point, boris johnson has — way to opening. on this point, boris johnson has this _ way to opening. on this point, boris johnson has this message. - way to opening. on this point, boris johnson has this message. to - way to opening. on this point, boris johnson has this message. to those j johnson has this message. to those who say we — johnson has this message. to those who say we should _ johnson has this message. to those who say we should delay _ johnson has this message. to those who say we should delay again, - johnson has this message. to those who say we should delay again, the | who say we should delay again, the alternative to that is to open up in winter, when the virus will have an advantage, ought not at all this year. advantage, ought not at all this ear. ~ g ., advantage, ought not at all this ear. , , , year. mrjohnson believes the summer weather and — year. mrjohnson believes the summer weather and the _ year. mrjohnson believes the summer weather and the school _ year. mrjohnson believes the summer weather and the school holidays - year. mrjohnson believes the summer weather and the school holidays can i weather and the school holidays can act as a firebreak on the virus, and he has support from some leading scientists. i he has support from some leading scientists. ., �* _ he has support from some leading scientists. ., �* , ., scientists. i wouldn't say it is a sweet spot. — scientists. i wouldn't say it is a sweet spot, but _ scientists. i wouldn't say it is a sweet spot, but the _ scientists. i wouldn't say it is a sweet spot, but the four - scientists. i wouldn't say it is a sweet spot, but the four week| scientists. i wouldn't say it is a - sweet spot, but the four week delay we have _ sweet spot, but the four week delay we have gone through has been worth it, we have gone through has been worth it. and _ we have gone through has been worth it. and the _ we have gone through has been worth it, and the benefits become somewhat less after— it, and the benefits become somewhat less after that. i do it, and the benefits become somewhat less after that-— less after that. i do think the government _ less after that. i do think the government are _ less after that. i do think the government are right, - less after that. i do think the government are right, i- less after that. i do think the | government are right, i think less after that. i do think the i government are right, i think it less after that. i do think the - government are right, i think it is time, we are in the summer, you know, it is time to start releasing
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and getting back to some kind of normality. ibis and getting back to some kind of normali . �* , and getting back to some kind of normali . . , ., , , normality. as well as this, the chief medical— normality. as well as this, the chief medical officer - normality. as well as this, the chief medical officer in - normality. as well as this, the | chief medical officer in england argues a delay may not help. it a argues a delay may not help. at a certain point. _ argues a delay may not help. at a certain point, we _ argues a delay may not help. at a certain point, we moved to the situation — certain point, we moved to the situation where instead of averting hospitalisations and deaths, you are 'ust hospitalisations and deaths, you are just delaying them.— just delaying them. those are some ofthe just delaying them. those are some of the arguments _ just delaying them. those are some of the arguments around _ just delaying them. those are some of the arguments around what - just delaying them. those are some of the arguments around what may | of the arguments around what may happen to hospitalisations, but there are other concerns, two more. infection is still matter. they matter because about 10—20% of people end up with long covid, which can be quite debilitating. they matter because every infection is a new chance for a new variant to arise, and they matter because we still don�*t know what the long—term impact of this disease is. let�*s impact of this disease is. let's take those _ impact of this disease is. let's take those points _ impact of this disease is. let's take those points in _ impact of this disease is. let's take those points in turn. - impact of this disease is. let's take those points in turn. one | take those points in turn. 0ne survey suggested that 2 million people in the uk have had some long lasting symptoms, and chris whitty doesn�*t deny this is a concern. to a question on this, he replied, since there is a lot of covid at the
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moment and the rates are going up, i regret to say i think we will get a significant amount more long covid, particularly in the younger ages where vaccination rates are currently much lower. there is an acceptance more people will get long covid, although no figures are put on this from the government. the next question was about the risk of new variants. we have no specific government response.— new variants. we have no specific government response. these vaccines are very effective. _ government response. these vaccines are very effective, and _ government response. these vaccines are very effective, and it _ government response. these vaccines are very effective, and it is _ government response. these vaccines are very effective, and it is likely - are very effective, and it is likely that immunity will last a long time and if— that immunity will last a long time and if new— that immunity will last a long time and if new variants arise there will be some _ and if new variants arise there will be some degree of protection. the government _ be some degree of protection. t“ta: government calculation is that vaccines can cope with whatever comes, but there is a broader question about whether the cut is risking people�*s health for the sake of the economy.
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now, covid has disrupted other health care, that is accepted, but whether the government�*s decision this week addresses that problem hinges on what happens to those hospitalisation rates. here is professor neil ferguson again. the challen . es professor neil ferguson again. t“ta: challenges there is still the potential of getting very large numbers of cases, and this is the $1 million question, if we get very high numbers of cases, up to 200,000, it still could cause some pressure to the health system. that indeed is the _ pressure to the health system. that indeed is the question, or at least one of them, because another we need to address is whether this is actually about politics as much as it is about science. to some degree, this is about the conservatives�* desire to assert individual responsibility and freedoms. here is cabinet minister robertjenrick. brute cabinet minister robert jenrick. we now cabinet minister robertjenrick. we now have to move into a different period _ now have to move into a different
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period where we learn to live with the virus. — period where we learn to live with the virus, we take precautions, and as individuals we take personal responsibility.— as individuals we take personal responsibility. boris johnson has also described _ responsibility. boris johnson has also described this _ responsibility. boris johnson has also described this shift. - responsibility. boris johnson has also described this shift. what i responsibility. boris johnson has l also described this shift. what we are doinu , also described this shift. what we are doing. mr— also described this shift. what we are doing, mr speaker, _ also described this shift. what we are doing, mr speaker, is - are doing, mr speaker, is cautiously, prudently, moving from a legal diktat, from legal diktat to allowing people to take personal responsibility for their actions. 50 responsibility fortheiractions. so some observers of boris johnson say some observers of borisjohnson say this is familiar territory, a veteran politicaljournalist tweeted, at everyjunction of the pandemic, beginning, last september, christmas, johnson has followed his libertarian instincts in full — here we go again. borisjohnson himself has been open about his reluctance to introduce nationwide restrictions. it has also talked of the importance of british common sense in navigating the pandemic, so it is not a surprise to see this move to reduce restrictions and to ask the public to use its judgment. there are, though, concerns about
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the limits of common sense. this is one of those _ the limits of common sense. this is one of those areas _ the limits of common sense. this is one of those areas where _ the limits of common sense. this is one of those areas where my - the limits of common sense. this is i one of those areas where my freedom affects your freedom, just like driving, my freedom to drive fast affects your safety, my freedom not to wear a mask affects your safety in terms of not getting covid, and in terms of not getting covid, and in areas like that, we recognise that we do need some level of regulation. 50 that we do need some level of regulation-— that we do need some level of reuulation. , ., ., regulation. so there is an argument that rules encourage _ regulation. so there is an argument that rules encourage us _ regulation. so there is an argument that rules encourage us to - regulation. so there is an argument that rules encourage us to act - that rules encourage us to act responsibly. and there is another issue, with reference to masks, the government is not defined what being responsible is. it has left it up to the individual. this feeds into a concern that there will be a lack of masks that will disproportionately impact certain groups of people. one political scientist said that removing mandatory masks in shops, hospitality and transport is just asking those working there to take on the burden of risk. and as well as certain professions, people who are particularly vulnerable are worried too. ti a
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are particularly vulnerable are worried too.— are particularly vulnerable are worried too. ., ., , , ,, worried too. if a lot shielders like m self, worried too. if a lot shielders like myself. and _ worried too. if a lot shielders like myself, and for _ worried too. if a lot shielders like myself, and for many _ worried too. if a lot shielders like myself, and for many other- worried too. if a lot shielders like i myself, and for many other disabled people across the country, we will remain in place or remain shielding, we will remain isolated just so we can protect ourselves. the government _ can protect ourselves. the government doesn't - can protect ourselves. the government doesn't dismiss the government doesn�*t dismiss the concerns, but its message is that society as a whole has to begin to learn to live with covid, while being cautious. t learn to live with covid, while being cautious.— learn to live with covid, while bein: cautious. ., �* . , being cautious. i don't want people to feel that — being cautious. i don't want people to feel that they _ being cautious. i don't want people to feel that they say _ being cautious. i don't want people to feel that they say is, _ being cautious. i don't want people to feel that they say is, as - being cautious. i don't want people to feel that they say is, as it - to feel that they say is, as it were — to feel that they say is, as it were the _ to feel that they say is, as it were, the moment to get demob happy, the end _ were, the moment to get demob happy, the end of— were, the moment to get demob happy, the end of covid, it is very far from — the end of covid, it is very far from dealing with this virus. if from dealing with this virus. if part from dealing with this virus. part of this from dealing with this virus. tt part of this is about political philosophy, part of it is straight politics too. tom newton dunn said that ministers concede they no longer have enough tory mps support to keep restrictions any longer. and here is one mp responding to the decision on masks. t
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here is one mp responding to the decision on masks.— here is one mp responding to the decision on masks. i think it is an infringement _ decision on masks. i think it is an infringement of— decision on masks. i think it is an infringement of civil _ decision on masks. i think it is an infringement of civil liberty - decision on masks. i think it is an infringement of civil liberty is, i l infringement of civil liberty is, i think— infringement of civil liberty is, i think it — infringement of civil liberty is, i think it is — infringement of civil liberty is, i think it is right to return to people _ think it is right to return to people a _ think it is right to return to people a degree of autonomy about the way— people a degree of autonomy about the way that they live their lives. and you — the way that they live their lives. and you might be watching england and thinking, how does this compare with other nations? well, those comparisons are difficult. here is my colleague nick triggle on the bbc news website, writing, we are perhaps the first country to find ourselves in this situation, attempting to return to normal in the face of a rapidly rising rate of infection. 0thers the face of a rapidly rising rate of infection. others will soon face similar dilemmas, nick writes. and it is a dilemma that israel recently faced. despite 60% of adults being fully vaccinated, facemasks indoors have been mandated again. it is a similar story in california. ali county is again recommending masks indoors, again because of rising cases. —— la county. the uk keeps coming back to the vaccine roll—out, but the who is clear, the stakes remain high. we
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but the who is clear, the stakes remain high-— remain high. we would ask governments _ remain high. we would ask governments to _ remain high. we would ask governments to be - remain high. we would ask governments to be really l remain high. we would ask- governments to be really careful at this moment, not to lose the gains we have made, to open up very carefully. we have made, to open up very carefull . we have made, to open up very carefully-— we have made, to open up very carefull . ,, ., , carefully. the uk government knows this is a decision _ carefully. the uk government knows this is a decision with _ carefully. the uk government knows this is a decision with risks _ this is a decision with risks attached. it knows when the infection rate rises, when there are buses, trains, pubs, offices, theatres and shops full of people not wearing masks, that will be living with covid, and only then will we know if it was the right decision. you can find more analysis from may and the team in lots of different places across the bbc. each week we tackle a different subject, you can see those videos on the bbc website from a saturday morning. you can also hear previous editions on the bbc sounds app, and you can see longer versions of the videos, such as the one you have just seen on bbc iplayer, just head to the news category, where you will find this week�*s and all of our previous reports as well. that is it for this
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edition of outside source. thank you very much for watching, we will see you next week. all the best. thursday brought us another day of sunny spells but some really active showers too, and other watchers spotted plenty of funnel clouds across eastern essex, cambridgeshire, and over the next few days we keep those active showers, a mix of sunny spells and scattered showers bubbling up through the course of the day. low pressure not far away, bringing the unsettled theme, but higher pressure trying to build in from the west for a time on friday. as we head through the course of the night, clear spells for most areas, patchy showery rain for eastern scotland, cloudy skies in general for scotland, western fringes of england and wales. central areas mostly dry
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overnight. a mild start to friday morning, and for some of us some sunshine from the word go. something of an east—west split, so for central and eastern england and eastern scotland, sunny spells developing, but scattered showers could be heavy and slow moving, bringing hail, thunderstorms and localised flooding. in the west, cloudier, but rain moving into the far north—west later in the day. most of us, around 15—23 on friday. if you suffer from hay fever, pollen levels will be high or very high for much of the uk, moderate for central and northern scotland. during friday evening, heavy showers in the east will continue for a time, thunder and lightning, quite a bit of surface water if you catch one of those heavy showers, but is in a way overnight. this next system approaches the south, so things staying very changeable, very unsettled. this area of rain could be heavy and persistent across southern england and wales, clearing eastwards, another day of sunny
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spells and scattered heavy showers and thunderstorms, i probably eastern areas seeing the bulk, drier for northern ireland. temperature is cooler than recently. as we head into sunday, the euro is final at wembley, likely that the weather at wembley, likely that the weather at wembley should stay dry if somewhat cloudy, but not the same picture everywhere in the uk, still quite unsettled, further showers, more unsettled, further showers, more unsettled showery weather into the first part of the working week, something dry on the horizon from midweek onwards. bye—bye.
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this is bbc news, i�*m james reynolds. the headlines at eight o�*clock. delight for the travel industry as double jabbed uk residents will no longer have to quarantine on their return from amber list countries this summer. at his massive news, and we should see a great pick—up and bookings and many customers who are looking forward to going up either on holiday or to the z family can finally realise that and get away in time for summer holidays. warnings of significant pressure ahead on the nhs as the uk�*s daily covid cases double in a fortnight to levels not seen since january. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan amid warnings that the country could slide into civil war once troop withdrawals are complete. celebrating all the way to the final
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as england prepare to make history in their first major final in 55 years.

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