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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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list this is bbc new lists. this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines... no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. as one of the world's most vaccinated countries, we must use these advantages to restore many of the freedoms that have been lost over recent months. kane is there to follow in! england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days. you know, we're here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet, and we know we've got
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everybody with us. nearly 26 million people tuned in to watch, in homes and pubs around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. renewed calls for recommendations to be implemented — a year after a scathing inquiry into three nhs scandals concluded that thousands of women came to "avoidable harm". the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set — to mark 60 years of the soap. while, back at the palace — you're invited to a picnic — we tour the gardens of buckingham palace as they're opened to the public for the summer. people in england who've had both doses of a covid vaccine will be allowed to travel to amber
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list countries without needing to quarantine when they return. list countries without needing the transport secretary grant shapps has told the commons that the changes will take effect on july 19th. the other nations are yet to comment if they will follow england. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. onejab, twojobs, nojab, one jab, twojobs, no jab, forthe last few months it has made no difference to the rules you have to follow when you travel from another country to the uk, that depends on the traffic light system and whether the traffic light system and whether the country you are coming from is green, amber or red, but things are about to change. from the 19th of july, anyone fully vaccinated does not need to quarantine when they travel from amber list countries to england but they will still need to take a test before they travel and another pcr test on arrival, and under 18 is won't need to quarantine at all. underfours under 18 is won't need to quarantine at all. under fours will not need to take any test. 11—17 —year—olds will need to take a predeparture test and
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a pcr test. for now, this is only open to those jabbed in the uk. it is notjust of open to those jabbed in the uk. it is not just of course about is notjust of course about holidays, eager as we are, i'm sure, for time in the sunshine, but this is also about reuniting families who have been apart throughout this pandemic. it is about helping businesses to trade and grow and is about supporting aviation, a sector which hundreds of thousands ofjobs rely upon. fist which hundreds of thousands of “obs rel u on. �* ., which hundreds of thousands of “obs rel uon. �* ., rely upon. at the moment, most countries in _ rely upon. at the moment, most countries in the _ rely upon. at the moment, most countries in the world _ rely upon. at the moment, most countries in the world are - rely upon. at the moment, most countries in the world are on - rely upon. at the moment, most countries in the world are on the j countries in the world are on the amber list including spain, greece and the usa, and the industry opened bookings will no go up for summer trips. it bookings will no go up for summer tri s. , . bookings will no go up for summer tris. , . , , trips. it is a huge step in the riaht trips. it is a huge step in the right direction _ trips. it is a huge step in the right direction and _ trips. it is a huge step in the right direction and perfect i trips. it is a huge step in the - right direction and perfect timing for all of those people who have booked a holiday in 2019 and could not take it in 2020 and had it transferred to this year and have been sitting there with their fingers crossed. but been sitting there with their fingers crossed.— been sitting there with their fingers crossed. but it is not the news some _ fingers crossed. but it is not the news some were _ fingers crossed. but it is not the news some were hoping - fingers crossed. but it is not the news some were hoping for, - fingers crossed. but it is not the - news some were hoping for, melanie lives in california is and has not seen her daughter since he left for
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drama school in london. melanie cannot quarantine because of her work and because she has been vaccinated in the us, for now she is not included in this policy. it’s not included in this policy. it's 'ust not included in this policy. it�*s just heartbreaking. sorry. everything keeps being road locked in some way. everything keeps being road locked in some way-— everything keeps being road locked in some way. what would it mean to ou if the in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules _ in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules were _ in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules were changed? - in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules were changed? it - you if the rules were changed? it would mean everything. i miss you if the rules were changed? it would mean everything. i miss her so much. we are best friends. it is like missing my right arm, you know, it is very difficult. i want to see her more than anything. the government _ her more than anything. the government has _ her more than anything. the government has said it will look at whether it is possible to phase in people jabbed in other countries over the summer and some are still urging caution about opening up. we can urging caution about opening up. - can open travel but we have to have the right safety measures in place, such as a good testing regime, to capture people who bring the virus
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back from their holidays, with other souvenirs. , , . . souvenirs. this is about what ha--ens souvenirs. this is about what happens when _ souvenirs. this is about what happens when entering - souvenirs. this is about what happens when entering the l souvenirs. this is about what i happens when entering the uk, souvenirs. this is about what - happens when entering the uk, and whether other countries will let uk travelers inn is a different matter. the new policy will change international travel this summer but there will also be questions about what happens to all of those people who are not fully vaccinated, you may feel left behind. —— who may feel. caroline davies, bbc news. lyn hughes is the editor—in—chief at wanderlust. we have heard from so many people in the travel industry, what has it been like for you? this the travel industry, what has it been like for you?— been like for you? as a travel magazine _ been like for you? as a travel magazine it — been like for you? as a travel magazine it has _ been like for you? as a travel magazine it has not _ been like for you? as a travel magazine it has not been - been like for you? as a travel| magazine it has not been easy because our fortunes are tied in with the industry. and for us, what we have had, we have had as many readers as ever, and our sales went up readers as ever, and our sales went up on our website traffic went up because people still wanted to dream, and read about travel and
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attend events about travel, virtual events, and so people have still felt this passion, there is a pent—up demand out there. it felt this passion, there is a pent-up demand out there. it has felt a bit like — pent-up demand out there. it has felt a bit like torture, _ pent-up demand out there. it has felt a bit like torture, watching i felt a bit like torture, watching travel programmes and reading travel magazines, but there is a change happening and we are hearing about this removal of restrictions, if you are double jabbed and coming back from an amber list country, how much difference will that make? this from an amber list country, how much difference will that make?— difference will that make? this is a name difference will that make? this is a game changer- _ difference will that make? this is a game changer. it _ difference will that make? this is a game changer. it is _ difference will that make? this is a game changer. it is not _ difference will that make? this is a game changer. it is not huge, - difference will that make? this is al game changer. it is not huge, there is still a lot to be done and a long way to go, but it is still a huge step forward. so many other countries that people do want to go to in the next few months are on the amber list. i wasjust to in the next few months are on the amber list. i was just checking the web traffic before i came on, and it is going crazy. we have got certain articles about which countries are on the amber list and what the restrictions are. i think that this is it, people really do want to go.
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there are so many people now who have been double jabbed and we have been hearing now over months, can i travel when i'm vaccinated? some of the pent—up demand, not everybody, of course, some people will be cautious, and some people will not feel comfortable travelling yet, but it means that for families and individuals and couples who have been double vaccinated, at least it means you can make a plan now. we know the hospitalisations are down and so are the number of deaths but we are still seeing huge numbers of people infected every day and the delta variant behind a lot of that. just because you can travel, should you? just because you can travel, should ou? ~ ., ., . , ., you? million dollar question. the sort of people — you? million dollar question. the sort of people who _ you? million dollar question. the sort of people who will _ you? million dollar question. the sort of people who will be - you? million dollar question. the sort of people who will be really l sort of people who will be really wanting to travel will be cautious, and i think people will still need to honestly in some cases take masks and people have got to research where they are going before they go.
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and of course not every country is open to travel at the moment, or travellers from the uk, so there is still going to be quite a bit of red tape and there's going to be a bit of research needed to be done, so i would urge anyone who is travelling to not do it themselves, but to use a really good tried and tested tour operator or travel agent who can give the best advice and make sure you have got insurance but also don't leave your common sense at home. take a facemask with you. just be careful. just be careful. there are all sorts of reasons why people want to travel and the benefits of travel have been made very clear, on the mental and physical well—being of people. as long as people do act sensibly, yes, you should be able to travel. .,
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sensibly, yes, you should be able to travel. . . , ., travel. there are many other reasons. _ travel. there are many other reasons, like _ travel. there are many other reasons, like needing - travel. there are many other reasons, like needing to - travel. there are many other reasons, like needing to see | travel. there are many other - reasons, like needing to see family or something you have been denied doing for a long time, but people will still have to have covid tests before and after they travel. give your best advice on which of the places that are going to be the new destinations that we should be may be thinking about all being well? this be thinking about all being well? is i say, be thinking about all being well? sis i say, you do need to do research here. the nice thing is, places like greece and the greek islands, it makes them a contender, and some of the greek islands have got hardly any cases of covid, really safe, and so places like that are worth looking at. i'm looking forward to going to denmark at some point where my family are, go and commiserate after the football last night, because denmark is open. france is now open, germany. lots of places. portugal. but even when you are
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choosing where to go, it might be worth looking to see where within that country you should go. of course, in a lot of cases, it might be that if they have covid cases it is more likely to be in the big cities but if you're in the rural areas or out in a greek island, they areas or out in a greek island, they are very low cases and those would be the safer bets. i’m are very low cases and those would be the safer bets.— are very low cases and those would be the safer bets. i'm sure you have waited many — be the safer bets. i'm sure you have waited many appetites. _ be the safer bets. i'm sure you have waited many appetites. thanks - be the safer bets. i'm sure you have waited many appetites. thanks for l waited many appetites. thanks for joining us. breaking news. we have heard from the japanese olympic minister that organisers have agreed to hold the olympic games in tokyo with no spectators. we knowjapan had declared a state of emergency in tokyo which will run throughout the olympic games to combat coronavirus. that will be from the 12th ofjuly until the 22nd of august and all
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sorts of restrictions on bars and restaurants, opening times and whether they can serve alcohol. very difficult decision. and whether they were going to allow local spectators in to watch the olympics. coronavirus numbers have been rising in tokyo. that decision has now been taken, they will be no spectators at the olympic games in tokyo. —— there will. the wait is finally over, and england fans are daring to dream — after a dramatic extra time 2—1win against denmark in the semi finals of the euros. the crucial goal was scored by captain, harry kane, after the ball rebounded from his missed penalty. more than 25 million people watched the action on tv, making it one of the most watched broadcasts in the last decade. england now face italy at wembley on sunday — in their first major men's final since 1966.
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these are pictures of the england team in training in burton upon trent in staffordshire. not much time to celebrate if you are a player. you can enjoy it for a bit and then you have got to get your head down and think about what comes next. the final hurdle, can they do it? but celebrations have been slightly marred today as football's european governing body, uefa, has opened disciplinary proceedings against england after a fan shone a laser pen towards the denmark goalkeeper during a critical moment. our sports correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game. # sweet caroline... a night for heroes and for history. sweet caroline has surely never sounded sweeter. at last a major final beckons for england and whether it was the players on the pitch, or the supporters, the emotion and the elation were plain to see.
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coming home! it's fantastic. i'm amazed, i neverthought they would get this far. - it's coming home! i can't believe it. but earlier, what nerve shredding tension as england's optimism was soon silenced. mikkel damsgaard brilliantly putting denmark in front. but soon england were level. england had to hit back quickly. that is what england have done. but the fans could only watch and hope as it went into extra time. finally, though, this challenge on raheem sterling, was it a penalty? crucially, the referee thought so and up stepped harry kane. schmeichel saves... kane is there to follow in! delight for england although not without further controversy. replays suggested a laser pen had been pointed from the stands
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at kasper schmeichel but after 55 years of english heartache, this was a night and a result which meant everything. amazing night for this country, the players, the staff. our first final at a european championship and to be at wembley, it's a real special occasion. credit to the boys, we dug deep, got the job done but let's recover well and get ready for the next one. it is very much the morning after the night before here at wembley but come sunday, the fans will be back in their thousands hoping to see england take one final step to greatness. even their manager, normally so calm and composed, was showing his passion last night. gareth southgate has united players and supporters on what has already been some journey. he's given everyone a bit of hope, something to cling on to. because it has been such a difficult 18 months for everyone and whatever happens on sunday, and we all have our fingers crossed that england can go and win this,
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but whatever happens he should feel very, very proud. and just in case you'd forgotten, not since the 1966 world cup have england won a major trophy but decades of disappointment have now been replaced by hope. this is for the next generation now. any young people watching this, tune in and enjoy it and fingers crossed, we can do it. but this is a very good italian team, make no mistake, but we have the ability to beat them. now only italy stand between england and that elusive glory. football is coming home, they say. well, it has never been closer. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. former sunderland and aston villa striker, kevin phillips, joins me now. he was in the england squad for the euros back in the year 2000, alongside none other than gareth southgate. let's deal with the laser pen which was shown at the face of kasper
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schmeichel. irate was shown at the face of kasper schmeichel-— was shown at the face of kasper schmeichel. . s, �* . ., , schmeichel. we don't want to see that. if it schmeichel. we don't want to see that- if it is _ schmeichel. we don't want to see that. if it is proven, _ schmeichel. we don't want to see that. if it is proven, then - that. if it is proven, then hopefully the person who was guilty of it will be held accountable. we don't want to see it. we don't want to see any rules broken because the night was an incredible night, and to see that on the breaking news today, it's likely mars the evening, but we can't let it overshadow what was an incredible night —— it slightly mars. to listen to the reruns of the game, it gives you goose bumps, and hopefully we won't see a repeat of that behaviour on sunday evening. it see a repeat of that behaviour on sunday evening.— sunday evening. it was a real nailbiter- _ sunday evening. it was a real nailbiter. last _ sunday evening. it was a real nailbiter. last night - sunday evening. it was a real nailbiter. last night was - sunday evening. it was a real nailbiter. last night was a - nailbiter. last night was a different prospect to the ukraine. yes, it was, credit to denmark, they were excellent, in the first 35 minutes, and then england grew into the game and took control. you have to give credit to them. they scored an incredible go to goal through
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mikkel damsgaard, and everyone wondered how england would be reacting after that, and they reacted perfectly, so credit to the manager and the tactics. just an incredible night. to see our country, and having played for england in 2000, to see the atmosphere last night, i've never heard anything like it.— heard anything like it. have you frozen, kevin? _ heard anything like it. have you frozen, kevin? we _ heard anything like it. have you frozen, kevin? we are - heard anything like it. have you frozen, kevin? we are having . heard anything like it. have you frozen, kevin? we are having a| heard anything like it. have you i frozen, kevin? we are having a bit of trouble with the sound. italy, how long can you afford to celebrate, when you know that you have gotten even tougher potentially coming up in a few days' time? —— gotan even coming up in a few days' time? —— got an even tougher. coming up in a few days' time? -- got an even tougher.— got an even tougher. there is no celebrations. _ got an even tougher. there is no celebrations. they _ got an even tougher. there is no celebrations. they are _ got an even tougher. there is no i celebrations. they are professionals and they are not going to go drinking last night. southgate is
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very professional, they have got to the final, so why would you let yourself down? they are at st georges park now, which is about ten minutes from where i am now, they will be recovering today, get the legs rested, they will be in the pool and be preparing, as simple as that, then hopefully on sunday evening, if we can win the football match, they can celebrate as long as they want because they will deserve it. they will go down as he and let's hope that happens. haifa it. they will go down as he and let's hope that happens. how would ou let's hope that happens. how would you approach _ let's hope that happens. how would you approach a _ let's hope that happens. how would you approach a game _ let's hope that happens. how would you approach a game against - let's hope that happens. how would you approach a game against italy? | let's hope that happens. how would| you approach a game against italy? i think the game will be similar to last night. southgate won't change. he will prepare in the same manner as he has for every other game. the big thing for the manager now is to keep the players feet on the ground. there is enough experience in the squad to do that. they will prepare the same. i'm sure they will travel down in the same way and they will keep it simple. i think the game
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will go similar to last night. the players will be nervous, it is natural, they are in a final, and i could see italy actually starting the game very well, maybe taking control like denmark last night, but then as the game progresses and england settle down, they will take control of the game and i see us winning the match. it will be very tight, like last night, it could go all the way to penalties, but i think england have got the bit between their teeth and with the crowd behind them, i sincerely hope they go and do it. so crowd behind them, i sincerely hope they go and do it-— they go and do it. so much excitement _ they go and do it. so much excitement about - they go and do it. so much excitement about it - they go and do it. so much excitement about it and i they go and do it. so much excitement about it and so j they go and do it. so much - excitement about it and so much pressure. you know southgate. how will he be feeling as he leads the team to its first major final in 55 years? pressure on him as well. he will be years? pressure on him as well. he: will be immensely proud. he is a very proud man. when i played with him, very professional, and when he sung the national anthem, he out sung the national anthem, he out
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sung everyone. he is mr england. he deserves every bit of credit that comes his way. in his room when he is sitting there, he will be proud, emotional, we saw that last night, i've never seen him get so excited after a match. you can tell it means after a match. you can tell it means a lot to him but he will compose himself and calm himself down for the game on sunday evening and that will hopefully influence the players when they go onto the pitch, to stay calm, because it was frantic in the first half an hour last night, and it will be the same on sunday because the crowd will be right up for it. , . ., , for it. they certainly will. kevin phillis, for it. they certainly will. kevin phillips, former _ for it. they certainly will. kevin phillips, former england - for it. they certainly will. kevin l phillips, former england striker, thanks forjoining us. the number of people in england waiting for routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. 5.3 million people were waiting to start treatment at the end of may 2021, according to figures from nhs england. this is the highest number since records began in august 2007. a total of 207,188 urgent cancer referrals were made by gps in england in may,
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nearly double the number in may last year. and nearly 300,000 patients in england had been waiting more than six weeks for a key diagnostic test in may. our health correspondent, katherine da costa, has been giving us more details. yes, planned operations have been badly affected as hospitals have rapidly had to expand capacity to deal with a surge in covid patients, but there is some good news for waiting lists. the number of patients waiting more than a year fell by 50,000 for the second month in a row, but there are still more than 330,000 patients waiting more than 52 weeks — compare that to 1,600 who were waiting that long before the start of the pandemic. now, nhs staff are working flat out to clear the backlog. at the same time, they're seeing very busy a&e departments. overall, units are seeing as many patients as they did before the pandemic. more than 2.1 million
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patients visited injune, similar to levels seen injune 2019. major a&e units recorded the busiest month on record, and nhs england has urged people to call 111 first so that they get the right service. now, the vaccine roll—out means not as many people are being admitted to hospital with covid in this wave, but nhs providers, which represents hospital bosses, has warned the rising infection rate, which is predicted could reach 100,000 cases a day, could slow efforts to tackle the backlog. the organisation says a combination of more staff needing to self—isolate, the need for annual leave and more beds being taken out for covid patients means real challenges for the health service. the latest weekly figures from the department of health show there has been a surge in the number of alerts sent out by the nhs covid—19 contact tracing app. in the week ending 30thjune, the app sent out over 356,000
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alerts telling users to go into isolation — that compares with around 219,000 the previous week. the alerts were triggered by nearly 61,000 positive tests entered in the app. a scathing inquiry into three nhs scandals published last year, concluded that thousands of women came to "avoidable harm", after their concerns around some medical treatments were ignored by the health service. the cumberlege review looked into the use of pelvic mesh, anti—epilepsy drugs and hormone pregnancy tests. now a year on, there are renewed calls for its recommendations to be implemented to avoid further suffering. our health correspondent anna collinson reports. three health treatments intended to improve women's lives, but instead ruined many of them. there are the women living with debilitating pain after having pelvic mesh fitted. the pain, i would be in tears with. it was so severe.
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there are the pregnant mothers, never warned taking the epilepsy drug sodium valproate could harm their unborn babies. felt guilty for so long, didn't i? yeah, you felt as if it was your fault. i idid. and there's the hormonal pregnancy test, primodos. its manufacturer denies any link with birth defects, but hundreds of families campaigning for decades disagree. i mean, iam now 75. so my thoughts are, how much longer can i carry on doing this? a year ago today, a damning review about the health service's treatment of female patients was released, including nine recommendations. the first happened straightaway. i want to issue a full apology to the... to those who have suffered. but 12 months on, most of baroness cumberlege's suggestions haven't happened.
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i'm very angry and frustrated. a year is a huge length of time for people who are suffering. it's time that they implemented all our recommendations. your review concluded thousands of women had been ignored by the health service for decades. do you think they're being heard now? we've heard too often that women have said, "we've been dismissed, we've been told, it's all in our heads". and so i hope that the culture will change and that the patients will always be foremost in the care that they receive. payment schemes for victims was a key recommendation, but so far, nothing has been confirmed. all three children in this family were born with health and learning problems after their mum took sodium valproate. their parents fear for their future without financial support. when the buffer of mum and dad have gone, you know, it's going to be sort of, it's going to be the oldest daughter to try and take
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on that responsibility. which she shouldn't have to do, she's got her own problems. but what do you do? some of the recommendations are being implemented. patient safety commissioners, intended to be a voice for the public�*s concerns, are being appointed, and some specialist mesh centres have been set up. after years of waiting, alison went to one in leicester to have her mesh removed, a complicated operation. it's very difficult to get out, they liken it to getting chewing gum out of hair. once a keen runner, alison now dreams of taking her dog for a long walk. i know that i may never get back to the person i was. but any improvement on how i was has got to be a good thing. after waiting so long for the cumberlege review, those who fought to be heard fear efficient action will not be taken. it will be, well, how much is it going to cost?
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"what can we get away with?" and that really is betraying all future patients of the nhs, which is a disgrace. that was marie lyon, ending our report by anna collinson. i'm nowjoined by marie lyon, a mother who was prescribed primodos and later gave birth to a daughter whose limbs were not all fully formed. ms lyon now chairs the association for children damaged by hormone pregnancy tests. it has been a fight that you have been battling now over decades. and for some families you are trying to support, it will come too late. it is too late. 12 support, it will come too late. it is too late-— is too late. 12 months since the re ort is too late. 12 months since the report was _ is too late. 12 months since the report was published _ is too late. 12 months since the report was published and - is too late. 12 months since the report was published and in - is too late. 12 months since the | report was published and in that is too late. 12 months since the i report was published and in that 12 months ten of our members have died. that is ten families whose parent will not know whether, and they died feeling guilty like we all do, why did we take the tablets? that guilt
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needs to be removed and the only way that can happen is by the government and it is notjust this government, it is not political, it is every government that has failed to address the problem of the regulatory system. it was faulty and it failed over 50 years ago and it is failing today, nothing is changing. unless these recommendations are implemented, they are well thought, baroness cumberlege and her team did a great job of actually getting to the core of what is wrong with the health system. why the government can't see that this will actually save lives as well as money, ijust don't understand. as well as money, i 'ust don't understandh as well as money, i 'ust don't understand.�* as well as money, i 'ust don't understand. ., ., , understand. you often get these re orts understand. you often get these reports and _ understand. you often get these reports and recommendations i understand. you often get these | reports and recommendations are nothing much more is heard from them, so what credit would you give to baroness cumberlege for coming back with these comments one year later and saying two out of nine recommendations being implemented is not enough? she recommendations being implemented is not enou~h? ,, , recommendations being implemented is notenou:h? ,, ,, . ,
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not enough? she is perfectly right and i think, _ not enough? she is perfectly right and i think, obviously, _ not enough? she is perfectly right and i think, obviously, because i not enough? she is perfectly right| and i think, obviously, because we had so many meetings with baroness cumberlege, and it was obvious that this was very close to her heart. it was notjust this was very close to her heart. it was not just a this was very close to her heart. it was notjust a job and once you have sucked in a room and listened to the heartbreaking stories —— once you have sat in a room and listen to the heartbreaking stories, you can't forget that information. i think withjulia, she is a wonderful person anyway, very empathetic, and to have that information and to know the harms that have been caused, and yet to know that no one is willing to redress this, either physically or financially, to redress this, either physically orfinancially, it is really, really frustrating and i feel as angry as she does that we are still battling and it is a battle. all these years. that drug should have been taken off in 1967. we have one particular member who was born in 1974 with
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pulmonary stenosis without a back passage, had to have various operations, she has one kidney and herfingers don't work. operations, she has one kidney and her fingers don't work. this operations, she has one kidney and herfingers don't work. this is operations, she has one kidney and her fingers don't work. this is what happened in 1974, so the goodness' sake, somebody take responsibility, i don't care which government it is, it is not political, this is a passionate appeal forjustice, for compassion, orsomeone passionate appeal forjustice, for compassion, or someone to listen and to try and look at the suffering of our families. to try and look at the suffering of ourfamilies. i know that to try and look at the suffering of our families. i know that we to try and look at the suffering of ourfamilies. i know that we have many of our women who have had stillbirths and miscarriages, and they always live with you, it never goes away. we have people, like me, i'm in my 70s, but they are caring for children who are physically very severely disabled, and when you think about trying to lift and carry someone to the bathroom, at that age, therejust is no kind of
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compassion about how they can be cared for. that is the right thing to do, but why won't they do that for the rest, for the likes of primodos?— for the rest, for the likes of primodos? ., s, s, , primodos? thanks for “oining us. you are very welcome. — now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. good afternoon. skies have been brightening so far today for many areas. there is some blue sky and sunshine. also a fair bit of cloud around, this is the picture in parkhead, midlothian, taken a few hours ago by one of our weather watchers. as we head through the rest of the afternoon, a few scattered showers around. that's because low pressure is not far away sitting off towards the east at the moment. it is still influencing our weather. so, a day of sunshine and showers.
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into the evening hours, some of those heavy showers across england and wales and eastern scotland will tend to ease away. so most places becoming dry overnight. a bit more cloud across northern and western parts of the uk and temperatures between about 12—14 degrees first thing tomorrow. friday brings us another day of sunshine and showers. but i think most of the showers will be focused in the east, and they could be quite slow moving, heavy, potentially thundery, with some flash flooding and some hail. parts of eastern england and eastern scotland in particular during the afternoon. sunny spells elsewhere and temperatures around 15—23 degrees. more showers into the south—west, though, later in the day. bye— bye. hello, this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. nearly 26 million people
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tuned in to watch, in homes and pubs around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. renewed calls for recommendations to be implemented — a year after a scathing inquiry into three nhs scandals concluded that thousands of women came to "avoidable harm". the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set — to mark 60 years of the soap. while, back at the palace — you're invited to a picnic — we tour the gardens of buckingham palace as they're opened to the public for the summer. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. what from the bbc sport centre. might hugh be talking hello. we hello. we have hello. we have plenty hello. we have plenty on hello. we have plenty on our hello. we have plenty on our plates hello. we have plenty on our plates we have plent this hello. we have plenty on our plates this afternoon, stretching all the way into sunday evening. but first, just in the last hour, we have heard the tokyo olympic games will go
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ahead without spectators. organisers have confirmed. it comes after a state of emergency was put in place for the duration of the games later this month with the japanese government concerned about the rising cases of coronavirus in the country. overseas supporters were barred from travelling to the games in april — but there had been hope that a limited number of domestic fans could attend. the games organisers have apologised to those who have bought tickets. more on that as we get it throughout the course of the afternoon. there'll be two new women's finalists at wimbledon, whatever happens in this afternoons semi—finals. chetan pathak is watching the first of them. what's the latest? we have got ash barty taking on angelique kerberfirst we have got ash barty taking on angelique kerber first up, we have got ash barty taking on angelique kerberfirst up, arguably the most mouthwatering of both of the most mouthwatering of both of the women's semifinals here on thursday. angelique kerber is no stranger to reaching the wimbledon final, she did it in 2018. she is taking on partey, the world number one, perhaps the favourite for the
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title here, although she has never been to a wimbledon final. partey had the better of the first set even in the games when she was down on her serve, she managed to battle her way back into contention with that slicing and dicing, and angelique kerber was unable to find the lines like we have seen her do so many times at this championships so far. no one has spent longer on court in the women's draw than angelique kerber so far, just over eight and a half hours. think back to that three setter last week which was one of the matches of the tournament last week. kerber has found her form the matches of the tournament last week. kerber has found herform in the second set, forcing a few more partey errors, she was three having zero up in this, still a break—up as you can see. 4—2 now. —— ash barty has found her form. you can see. 4—2 now. —— ash barty has found herform. ash barty has more variety in her game than angelique kerber, but if angelique kerber is on its she can blow anyone away in tennis and ash barty will have to stay strong to get the job done here. ash barty is a set up but 4-2 done here. ash barty is a set up but 4—2 down in the second and whoever
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wins it will take on either karolina pliskova or aryna sabalenka, that's the second semifinal we have to look forward to. sabalenka has got over their grand slam hump she has had for quite some time, not able to get passed round four. she finally into a semifinal here. pliskova has been weaving really well, almost a forgotten woman in tennis and she won the us open a few years ago. she has really found herform here without dropping a set. that will be a fascinating semifinal as well. i want to update you with what is happening in the doubles action becausejoe salisbury is playing with his american partner rajeev ram. they are against the number one seeds on no one court, mektic and pavic. salisbury and ram lost the first set 7—6 and they look like they will be in trouble now they are 5-2 they will be in trouble now they are 5—2 down in the second set. just again on what is happening with the wheelchair singles, because that got under way today as well. we have seen alfie hewett who was going for his first singles title here go out,
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lost to the number fourjoachim gerard. against the 2019 champion aniek van koot, she hasjust won. there was against the 2019 champion aniek van koot, she has just won. there was a cheer of applause just before we came on air. the rain staying away and all those eyes on centre court, fixed on ash barty against angelique kerber right now which is live on the bbc now. yes indeed. thank you very much. england's footballers are back at their base in st george's park this afternoon after a historic night at wembley stadium. a 2—1victory over denmark has them in the final of euro 2020. their first at a major tournament since 1966. joe lynskey reports. singing # sweet caroline... # it has been 55 years but they never stop dreaming. the last time england reached
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a final it wasjuly 1966. through the decades there have been bleak nights and golden generations, now onlyjoy. the fans singing there. my emotions are all over the place. what a night and a fully deserved win. it is the work ethic and the determination from each and every one of us to help your mate out. it says a lot about this team. i am so proud. this group of players deserve what has happened to them. | they've been fantastic _ from when we met five weeks ago. in the end it was our night. harry kane's spot kick was one of his worst. it did not matter. how he finds ways to score is key to this team. and so is the man at the helm. throughout the match gareth southgate is calm and then at the end is the release. he is a thinker and he listens and takes things on board. he has a ruthless streak
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which you have to have as a manager and it is the toughest manager's job in the world. it is great to see him enjoy the success because he really deserves it. and england are out of the world cup! england's semifinal woes are over but there is one more hurdle. italy last beat them in the knockouts at euro 2012. the are on extraordinary form. they are superb opposition, the italians. they have not lost in 33 games. whatever standard of football you play, that is impressive. they, like england, have great togetherness. they have two giants of defenders, and they will have to be wary of them. it is a tough one to call. on the pitch and understand there were personal moments. mason mount gave his shirt away and calvin phillips put on a new one for his gran who died in february. many have had a year like him but after so long in the silence,
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the noise is back in our country brought together by football. there is one more to go. joe lynskey, bbc news. england have new—look side for the first of the three one day internationals against pakistan in cardiff. but they still had an instant impact. saqib mahmood took a wicket with the first ball of the innings and he's since taken two more after stand in captain ben stokes won the toss and decided to bowl first. pakistan had rebuilt slightly after falling to 26—4. but have just lost another wicket. they have lost a couple of wickets. they have lost a couple of wickets. the current score is 90—6 from cardiff. that's all the sport for now. thank you. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan but the uk will keep a small presence in kabul. it comes as britain's most senior general has warned that afghanistan could slide into civil war, once foreign are troops out of the country. mrjohnson said the uk was not turning its back on afghanistan. i hope that no one will leap
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to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away, nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. let's talk now to jack cummings, who was serving with the armed forces in afghanistan as a bomb disposal specialist when an ied exploded, causing him to lose both of his legs. jack, thank you forjoining us. life changing horrific injuries that you sustained. tell us a little bit about your time in afghanistan. sure, thank you for having me. i deployed on two tours to afghanistan, my first tour was in winter 2007 and second was in summer of 2010, i was part of the bomb disposal search team, the royal engineers, myjob was to go out before everyone else and clear the roots for everyone and look for improvised explosive devices, or bombs. unfortunately for me i had a
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bad day at the office on my second tour and ifound a bad day at the office on my second tourand ifound a bomb, iwent bang, spent a month in a coma, five months in hospital and three and a half years of rehabilitation. i lost both my legs above my knee, injuries to my hand, internal bleeding, i could go on and bore you but i'm alive and that's the main thing, i'm here and trying to make the most of it. i here and trying to make the most of it. s, �* ~ here and trying to make the most of it. i don't think anybody would ever think that kind — it. i don't think anybody would ever think that kind of _ it. i don't think anybody would ever think that kind of sacrifice - it. i don't think anybody would ever think that kind of sacrifice was - think that kind of sacrifice was boring to listen to. most people don't have that sort of story to tell and don't make that sort of commitment to a country they have very little to do with. what was afghanistan like then compared to what you believe it to be like now? i only went to helmand province and the difference we found on the bomb disposal site, the first tour in 2007, the bombs were big but the threat then wasn't really the improvised explosive device bombs, it was more towards 2009—10 when the
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focus switched to bombs on the ground that were laid and then they went off and forgot about them, even more so with the opening of the p°ppy more so with the opening of the poppy season, it was even more kinetic. a lot of the guys in my regiment left after that tour because of what happened. they'd had enough and it has totally changed them, it totally changed me. i think more so with me being a physical injury, i kind of moved on straightaway. job done, i moved on, i haven't got the mental health side of things but i'm more worried about the guys who are struggling with the mental health side of things, to ptsd. i really do hope they get help and seeing in the news we are pulling out of afghanistan, hopefully we have not left in vein with all the guys and girls we lost out there. you see some horrific injuries. hopefully, i'd say come as
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squaddies we have a real sense of humour, it is a shocking sense of humour, it is a shocking sense of humour, even more so with the injury side, people taking the mick out of single amputees saying it is a flesh wound. i miss that but at the same time you see it and think, this guy has lost both legs and an arm and cracking on with life so why can't i make the most of life? it is humbling — make the most of life? it is humbling to _ make the most of life? it is humbling to hear— make the most of life? it is humbling to hear you - make the most of life? it is humbling to hear you speak like this and that sense of humour is an extraordinary way of people coping. when you hear british troops have withdrawn pretty much fully from afghanistan, what is your view? i’m afghanistan, what is your view? i'm a little bit afghanistan, what is your view? in a little bit disappointed. to me it is not a job done. i don't know if we would ever have got the job done but i don't think it was a job done. we lost two great guys on my summer tour and to me it seems like they have lost their lives in vain. kp was a number two. to me, pulling out
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its bad to their memory, especially all the other guys and girls that got injured as well. obviously it has gone way above our pay grade. somebody above us, it does nothing to do with us, we cannot influence that, but my personal view is... don't get me wrong, i've moved on and i'm trying to make the most of my life, i'm positive and happy to be here etc. but deep down a bit disappointed that we are pulling out. �* , ., disappointed that we are pulling out. �* , . ., s, disappointed that we are pulling out. , . ., s, , out. i'm sure a lot of people listening _ out. i'm sure a lot of people listening to _ out. i'm sure a lot of people listening to you _ out. i'm sure a lot of people listening to you could - out. i'm sure a lot of people - listening to you could understand that. jack cummings, thank you for talking to us. that. jack cummings, thank you for talking to us— that. jack cummings, thank you for talking to us._ a - that. jack cummings, thank you for talking to us._ a rare - talking to us. thank you. a rare drawin: talking to us. thank you. a rare drawing by _ talking to us. thank you. a rare drawing by leonardo _ talking to us. thank you. a rare drawing by leonardo da - talking to us. thank you. a rare drawing by leonardo da vinci i talking to us. thank you. a rare drawing by leonardo da vinci is| talking to us. thank you. a rare i drawing by leonardo da vinci is up for sale at christies in london today. the �*head of a bear�* drawing
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is one of less than eight by leonardo still in private hands outside of the british royal collection. it is expected to sell for £12 million. i it is expected to sell for £12 million. ., f it is expected to sell for £12 million. ., j , million. i run that they're being told off in _ million. i run that they're being told off in art _ million. i run that they're being told off in art class _ million. i run that they're being told off in art class when - million. i run that they're being told off in art class when i - million. i run that they're being told off in art class when i drew something that small! it could be priceless in 500 years time! tbs, lat priceless in 500 years time! a lot of auctions _ priceless in 500 years time! a lot of auctions are _ priceless in 500 years time! a lot of auctions are doing _ priceless in 500 years time! a lot of auctions are doing very - priceless in 500 years time! a lot of auctions are doing very good business. sorry, i've not said, this is ramzan karmali, our business editor. we got carried away with leonardo da vinci! auction sales in the first half of this year are auction sales in the first half of this yearare up auction sales in the first half of this year are up 230%, more than tripled. amongst the three biggest houses, sotheby�*s, christies and philips, sales hit over £4 billion. don't forget, i say tripled, but you compare last year and obviously things were massively affected. £4 billion is a massive amount of money. it is but that figure is closer to what they were doing in 2019, so we're back to pre—pandemic levels in
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the auction houses. this picture is very rare. it is 500 years old. but we want to know what makes it so special. let's speak now to stijn alsteen who's from christie's. why do you think this could hit the £12 million mark today? it’s why do you think this could hit the £12 million mark today?— £12 million mark today? it's quite eas to £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see _ £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see that _ £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see that it _ £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see that it is _ £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see that it is just - £12 million mark today? it's quite easy to see that it isjust a - easy to see that it is just a wonderful drawing. it is by one of the most appealing artists in the world. it is quite early, 14 80s, and it represents a ground—breaking moment in leonardo's career but in european art in general. here we have an artist who is not relying on formulas from the past, but really looking at this animal, a bear in this case, trying to capture every detail, the whole structure of the head as best he can. it is a
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masterful demonstration, notjust of his artistic skills, but also of his powers of observation, of his scientific mind, of his desire to grasp, and to understand the world around. , , �* ., , grasp, and to understand the world around. , ,�* ., i, . around. this isn't the only small drawin: around. this isn't the only small drawing that _ around. this isn't the only small drawing that is _ around. this isn't the only small drawing that is out _ around. this isn't the only small drawing that is out there - around. this isn't the only small drawing that is out there as - around. this isn't the only small| drawing that is out there as well. do you envisage more drawings like this coming to auction in the near future? i this coming to auction in the near future? ., , ~ ., s, future? i only know of eight drawings — future? i only know of eight drawings in _ future? i only know of eight drawings in private - future? i only know of eight drawings in private hands i future? i only know of eight | drawings in private hands by leonardo, of which this one is one. most of these will almost certainly end up in museums. one certainly will end up in the metropolitan museum which already owns half of it. and most of the others i think won't be sold by their owners either but rather given to an institution. as i said, i only see three that are likely to come up on the market, of which this one is one. and arguably one, orthe which this one is one. and arguably one, or the most beautiful one. i one, orthe most beautiful one. i have read this was originally sold
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to christies in 1864 to pounds 50 p. together with another drawing. those were very different times. drawings were very different times. drawings were probably not as valued as they are today —— £2 50 p. not in financial terms. there were more drawings sold in 1860 with a group of drawings from tom lawrence's collection, the british portraitist and president of the royal academy, and president of the royal academy, and he had about 20 or 25 drawings, so there were more drawings around. the rarity wasn't as great as it is today. the rarity wasn't as great as it is toda . ,, ~ , the rarity wasn't as great as it is toda . ,, �* , ., , , today. sti'n alsteen from christies, thanks today. stijn alsteen from christies, thanks for your _ today. stijn alsteen from christies, thanks for your time. _ today. stijn alsteen from christies, thanks for your time. thank - today. stijn alsteen from christies, thanks for your time. thank you. i today. stijn alsteen from christies, i thanks for your time. thank you. the auction is in — thanks for your time. thank you. the auction is in a _ thanks for your time. thank you. the auction is in a few— thanks for your time. thank you. the auction is in a few hours' _ thanks for your time. thank you. the auction is in a few hours' time. - auction is in a few hours' time. i don't know why you are telling me! you are more likely to have a spare 12 million then i am, let's be honest! marginally more likely. thank you, see you later. more than 60,000 fans were allowed into wembley stadium for the match. which match, you ask, the one last
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night! and millions who couldn't make it to london packed out pubs, fanzones and living rooms across the country — as simon jones reports: cheering pure joy on the streets of london. accompanied by more than just a little relief. even if getting home after the match wasn't proving easy. cheering in newcastle, the final whistle signalled confirmation that england had made the final. and in preston, a familiar refrain. # it's coming home # it's coming # football's coming home.# it means the world to me, the world. the absolute world to me. # it's coming home!# what a team, though. the team spirit. i they're everything. they believed it and they never gave in, did they? _ in croydon, celebrations as the goals went in,
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followed by a party that went on long into the night and fans already looking forward to sunday and that clash with italy. we're in a final, england are in a final for the first time in who cares how many years? there is a sense that last night's win is what the country has been crying out for. who'd have thought this six months ago in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic? this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. this is a team that has caught the country's imagination. one of its biggest stars, mason mount, even found time to give his shirt to an adoring fan. and praise too from the prime minister. it was just euphoric, absolutely extraordinary. so i congratulate gareth southgate and the whole team. i thought they were stunning. and obviously wishing them all the best for sunday. and this morning at raheem sterling's former primary school in the shadow of wembley,
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despite the late night, the potential stars of the future were feeling inspired. he's a role model. his work ethic is amazing. even in the 117th minute, he was running down players, making them tired, you know? he's just that sort of player. he never gives up. spare a thought for the danish fans. their side gave so much but it wasn't enough. one family from copenhagen with a danish mum and an english dad held a party with mixed emotions. i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country. so i was hoping for the danish win. but i wasn't angry at the english team. they played well. and it was nice also, if we had only been danish people in the house it would have been, hm, but it was happy to see the other guys happy, so it was a party anyway.
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and this was england's moment, something to savour before the players and the fans do it all again in just three days' time. simon jones, bbc news. olly foster is at the england training ground in staffordshire where we've just seen the england team training. what is the atmosphere amongst them? they want to celebrate but they have a job to do. they have. ijust grabbed a quick they have. i 'ust grabbed a quick word with they have. ijust grabbed a quick word with steve _ they have. ijust grabbed a quick word with steve holland, - they have. ijust grabbed a quick word with steve holland, gareth | word with steve holland, gareth southgate's assistant, and he said it is fantastic being back here because of that hullabaloo. that cauldron of wembley was fantastic, and atmosphere i don't think i've ever experienced something like it in the stadium last night. they say it is fantastic to get back here in the rolling staffordshire countryside so they can fully focus, push the reset button. it is such a tight turnaround. they have only got two full days training. it was just
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a light training session for those that didn't start. the starting 11, harry harry kane, harry maguire, jordan pickford, they were behind closed doors resting and recovering. jordan henderson and jack grealish we come off the bench are having their own fitness programme. there were 13 out there today. it was a really good 15 minutes. we were only allowed to watch the first 15 minutes but they were at it from the off. it made you realise how important the training session was for the 13 players who didn't start in the semifinal because how hard will they be pushing to start in what is going to be the most important game that these players will have played in? how often have we been talking about 55 years ago since 1966? all those failed the semifinals. but now this generation, where so many others have failed, have the opportunity to turn out in a major championship final. so this training session today for those that didn't start against denmark, itjust that didn't start against denmark, it just looks very that didn't start against denmark, itjust looks very intense from the
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off, the likes of phil foden, jadon sancho who have been used in parts during this championship, they will be pushing for one of those forward line places alongside harry kane and raheem sterling who are shoe ins for the final against italy. it will be fascinating to see what the team is in three days from now. but also the work that goes behind the scenes now from gareth southgate. they will all have watched the italy match is over the past few weeks but now they really dig down and analyse roberto mancini's team and work out how they can beat them. fill? mancini's team and work out how they can beat them-— can beat them. olly foster, thank ou ve can beat them. olly foster, thank you very much. — can beat them. olly foster, thank you very much. at _ can beat them. olly foster, thank you very much, at the _ can beat them. olly foster, thank you very much, at the england i you very much, at the england training ground. the prime minister has been criticised for not fully explain the arrangements for his holiday to the caribbean island of mustique. though he has been cleared of breaking the mps code of conduct. an investigation by the mps standards watchdog said it was regrettable that full details of who funded the trip hadn't been provided long ago. but the standards committee
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concluded that the founder of carphone warehouse, david ross, had donated £15,000 of accommodation, so the prime minister's register entry is now accurate and complete. now, who would you expect to bump into at the rovers return? applause. the queen has made a visit to the set of coronation street and met the cast and crew of the itv soap. her majesty walked down weatherfield's famous cobbled streets but on a red carpet — in fact it's the second time she's visited them. herjourney to the region will also see her visit manchester cathedral. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. good afternoon. we're heading towards the middle of the summer now and the weather seems to be stuck in a bit of a pattern of sunshine and showers at the moment. but we have got some blue sky and some sunshine out there. this is the picture in gravesend in kent, taken recently by one of our weather watchers. the shower cloud is building through the remainder of the day, and in fact, over the next few days,
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we are going to keep that theme. sunny spells and scattered showers. low pressure not far away. it's sitting off to the east. we got a ridge of slightly higher pressure trying to build in and squeeze away those showers, but certainly through the rest of the afternoon, into the evening, parts of england and wales, particularly towards the east, will see a few of those scattered showers. at wimbledon, i think most of them should stay towards the north so temperatures around about 22 celsius or so as we head through the early evening, and it should stay dry. just an outside chance of a passing shower. a few heavy showers, too, for eastern scotland for a time. they should largely fade away, most places are becoming dry with clear spells tonight and temperatures down to between 12—14 celsius. a little bit of showery rain into the far south—west first thing friday morning. it will be cloudier across western and northern parts of the uk tomorrow with a few spots of drizzly rain. central and eastern parts of england tending to brighten up with sunny spells, but similar to recent days, we are going to see those afternoon showers bubbling up, and they could be quite slow moving and heavy per parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. there is a small risk of some localised flooding around because the showers are not moving
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through in a hurry. and pollen levels are also going to be high or very high across much of england, wales, southern scotland, northern ireland, too. just moderate across central and northern scotland. but into friday evening, still some of these really heavy showers with thunder, lightning and hail across eastern areas. they will slowly fade away overnight on friday and into the weekend as well. butjust in time for the weekend, this next area of low pressure arrives from the south—west. it looks like that's going to affect southern parts of england and wales initially on a saturday. quite heavy, persistent rain, too. slowly clearing eastwards. then we are left with another day of sunshine and hit and miss heavy, scattered downpours as well. most likely across parts of eastern scotland, eastern england, too. but we will see some of them cropping up further west later in the day. probably a little bit drier for northern ireland, and temperatures generally down a notch on recent days, perhaps into the low 20s. it remains unsettled. more rain towards the north on sunday. and further showers into the new working week. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. as one of the world's most vaccinated countries, we must use these advantages to restore many of the freedoms that have been lost over recent months. kane is there to follow in! england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days. you know, we're here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet, and we know we've got everybody with us.
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nearly 26 million people tuned in to watch, in homes and pubs around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. the olympic games injapan are to be held without spectators due to rising cases of coronavirus. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set — to mark 60 years of the soap. good afternoon. people in england who've had both doses of a covid vaccine will be allowed to travel to amber list countries without needing to quarantine when they return. the transport secretary grant shapps has told the commons that the changes will take effect on july 19th. the other nations are yet to comment
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if they will follow england. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. one jab, two jabs, no jab — for the last few months it has made no difference to the rules you have to follow when you travel from another country to the uk. that depends on the traffic light system and whether the country you are coming from is green, amber or red, but things are about to change. from the 19th ofjuly, anyone fully vaccinated does not need to quarantine when they travel from amber list countries to england but they will still need to take a test before they travel and another pcr test on arrival. under 18s won't need to quarantine at all. under—4s will not need to take any test. 5-11 5—11 will take a pcr test after they arrive. 11—17—year—olds will need to take a predeparture test and a pcr test. for now, this is only open to those jabbed in the uk. it is notjust of course about holidays, eager as we are, i'm sure, for time in the sunshine,
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but this is also about reuniting families who have been apart throughout this pandemic. it's about helping businesses to trade and grow and it's about supporting aviation, a sector which hundreds of thousands ofjobs rely on. at the moment, most countries in the world are on the amber list including spain, greece and the usa, and the industry is hoping bookings will now go up for summer trips. i think it's a huge step in the right direction and perfect timing for all of those people who booked a holiday in 2019 and could not take it in 2020 and had it transferred to this year and have been sitting there with their fingers crossed. but it is not the news some were hoping for. melanie lives in california and has not seen her daughter since she left for drama school in london. before christmas, melanie's husband died and her daughter could not come back for herfather�*s died and her daughter could not come back for her father's funeral. melanie cannot quarantine because of her work and because she has been vaccinated
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in the us, for now, she is not included in this policy. it's just heartbreaking. sorry. everything keeps being road blocked in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules were changed? it would mean everything. i miss her so much. we're best friends. it's like missing my right arm, you know, it's very difficult. i want to see her more than anything. the government has said it will look at whether it is possible to phase in people jabbed in other countries over the summer. some are still urging caution about opening up. we can open travel but we have to have the right safety measures in place, such as a good testing regime, to capture people who bring the virus back from their holidays, with other souvenirs. this is about what happens when entering the uk, whether other countries will let uk travellers in is a different matter. the new policy will change international travel this summer
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but there will also be questions about what happens to all of those people who are not fully vaccinated, who may feel left behind. caroline davies, bbc news. and we'll have a lot more on these changes at 3:30 when we'll be putting your questions to the sun's travel editor, lisa minot, and the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. do send in your questions using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the wait is finally over, and england fans are daring to dream — after a dramatic extra time 2—1win against denmark in the semi finals of the euros. the crucial goal was scored by captain, harry kane, after the ball rebounded from his missed penalty. more than 25 million people watched the action on tv, making it one of the most watched broadcasts in the last decade. england now face italy at wembley on sunday — in their first major men's final since 1966. but celebrations have been slightly marred today
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as football's european governing body, uefa, has opened disciplinary proceedings against england after a fan shone a laser pen towards the denmark goalkeeper during a critical moment. our sports correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game. # sweet caroline... a night for heroes and for history. sweet caroline has surely never sounded sweeter. at last, a majorfinal beckons for england and whether it was the players on the pitch, or the supporters, the emotion and the elation were plain to see. coming home! oh, it's fantastic. i'm amazed, i neverthought they would get this far. - it's coming home! i can't believe it. but earlier, what nerve shredding tension as england's optimism was soon silenced. mikkel damsgaard brilliantly putting denmark in front.
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but soon england were level. england had to hit back quickly. that is what england have done. but the fans could only watch and hope as it went into extra time. finally, though, this challenge on raheem sterling, was it a penalty? crucially, the referee thought so and up stepped harry kane. schmeichel saves... kane is there to follow in! delight for england although not without further controversy. replays suggested a laser pen had been pointed from the stands at kasper schmeichel but after 55 years of english heartache, this was a night and a result which meant everything. amazing night for this country, for the players, the staff. our first final at a european championship and to be at wembley, it's a real special occasion. credit to the boys, we dug deep, got the job done but let's recover well
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and get ready for the next one. it's very much the morning after the night before here at wembley but come sunday, the fans will be back in their thousands hoping to see england take one final step to greatness. even their manager, normally so calm and composed, was showing his passion last night. gareth southgate has united players and supporters on what has already been some journey. he's given everyone a bit of hope, something to cling on to. cos it has been such a difficult 18 months for everyone and whatever happens on sunday, and we all have our fingers crossed that england can go and win this, but whatever happens he should feel very, very proud. and just in case you'd forgotten, not since the 1966 world cup have england won a major trophy, but decades of disappointment have now been replaced by hope. this is for the next generation now. any young people watching this, tune in and enjoy it and fingers crossed,
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we can do it. but this is a very good italian team, make no mistake, but we have the ability to beat them. so now only italy stand between england and that elusive glory. football is coming home, they say. well, it has never been closer. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. more than 60,000 fans were allowed into wembley stadium for the match. and millions who couldn't make it to london packed out pubs, fanzones and living rooms across the country — as simon jones reports. wild cheering pure joy on the streets of london. accompanied by more than just a little relief. even if getting home after the match wasn't proving easy. cheering. in newcastle, the final whistle signalled confirmation that england had made the final. and in preston, a familiar refrain.
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# football's coming home.# it means the world to me, the world. the absolute world to me. # it's coming home!# what a team, though. the team spirit. they're everything. they believed it and they never gave in, did they? in croydon, celebrations as the goals went in, followed by a party that went on long into the night and fans already looking forward to sunday and that clash with italy. we're in a final, england in a final for the first time in, who cares how many years? there is a sense that last night's win is what the country has been crying out for. who'd have thought this six months ago in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic? this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. this is a team that has caught
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the country's imagination. one of its biggest stars, mason mount, even found time to give his shirt to an adoring fan. praise, too, from the prime minister. it was just euphoric, absolutely extraordinary. so i congratulate gareth southgate and the whole team. i thought they were stunning. and, obviously, wishing them all the best for sunday. and this morning at raheem sterling's former primary school in the shadow of wembley, despite the late night, the potential stars of the future were feeling inspired. he's a role model. his work ethic is amazing. even in the 117th minute, he was running down players, making them tired, you know? he's just that sort of player. he never gives up. spare a thought for the danish fans. their side gave so much but it wasn't enough. one family from copenhagen
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with a danish mum and an english dad held a party with mixed emotions. i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country. so i was hoping for the danish win. but i wasn't angry at the english team. they played well. and it was nice also, if we had only been danish people in the house it would have been, hm, but it was happy to see the other guys happy, so it was a party anyway. and this was england's moment, something to savour before the players and the fans do it all again in just three days' time. simon jones, bbc news. let's look ahead to sunday's match with the football broadcaster and writer, mina rzouki. thanks forjoining us. what did you think of the performance of both sides last night? it think of the performance of both sides last night?— think of the performance of both sides last night? it was interesting because in the _ sides last night? it was interesting because in the first _ sides last night? it was interesting
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because in the first half _ sides last night? it was interesting because in the first half denmark. because in the first half denmark were rather fabulous, because in the first half denmark were ratherfabulous, at because in the first half denmark were rather fabulous, at least because in the first half denmark were ratherfabulous, at least on the defensive level, they stayed compact and they shut down england and england were pushed deep into their own half trying to defend, but everything changed in the second half and england found their rhythm and confidence and they put in a tremendous performance. raheem sterling has been the man of the tournament for england. every time he runs at players, he creates so many problems for the opposition, and i think once again he did a lot of that, adding a vertical edge to the team, and they were tremendous. on a mental level, on a technical level and on a tactical level, so credit to southgate.— level and on a tactical level, so credit to southgate. how different are ital credit to southgate. how different are italy going _ credit to southgate. how different are italy going to _ credit to southgate. how different are italy going to be _ credit to southgate. how different are italy going to be as _ credit to southgate. how different are italy going to be as the - are italy going to be as the opposition?— are italy going to be as the opposition? italy will be the tou . hest opposition? italy will be the toughest test _ opposition? italy will be the toughest test for _ opposition? italy will be the toughest test for england i opposition? italy will be the j toughest test for england to opposition? italy will be the - toughest test for england to face on sunday and it will also be the toughest test for italy. this is a
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squad that was deemed a tournament too early for many of these youngsters. roberto mancini has done wonders for this site, creating a revolution and a tactically adept team with young players, but various older veterans in there to add the leadership required with the likes of chiellini. on a tactical level i think maybe roberto mancini might be better but in terms of stars, raheem sterling is very scary and harry kane is the man you want your chances to fall to. on this level it is 50-50 chances to fall to. on this level it is 50—50 and i think both sides are happy to be there but they are also both desperate for the trophy. yes. both desperate for the trophy. yes, millions of fans _ both desperate for the trophy. yes, millions of fans in _ both desperate for the trophy. yes, millions of fans in both _ both desperate for the trophy. yes, millions of fans in both countries wanting it for the trophy cupboard. how much do you think southgate will change his team from last night? this is the thing that will be so
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interesting, because there won't be a team that will look to defend and both have very strong defences, england have conceded one goal against denmark and for italy, it is part of their ideology and their philosophy, they will also be a tumour that is defensively capable, so both of them will look to show how good an tactical day are —— they will also be a team that is defensively capable. but there will always be a level of caution, southgate and he will always play the two in front defence but i do think you will see the usual candidates like saka, and then on the bench the likes of phil foden and jack grealish can make a difference. italy do not have spinner zola and so i wonder if they
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are on a tactical level at their best to penetrate the english defence. ., :: :: ,, defence. you said 50-50 so i think that will have _ defence. you said 50-50 so i think that will have to _ defence. you said 50-50 so i think that will have to do _ defence. you said 50-50 so i think that will have to do for _ defence. you said 50-50 so i think that will have to do for a _ that will have to do for a prediction! race—macro. the headlines on bbc news. no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. nearly 26 million people tuned in to watch, in homes and pubs around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. when the tokyo olympics begin in two weeks, there'll be no fans in the stands — making it the first games to take place behind closed doors. the organisers' announcement follows the japanese government's
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decision to declare a fourth state of emergency for the capital due to rising coronavirus infections. the extra restrictions will run from the 12th ofjuly and remain in place until the 22nd of august. let's talk to our tokyo correspondent mariko oi, who has more on this. they said it was a difficult decision and one they did not make lightly. the decision and one they did not make lithtl . . , ., decision and one they did not make lithtl. ._, s, s, decision and one they did not make lithtl. . s, s, . ., lightly. the decision not to allow an fans lightly. the decision not to allow any fans into _ lightly. the decision not to allow any fans into the _ lightly. the decision not to allow any fans into the stadiums - lightly. the decision not to allow any fans into the stadiums was l any fans into the stadiums was somewhat expected after the latest state of emergency was announced because you can't exactly ask people not to go out and still say, oh, but you can still go and watch the olympics, especially when the state of emergency means that restaurants and bars are not to serve any alcohol and department stores are asked to close early and that decision faced a lot of opposition from those businesses, saying it has a devastating impact on their financial performance, while it has
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somewhat limited impact on controlling the pandemic, according to them. but for the government, they were concerned with people going to watch some competitions and going to watch some competitions and going out for a few beers, basically increasing the number of people out and about, possibly leading to a growing number of new infections, especially of the delta variant of covid—19 and so that is why they have made the decision, to declare the state of emergency and also do not allow any fans into the stadiums. not allow any fans into the stadiums-— not allow any fans into the stadiums. . , , . stadiums. that is the stadium in to 0 but stadiums. that is the stadium in tokyo but what _ stadiums. that is the stadium in tokyo but what about _ stadiums. that is the stadium in tokyo but what about other - stadiums. that is the stadium in i tokyo but what about other venues outside the capital, are they also affected? , ,. , . affected? they were saying that the ones that were _ affected? they were saying that the ones that were outside _ affected? they were saying that the ones that were outside of _ affected? they were saying that the ones that were outside of tokyo, i ones that were outside of tokyo, because of the heat concerns they are holding a marathon in other events in the northern ireland of
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hokkaido —— in the northern island. they have not made an official announcement ofjust they have not made an official announcement of just yet, they have not made an official announcement ofjust yet, and as for the tokyo games, no fans will be allowed, and that basically means the japanese government has spent $25 billion in preparation for the olympics and yet they will see basically an empty stadium in that brand—new stadium and also see pretty much no financial benefits from tourism because we are not allowing any overseas visitors in and also ticket sales, which they were expecting from at least those domestic spectators. for were expecting from at least those domestic spectators.— were expecting from at least those domestic spectators. for the moment, thanks forjoining _ domestic spectators. for the moment, thanks forjoining us. _ the number of people in england waiting for routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. 5.3 million people were waiting to start treatment at the end of may 2021, according to figures from nhs england. this is the highest number since records began in august 2007. a total of 207,188 urgent cancer referrals were made by gps in england in may, nearly double the number in may
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last year. and nearly 300,000 patients in england had been waiting more than six weeks for a key diagnostic test in may. our health correspondent, katherine da costa, has been giving us more details. yes, planned operations have been badly affected as hospitals have rapidly had to expand capacity to deal with a surge in covid patients, but there is some good news for waiting lists. the number of patients waiting more than a year fell by 50,000 for the second month in a row, but there are still more than 330,000 patients waiting more than 52 weeks — compare that to 1,600 who were waiting that long before the start of the pandemic. now, nhs staff are working flat out to clear the backlog. at the same time, they're seeing very busy a&e departments. overall, units are seeing as many patients as they did before the pandemic. more than 2.1 million
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patients visited injune, similar to levels seen injune 2019. major a&e units recorded the busiest month on record, and nhs england has urged people to call 111 first so that they get the right service. now, the vaccine roll—out means not as many people are being admitted to hospital with covid in this wave, but nhs providers, which represents hospital bosses, has warned the rising infection rate, which is predicted could reach 100,000 cases a day, could slow efforts to tackle the backlog. the organisation says a combination of more staff needing to self—isolate, the need for annual leave and more beds being taken out for covid patients means real challenges for the health service. the latest weekly figures from the department of health show there has been a surge in the number of alerts sent out by the nhs covid—19 contact tracing app. in the week ending 30thjune,
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the app sent out over 356,000 alerts telling users to go into isolation — that compares with around 219,000 the previous week. the alerts were triggered by nearly 61,000 positive tests entered in the app. the labour leader keir starmer — who is visiting northern ireland — has accused the prime minister of treating people as "fools" over brexit trade arrangements. sir keir said the prime minister had "not been straight about the consequences" of the northern ireland protocol. he has been talking to our correspondent emma vardy. well, i think the starting point is to recognise that the prime minister negotiated this protocol, he wasn't straight about what it meant and is now pretending it's somebody else's problem. and he's trying to take people in northern ireland as fools and they're not. and everybody here knows exactly what the problems are.
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we need to find a solution, practical solution. there are two things about the practical solution that matter. the first is, what is the solution? i think a veterinary agreement would be a big step in the right direction. but more important than that is trust. if we are to find a way forward, there has to be trust. and trust is the word that's come out of all the discussions i've had here in northern ireland. you say we need a veterinary agreement. the kind of veterinary agreement that the eu wants would do away with around 80% of those checks over the irish sea border but that would require the uk to be aligned with lots of eu rules on food. the uk government says it doesn't want to be bound to the eu in this way, it needs to be freed up, it will inhibit its ability to do trade deals with other countries. so how can you justify advocating an approach that keeps us bound to eu rules when many people will say they voted to break away from that? well, we have got to find a practical solution. we can't have this impasse. the prime minister said there would not be checks east—west and there are checks east—west, so we have to find a practical solution. a veterinary agreement could be one
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step in the right direction. there are other practical ways forward. there's going to have to be flexibility on both sides. but we should also make the bigger argument which is, it's in the interests of the united kingdom to have high standards. do you think the eu is showing enough flexibility? because unionist politicians in northern ireland say lots of goods coming from gb to northern ireland are staying in northern ireland, they are not entering the single market, so there is no need for a lot of those checks. do you think the eu is being too rigid? i think both sides have to be flexible here because we need to find a way forward. and i do think there is a practical way forward. in every meeting i've had here in northern ireland i've asked people, do you think there is a way forward on this? everybody thinks we can find a way. it does need flexibility on both sides. the eu need to be flexible, we need to be flexible, the missing ingredient is trust and the lack of trust, i'm afraid, is down to the prime minister. the chancellor says the government is looking at what he described as "a more balanced approach" to self—isolation. rishi sunak said he's aware of frustration among businesses about large numbers of employees
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having to stay at home after being pinged by the tracing app. he's also been talking about the triple lock on pensions. our economics editor faisal islam has been giving us more details. it's clear that businesses have expressed frustration over the increased number of staff who have had to isolate because of the contact from the app. this comes on top of existing severe staff shortages for other reasons and the chancellor has recognised that. he has talked to the health secretary about a change that could be made to the app, some sort of more balanced approach, as he put it, so that would have to come in pretty quickly, clearly there are cabinet level discussions about that. another consequence of the pandemic has been on the way in which the state pension is increased year to year. because it's got to track the highest of either prices, earnings or 2.5% under the triple lock policy, as a result of basically a distortion in the way in which earnings have been calculated during the pandemic,
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that's due to go up by 8% according to the office for budget responsibility, which would cost £3 billion. we've got the strongest hints this morning from the chancellor that in fact the way in which that triple lock works may be looked at again and we won't see that 8%. this is what the chancellor said this morning. i do recognise people's concerns on this, i think they are completely legitimate and fair concerns to raise and what i would say, when we look at this properly at the appropriate time, your word is the right word, fairness. that will be absolutely driving what we do and we want to make sure that the decisions we make and the systems we have are fair both for pensioners and for taxpayers. stressing fairness for taxpayers, which means that £3 billion bill, when you have other pressures, public sector pay, other parts of the budget, means they are looking at ways to make sure the £3 billion bill doesn't become a reality. faisal islam, there. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan but the uk will keep a small presence in kabul.
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it comes as britain's most senior general has warned that afghanistan could slide into civil war, once foreign troops are out of the country. mrjohnson said the uk was not turning its back on afghanistan. i hope that no one will leap to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away, nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. the prime minister has been criticised for not fully explaining the arrangements for his holiday to the caribbean island of mustique in 2019 — though he has been cleared of breaking the mps code of conduct. a investigation by the mps standards watchdog said it was regrettable that full details of who funded the trip hadn't been provided long ago. but the standards committee concluded that the founder of carphone warehouse, david ross, had donated £15,000 of accommodation,
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so the prime minister's register entry is now accurate and complete. now, who would you expect to bump into at the rovers return? applause the queen made a visit to the set of coronation street and met the cast and crew of the itv soap. her majesty walked down weatherfield's famous cobbled streets but on a red carpet — in fact, it's the second time she's visited them. herjourney to the region will also see her visit manchester cathedral. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. good afternoon. skies have been brightening so far today for many areas. there is some blue sky and sunshine. also a fair bit of cloud around, this is the picture in pathhead, midlothian, taken a few hours ago by one of our weather watchers. as we head through the rest of the afternoon, a few scattered showers around. that's because low pressure is not
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far away, sitting off towards the east at the moment. it is still influencing our weather. so, a day of sunshine and showers. into the evening hours, some of those heavy showers across england and wales and eastern scotland will tend to ease away. so most places becoming dry overnight. a bit more cloud across northern and western parts of the uk and temperatures between about 12—14 degrees first thing tomorrow. friday brings us another day of sunshine and showers. but i think most of the showers will be focused in the east, and they could be quite slow moving, heavy, potentially thundery, with some flash flooding and some hail. parts of eastern england and eastern scotland in particular during the afternoon. sunny spells elsewhere and temperatures around 15—23 degrees. more showers into the south—west, though, later in the day. bye— bye.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. england are into the first final of a major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. nearly 26 million people tuned in to watch, in homes and pubs around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. the olympic games injapan are to be held without spectators due to rising cases of coronavirus.
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the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set — to mark 60 years of the soap. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh ferris. good afternoon. world number one ashleigh barty is through to her first wimbledon final. she's beaten the 2018 winner angelique kerber in straight sets. after winning the first set 6—3 barty recovered from a break down to claim the second on the tie—break. it'll be the australian's second grand slam final after she won the 2019 french open. and she'll face the winner of the other semi—final between karolina pliskova and aryna sabalenka which isjust
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under way on centre court. you can watch it on bbc one. england's players are back at their base in st george's park this afternoon. and chance to refresh after what was a historic and late night. olly foster is there for us. gareth southgate and the team have to squeeze all the preparations for the biggest game of their lives into two and a half days. they got back about three o'clock this morning. that final will be upon them before they know it. the 11 that started against denmark, extra time and all that, they didn't train today, just some light recovery work behind closed doors. jordan henderson and jack grealish who came on are undergoing their own personal fitness programme. who came on are undergoing their own personalfitness programme. what we did see was the other 13 members of the squad including phil foden who we saw come off the bench, jadon sancho in there as well, and it soon became very apparent to us, even though obviously these are fringe players, you might say, it was very intense from the off. so important for those players to impress gareth southgate who was watching on
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intently as always, because what is at stake is getting into the final, which is by far the biggest match any of them will have played in. but yes, they will have a full training session together tomorrow behind closed doors and then saturday morning will be allowed to watch training again for the next 15 minutes —— we will be allowed to watch training again for the first 15 minutes on the eve of the european championships final. can ou european championships final. can you explain the disciplinary actions against some of the fans and indeed what happened last night in a number of different areas? can you explain what they have done?— of different areas? can you explain what they have done? these charges are actually brought _ what they have done? these charges are actually brought against - what they have done? these charges are actually brought against the - are actually brought against the english fa, england, forfailing, for the conduct of their own fans, firstly, the eye—catching one, no pun intended, somebody was using one of those laser pens shining it in the face of kasper schmeichel in the first period of extra time as he was trying to save that harry kane
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penalty. he did save it but obviously kane scored the winner from the rebound. there was boeing of the danish national anthem, charges have been brought against england for that. there was booing, i was there in the stadium, but there was far more booing in the germany match, i can tell you that, in the last 16. and also england fans set off some flares. three separate charges, they couldn't find the culprit behind the laser pen incident but all the charges are squared out england for the conduct of theirfans. squared out england for the conduct of their fans. fill? squared out england for the conduct of their fans-— of their fans. olly foster, at st georte's of their fans. olly foster, at st george's park, _ of their fans. olly foster, at st george's park, thank - of their fans. olly foster, at st george's park, thank you - of their fans. olly foster, at st george's park, thank you for i of their fans. olly foster, at st. george's park, thank you for now. the tokyo olympic games will take place without spectators. organisers have confirmed today. it comes after a state of emergency was put in place in tokyo for the duration of the games as the japanese government try to combat the rising cases of coronavirus in the country. overseas supporters were barred from travelling to the games in april — but there had been hope that a limited number of local fans could attend. organisers have apologised to those who have bought tickets.
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a decision on the paralympics will be made after the olympics. harlequins' premiership—winning number eight alex dombrandt is one of four players who will make his debut in england's match against canada on saturday. many of eddiejones�* first choice players are on tour with the british and irish lions. 12 players made theirfirst international appearance in sunday's win against usa. while lock harry wells, centre dan kelly and wing adam radwan are also winning theirfirst caps at twickenham this weekend. it might be a new—look side but england's bowlers have picked up where they left off in the one day series against pakistan. they dominated the matches with sri lanka. and despite positive covid tests in the camp leading to a completely fresh squad, they've had a good start against pakistan in cardiff. saqib mahmood took a wicket with the first ball of the innings. and then three more. pakistan have had only one significant partnership. even though that score says 140—9, i can tell you in the last couple of
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seconds pakistan have been bowled out for 141, england chasing 142. that's all of your support for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. next it's your questions answered. it is indeed, this is your questions answered. the transport secretary, grant shapps, has said that travellers who have had both doses of a covid vaccine will no longer need to quarantine when returning to england from an amber list country. the new rules will come into force on july the 19th, a week on monday. this afternoon we are answering your questions on this, with our two guests. simon calder, travel correspondent for the independent. also i'm joined by lisa minot, travel editor of the sun. you have gone to town with those flanks. so good have you, you have put simon to shame. it is looking
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bit spartan in the independent office! first of all, simon, janet jardine says my son, his wife and seven—year—old child hope to travel from poland to the uk in august. the adults are both double jabbed. is this going to be possible?- adults are both double jabbed. is this going to be possible? janet, i fear that if they _ this going to be possible? janet, i fear that if they were _ this going to be possible? janet, i fear that if they were jabbed - this going to be possible? janet, i fear that if they were jabbed in i this going to be possible? janet, i | fear that if they were jabbed in the eu, no, it's not going to be possible for them to swerve quarantine. it's a really unusual one. whereas most other countries around the world say we will accept proof from your health authority that you have been double jabbed and that you have been double jabbed and that will reduce the travel restrictions, the uk appears to be saying, we need to verify every single person who comes in using this amber list avoiding quarantine rule to be verified against the nhs database. and clearly, if they have been vaccinated in poland that isn't going to work. no doubt they will
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have the digital green covid pass the eu has done but that is getting exactly no points within the uk. the only timely variation is if you have been involved in an nhs vaccine trial here then you would be able to get the same benefit. but i'm afraid all they can do is wait. it is very unusual to say only british vaccines will do but that's exactly what they've done. of course, they can come over any time they want to and they werejust simply come over any time they want to and they were just simply have to self—isolate, although i think the seven—year—old will be able to go out and about. but obviously you'd need to look after him! yes. out and about. but obviously you'd need to look after him! yes, grandma comes to the — need to look after him! yes, grandma comes to the rescue _ need to look after him! yes, grandma comes to the rescue again, _ need to look after him! yes, grandma comes to the rescue again, probably! | comes to the rescue again, probably! probably not what she was hoping to hearin probably not what she was hoping to hear in full but some optimism. lisa, this is about vaccines. you and i have talked about this because you have been affected by this. what is being done to allow uk travellers who had an astrazeneca vaccine from the restricted batches from india to be able to travel in the eu? this is
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from robert in bournemouth. trite be able to travel in the eu? this is from robert in bournemouth. we are over a week — from robert in bournemouth. we are over a week since _ from robert in bournemouth. we are over a week since we _ from robert in bournemouth. we are over a week since we first _ from robert in bournemouth. we are over a week since we first heard - over a week since we first heard about— over a week since we first heard about this — over a week since we first heard about this particular three batches. ithink_ about this particular three batches. i think simon is also one of those who is— i think simon is also one of those who is affected. the department of health _ who is affected. the department of health and social care have said basically— health and social care have said basically it isn't a problem, we are confident— basically it isn't a problem, we are confident that because our batches have actually been named as the virus _ have actually been named as the virus approved —— vaccine approved by the _ virus approved —— vaccine approved by the european medicines agency they should be approved. however, malta _ they should be approved. however, malta have said they are not quite ready— malta have said they are not quite ready to _ malta have said they are not quite ready to accept that yet. what we do havei _ ready to accept that yet. what we do have, though, is ten eu countries including — have, though, is ten eu countries including greece, spain, ireland and switzerland who have all said they would _ switzerland who have all said they would recognise the indian made astrazeneca jab. it's one of those situations— astrazeneca jab. it's one of those situations where i think it hasn't quite _ situations where i think it hasn't quite been — situations where i think it hasn't quite been tested and it mayjust be an administrative thing that needs to be _ an administrative thing that needs to be sorted out. let's hope it is sorted _ to be sorted out. let's hope it is sorted out — to be sorted out. let's hope it is sorted out before july the 19th. how do we know — sorted out before july the 19th. how do we know when _ sorted out before july the 19th. firm-in do we know when it will be sorted out? is itjust a case of waiting and seeing who says what and when?
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exactly that. we have those ten that have said _ exactly that. we have those ten that have said they will do it and the likes— have said they will do it and the likes of— have said they will do it and the likes of greece and spain are places that obviously for most brits are going _ that obviously for most brits are going to — that obviously for most brits are going to be the ones they are most interested — going to be the ones they are most interested in this summer. but it is going _ interested in this summer. but it is going to _ interested in this summer. but it is going to be — interested in this summer. but it is going to be a case of wait and see. forbid, _ going to be a case of wait and see. forbid, we — going to be a case of wait and see. forbid, we mightjust have to try it. i forbid, we mightjust have to try it i really— forbid, we mightjust have to try it. i really want to go to france this year— it. i really want to go to france this year on— it. i really want to go to france this year on holiday, i'd like to go and see _ this year on holiday, i'd like to go and see my— this year on holiday, i'd like to go and see my caravan in the south of france _ and see my caravan in the south of france and — and see my caravan in the south of france and i— and see my caravan in the south of france and i might have to see what happens _ france and i might have to see what happens when i get to the border. that is— happens when i get to the border. that is a _ happens when i get to the border. that is a risk worth taking. simon, another view _ that is a risk worth taking. simon, another view asks _ that is a risk worth taking. simon, another view asks what _ that is a risk worth taking. simon, another view asks what the - another view asks what the regulations for an 11—year—old travelling with vaccinated parents are? very straightforward. the 11—year—old doesn't have to have any vaccinations. but he or she must have two tests. now this is getting really complicated. i hope i've remembered it right! so you would need to do, as an 11—year—old, the predeparture to the uk test, which will get you on the train, boat or plane to britain, and then you'd
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need to do a test on the day you arrive, or the following day, or the day after that. that is a pcr test. between them they are probably going to cost something like £100. if you were underfive, then to cost something like £100. if you were under five, then you skip the predeparture to the uk test. do pay attention, lisa, there is going to be a test later for these answers! let's remember everybody but this is only for england, arrivals to england. wales, scotland and northern ireland have not yet said what they think about this.- what they think about this. thank ou for what they think about this. thank you for the _ what they think about this. thank you for the reminder, _ what they think about this. thank you for the reminder, simon. - what they think about this. thank. you for the reminder, simon. lisa, patricia in partington says, can people with two jabs travel to the red list countries and avoid hotel quarantine. if not, why not? ida. red list countries and avoid hotel quarantine. if not, why not? no, at the moment— quarantine. if not, why not? no, at the moment they _ quarantine. if not, why not? no, at the moment they can't. _ quarantine. if not, why not? no, at the moment they can't. what - quarantine. if not, why not? no, at the moment they can't. what we i quarantine. if not, why not? no, at. the moment they can't. what we have basically— the moment they can't. what we have basically been told it is the green and amber list we are getting, no need _ and amber list we are getting, no need to— and amber list we are getting, no need to self—isolate on return. the red list _ need to self—isolate on return. the red list countries, it is still your ten days— red list countries, it is still your ten days in— red list countries, it is still your ten days in hotel quarantine at a
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cost of— ten days in hotel quarantine at a cost of £1750. why not? that's up to the government, unfortunately, to try to _ the government, unfortunately, to try to explain to us. we still have many— try to explain to us. we still have many people saying what other parameters the government are using to put— parameters the government are using to put a _ parameters the government are using to put a country onto any of the particular— to put a country onto any of the particular parts of our traffic light— particular parts of our traffic light system? we have had the likes of the _ light system? we have had the likes of the uae, dubai, saying, look, we have— of the uae, dubai, saying, look, we have fantastic vaccination rates, we have fantastic vaccination rates, we have fairly — have fantastic vaccination rates, we have fairly low case numbers, why are we _ have fairly low case numbers, why are we still— have fairly low case numbers, why are we still on the red list? the government have yet to explain why they are _ government have yet to explain why they are making some of these decisions _ they are making some of these decisions. ,, ., they are making some of these decisions. ,, s, . . they are making some of these decisions-— they are making some of these decisions. ,, s, . . s, . , decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says. — decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says. can _ decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says. can i — decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says, can i use _ decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says, can i use a _ decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says, can i use a proof- decisions. simon, jane from chapel green says, can i use a proof of- green says, can i use a proof of recovery rather than doubled vaccination to enter the uk without quarantine or testing?— quarantine or testing? again, lots of other countries _ quarantine or testing? again, lots of other countries are _ quarantine or testing? again, lots of other countries are doing - quarantine or testing? again, lots of other countries are doing this l of other countries are doing this and the digital covid certificate in the eu, yes, basically gives you three possible category areas. first of all, having beenjabbed, secondly having had a very recent test
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command 30 having recovered from covid—19. now, some countries around the world are still saying if you can provide proof then we will let you win. but for the uk it does not count. and just picking up, if i make a briefing on the reddest questionjust now, we have quite make a briefing on the reddest question just now, we have quite an exciting court case starting tomorrow, manchester airports group and lots of airlines are asking the government to reveal exactly how they make their decisions. itrite government to reveal exactly how they make their decisions. we will look out for _ they make their decisions. we will look out for that _ they make their decisions. we will look out for that for _ they make their decisions. we will look out for that for sure. - they make their decisions. we will look out for that for sure. lisa, i look out for that for sure. lisa, laura in philadelphia says, will i be able to travel from the us this summer to england to visit my family? summer to england to visit my famil ? . , summer to england to visit my famil? . my i, summer to england to visit my famil ? . _ , , summer to england to visit my famil ? . my , , family? technically, yes you can. the us is on _ family? technically, yes you can. the us is on our— family? technically, yes you can. the us is on our amber— family? technically, yes you can. the us is on our amber list. - family? technically, yes you can. | the us is on our amber list. there will be _ the us is on our amber list. there will be now — the us is on our amber list. there will be no... you can come over, it is on _ will be no... you can come over, it is on the _ will be no... you can come over, it is on the amber list... actually, not _ is on the amber list... actually, not thinking _ is on the amber list... actually, no, thinking myself here at the moment, — no, thinking myself here at the moment, i_ no, thinking myself here at the moment, i think perhaps it would be possible _ moment, i think perhaps it would be possible later in the summer. i'm maybe _ possible later in the summer. i'm maybe going to ask simon to come in
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here _ maybe going to ask simon to come in here. ,, ., maybe going to ask simon to come in here, ,, ., .,, maybe going to ask simon to come in here. ,, ., ., , here. simon has his finger in the air. it is here. simon has his finger in the air- it is so _ here. simon has his finger in the air. it is so confusing. _ here. simon has his finger in the air. it is so confusing. how- here. simon has his finger in the air. it is so confusing. how you l air. it is so confusing. how you keep any of it in your heads i really don't know. help us out. anybody can come into the uk from the us but you will have to go into ten days of isolation if you have been jabbed ten days of isolation if you have beenjabbed in ten days of isolation if you have been jabbed in the ten days of isolation if you have beenjabbed in the us, as mentioned before, that will not count for anything. the main problem is travelling in the opposite direction if you are not a us citizen or have residency in america than the presidential proclamation says we don't want you here. there are plenty of british people actually laundering their uk status in mexico as we speak on the beach are spending two weeks there before they move on to the us. 50 spending two weeks there before they move on to the us.— move on to the us. so that they can legitimately — move on to the us. so that they can legitimately go _ move on to the us. so that they can legitimately go in? _ move on to the us. so that they can legitimately go in? exactly, - move on to the us. so that they can legitimately go in? exactly, yes. - legitimately go in? exactly, yes. the same thing _ legitimately go in? exactly, yes. the same thing is _ legitimately go in? exactly, yes. the same thing is happening - legitimately go in? exactly, yes. l the same thing is happening here, lots of people are going to malta and turkey in places like that on the red list so they can spend ten days there before they come back to the uk. perfectly legitimate use of
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the uk. perfectly legitimate use of the rules. . .. the uk. perfectly legitimate use of the rules. . ,, the uk. perfectly legitimate use of the rules. . ~' , ., �* ., the rules. 0k, thank you. another one from henry — the rules. 0k, thank you. another one from henry in _ the rules. 0k, thank you. another one from henry in farnborough. i the rules. 0k, thank you. another - one from henry in farnborough. when will travel to african countries be eased? , .,, , ~' �* eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a nical eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a cynical person — eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a cynical person would _ eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a cynical person would say _ eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a cynical person would say that - eased? henry, gosh, iwish i knew. a cynical person would say that the - cynical person would say that the government seems to have it in for africa. it is so sad. there are fantastic countries like morocco which every indication i have seen it should be on the green list but it's not, it's on the amber list. a large part of south africa, a large part of africa, all the way from egyptin part of africa, all the way from egypt in the north to south africa taking in kenya and loads of southern african locations, they are all on the red list, and very sadly, as we have seen, getting off the red list is a real palaver and the government doesn't seem to be in any hurry to do that. this government doesn't seem to be in any hurry to do that-— hurry to do that. this viewer from birmingham _ hurry to do that. this viewer from birmingham asks, _ hurry to do that. this viewer from birmingham asks, my _ hurry to do that. this viewer from birmingham asks, my fiance - hurry to do that. this viewer from birmingham asks, my fiance is i birmingham asks, my fiance is waiting to come to the uk from india. will she be able to travel
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once she has been vaccinated? i think we have covered thisjust recently— think we have covered thisjust recently in that it is the fact that because — recently in that it is the fact that because the rules are it is uk citizens— because the rules are it is uk citizens who have had a jab in the uk that— citizens who have had a jab in the uk that can — citizens who have had a jab in the uk that can come in without requiring _ uk that can come in without requiring to do self—isolating. but india _ requiring to do self—isolating. but india is— requiring to do self—isolating. but india is a — requiring to do self—isolating. but india is a red list country as well, so at _ india is a red list country as well, so at the — india is a red list country as well, so at the moment the rules are if you are _ so at the moment the rules are if you are coming into uk from india it is that— you are coming into uk from india it is that ten— you are coming into uk from india it is that ten days in hotel self—isolation. unless, as we have been _ self—isolation. unless, as we have been pointing out, somebody is laundering themselves by going into another— laundering themselves by going into another country that is on the amber list, another country that is on the amber list. 10-14— another country that is on the amber list, 10—14 days there and then coming — list, 10—14 days there and then coming in _ list, 10—14 days there and then coming in from there. there is a possibility— coming in from there. there is a possibility of doing it that way but the vaccination status doesn't make any difference. the vaccination status doesn't make any difference-— the vaccination status doesn't make any difference. thank you very much indeed. it any difference. thank you very much indeed- it is — any difference. thank you very much indeed. it is immensely _ any difference. thank you very much indeed. it is immensely complicated j indeed. it is immensely complicated and keeps changing all the time, so we are very grateful to you for keeping across it and coming here to answer the questions. simon calder from the independent and lisa minot from the independent and lisa minot from the sun, thank you very much.
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with thousands of fans watching last night's euro 2020 game in pubs and bars, the hospitality industry is getting a much—needed boost. and if england win the tournament, one forecaster says the economy could grow by as much as £10 billion. our business correspondent ramzan karmali has more. not only english football fans but hundreds of publicans. 9.7 million pints were rumoured to have been pulled during the day and that it was set to be even higher for sunday. euro 2020 has given a much—needed boost to the pub trade but restrictions are still in place and sales could have been even higher. the british beer and pub association save a further 1.7 million pints could have been pulled, possible hit two takings of £6.5 million. supermarkets have also seen sales rise in the back of euro 2020, with many people celebrating at home rather than the pub. the co—op supermarket expects
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a million drinks to be sold on sunday alone, but it isn'tjust alcohol sales that are on the rise. anything to do with people getting together with friends and family, so things like sharing bags of snacks, up 30% at the moment, pizzas, massively up, burgers, hugely up. disposable barbecues, i'm sure over the weekend will be huge. it's all about, as i say, that get—together occasion. before a ball was even kicked economists had predicted the economy would benefit, even with restrictions in place. with estimates of around £150 million more being spent by consumers. but over the last 16 months households have saved almost £200 billion due to the pandemic and spending in the second half of this year could rise even more dramatically. if the football triggers a broader feel—good factor that translates into consumer confidence, then we do know from previous events such as 1996, the euros, the olympics in 2012, that consumer confidence can trigger a pick—up in consumer spending
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and some of that 200 billion is going to come on stream in terms of the spending on the high streets, you know, hospitality venues, during the second half of the year. whatever the outcome on sunday the impact on the economy will depend much more heavily on whether lockdown restrictions are going to be lifted as expected onjuly19th. ramzan karmali, bbc news. the talents of some of the best adaptive surfers from across the world will be showcased in bristol today. it's an increasingly popular para—sport, and many are hoping the event will build the case for national funding. john maguire has this report. there is something quite fun about getting wiped out by a wave. something else i've really enjoyed from being a kid is the adrenaline side of it, doing something that's maybe a little bit dangerous. water can be a great leveller, and surf even more so. this competition is
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the english adaptive surf open. the athletes are divided into different groups dependent on their disabilities. but it's their ability that's really impressive. tash davies competes in an assisted category. she has someone to help her push off and someone to catch her nearer the shore. previously a wheelchair basketball player, she enjoys not just surfing but competing and was bitten by the bug from day one. what does it feel like when you're in the water? it's a completely different experience to other different activities and sports i've done on land. it's really difficult as a wheelchair user to be able to just go to the beach and get in the water, which other people do really easily. so actually having a setup where people are around to help you get in the water and just enjoy getting on the board and catching waves was a really unique experience for me, and something that was totally different to other sports that i'd tried.
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martin pollock was blown up while serving with the army in afghanistan. a triple amputee, he's developed a special prosthesis to help him paddle. despite being brought up in cornwall, he only took up surfing to help with the recovery from his injuries. it's the perfect tonic, he says, for body and full mind. for body and for mind. i actually feel less restricted on the water than i do on land. it seems like my paddling is a lot slower than most people. but, you know, i can still move around pretty much the same, i'm actually riding smaller boards than a lot of people would. it's like once i know how to use the currents and which bits to avoid and all that it flows really well and ijust feel freer. this competition has been running for four years, the last
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two here at the wave artificial surf lake near bristol. the sport is determined to grow. surfing will feature at this summer's olympics for the first time, so the ambition is for it to be included in future paralympics too. so our athletes do an amazing job with no core funding from the - government at the moment, so it's all off their own backs getting - themselves out to the world - championships and other events. we really want to change that. we know— the benefits that adaptive surfing brings, how good it is for you, how good it is for your mental health and your mental resilience. - so we are super, super. keen on getting adaptive surfing properly funded so we can build on the momentum we have got already. _ as with all para or adaptive sports, it's not about what these athletes can't do. my gosh! it's about what they can do, about proving the seemingly impossible is possible. john maguire, bbc news, south gloucestershire. a 98—year—old british woman has
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been awarded france's highest honour for her top secret wartime work. betty webb was stationed at bletchley park during the second world war — decrypting enemy messages. she's now received the legion d'honneur for her services asjoanne writtle reports. i'd never heard of bletchley and i certainly didn't know what went on there. it was a complete surprise to me. bletchley park, secret home of the world war ii code breakers was where betty webb went aged 18. her mother had taught her to speak german as a child. when she joined up in wartime, it was to become a valuable skill. i was taken into the mansion to sign the official secrets act, i was taken into the mansion to read the official secrets act, which as you can imagine was a very formidable document. and i realised that from then on there was no way i was going to be able to tell even my parents where i was and what i was doing. until 1975.
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in fact, she was playing a critical role in intercepting and deciphering enemy messages and now she has been given france's highest accolade for her work. describe the atmosphere between you and your colleagues at bletchley park. i remember it being very friendly. we were all doing a job which we knew had to be done. but we were all very much in the dark. bearing in mind that we had signed the official secrets act, we could not talk about anything outside our own room. it was that strict. betty has since written memoirs and received an mbe. when she lodged with a family near bletchley park, her lips remained sealed. ijust said i was doing a boring secretaryjob. a boring secretarialjob. that was my answer. i believe a lot of people adopted that attitude. later, she crossed the atlantic to serve at the pentagon. working was wonderful. i was one of 32,000 people in the pentagon. the working conditions were very
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modern and very pleasant. in the main, i got on very well with the americans. post—war, she became a school secretary at ludlow in shropshire for a boss who knew not to ask questions. the head happened to be an ex bletchley man himself so he didn't ask me any awkward questions. which was a godsend because a lot of prospective employers couldn't understand why i couldn't tell them what i'd been doing. in case you're wondering, betty is 98. her recollections are razor—sharp and her conversation compelling. congratulations to betty. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. good afternoon. we're heading towards the middle of the summer now and the weather seems to be stuck in a bit of a pattern of sunshine and showers at the moment.
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but we have got some blue sky and some sunshine out there. this is the picture in gravesend in kent, taken recently by one of our weather watchers. the shower cloud is building through the remainder of the day, and in fact, over the next few days, we are going to keep that theme. sunny spells and scattered showers. low pressure not far away. it's sitting off to the east. we got a ridge of slightly higher pressure trying to build in and squeeze away those showers, but certainly through the rest of the afternoon, into the evening, parts of england and wales, particularly towards the east, will see a few of those scattered showers. at wimbledon, i think most of them should stay towards the north so temperatures around about 22 celsius or so as we head through the early evening, and it should stay dry. just an outside chance of a passing shower. a few heavy showers, too, for eastern scotland for a time. they should largely fade away, most places are becoming dry with clear spells tonight and temperatures down to between 12—14 celsius. a little bit of showery rain into the far south—west first thing friday morning. it will be cloudier across western and northern parts of the uk tomorrow with a few spots of drizzly rain. central and eastern parts of england tending to brighten up with sunny spells, but similar to recent days, we are going to see those afternoon
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showers bubbling up, and they could be quite slow moving and heavy per parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. there is a small risk of some localised flooding around because the showers are not moving through in a hurry. and pollen levels are also going to be high or very high across much of england, wales, southern scotland, northern ireland, too. just moderate across central and northern scotland. but into friday evening, still some of these really heavy showers with thunder, lightning and hail across eastern areas. they will slowly fade away overnight on friday and into the weekend as well. butjust in time for the weekend, this next area of low pressure arrives from the south—west. it looks like that's going to affect southern parts of england and wales initially on a saturday. quite heavy, persistent rain, too. slowly clearing eastwards. then we are left with another day of sunshine and hit and miss heavy, scattered downpours as well. most likely across parts of eastern scotland, eastern england, too. but we will see some of them cropping up further west later in the day. probably a little bit drier for northern ireland, and temperatures generally down a notch on recent days, perhaps into the low 20s.
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it remains unsettled. more rain towards the north on sunday. and further showers into the new working week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed when they return to england from amber list countries this summer, like portugal and greece. as one of the world's most vaccinated countries, we use these advantages to restore many of the freedoms that have been necessarily lost over recent months. saves! harry kane is 30 follow in! -- is _ saves! harry kane is 30 follow in! -- is there — saves! harry kane is 30 follow in! -- is there to— saves! harry kane is 30 follow in! —— is there to follow in. england are into the first final of a major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. to bring that happiness and excitement and took canute the excitement and took canute the excitement for another —— to continue that journey for another
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four days, we know we have everyone with us. uefa has charged england after a laser pointer was directed at denmark keeper kasper schmeichel during last night's match — just before harry kane took this extra—time penalty the olympic games injapan are to be held without spectators due to rising cases of coronavirus. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set to mark 60 years of the soap. people in england who've had both doses of a covid vaccine will be allowed to travel to amber list countries without needing
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to quarantine when they return. the transport secretary, grant shapps, has told the commons that the changes will take effect on july 19th. the other nations are yet to comment if they will follow england. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. one jab, two jabs, no jab — for the last few months it has made no difference to the rules you have to follow when you travel from another country to the uk. that depends on the traffic light system and whether the country you are coming from is green, amber or red, but things are about to change. from the 19th ofjuly, anyone fully vaccinated does not need to quarantine when they travel from amber list countries to england but they will still need to take a test before they travel and another pcr test on arrival. under 18s won't need to quarantine at all. under—4s will not need to take any test. 5—11 will take a pcr test after they arrive. 11—17—year—olds will need to take a predeparture test and a pcr test. for now, this is only open
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to those jabbed in the uk. it is notjust of course about holidays, eager as we are, i'm sure, for time in the sunshine, but this is also about reuniting families who have been apart throughout this pandemic. it's about helping businesses to trade and grow and it's about supporting aviation, a sector which hundreds of thousands ofjobs rely on. at the moment, most countries in the world are on the amber list including spain, greece and the usa, and the industry is hoping bookings will now go up for summer trips. i think it's a huge step in the right direction and perfect timing for all of those people who booked a holiday in 2019 and could not take it in 2020 and had it transferred to this year and have been sitting there with their fingers crossed. but it is not the news some were hoping for. melanie lives in california and has not seen her daughter since she left for drama school in london. before christmas, melanie's husband died and her daughter could not come
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back for her father's funeral. melanie cannot quarantine because of her work and because she has been vaccinated in the us, for now, she is not included in this policy. it's just heartbreaking. sorry. everything keeps being road blocked in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules were changed? it would mean everything. i miss her so much. we're best friends. it's like missing my right arm, you know, it's very difficult. i want to see her more than anything. the government has said it will look at whether it is possible to phase in people jabbed in other countries over the summer. some are still urging caution about opening up. we can open travel but we have to have the right safety measures in place, such as a good testing regime, to capture people who bring the virus back from their holidays, with other souvenirs. this is about what happens
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when entering the uk, whether other countries will let uk travellers in is a different matter. the new policy will change international travel this summer but there will also be questions about what happens to all of those people who are not fully vaccinated, who may feel left behind. caroline davies, bbc news. we have just received the new coronavirus numbers.- we have just received the new coronavirus numbers. they are compared _ coronavirus numbers. they are compared with _ coronavirus numbers. they are compared with three _ coronavirus numbers. they are compared with three fewer - coronavirus numbers. they are - compared with three fewer yesterday. this time last week, it was 27,989. so it has gone up by 4000 in the week. the uk has recorded 35 deaths today. that is within 28 days of someone having a positive covid—19
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test. another was 33 people dying on wednesday. compared with this time last week, that i was 22. —— the number was 22. the wait is finally over, and england fans are daring to dream — after a dramatic extra time 2—1win against denmark in the semifinals of the euros. the crucial goal was scored by captain harry kane after the ball rebounded from his missed penalty. more than 25 million people watched the action on tv, making it one of the most watched broadcasts in the last decade. england now face italy at wembley on sunday in their first major men's final since 1966. but celebrations have been slightly marred today as football's european governing body, uefa, has opened disciplinary proceedings against england after a fan shone a laser pen towards the denmark goalkeeper during a critical moment. our sports correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game. # sweet caroline... a night for heroes and for history.
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sweet caroline has surely never sounded sweeter. at last, a majorfinal beckons for england and whether it was the players on the pitch, or the supporters, the emotion and the elation were plain to see. coming home! oh, it's fantastic. i'm amazed, i neverthought they would get this far. - it's coming home! i can't believe it. but earlier, what nerve shredding tension as england's optimism was soon silenced. mikkel damsgaard brilliantly putting denmark in front. but soon england were level. england had to hit back quickly. that is what england have done. but the fans could only watch and hope as it went into extra time. finally, though, this challenge on raheem sterling, was it a penalty? crucially, the referee thought
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so and up stepped harry kane. schmeichel saves... kane is there to follow in! delight for england although not without further controversy. replays suggested a laser pen had been pointed from the stands at kasper schmeichel but after 55 years of english heartache, this was a night and a result which meant everything. amazing night for this country, for the players, the staff. our first final at a european championship and to be at wembley, it's a real special occasion. credit to the boys, we dug deep, got the job done but let's recover well and get ready for the next one. it's very much the morning after the night before here at wembley but come sunday, the fans will be back in their thousands hoping to see england take one final step to greatness. even their manager, normally so calm and composed, was showing his passion last night.
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gareth southgate has united players and supporters on what has already been some journey. he's given everyone a bit of hope, something to cling on to. cos it has been such a difficult 18 months for everyone and whatever happens on sunday, and we all have our fingers crossed that england can go and win this, but whatever happens he should feel very, very proud. and just in case you'd forgotten, not since the 1966 world cup have england won a major trophy, but decades of disappointment have now been replaced by hope. this is for the next generation now. any young people watching this, tune in and enjoy it and fingers crossed, we can do it. but this is a very good italian team, make no mistake, but we have the ability to beat them. so now only italy stand between england and that elusive glory. football is coming home, they say. well, it has never been closer. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley.
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earlier we caught up with kevin phillips, who was in the england squad for the euros back in the year 2000, alongside none other than gareth southgate. he gave his reaction to the laser pointer incident for which the fa has been charged. we don't want to see it. if it is proven, then hopefully the person who is guilty of it will be held accountable. of course, we don't want to see it. we don't want to see any evil is broken. because the night wasjust any evil is broken. because the night was just incredible. it's likely mars the evening. we cannot let it overshadow an incredible night. listening to the reruns of the game, it sends shivers down your spine. hopefully we will not see any repeat of that on sunday. it spine. hopefully we will not see any repeat of that on sunday.— repeat of that on sunday. it was a real nailbiter. _ repeat of that on sunday. it was a real nailbiter. anything _ repeat of that on sunday. it was a real nailbiter. anything about - repeat of that on sunday. it was a j real nailbiter. anything about how easy england had it against ukraine, last night was a different prospect. yeah, it was. you have to give
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credit to denmark. they were excellent in the first half, certainly for the first 35 minutes. england grew into the game, took control, but you have to give credit to them, they scored an incredible goal. i think england reacted perfectly to that first goal, and thatis perfectly to that first goal, and that is credit to the players, to the manager, tweaking the tactics late on in the game. it was an incredible night, i do see our country... having played for england in euro 2000 and a few times at other competitions, i have never heard anything like it.— heard anything like it. have you frozen? we _ heard anything like it. have you frozen? we are _ heard anything like it. have you frozen? we are having - heard anything like it. have you frozen? we are having a - heard anything like it. have you frozen? we are having a little i frozen? we are having a little trouble with the sound. it's fine. italy, how long can you afford to celebrate for when you know that you have an even tougher match coming up
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in a few days?— in a few days? there is no celebration, _ in a few days? there is no celebration, it's _ in a few days? there is no celebration, it's as - in a few days? there is no celebration, it's as simple in a few days? there is no i celebration, it's as simple as in a few days? there is no - celebration, it's as simple as that. these are professionals, they will not let themselves down now. gareth southgate is very professional, they have got to the final, why would you let yourselves down? they are about ten or 15 minutes from where i am at the moment, they will be recovering, a light training session, they will be eating properly and they will be preparing. as simple as that. hopefully, come sunday evening, if they win, they can celebrate for as long as they want. they will go down as absolute heroes. let's hope that happens. as absolute heroes. let's hope that ha ens. , , as absolute heroes. let's hope that hauens. ,, ,, ., happens. kevin phillips speaking to us earlier. let's return to our top story, and people who have had both doses of the vaccine will not have to quarantine when they come back from amber list countries. we are told it
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will take effect from july the 19th. i'm joined by caroline lucas, member of parliament for brighton pavilion. what is your reaction to the easing of this restriction? certainly coming on top of all of the other restrictions that have been thrown out by the government, i do have concerns. we need your memo that case numbers are still rising exponentially. many people are not vaccinated yet. i hope the government will not be repeating the same mistakes that allowed the delta variant to take root in the uk in the first place. in particular what we need to see is better restrictions within airports, for example. we took evidence of the all—party group on coronavirus, there are often occasions where people are coming back from red list countries, being in the same area as people coming back from amber and green list countries. there is a
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risk of infection there. we do not have a sufficiently digitised electoral system, so for as long as it is a paper—based way of checking verifications and so forth, that also means people are likely to be close to one another in crowded airports. crucially, we are not properly sequencing the tests, the pcr tests of people arriving back from amber list countries, we are only actually testing around a fraction of those pcr tests. we are not sure whether or not we run the risk of new variants coming in by this measure as well. but risk of new variants coming in by this measure as well.— risk of new variants coming in by this measure as well. but if people have been led _ this measure as well. but if people have been led to _ this measure as well. but if people have been led to believe _ this measure as well. but if people have been led to believe that - this measure as well. but if people have been led to believe that they | have been led to believe that they buy out of the pandemic, the way to open up the economy again, is to be vaccinated, people have come forward in huge numbers to have those
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vaccines done, it is inevitable that they will expect to be able to have these freedoms restored. i they will expect to be able to have these freedoms restored.- these freedoms restored. i quite understand _ these freedoms restored. i quite understand people's _ these freedoms restored. i quite understand people's impatience | these freedoms restored. i quite i understand people's impatience to have freedoms restored but, at the same time, we need to recognise that the uk is one of those countries where the delta variant is absolutely rising incredibly fast. 30,000 cases today, rising exponentially, we could be looking at 100,000 cases a day very soon. that is one concern. another is that even with vaccinations, that doesn't give you 100% protection either from infecting others or getting the infection yourself. so i think we need to wait a bit longer until we have got more protections in place, both at airports in terms of that infrastructure, but also in terms of the positive tests coming from amber list countries. we need to make sure that we are not importing more variants at the same time. ministers
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oint to variants at the same time. ministers point to the — variants at the same time. ministers point to the fact _ variants at the same time. ministers point to the fact that _ variants at the same time. ministers point to the fact that we _ variants at the same time. ministers point to the fact that we are - point to the fact that we are thankfully seeing lower death rates now. we have just thankfully seeing lower death rates now. we havejust been reporting how much they have been coming down. we have a lot of cases each day, but the nhs isn't under the pressure that it was, because people are not being hospitalised, yet that is not enough encouragement to you? fiji enough encouragement to you? of course, i enough encouragement to you? oi course, i am externally glad enough encouragement to you? (zii course, i am externally glad to know that that link between the cases and hospitalisation is being loosened, but it hasn't been severed illegally. when we are seeing cases rising at such an exponentially right, then there will still be pressures on the nhs was not that argument overlooks the numbers of people who are contracting long covid—19, and that is something that the government lisa look at more closely. people have been living with it for a year or more now, it has been estimated that over1
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million people have actually experienced it, the symptoms that continues after the first infection. some of that is deeply serious, not a mild illness. it can be an illness that can take people who have been running marathons to be confined to wheelchairs. i share people's impatience, i understand that, and i also understand the travel industry also understand the travel industry also needs ongoing support from the government until things are so called back to normal. but let's not put at risk all of the sacrifices people have made in the last 18 months. let's wait a bit longer, until we have got better safety in our airports and infrastructure and until we are more sure that more of that sequencing is being done so we are sure that we are not importing new variants when people come back from overseas. haifa new variants when people come back from overseas-— from overseas. how problematic is the message _ from overseas. how problematic is the message from _ from overseas. how problematic is the message from the _ from overseas. how problematic isj the message from the government from overseas. how problematic is - the message from the government that we will have to learn to live with coronavirus, that it might never go away? that will now require less
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government guidance but much more personal responsibility. this government guidance but much more personal responsibility.— personal responsibility. this is a dangerous _ personal responsibility. this is a dangerous position _ personal responsibility. this is a dangerous position from - personal responsibility. this is a dangerous position from the - dangerous position from the government because personal responsibility all too often sounds like the government is simply washing its hands of its own responsibility. if i'm someone who hasn't been vaccinated or someone who has a number of underlying health conditions, then there is nothing i can do to make someone elsewhere ask on a crowded train, for example. but that is one of the restrictions which the government is lifting far too soon, in my view. the problem is that personal responsibility doesn't protect other people. we don't ask for personal responsibility in other areas of public health, we don't ask for public health, we don't ask for public responsibility when it comes to keeping two motorway resections, speeding or smoking inside. these are freedoms which undermine the freedoms of others, and that is why i think this whole discourse around personal responsibility is such a difficult one here, because it
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doesn't help people who bother victims of other people's choices, if you like. victims of other people's choices, if you like-— some breaking use from the houses of parliament, where we are told that i'm in has been arrested after an altercation with a police officer outside the houses of parliament. scotland yard said the man threw a punch at an officer and has been arrested on suspicion of assault on an emergency worker. the incident is not being treated as terrorism. when the tokyo olympics begin in two weeks, there'll be no fans in the stands — making it the first games to take place behind closed doors. the organisers' announcement follows the japanese government's decision to declare a fourth state of emergency for the capital due to rising coronavirus infections. our tokyo correspondent, mariko oi, explained that the decision not to allow spectators into the olympic games was hardly a surprise. the decision not to allow any fans
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into the stadiums was somewhat expected after the latest state of emergency was announced, because you cannot exactly ask people not to go out and still say, oh, but you can go and watch the games, especially when the state of emergency means that restaurants and pubs are not to serve any alcohol, department stores are asked to close early. that decision faced a lot of opposition from those businesses, saying it has a devastating impact on their financial performance, while it has a limited impact on controlling the pandemic, according to them. from the government's point of view, they were concerned about people going to watch some competitions and possibly going out for a beer or two and basically increasing the number of people out and about, possibly leading to a growing number of new infections, especially with the
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infectious delta variant. that influence the decision to allow no fans into the stadiums. that is the stadium in tokyo will be understand. but what about other venues outside the capital? our very affected by this as well? they are saying that the ones in hokkaido, because of the heat concerns, they are holding marathons and some other events in the northern ireland of hokkaido, in sapporo. they are saying they might be open to allow some spectators in at the moment. but they haven't made an official announcement yet. as for the tokyo games, no fans will be allowed, and that basically means that the japanese government spent some $25 billion in preparation for the games and yet they will see basically an empty stadium in that
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brand—new stadium, and also see pretty much no financial benefits from tourism because we are not allowing any overseas visitors in, and also ticket sales, which they were expecting from domestic spectators. borisjohnson says most british troops have pulled out of afghanistan but the uk will keep a small presence in kabul. it comes as britain's most senior general has warned that afghanistan could slide into civil war, once foreign troops are out of the country. mrjohnson said the uk was not turning its back on afghanistan. i hope that no one will leap to the false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away, nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. the searing heat that scorched
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western canada and the us at the end ofjune would never have occured without climate change, say scientists. in their study, the team of researchers says that the deadly heatwave was a one—in—a—1,000—year event. but we can expect extreme events such as this to become more common as the world heats up due to climate change. if humans hadn't influenced the climate to the extent that they have, the scientists say the event would have been 150 times less likely. our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, has this report. as temperatures soared in the last days ofjune, people living in western canada and parts of the us sought refuge from the heat where ever they could find it. the prolonged heatwave so i sudden spike in deaths, with homeless people particular vulnerable to the searing temperatures. the heat smashed temperatures. the heat smashed temperature records. many cities passing 40 celsius. in british columbia, the village of lytton almost reached 50 degrees, shortly before it was largely destroyed by
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wildfire. governments and citizens were quick to question the role of climate change in the heatwave. now researchers say that without all of the carbon from cars and other human activities, it would have been virtually impossible for the deadly heat to occur. a big worry for climate researchers is that their models do not predict heat on the scales seen in canada for many decades. they are concerned that their climate might have passed a threshold where small amount of extra carbon will trigger big temperature rises. the situation in canada injune was extreme, but it was not the only place to endure intense heat. india and pakistan both saw soaring temperatures and deadly outcomes for many. scientists believe the global nature of warming means that every heatwave occurring todayis means that every heatwave occurring today is made more likely and more intense by climate change. it is little wonder that he topped the charts of the deadliest disasters in both 2019 and 2020, according to the
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red cross. the rising tide of scientific evidence on the impacts of climate change will put added pressure on the world's political leaders, who will meet in glasgow in the uk in november. they will try to agree new measures to rapidly cut emissions of carbon. even if they succeed, extreme heat events like those seen in canada and the us in recent weeks will likely recur, with greater frequency and increasing intensity. matt mcgrath, bbc news. i'm joined by dr steve mitchell, the medical director of the emergency department at haborview medical center. thank you forjoining us. when did you realise that you were in the middle of something approximating a regional disaster?— regional disaster? really it was the third da of regional disaster? really it was the third day of extreme _ regional disaster? really it was the third day of extreme heat - regional disaster? really it was the third day of extreme heat in - regional disaster? really it was the third day of extreme heat in our i third day of extreme heat in our area, when we realise that people
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were no longer compensating very well for the extreme heat and quite rapidly, as patients began arriving in our area, with severe heatstroke and symptoms we had never seen before. it was at that point that we realised that this was different, something where we needed to actually operate our disaster protocols in order to manage the situation that was occurring. haifa protocols in order to manage the situation that was occurring. how do these patients _ situation that was occurring. how do these patients present _ situation that was occurring. how do these patients present to _ situation that was occurring. how do these patients present to you, - situation that was occurring. how do these patients present to you, and l these patients present to you, and how do you help them? the patients with the most _ how do you help them? the patients with the most severe _ how do you help them? the patients with the most severe form _ how do you help them? the patients with the most severe form present i with the most severe form present with the most severe form present with something called heatstroke, and it is similar to a stroke, where their brain is no longerfunctioning normally. so quite literally the entire goal is to lower their body temperature as rapidly as possible, so our approach is something as rudimentary as packing them in ice in order to rapidly bring down their temperature as a primary treatment,
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while we also address all of the other things that are made worse by the heat elements will stop who is most vulnerable to heatstroke? the extremes of age, either the very young, or particularly the very old, the geriatric population were very vulnerable. those who are old, look after themselves, and you take medication that can reduce their body's ability to compensate that they were getting ill in large numbers. lip they were getting ill in large numbers-— they were getting ill in large numbers. , ., . numbers. up until now, what extent has extreme — numbers. up until now, what extent has extreme heat, _ numbers. up until now, what extent has extreme heat, climate - numbers. up until now, what extent has extreme heat, climate change, | has extreme heat, climate change, been part of your disaster planning? up been part of your disaster planning? up until now, we try to take an approach, but none of us have any
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experience with this extreme heat because we have a temperate climate. from now on, we will certainly be getting ready for even more of this specific burden. but you can go and entire career in medicine and never actually take care of one of these patients, and that is no longer the case. 5a patients, and that is no longer the case. ., patients, and that is no longer the case, ., ., patients, and that is no longer the case. . . . . , . case. so what are the changes that are necessary _ case. so what are the changes that are necessary for _ case. so what are the changes that are necessary for your _ case. so what are the changes that are necessary for your planning, i case. so what are the changes that. are necessary for your planning, and how do you identify those who are most at risk? ifife how do you identify those who are most at risk?— most at risk? we are still working on that, most at risk? we are still working on that. but _ most at risk? we are still working on that, but we _ most at risk? we are still working on that, but we realise _ most at risk? we are still working on that, but we realise that - most at risk? we are still working on that, but we realise that this i on that, but we realise that this will be a community effort, where small communities of people who can reach out and care for people who live alone, people who are older, and help them manage this heat will be primary. while the hospital and the health system bolsters their ability to identify those patient clusters and populations to make sure they are brought to safety before they get to a point of such
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extreme illness. so we are absolutely focused on that right now. ., .. absolutely focused on that right now. ., , . ., now. how can people avoid heatstroke? _ now. how can people avoid heatstroke? what - now. how can people avoid heatstroke? what can - now. how can people avoid heatstroke? what can they| now. how can people avoid i heatstroke? what can they do now. how can people avoid - heatstroke? what can they do for themselves to try to prevent it? first, recognise the symptoms. fatigue and headaches and first, but also it is as simple as trying to get into areas that are cool and places that have air—conditioning and making sure you are hydrated all the while while you are trying to manage that. but it was the patients who did not have air—conditioning and who were living alone who were unfortunately most impacted. it is really focusing on those people. if you are one of those, you have to make sure you are not isolated as a way to prevent this. iii make sure you are not isolated as a way to prevent this.— way to prevent this. in terms of our way to prevent this. in terms of your resources, _ way to prevent this. in terms of your resources, you _ way to prevent this. in terms of your resources, you were - way to prevent this. in terms of. your resources, you were dealing with this while you got covid—19 patients who need your help as well. what sort of change in emphasis do you need in terms of the equipment
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you need in terms of the equipment you have in the hospital? we have both readily available to care for these patients... we do something as simple as making sure our cafeteria has plenty of ice on hand when this extreme heat will be coming and approaching our area. but we stand ready with many different devices to rapidly lower a patient�*s body capture. but also what we found is that items such as ventilators became sort of higher in supply and we had anticipated before. so we will be doing additional planning around that.— will be doing additional planning around that. . ,, , ., , . will be doing additional planning around that. . ,, , . ., around that. thank you very much for our time. we take you now to the weather. good afternoon. skies have been brightening so far
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today for many areas. there is some blue sky and sunshine. also a fair bit of cloud around — this is the picture in pathhead, midlothian, taken a few hours ago by one of our weather watchers. as we head through the rest of the afternoon, a few scattered showers around. that's because low pressure is not far away, sitting off towards the east at the moment. it's still influencing our weather. so, a day of sunshine and showers. into the evening hours, some of those heavy showers across england and wales and eastern scotland will tend to ease away. so most places becoming drier overnight. a bit more cloud across northern and western parts of the uk and temperatures between about 12—14 degrees first thing tomorrow. friday, then, brings us another day of sunshine and showers. but i think most of the showers will be focused in the east, and they could be quite slow—moving, heavy, potentially thundery, with some flash flooding and some hail. parts of eastern england and eastern scotland in particular during the afternoon. sunny spells elsewhere and temperatures around 15—23 degrees. more showers into the south—west, though, later in the day. bye— bye.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... no more quarantine for uk residents who are double—jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer, like portugal and greece. england are into the first final of a major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. uefa has charged england after a laser pointer was directed at denmark keeper kasper schmeichel during last night's match — just before harry kane took this extra—time penalty. the olympic games injapan are to be held without spectators due to rising cases of coronavirus. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. the queen pays a visit to the coronation street set —
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to mark 60 years of the soap. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh ferris. good afternoon. world number one ashleigh barty says she'll have the chance to live out a childhood dream after reaching her first wimbledon final. the australian beat angelique kerber in straight sets and will play the winner of the second match, which is being watched by chetan pathak. what has been going on? it has been a fascinating afternoon so far. it has and history made by ashleigh barty. herfirst wimbledon has and history made by ashleigh barty. her first wimbledon final and she is the first australian warm and to reach the final since 1918 and she has talked about how much of a hero ghoul are is for her and the indigenous community and the fact that she has warm a dress in honour of air and batty getting the job donein of air and batty getting the job done in straight sets and is such a
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wonderful player to watch with a variety she has got on the way she was going to get past kerber was with slice and dice and mixing it up and in the end because i couldn't cope without. ashleigh barty was much more comfortable in that sixth set and was close in the second and kerber was really fighting back and getting low on the baseline, that squat position where she lives the power that ball down low, but ashleigh barty hung and in the tie—break she hung on and a fantastic win for ash barty who wants to increase local and dharmic grand slam and can she do that? she will play the match currently on centre court between the number two seed sabalenka and pliskova. pliskova has reached eight slam final a few years ago and sabalenka has overcome a mental hurdle at these championships getting passed before the round and she did manage to break when it mattered at the end of that first set to win it seven
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games to five but i can see that karolina pliskova's now broken in the second as she tries to swing that momentum back towards her, the czech eighth seed 3—2 up in that second set. we haven't had a quarterfinal or semifinal in the women's draw go to hit could this be the one? we shall wait and see. just to win your to date with what has been happening in the men's doubles joe salisbury in action with his american partner rajeev ram and they have just gone out in the last few minutes. i can see the croatian number one seeds who won the first two sets good on salisbury and ram to win the third on a tie—breaker before they lost the fourth on the tie—break so those croatian players go through and we should be seeing joe salisbury in action a little bit later on with harriet for mixed doubles and of course salisbury won the mixed doubles title just last
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month so he will fancy his chances on this one too albeit with a new partner, harriet.— partner, harriet. thank you very much indeed. _ partner, harriet. thank you very much indeed. our— partner, harriet. thank you very | much indeed. our correspondent partner, harriet. thank you very i much indeed. our correspondent at wimbledon for us. england's footballers have begun their preparations for the euro 2020 final. although those who got them there were given the day off training, having returned to their base at st george's park — just those who weren't involved in the semi—final win over denmark and some of the subs had a light session. they take on italy on sunday night in theirfirst major tournament final for 55 years. meanwhile, uefa have charged england after a laser was shone into the face of the denmark goalkeeper kasper schmeichel just before england's winning goal. he saved the penalty but harry kane scored on the rebound. england have also been charged for fans booing the danish national anthem. eddiejones has described gareth southgate as a "great example to every coach" as his england football counterpart continues to make history with his team. jones has developed a relationship with southgate during the time he's been in charge of the england rugby side and says he's been most
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impressed with the football manager's team selection. jones himself named four new caps in the starting 15 for engalnd's match against canada at twickenham on saturday. england are chasing a modest 142 to win the first one day international against pakistan in cardiff. the squad had to be completely changed after the previous team were forced to isolate because of a number of positive covid tests, but it doesn't seem to have affected their fortunes too much. pakistan bowled out for 141 in the 36th over. the tokyo olympic games will take place without spectators, organisers have confirmed. it comes after a state of emergency was put in place in tokyo for the duration of the games as the japanese government try to combat the rising cases of coronavirus in the country. overseas supporters were barred from travelling to the games in april — but there had been hope that a limited number of local fans could attend. organisers have apologised to those who have bought tickets. a decision on the paralympics
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will be made after the olympics. there was no record—equalling 34th stage win of the tour de france for mark cavendish today. cavendish, who is still wearing the green jersey, was never really in contention on todays very fast 160 kilometre stage. it was won by the german nils pollitt. tadej pogacar maintains his overall race lead. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. next it's your questions answered. let us just take a look at what is happening in northern ireland with regarding the restrictions because of coronavirus. stormont ministers have agreed to some changes. a bit more cautious than those announced by borisjohnson more cautious than those announced by boris johnson for more cautious than those announced by borisjohnson for england. the devolved government in belfast has agreed that on the 26th ofjuly theatre than conference venues can reopen, face coverings would have to be warm in places of worship and
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travellers returning from the list countries won't have to quarantine so some similarities there and will is the social gatherings in peoples homes will be relaxed and a maximum of ten people from two households will be able to meet in dollars and 50 people from 15 households will be able to get together in private gardens. these will need to be confirmed at a meeting of ministers on the 22nd ofjuly. the indication that the removal of all other restrictions could be considered in august. so a few changes they're being announced in northern ireland. a scathing inquiry into three nhs scandals published last year, concluded that thousands of women came to "avoidable harm", after their concerns around some medical treatments were ignored by the health service. the cumberlege review looked into the use of pelvic mesh, anti—epilepsy drugs and hormone pregnancy tests. now a year on, there are renewed calls for its recommendations to be implemented to avoid further suffering. our health correspondent anna collinson reports.
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three health treatments intended to improve women's lives, but instead ruined many of them. there are the women living with debilitating pain after having pelvic mesh fitted. the pain, i would be in tears with. it was so severe. there are the pregnant mothers, never warned taking the epilepsy drug sodium valproate could harm their unborn babies. felt guilty for so long, didn't i? yeah, you felt as if it was your fault. i idid. and there's the hormonal pregnancy test, primodos. its manufacturer denies any link with birth defects, but hundreds of families campaigning for decades disagree. i mean, iam now 75. so my thoughts are, how much longer can i carry on doing this? a year ago today, a damning review about the health service's treatment of female patients was released including nine recommendations. the first happened straightaway.
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i want to issue a full apology to the... to those who have suffered. but 12 months on, most of baroness cumberlege's suggestions haven't happened. i'm very angry and frustrated. a year is a huge length of time for people who are suffering. it's time that they implemented all our recommendations. your review concluded thousands of women had been ignored by the health service for decades. do you think they're being heard now? we've heard too often that women have said, "we've been dismissed, we've been told, its all in our heads". and so i hope that the culture will change and that the patients will always be foremost in the care that they receive. payment schemes for victims was a key recommendation, but so far, nothing has been confirmed. all three children in this family were born with health and learning problems after their mum
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took sodium valproate. their parents fear for their future without financial support. when the buffer of mum and dad have gone, you know, it's going to be sort of, it's going to be the oldest daughter to try and take on that responsibility. which she shouldn't have to do, she's got her own problems. but what do you do? some of the recommendations are being implemented. patient safety commissioners, intended to be a voice for the public�*s concerns, are being appointed, and some specialist mesh centres have been set up. after years of waiting, alison went to one in leicester to have her mesh removed, a complicated operation. it's very difficult to get out, they liken it to getting chewing gum out of hair. once a keen runner, alison now dreams of taking her dog for a long walk. i know that i may never get back to the person i was.
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but any improvement on how i was has got to be a good thing. after waiting so long for the cumberlege review, those who fought to be heard fear efficient action will not be taken. it will be, well, how much is it going to cost? what can we get away with? and that really is betraying all future patients of the nhs, which is a disgrace. that was marie lyon, ending our report by anna collinson. i'm nowjoined by kath samson, a mother who was precribed mesh to treat incontinence after childbirth which left her in both pain and unable to live the active lifestyle she was used to. kath, thanks very much forjoining us. just describe if you would what your health was like before and after this procedure. 5a. your health was like before and after this procedure. so, before surte i after this procedure. so, before surgery i was — after this procedure. so, before surgery i was high _ after this procedure. so, before surgery i was high blood - after this procedure. so, before
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surgery i was high blood diving, mountain biking, boxing, running, you know, the least superfit and i went in for what i was assured was a simple day case surgery and i assumed it was a bit like a coil so if i didn't get on with it could perhaps be taken out. i had no idea it was permanent and no idea it was plastic. so i went in as a superfit mum and came up barely able to work and at first ijust mum and came up barely able to work and at first i just accepted mum and came up barely able to work and at first ijust accepted well, i've had surgery and then as the days went on and the pain got worse i realised there was something really, really long and then that was when i started looking online and found other women who had been trying to raise awareness about this for some years we just had me taken seriously in the media. iftihat for some years we just had me taken seriously in the media.— seriously in the media. what did our seriously in the media. what did your surgeon — seriously in the media. what did your surgeon say _ seriously in the media. what did your surgeon say to _ seriously in the media. what did your surgeon say to me? - seriously in the media. what did your surgeon say to me? what i seriously in the media. what did | your surgeon say to me? what he seriously in the media. what did - your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that — your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that what _ your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that what is _ your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that what is taken - your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that what is taken to - your surgeon say to me? what he said to me was that what is taken to the i to me was that what is taken to the majority of women on the group was that he is, you are a mystery patient and i have never had this before and i'm sure it will settle down and he then tried to blame it on a slipped disc in refer me to a different department of the hospital and that is really common. but there are thousands _ and that is really common. but there are thousands of _ and that is really common. but there are thousands of women _ and that is really common. but there are thousands of women who - and that is really common. but there are thousands of women who had - are thousands of women who had problems so they can all be
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mysteries, can they? he did have it removed but how successful was that? i did have a mesh removal about seven months after it was inserted but like the only warm and in the film said it is like getting during a mass of matted hair, you can't always guarantee you will get all of it out plus that plastic material leaches toxins inside of you that sense of the trigger of autoimmune diseases and allergic reactions that never go away and we see that for lots of people on the page you have things like fibromyalgia, fibrosis, lupus, some really long—term chronic debilitating illnesses on the page from either no damage or as i say plastic toxicants causing these allergic and inflammatory reactions. —— nerve damage. i bet you have some allergies to? i did. i have to be really careful of any face washes that contain if plastic —based products in them and it's so random and it took me a long time to get to the bottom of them and i can drink fizzy coke from a can and that is
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fine bit if i drink it from a pump ina bar fine bit if i drink it from a pump in a bar i get an anaphylactic reaction in my throat and the only additional ingredient to pump coca—cola is that it has an ingredient in it called dimethyl poly siloxane which is an anti—fizzing agent but is also plastic —based so explain that. there were a lot of women with these bizarre allergies on the page. the thin to bizarre allergies on the page. the thing to have had to become an expert on a quite remarkable. baroness cumberlege said she is quite unhappy that several of the problems and recommendations and her reports regarding notjust an estimate of the medical concerns were only followed. what is your view to why there is a hold—up? borisjohnson view to why there is a hold—up? boris johnson says view to why there is a hold—up? borisjohnson says that view to why there is a hold—up? boris johnson says that action view to why there is a hold—up? borisjohnson says that action will be taken but it hasn't done it yet. it hasn't done it yet and we can't blame covid. i have seen pushback from the department of health and many of the key recommendations. the one that is most important to me as
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the sunshine payment packs and what thatis the sunshine payment packs and what that is will force industry to declare all of the money they give to doctors, hospitals, research institutions and charities in that way we can see who is funding our doctor's voice and i was a really strong pushback from the department of health but that in yet that is really important for patient safety because once you get bias in terms of money and gifts that bias in terms of money and gifts that the scientific research which is used to base our health care treatments on and so that is absolutely crucial and so that is absolutely crucial and we have got it in america, denmark, portugal, italy in front of a need it for the uk. it is absolutely vital.- a need it for the uk. it is absolutely vital. a need it for the uk. it is absolutel vital. . ,, , ., , absolutely vital. thank you very much for talking _ absolutely vital. thank you very much for talking to _ absolutely vital. thank you very much for talking to us. - ramzan karmali is here and he's been looking at the impact of the cornavirus pandemic on living standards — so what kind of picture has emerged on this, ramzan? the institute for fiscal studies have been looking at this and says
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surprisingly living standards have done fairly well during the pandemic due to the furlough scheme and the 20 bound up left in universal credit which have been helping living standards but there have been groups of people who have been unfairly felt the force of the pandemic, self—employed, ethnic minorities, families already on low incomes as well and we can speak tojonathan cribb from the iss who was ended senior research economy there and jonathan, just can you explain why those particular groups have been particularly hard—hit? i'm joined byjonathan cribb senior research economist at the institute for fiscal studies these three groups are of course overlapping because of a lot of self—employed people who are poor and ethnic— self—employed people who are poor and ethnic minorities can think of these _ and ethnic minorities can think of these as— and ethnic minorities can think of these as overlapping loops and it looks— these as overlapping loops and it looks like — these as overlapping loops and it looks like they are worse off because _ looks like they are worse off because of a combination of finding it to work— because of a combination of finding it to work and because of the fact
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that the _ it to work and because of the fact that the self—employment income support— that the self—employment income support scheme while it is generous to those _ support scheme while it is generous to those who get it didn't always come _ to those who get it didn't always come quickly, wasn't always paid quickly— come quickly, wasn't always paid quickly and lots of people were excluded receiving it so i think those — excluded receiving it so i think those are _ excluded receiving it so i think those are probably the key reasons why those — those are probably the key reasons why those groups suffered more than furloughed employees during the pandemic. the furloughed employees during the andemic. ., . . ., pandemic. the overall headline of our pandemic. the overall headline of your report _ pandemic. the overall headline of your report though, _ pandemic. the overall headline of your report though, martin - pandemic. the overall headline of your report though, martin was i your report though, martin was advised when i said that living standards generally haven't come down during the pandemic —— martin was surprised. is that all dented government support or is there more than that? . . , ., than that? there are a number of thins. than that? there are a number of things- one _ than that? there are a number of things- one is— than that? there are a number of things. one is that _ than that? there are a number of things. one is that the _ than that? there are a number of. things. one is that the government supports _ things. one is that the government supports most furloughed people by paying _ supports most furloughed people by paying 80% of their salaries but academic— paying 80% of their salaries but academic analysis and surveys are followed _ academic analysis and surveys are followed people implied that lots of employers have actually topped that up, maybe to almost 100% for some
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people _ up, maybe to almost 100% for some people at— up, maybe to almost 100% for some people. at least during the first bit of— people. at least during the first bit of the — people. at least during the first bit of the pandemic. so that, you know. _ bit of the pandemic. so that, you know. has— bit of the pandemic. so that, you know, has protected people. and then there is— know, has protected people. and then there is also— know, has protected people. and then there is also the fact that lots of people _ there is also the fact that lots of people in— there is also the fact that lots of people in this country live with another— people in this country live with another working person. there are lots of— another working person. there are lots of households that if the wife loses _ lots of households that if the wife loses her — lots of households that if the wife loses herjob and the husband is still working or and vice versa, not everyone _ still working or and vice versa, not everyone but lots of them and that is high _ everyone but lots of them and that is high earning couples doesn't mean people _ is high earning couples doesn't mean people aren't worse off but they are protected _ people aren't worse off but they are protected often from severe deprivation in a way that they wouldn't _ deprivation in a way that they wouldn't be if they were only single income _ wouldn't be if they were only single income households and that means actually _ income households and that means actually toward some of the people from ethnic minority groups where particularly people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds not many relative _ and bangladeshi backgrounds not many relative to— and bangladeshi backgrounds not many relative to the population as a whole —
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relative to the population as a whole have a dual income household and that _ whole have a dual income household and that exposes them to that extra risk if— and that exposes them to that extra risk if there — and that exposes them to that extra risk if there one breadwinner loses theiriob _ risk if there one breadwinner loses their 'ob. ~ . . risk if there one breadwinner loses their “ob. . . , risk if there one breadwinner loses their 'ob. . . , ., theirjob. what is the risk to livin: theirjob. what is the risk to living standards _ theirjob. what is the risk to living standards if _ theirjob. what is the risk to i living standards if government support scheme start to be wound down? we have heard about universal credit and £20 being slowly taken out eventually and what will happen to our living standards because of that? ., ~ ., ., , ., that? then a kind of two things that to on that? then a kind of two things that go on there. — that? then a kind of two things that go on there, right? _ that? then a kind of two things that go on there, right? one _ that? then a kind of two things that go on there, right? one is - that? then a kind of two things that go on there, right? one is the - that? then a kind of two things that go on there, right? one is the fact. go on there, right? one is the fact that the _ go on there, right? one is the fact that the economy is reopening and more _ that the economy is reopening and more people are getting back into work on _ more people are getting back into work on getting their full page out and that— work on getting their full page out and that will push up living standards of working people but as the furlough scheme is withdrawn there _ the furlough scheme is withdrawn there are — the furlough scheme is withdrawn there are expectations of some increases — there are expectations of some increases and unemployment albeit smaller— increases and unemployment albeit smaller unemployment increases than would _ smaller unemployment increases than would be _ smaller unemployment increases than would be perhaps expected 6—9 months a-o would be perhaps expected 6—9 months ago so _ would be perhaps expected 6—9 months ago so that— would be perhaps expected 6—9 months ago so that more people with fewer 'obs ago so that more people with fewer jobs and _ ago so that more people with fewer jobs and they are going to be falling — jobs and they are going to be falling back on the universal
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credits _ falling back on the universal credits system which is a lot less generous— credits system which is a lot less generous than the furlough scheme and that— generous than the furlough scheme and that universal credit system is beginning — and that universal credit system is beginning less generous because of the end _ beginning less generous because of the end to — beginning less generous because of the end to the £20 uplift so these things— the end to the £20 uplift so these things in— the end to the £20 uplift so these things in particular i think are more — things in particular i think are more likely to affect the lower end of the _ more likely to affect the lower end of the income distribution and people — of the income distribution and people on lower incomes. jonathan from the and _ people on lower incomes. jonathan from the and comic _ people on lower incomes. jonathan from the and comic institute - people on lower incomes. jonathan from the and comic institute for. from the and comic institute for fiscal studies, nice to see you. nice to have company. breaking news, government has mentioned that the people who are dying to have welfare support quickly scrapping the six—month rule and replacing it with a 12 month bills entered the ministerfor a 12 month bills entered the minister for disabled people, a 12 month bills entered the ministerfor disabled people, health minister for disabled people, health and ministerfor disabled people, health and work says that people who can prove they have 12 months or less to live will get quick and easy access to financial support. firstly, i want to play tribute to
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all of _ firstly, i want to play tribute to all of the — firstly, i want to play tribute to all of the different health and disability stay cold as who have helped — disability stay cold as who have helped support this two—year review and we _ helped support this two—year review and we have had a commitment to scrap _ and we have had a commitment to scrap the — and we have had a commitment to scrap the six month rule and we had set out _ scrap the six month rule and we had set out our— scrap the six month rule and we had set out our plans to improve of this fast-track_ set out our plans to improve of this fast—track scheme to improve consistency and scrap the six—month rule and _ consistency and scrap the six—month rule and this — consistency and scrap the six—month rule and this is a system for those who get— rule and this is a system for those who get that devastating news around terminal— who get that devastating news around terminal illness that they can have a fast—track access to five different dwp benefits which is much quicker— different dwp benefits which is much quicker and where time is precious that is— quicker and where time is precious that is absolutely essential and what _ that is absolutely essential and what we — that is absolutely essential and what we will be doing is looking to match _ what we will be doing is looking to match the — what we will be doing is looking to match the nhs definition of terminal illness— match the nhs definition of terminal illness and so moving from the six-month _ illness and so moving from the six—month definition to 12 months. let's returns to england's famous win yesterday ,
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more than 60,000 fans were allowed into wembley stadium for the match. and millions who couldn't make it to london packed out pubs, fanzones and living rooms across the country — as simon jones reports: wild cheering. pure joy on the streets of london. accompanied by more than just a little relief. even if getting home after the match wasn't proving easy. cheering. in newcastle, the final whistle signalled confirmation that england had made the final. and in preston, a familiar refrain. # football's coming home.# it means the world to me, the world. the absolute world to me. # it's coming home!# what a team, though. the team spirit. they're everything. they believed it and they never gave in, did they? in croydon, celebrations as the goals went in, followed by a party that went on long into the night and fans already looking forward to sunday and that clash with italy.
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we're in a final, england in a final for the first time in, who cares how many years? there is a sense that last night's win is what the country has been crying out for. who'd have thought this, you know, like, six months ago in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic? this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. this is a team that has caught the country's imagination. one of its biggest stars, mason mount, even found time to give his shirt to an adoring fan. praise, too, from the prime minister. it was just euphoric, absolutely extraordinary. so i congratulate gareth southgate and the whole team. i thought they were stunning. and, obviously, wishing them all the best for sunday. and this morning at raheem sterling's former primary school in the shadow of wembley, despite the late night, the potential stars of the future were feeling inspired. he's a role model. his work ethic is amazing.
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even in the 117th minute, he was running down players, making them tired, you know? he's just that sort of player. he never gives up. spare a thought for the danish fans. their side gave so much but it wasn't enough. one family from copenhagen with a danish mum and an english dad held a party with mixed emotions. i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country. so i was hoping for the danish win. but i wasn't angry at the english team. they played well. and it was nice also, if we had only been danish people in the house it would have been, hm, but it was happy to see the other guys happy, so it was a party anyway.
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and this was england's moment — something to savour before the players and the fans do it all again in just three days' time. simon jones, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. good afternoon. we're heading towards the middle of the summer now and the weather seems to be stuck in a bit of a pattern of sunshine and showers at the moment. but we have got some blue sky and some sunshine out there. this is the picture in gravesend in kent, taken recently by one of our weather watchers. the shower cloud is building through the remainder of the day, and in fact, over the next few days, we are going to keep that theme. sunny spells and scattered showers. low pressure not far away. it's sitting off to the east. we got a ridge of slightly higher pressure trying to build in and squeeze away those showers, but certainly through the rest of the afternoon, into the evening, parts of england and wales, particularly towards the east, will see a few of those scattered showers. at wimbledon, i think most of them should stay towards the north so temperatures around about 22
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celsius or so as we head through the early evening, and it should stay dry. just an outside chance of a passing shower. a few heavy showers, too, for eastern scotland for a time. they should largely fade away, most places are becoming dry with clear spells tonight and temperatures down to between 12—14 celsius. a little bit of showery rain into the far south—west first thing friday morning. it will be cloudier across western and northern parts of the uk tomorrow with a few spots of drizzly rain. central and eastern parts of england tending to brighten up with sunny spells, but similar to recent days, we are going to see those afternoon showers bubbling up, and they could be quite slow moving and heavy per parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. there is a small risk of some localised flooding around because the showers are not moving through in a hurry. and pollen levels are also going to be high or very high across much of england, wales, southern scotland, northern ireland, too. just moderate across central and northern scotland. but into friday evening, still some of these really heavy showers with thunder, lightning and hail across eastern areas. they will slowly fade away overnight on friday and into the weekend as well. butjust in time for the weekend, this next area of low pressure arrives from the south—west. it looks like that's going to affect southern parts of england and wales
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initially on saturday. quite heavy, persistent rain, too. slowly clearing eastwards. then we are left with another day of sunshine and hit and miss heavy, scattered downpours as well. most likely across parts of eastern scotland, eastern england, too. but we will see some of them cropping up further west later in the day. probably a little bit drier for northern ireland, and temperatures generally down a notch on recent days, perhaps into the low 20s. it remains unsettled. more rain towards the north on sunday. and further showers into the new working week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. is one of the worlds most asked countries, we must use these advantages to a of the freedoms that have been necessarily knots the last of it and i few months. and in the next 15 minutes, ill be speaking to one of the directors of the uk travel industry body, abta england are into the first final of a major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday.

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