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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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ramzan karmali, bbc news. we are going tojohn, at wembley, is there a scramble for tickets, john? wembley, is there a scramble for tickets, john?— wembley, is there a scramble for tickets, john? yes, there is, after encland tickets, john? yes, there is, after england made _ tickets, john? yes, there is, after england made it _ tickets, john? yes, there is, after england made it through - tickets, john? yes, there is, after england made it through to - tickets, john? yes, there is, after england made it through to first l england made it through to first major men's final. in 55 years. it's going to be a sell—out. some are made available through uefa's ticketing website but many more are being made available on resale websites despite uefa's best efforts that they not be sold above face value. there was a pair of tickets on sale this morning for as much as £14,000. the english fans will outnumber italian fans due to restrictions on those coming over from italy something that has from italy but something that has frustrated their manager roberto mancini, he is frustrated there will not be more italian fans for the
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final but how you do you split these two teams? it's so tough when you consider italy are former winners, they've won it in 1968 and may two final since then. england in their first european final, how do you call this one? it's going to be very tight, isn't it? a nation waits. how are your nerves, jane hill? are your nerves, jane same tight, isn't it? a nation waits. how are your nerves, jan- are your nerves, jane same as everyone _ are your nerves, jane same as everyone else's! _ now, who would you expect to bump into at the rovers return? cheering and applause the queen made a visit to the sets of coronation street and met the cast and crew of the itv soap today. her majesty walked down weatherfield's famous cobbled streets but on a red carpet — in fact, it's the second time she's visited them. herjourney to the region will also see her visit manchester cathedral. time for a look at the weather.
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0ne one word sums up our weather at the moment and that's changeable because we still got the theme of some sunshine and scattered heavy downpours around too. 0ver sunshine and scattered heavy downpours around too. over the next few days that's going to be the story. sunshine one minute, really heavy scattered downpours the next as well and that's down to the fact that low pressure is not far away, sitting out towards the east at the moment. we got a ridge of high pressure that's trying to push its way in but further weather fronts in the atlantic. here is the satellite and radar. it shows most of the cloud has been breaking up nicely today but we've had a few showers breaking out and we could see more of them particularly across southern and eastern parts of england, into wales as well. for scotland and northern ireland, fairly cloudy but mostly dry here. sunny spells for eastern scotland and england and wales. temperatures up to around 23 degrees or so in the warmest spots. we are also going to see some of those slow moving torrential downpours. you could catch some hail and thunderstorms that you've
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probably already noticed if you suffer from probably already noticed if you sufferfrom hay probably already noticed if you suffer from hay fever we've got high or very high levels of pollen particularly across parts of england. as for the action at wimbledon today, it could be just one or two showers that move across wimbledon over the next few hours. they look like they should fade away fairly quickly into the evening hours. most of these hit and miss downpours will fade away through this evening and overnight. most places dry, a little bit of showery rain for eastern scotland and overnight temperatures around 12—14. through the day tomorrow, similar to today because again, sunshine and showers but i think the bulk of the showers but i think the bulk of the showers tomorrow will be concentrated across eastern england and eastern scotland. if you catch one it could be really torrential and slow—moving. localised flooding possible. temperatures around 21—23 for most of us, cooler under the cloud in the far north—west. it will be another day with high or very high levels of grass pollen out there as well. into the evening hours these really torrential downpours in the east will continue
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for a time. they will fade away overnight and there will be some more showery rain working into the south—west through friday night and that's down to this feature here which is going to bring us the next batch of rainfall through the course of the weekend. saturday, we start off with quite persistent rain across southern parts of england. clearing eastwards to leave some sunshine, some scattered heavy showers as well. a little bit cooler on saturday. the unsettled weather lasts into sunday for most of us too. time for some sport here on the bbc news channel. hello, i'm hugh ferris. it's now four grand slams in a row that the four women's semifinalists are different to the previous tournament and none of them have gone any further than the last four at wimbledon. chetan pathak is there for us. chetan, it'll be a significant day whoever makes the final?
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absolutely, hugh, and we are hoping for two cracking semifinals. there has been a shortage of stories when you think of serena williams or andy murray or what happened with roger federal last night, but we would like some top quality tennis to talk about as well. the women public quarterfinals were fairly straightforward, but there is a potential cracker about to get under way on centre court at the moment. it involves the world number one ashleigh barty looking to get to her first final against angelique kerber who has rediscovered her best form of late, the 2018 finalist who is 33 now. there is speculation she was thinking of retiring earlier this year, but she has been moving so well, we know what she is like from the baseline, expect some slice and dice from ash barty. if anyone can disrupt, it is her. this going on first on centre court, probably thinking about the australian
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audience at home to watch ash barty. this will get under way and then we will see the two big hitters, karolina pliskova, the number two seed aryna sabalenka. she has never been this far at a grand slam, again, moving so well. this is the only semifinal missing from pliskova's cv and another mouthwatering match that we will look forward to, ash barty and angelique kerberfirst, and the doubles as well, a big day forjoe salisbury. he is currently on court one at the moment. if we look at the minute, he is playing with his american partner in his men's doubles semifinals. a tough one against the number one seeds. there was a coronavirus positive test in their camp which denied them a place in the opening—round of the french open, so a tough test for salisbury 0pen, so a tough test for salisbury as their opponents have been winning everything recently. 4— for their
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and we will also see him in the mixed doubles full stop loss look forward to here. we mixed doubles full stop loss look forward to here.— forward to here. we will be back with ou forward to here. we will be back with you later— forward to here. we will be back with you later on. _ england's players are back at their base in st george's park this afternoon after burying another bit of history that has burdened them. a 2—1victory over denmark has them in the final of euro 2020, their first at a major tournament since 1966. joe lynskey reports. it has been 55 years but they never stop dreaming. the last time england reached a final, it wasjuly 1966. through the decades, there have been late nights and golden generations, now onlyjoy. the fans singing. my emotions are all over the place. what a night and a fully deserved win. it's the work ethic and the determination from each and every one of us.
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help your mate out, i think it says a lot about this team. i am so proud. this group of players deserve what has happened to them. | they've been fantastic _ from when we met five weeks ago. in the end, it was our night. harry kane's spot kick was one of his worst. it didn't matter. how he finds ways to score is key to this team. and so is the man at the helm. through the match gareth southgate is calm at the end is his release. he is a thinker and he listens and takes on board. he has a ruthless streak which you have to have as a manager and it is the most difficult manager's job in the world. it is great to see him enjoy the success because he really deserves it. england's semifinal woes are over but there is one more hurdle. italy, who last beat them in the knockouts at euro 2012.
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they're on extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have not lost in 33 games. whatever standard of football you play, that is impressive. they, like england, have a great togetherness, they have two giant defenders, we will have to be very wary of that. it is a tough one to call. 0n the pitch and in the stands there were personal moments. mason mount gave his shirt away and calvin phillips put on a new one for his granny who died in february. many others have had a year like him but after so long in the silence, the noise is back in a country brought together by the game. there is one more to go. paris st—germain have signed sergio ramos on a two—year deal following the defender�*s departure from real madrid. ramos is spain's most—capped player, but was left out of their euro 2020 squad. he won five la liga titles and four champions league medals with real. ramos spent 16 years at the club
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but left when his contract expired at the end ofjune. harlequins' premiership—winning number eight alex dombrandt is one of four players who will make his debut in england's match against canada on saturday. many of eddiejones' first choice players are on tour with the british and irish lions. 12 players made theirfirst international appearance in sunday's win against usa while lock harry wells, centre dan kelly and wing adam radwan are also winning theirfirst caps at twickenham this weekend. tokyo has declared a state of emergency that will be in place for the whole of the olympic games later this month. the japanese government is taking action against the rising coronavirus infections rates and casts doubt on whether even a limited number of fans will be able to attend the events. 0verseas supporters were barred from travelling to the games in april. an entirely new look england team is taking on pakistan in the first of three one day internationals in cardiff. positive tests returned by three players and four backroom staff forced the original squad into isolation. but the stand—in team couldn't have had a better start
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after captain ben stokes won the toss and decided to bowl first. lancashire's saqib mahmood got a wicket with the first ball of the innings and two in the first over. he's got another one since, as has lewis gregory. it is 28—4 after six overs. that's all the sport for now. but you can keep up to date with mark cavendish's quest to equal eddy merckx's record of 34 tour de france stage wins on the bbc sport website. they are under way but there is plenty of time to go in this stage today. follow that and much, much more and i will be back in an hour. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. if only the sports team had something to talk about at the moment! we will have more in the next hour. hours of eight! right now, we are going to talk about covid and changes to the travel rules. let's talk a little bit more about the announcements today.
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children and fully vaccinated adults will no longer have to quarantine on their return to england from amber list countries from the 19th of july. the transport secretary grant shapps set out his plans in the commons to free up foreign holidays when coronavirus restrictions are eased. i can confirm today that from the 19th ofjuly, uk residents who are fully vaccinated through the uk vaccine roll—out will no longer have to self—isolate when they return to england. they will still be required to take a test three days before returning, the predeparture test, demonstrating they are negative before they travel and a pcr test on or before day two, but they will no longer be required to take a day eight test. in essence, this means that for fully vaccinated travellers, the requirements for green and amber list countries are the same. to be clear, a full vaccination means 14 days have passed since your final dose of the vaccine and it's also important to note
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that health matters are devolved, so decision—making and implementation may differ across the uk administrations and we will continue to work with the devolved administrations to ensure we achieve our shared objectives of a safe, sustainable and robust return to international travel. let's speak now to the shadow secretary of state for transport, jim mcmahon. hello, i very good afternoon. your thoughts? hello, i very good afternoon. your thouuhts? . , hello, i very good afternoon. your thouuhts? ., , ., hello, i very good afternoon. your thouhts? ., , ., , , ., thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to net back thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to get back to _ thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to get back to a _ thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to get back to a sense _ thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to get back to a sense of _ thoughts? clearly, we are desperate to get back to a sense of normality. | to get back to a sense of normality. we are very mindful ofjust how difficult it has been for aviation, tourism, eurostar in what has been a very difficult period forjobs and their economies. we need to make sure that in easing restrictions on getting back to that sense of normality that the government do it in an open and transparent way, so we have been very heavily pushing for the data to be published, we
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have been pushing for a reduction of the amber list and it seems as though the government are moving towards that, so people can have confidence that it is safe to travel or not. if it is not safe to travel, we should have robust measures in place to quarantine people in hotels to keep the country safe from potential new strain variance but where it is safe to travel, people need the information so they can confidently book.— need the information so they can confidently book. when you say it is not transparent, _ confidently book. when you say it is not transparent, what _ confidently book. when you say it is not transparent, what are _ confidently book. when you say it is not transparent, what are your- not transparent, what are your concerns? there is a lot of information out there, isn't there, for people? i! information out there, isn't there, for neonate?— for people? if you are trying to book a holiday _ for people? if you are trying to book a holiday where - for people? if you are trying to i book a holiday where information for people? if you are trying to - book a holiday where information is held is critical. you should not have to go to 20 different places on 20 websites from different government departments to find out whether it is safe or not. that does not give confidence. the government have published some data but only for 22 countries and there are gaps in that data, so one example would be when they moved the balearics from amber to green, there was no
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data on incoming passenger testing, no data on new variant testing in those islands which is critical for us to be able to hold the government to account for that another example is when pakistan and bangladesh were on the red list and india should have been at the same time but there was a two—week delay which made the delta variant, thejohnson variance, was already running through large swathes of the uk.— was already running through large swathes of the uk. people are still havin: to swathes of the uk. people are still having to take _ swathes of the uk. people are still having to take tests, _ swathes of the uk. people are still having to take tests, though? - swathes of the uk. people are still. having to take tests, though? there is that very obvious barrier and thatis is that very obvious barrier and that is going to stay. find is that very obvious barrier and that is going to stay.— is that very obvious barrier and that is going to stay. and that is another concern _ that is going to stay. and that is another concern we _ that is going to stay. and that is another concern we have. - that is going to stay. and that is another concern we have. at - that is going to stay. and that is j another concern we have. at the moment, the government will publish almost an 80 z of companies who will provide from the private market before people go, but that can mean people have to pay £100 per person to carry out those tests, so for a family of four, the numbers are pretty obvious and what we said to the government is they should intervene it to use the spare capacity in the nhs testing sites and local communities to update the nhs after so that it confirms your
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vaccination status and it should also be able to confirm testing status is well on the same app and when we do that, we can have bilateral conversations with other countries to make sure that that evidence is recognised.- countries to make sure that that evidence is recognised. airlines and travelfirms— evidence is recognised. airlines and travel firms are _ evidence is recognised. airlines and travel firms are broadly _ evidence is recognised. airlines and travel firms are broadly rail- evidence is recognised. airlines and travel firms are broadly rail coming| travel firms are broadly rail coming what the transport secretary has laid out today. this is an industry on its knees. isn't the tricky is for any government making these decisions that they have to try to balance this? public health on one side but an industry that is desperate. side but an industry that is desnerate-_ side but an industry that is deserate. ~ , ., ., ., desperate. absolutely and throughout the covid pandemic, _ desperate. absolutely and throughout the covid pandemic, as _ desperate. absolutely and throughout the covid pandemic, as in _ the covid pandemic, as in opposition, we have been trying to give the government support and guidance on the best way that we believe to proceed in on international travel, we absolutely believe in the need to secure our borders but we need to balance that with the economic impact and the desire of people to want to go away and the way we meet that is about transparency, openness of data and giving consumers confidence and an
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example of that would be how many people went to portugal in good faith in the belief they would have a good holiday only to be forced to rush back or face quarantine? a good holiday only to be forced to rush back orface quarantine? had they established a country by country assessment about travel, that would have given people the information to make an informed choice and that is all we are asking for today. jim choice and that is all we are asking fortoda ., a ., choice and that is all we are asking for toda ., a a, ., ., ~ choice and that is all we are asking fortoda ., a ., ., ~ for today. jim mcmahon, thank you very much. — for today. jim mcmahon, thank you very much, shadow _ for today. jim mcmahon, thank you very much, shadow secretary - for today. jim mcmahon, thank you very much, shadow secretary of. for today. jim mcmahon, thank you i very much, shadow secretary of state for transport. you may have questions about all of this, very complex area. and at 3:30pm this afternoon, we'll be putting your questions and whenever we have one of these on travel, we are inundated with travels questions. do send in your questions using the hashtag bbcyourquestions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that is just after 3:30pm. we will be joined by the sun's
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travel editor, lisa minot and the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. any queries you have about the rules and travel generally the summer, please send them to us as that will be a really interesting session at 3:30pm. it's about people trying to visit family as well, not just about trying to get away to the sun. lots of people have not in their loved ones for a very long time due to this pandemic, so that is coming up just after 3:30pm. it's 12 minutes to two. the headlines on bbc news... the long wait is over. england's history makers beat denmark. they have reached their first major men's final since 1966. as we have been discussing, fully vaccinated people will no longer have to quarantine on their return to england from amber list countries. that rule changes on the 19th ofjuly. and the number of people when england waiting to have steadied
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hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. now on bbc news, it's time to take a look at some of the stories making the headlines across the uk. a dance group is trying to encourage young boys to join, even if they've never danced before. this is ahead of a new show in southampton next month. auditions are taking place this weekend. steve humphrey has more. it's like a family setting for everyone and it's just so much fun to be in. everyone and it's 'ust so much fun to be in. , ., . , everyone and it's 'ust so much fun tobein. , ., . everyone and it's 'ust so much fun tobein. ,~/ . .,, to be in. fuzzy logic is a group that is all— to be in. fuzzy logic is a group that is all about _ to be in. fuzzy logic is a group that is all about challenging i that is all about challenging people's perceptions about dance.
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you just want to get more and more of it. itjust encapsulates you. you can't describe it in words because it is just so amazing. [30 can't describe it in words because it isjust so amazing.— it isjust so amazing. do you like seeinu it isjust so amazing. do you like seeing the _ it isjust so amazing. do you like seeing the audience _ it isjust so amazing. do you like seeing the audience reaction? . it isjust so amazing. do you like - seeing the audience reaction? yeah, it is all the fun _ seeing the audience reaction? yeah, it is all the fun thing. _ seeing the audience reaction? yeah, it is all the fun thing. it's _ seeing the audience reaction? yeah, it is all the fun thing. it's very - it is all the fun thing. it's very helpful— it is all the fun thing. it's very helpful to _ it is all the fun thing. it's very helpful to tell our be doing a dance — helpful to tell our be doing a dance. ., ., ., ~' helpful to tell our be doing a dance. ., ., ., 4' ., helpful to tell our be doing a dance. ., ., , ., . dance. you look at them. fuzzylogic are now trying _ dance. you look at them. fuzzylogic are now trying to _ dance. you look at them. fuzzylogic are now trying to get _ dance. you look at them. fuzzylogic are now trying to get new _ dance. you look at them. fuzzylogic are now trying to get new members| are now trying to get new members between the ages of ten and 18 and have open auditions this saturday. it's about coming along with a willingness to give it a go and to embrace our style of high—energy physical dance theatre. with; embrace our style of high-energy physical dance theatre.— embrace our style of high-energy physical dance theatre. why do you think there is _ physical dance theatre. why do you think there is still _ physical dance theatre. why do you think there is still in _ physical dance theatre. why do you think there is still in 2021 _ physical dance theatre. why do you think there is still in 2021 some - think there is still in 2021 some male resistance to getting involved in dance? to male resistance to getting involved in dance? ., , ., , male resistance to getting involved in dance? ., , in dance? to be honest, i don't know. ithink— in dance? to be honest, i don't know. i think maybe _ in dance? to be honest, i don't know. i think maybe they - in dance? to be honest, i don't know. i think maybe they are i in dance? to be honest, i don't. know. i think maybe they are just nervous. they are like, oh, i have heard it is like this... i say, how about you just try it? it won't hurt you. about you 'ust try it? it won't hurt ou. ., , about you 'ust try it? it won't hurt ou. ., , ., about you 'ust try it? it won't hurt ou. ., , ., ., ~ ., ., , about you 'ust try it? it won't hurt
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ou. ., ., ~ ., ., you. the group are working towards a bi ublic you. the group are working towards a big public performance _ you. the group are working towards a big public performance at _ you. the group are working towards a big public performance at the - you. the group are working towards a big public performance at the master| big public performance at the master mayflower studio on august 21. it is the first main _ mayflower studio on august 21. it is the first main big performance we are doing — the first main big performance we are doing as a group. fiver the first main big performance we are doing as a group.— are doing as a group. over the cominu are doing as a group. over the coming weeks. _ are doing as a group. over the coming weeks, a _ are doing as a group. over the coming weeks, a great - are doing as a group. over the coming weeks, a great deal i are doing as a group. over the coming weeks, a great deal ofj are doing as a group. over the - coming weeks, a great deal of effort will go into creating and fine tuning the performance. some of the best adaptive surfers from around the world are showcasing their talents in bristol today. it's a para—sport which is becoming increasingly popular, and many are hoping the event will build the case for nationalfunding. john maguire reports. water can be a great leveller and surf even more so. this competition is the english adaptive surfing open. the athletes are divided into different groups depending on their disabilities. but it's their tablet ty disabilities. but it's their tablet ty that is really impressive. tash
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compete in an assisted category with someone to help her push off and someone to help her push off and someone to help her push off and someone to catch her nearer the shore. �* , . someone to catch her nearer the shore. �*, ., _, , , someone to catch her nearer the shore. �*, ., , , , shore. it's a completely different exnerience _ shore. it's a completely different exnerience to — shore. it's a completely different experience to other— shore. it's a completely different experience to other different - experience to other different activities and sports i have done online. it is really difficult as a wheelchair user to be able to go to the beach and get in the water which other people do really easily, so actually having a set up where people are around help you get in the water and enjoy getting on a board and catching waves, is a really unique experience for me. martin was blown up while serving with the army in afghanistan. triple amputee, he has developed a special prosthesis to help him paddle. i feel less restricted in the water than _ feel less restricted in the water than i _ feel less restricted in the water than i do — feel less restricted in the water than i do on land. it seems like... my paddling — than i do on land. it seems like... my paddling is a lot slower than most _ my paddling is a lot slower than most people, but i can still move around _ most people, but i can still move around pretty much the same. i'm actually— around pretty much the same. i'm actually riding smaller boards than actually riding smaller boards than a lot of— actually riding smaller boards than a lot of people and ijust feel freer~ —
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a lot of people and i 'ust feel freer. , , ., , freer. this competition has been runnina freer. this competition has been running for _ freer. this competition has been running for four _ freer. this competition has been running for four years. _ freer. this competition has been running for four years. the - freer. this competition has been running for four years. the last i running for four years. the last two, here at the wave artificial surf lake near bristol. this sport is determined to grow full stops surfing will feature at the summer's 0lympics for the first time, so the ambition is for it to be featured in future paralympics, too. £311" future paralympics, too. our athletes do _ future paralympics, too. our athletes do an _ future paralympics, too. o!" athletes do an amazing job future paralympics, too. cl" athletes do an amazing job with no core funding from government at the moment, so it is all of their own backs, getting themselves out to world championships and other events and we really want to change that. we know the benefits that adaptive surfing brings, how good it is for you and for your mental health and mental resilience. so we are super, super keen on getting adaptive surfing properly funded going forwards. this surfing properly funded going forwards. �* , . surfing properly funded going forwards. a ., ., ., forwards. as with all para or ada tive forwards. as with all para or adaptive sports, _ forwards. as with all para or adaptive sports, it - forwards. as with all para or adaptive sports, it is - forwards. as with all para or adaptive sports, it is not. forwards. as with all para or. adaptive sports, it is not about what these athletes can't do, it's about what they can do.
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a 98—year—old british woman has been awarded france's highest honour for her top secret wartime work. betty webb was stationed at bletchley park during the second world war — decrypting enemy messages. she's now received the legion d'honneur for her services asjoanne writtle reports. i'd never heard of bletchley and i certainly didn't know what went on there. it was a complete surprise to me. bletchley park, secret home of the world war ii code breakers was where betty webb went aged 18. her mother had taught her to speak german as a child. when she joined up in wartime, it was to become a valuable skill. i was taken into the mansion to sign the official secrets act, which as you can imagine was a very formidable document. and i realised that from then
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on there was no way i was going to be able to tell even my parents where i was and what i was doing. until 1975. in fact, she was playing a critical role in intercepting and deciphering enemy messages and now she has been given france's highest accolade for her work. describe the atmosphere between you and your colleagues at bletchley park. i remember it being very friendly. we were all doing a job which we knew had to be done. but we were all very much in the dark. bearing in mind that we had signed the official secrets act, we could not talk about anything outside our own room. it was that strict. betty has since written her memoirs and received an mbe. when she lodged with a family near bletchley park, her lips remained sealed. ijust said i was doing a boring secretaryjob. that was my answer. i believe a lot of people
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adopted that attitude. later, she crossed the atlantic to serve at the pentagon. working was wonderful. i was one of 32,000 people in the pentagon. the working conditions were very modern and very pleasant. in the main, i got on very well with the americans. post—war, she became a school secretary at ludlow in shropshire for a boss who knew not to ask questions. the head happened to be an ex bletchley man himself so he didn't ask me any awkward questions. which was a godsend because a lot of prospective employers couldn't understand why i couldn't tell them what i'd been doing. in case you're wondering, betty is 98. her recollections are razor—sharp and her conversation compelling. what a wonderful, wonderful woman.
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much more coming up, all the latest news at 10pm. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. good afternoon. we're heading towards the middle of the summer now and the weather seems to be stuck in a bit of a pattern of sunshine and showers at the moment. but we have got some blue sky and some sunshine out there. this is the picture in gravesend in kent, taken recently by one of our weather watchers stop the shower cloud is building through the remainder of the day, and in fact, over the next few days, we are going to keep that theme. sunny spells and scattered showers. low pressure not far away. it's sitting off to the east. we got a ridge of slightly higher pressure starting to build in and squeeze away those showers, but certainly through the rest of the afternoon, into the evening, parts of england and wales, particularly towards the east, will see a few of those scattered showers. at wimbledon, i think most of them should stay towards the north so temperatures around about 22 celsius or so as we head through the early evening, and it should stay dry. just an outside chance of a passing shower. a few heavy showers, too, for eastern scotland for a time. they should largely fade away, most places are becoming dry with clear spells tonight
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and temperatures down to between 12—14 celsius. a little bit of showery rain into the far south—west first thing friday morning. it will be cloudier across western and northern parts of the uk tomorrow with a few spots of drizzly rain. central and eastern parts of england tending to brighten up with sunny spells, but similar to recent days, we are going to see those afternoon showers bubbling up, and they could be quite slow moving and heavy per parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. there is a small risk of some localised flooding around because the showers are not moving through in a hurry. and pollen levels are also going to be high or very high across much of england, wales, southern scotland, northern ireland, too. just moderate across central and northern scotland. but into friday evening, still some of these really heavy showers with thunder, lightning and hail across eastern areas. they will slowly fade away overnight on friday and into the weekend as well. butjust in time for the weekend, this next area of low pressure arrives from the south—west. it looks like that's going to affect southern parts of england and wales initially on a saturday. quite heavy, persistent rain, too. slowly clearing eastwards.
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then we are left with another day of sunshine and hit and miss heavy, scattered downpours as well. most likely across parts of eastern scotland, eastern england, too. but we will see some of them cropping up further west later in the day. probably a little bit drier for northern ireland, and temperatures generally down a notch on recent days, perhaps into the low 20s. it remains unsettled. more rain towards the north on sunday. and further showers into the new working week. goodbye.
2:00 pm
list this is bbc new list s. this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines... no more quarantine for uk residents who are double jabbed, when they return to england from amber list countries this summer — like portugal and greece. as one of the world's most vaccinated countries, we must use these advantages to restore many of the freedoms that have been lost over recent months. kane is there to follow in! england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years and now face italy at wembley on sunday. to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days. you know, we're here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet, and we know we've got everybody with us.

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