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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the long wait is over, england's historymakers beat denmark to reach their first major final since 1966 to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days, you know, we are here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet and we know we've got everybody with us. across the country, from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fanzones, the nation celebrated a famous night for the three lions. who'd have thought this? six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic. this is just what the country needed. where will you be watching the final? let us know your plans by tweeting me...
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japan's government declares a state of emergency for the tokyo area ahead of the the olympic games the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high chancellor rishi sunak defends the decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. this was a temporary measure, it was always intended to be a temporary measure and much like all the other things that we have done, they were the things that we put in place to deal with the crisis. plans for how and when fully vaccinated travellers can go abroad without having to quarantine on their return are to be set out later.
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. england have reached the final of euro 2020 after beating denmark 2—1 in front of more than 60,000 fans at wembley. captain harry kane hit the winner in extra time to secure a place against italy on sunday. if england win, it will be their first major tournament victory since the 1966 world cup, 55 years ago. a warning, this report from tim allman has some flashing images. england fans have waited a long time for this. 55 years, england fans have waited a long time forthis. 55 years, in england fans have waited a long time for this. 55 years, in fact. 55 years since they had last reached the final of a major tournament. so you can understand why they wanted
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to have a party. in london, they danced in trafalgar square. they danced in trafalgar square. they danced on top of double—decker buses. and it wasn'tjust the capital. all across the country they celebrated, as of the tournament had already been one! north, south, east and west, everyone understanding the significance of three very important words. it’s significance of three very important words. �* , . ., significance of three very important words. �* , _, ., significance of three very important words. �*, _, ., �*, significance of three very important words. �*, ., �*, words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there — words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there is— words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there is no _ words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there is no other _ words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there is no other option. - words. it's coming home, it's coming home! there is no other option. we l home! there is no other option. we are in the final, england are in a final, for the first time in who cares how many years? i final, for the first time in who cares how many years? i think auainst cares how many years? i think against italy — cares how many years? i think against italy boom _ cares how many years? i think against italy boom will - cares how many years? i think against italy boom will be - cares how many years? i think against italy boom will be a i cares how many years? i think| against italy boom will be a lot better— against italy boom will be a lot better than we would against spain. i say quietly, i have had a couple of beers! — i say quietly, i have had a couple of beers! �* ., , i say quietly, i have had a couple of beers! ~ ., , of beers! also loudly confident where the _ of beers! also loudly confident where the supporters - of beers! also loudly confident where the supporters and - of beers! also loudly confident - where the supporters and wembley stadium. covid safety measures meant it was only about two thirds full. among those in attendance, the prime minister, suitably attired for the occasion. he was no doubt
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disappointed when denmark took the lead on the half—hour mark. this stunning free kick making it 1—0. but within ten minutes england were on level terms, the danish own goal sending wembley into raptures. we had to wait until extra time for a winner, raheem sterling going down in the box. penalty. up stepped harry kane whose shot was saved but then he tapped in the rebound. and what a sweet night for gareth southgate? 25 years after his own semifinal disappointment as a player, he leads his nation into a majorfinal as a manager. for player, he leads his nation into a major final as a manager. for our count , major final as a manager. for our country. i — major final as a manager. for our country. i mean. _ major final as a manager. for our country, i mean, i've— major final as a manager. for our country, i mean, i've not- major final as a manager. for our country, i mean, i've not heard i major final as a manager. for our. country, i mean, i've not heard this new wembley like that ever, and to be able to share that with everybody and share it with everybody at home is very special. 55 and share it with everybody at home is very special-— and share it with everybody at home is very special-— is very special. 55 years is a long, lona is very special. 55 years is a long, long time- _ is very special. 55 years is a long, long time. more _ is very special. 55 years is a long, long time. more than _ is very special. 55 years is a long, long time. more than half- is very special. 55 years is a long, long time. more than half a - is very special. 55 years is a long, i long time. more than half a century of heartache, of handballs, penalty misses and red cards. but now, england believes anything is
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possible. tim allman, bbc news. john watson is at wembley this morning. good morning to you, what a night! it had all the elements, lots of tension, tough game. really interesting game to watch but then the euphoria at the end for the england fans and of course we have to mention the danish who played so well. �* , ,., , to mention the danish who played so well. , , , ., , well. absolutely, yes, a very good mornin: well. absolutely, yes, a very good morning from _ well. absolutely, yes, a very good morning from wembley _ well. absolutely, yes, a very good morning from wembley and - well. absolutely, yes, a very good morning from wembley and it - well. absolutely, yes, a very good morning from wembley and it wasj morning from wembley and it was tough. when you think about how comfortable the quarterfinal against ukraine was, very different here last night and that was the big question facing england. they had not conceded in the tournament so far, what would happen when they were put under pressure and they were put under pressure and they were after that stunning free kick but they answered emphatically as they managed to equalise through the danish own goal and harry kane stepping up with the penalty as the match went into extra time. the plan for england throughout this tournament was to try and reshape the history, the negativity that
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followed them into major tournaments, you think of the penalty miss at italia 90, the effort from chris waddle, gareth southgate the england manager now missing that penalty in euro 96 and they wanted to create more positive stories and you look at the images on the pitch last night and arguably, they have done that. declan ricejumping on the back of harry maguire who after his brilliant performance singing suite caroline in front of the fans, the brilliant break into the box to set “p brilliant break into the box to set up the equalising goal for england. held aloft by other players and it's these type of images which i think will now, we will reflect on going forward into other tournaments and other big matches. gareth southgate celebrating on the pitch and applauding the fans. the disappointment he suffered here all those years ago, he has a shot at glory in the final on sunday. there was a really touching moment when we saw mason mount were starting for england again last night, he went
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over to the fans and he gave his shirt to a young girl. she was almost in tears. with delight. such a special moment for her and i guess it encapsulate what that means the nation, for her, it's unifying. that is something have witnessed. inside the stadium last night, flags from all the countries, bringing the nation together, bringing people together and we wonder what will happen as england go against italy in the final on sunday. tough match once again, you consider how well italy have played, really strong defensive side. they used all other streetwise qualities to come through against spain in the last round and closing the match out against belgium but we saw that from england as well as night. as they managed to close out the match in the latter stages of extra time. who knows how it will play out on sunday? 0ne it will play out on sunday? one thing is for sure,
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it will play out on sunday? one thing is forsure, it it will play out on sunday? one thing is for sure, it will be dramatic, high drama. yes, you wonder how your nerves will be on sunday! i wonder how your nerves will be on sunda ! ., wonder how your nerves will be on sunda ! . ., ., ,~' ., sunday! i am not asking for predictions _ sunday! i am not asking for predictions yet, _ sunday! i am not asking for predictions yet, i _ sunday! i am not asking for predictions yet, i will - sunday! i am not asking for predictions yet, i will not i sunday! i am not asking for| predictions yet, i will not be sunday! i am not asking for - predictions yet, i will not be that cruel, it is a bit early but i wonder what you think the psychological and tactical challenges will be for england as they prepare to face italy? trier? they prepare to face italy? very tou~h they prepare to face italy? very tou . h to they prepare to face italy? very tough to say- — they prepare to face italy? very tough to say- i _ they prepare to face italy? very tough to say. i think— they prepare to face italy? very tough to say. i think when - they prepare to face italy? - tough to say. i think when you look at teams at this stage of the tournament, there are art tournament harden, they are ready, they have produced big results in big matches, build momentum and they are deserving of their place and the thing that is interesting between italy and england, you look at the togetherness in the squad, you would not say there is any one individual who has stood out for both teams and you think about the individuals, the likes of cristiano ronaldo for portugal, pol pot but for france, it's not the individual is starring in the biggest stage, it is the collective that has proved the most important factor and i think that is something italy and england share but italy are a superb team. you
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look at their defensive line—up. hardened veterans, strong defensive players. harry kane and raheem sterling will have to go up against them on sunday and they have a brilliant midfield. players instrumental in forming and shaping that run so very tell players that england will go up against but as england will go up against but as england have proved so far, albeit conceding just one goal, they have been defensively solid and proved hard to beat and harry kane peaking atjust hard to beat and harry kane peaking at just the hard to beat and harry kane peaking atjust the right hard to beat and harry kane peaking at just the right time hard to beat and harry kane peaking atjust the right time and raheem sterling again, last night, showing why gareth southgate has put his faith in him throughout this tournament, his ability to run and run and continue to stretch play last night in the latter stages of extra time, worth pointing out as we saw with italy, they came through a tough penalty shoot—out against spain in extra time so tiredness could well be a factor but this is where the squad is in the play and the strength that the teams have on their bench and that is a huge
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advantage that england has and gareth southgate has been good at managing players and bringing players in at the right time. i think that squad, togetherness, will be crucial for england heading think that squad, togetherness, will be crucialfor england heading into the huge game on sunday. john watson, thank _ the huge game on sunday. john watson, thank you _ the huge game on sunday. john watson, thank you so much. the three lions to victory. fanzones, bars and living rooms. by kieran trippier�*s brother. these are memories to last a lifetime.
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and, boy, did we need this moment. well, it'sjust brilliant to see people celebrating like this. it'sjust, who'd have thought this, six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic, this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. commentator: the long, long wait is over. into the final of a major tournament. for the first time in 55 years.
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this was euphoria. # it's coming home, it's . coming home, it's coming, football's coming home!# and it was felt in garden bars. on london buses. in preston. they believed it, and they never gave in, did they? in croydon. england are in the final for the first time in, who cares how many years? in birmingham. in newcastle. we are confident, we're on form, we are going all the way. - next stop, italy. in wembley, on sunday. and the first chance
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at a major trophy since 1966. last night, there were many households with split loyalties — let's speak to one of them — joining me are rob and julie smith and their two sons sebastian and marcus. good morning to all of you. rob, as we told viewers yesterday, you moved to denmark 20 years ago. you're wife is danish. the boys, marcus, i think it was you who said make the best team win, very diplomatically. what did you think of the match? i thought it was good. i think both teams played well. but harry kane made a very good goal. he teams played well. but harry kane made a very good goal.— teams played well. but harry kane made a very good goal. he made the difference, didn't _ made a very good goal. he made the difference, didn't he _ made a very good goal. he made the difference, didn't he and _ made a very good goal. he made the difference, didn't he and i _ made a very good goal. he made the difference, didn't he and i thought i difference, didn't he and i thought both goalkeepers were brilliant. it
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was a fascinating match all in. rob, really tense at times, wasn't it? when the danish scored first we were thinking, _ when the danish scored first we were thinking, not again! it was great that england came back straightaway and i that england came back straightaway and i think_ that england came back straightaway and i think even though it was an own goal. — and i think even though it was an own goal. i— and i think even though it was an own goal, i think raheem sterling would _ own goal, i think raheem sterling would have got there otherwise. it was a _ would have got there otherwise. it was a highly tense game, we talked ahout— was a highly tense game, we talked about it _ was a highly tense game, we talked about it not going into extra time and then— about it not going into extra time and then it — about it not going into extra time and then it did, everyone was thinking — and then it did, everyone was thinking about the nightmare of english — thinking about the nightmare of english penalties again. really glad. — english penalties again. really glad, the penalty, was it a penalty? harry— glad, the penalty, was it a penalty? harry kane — glad, the penalty, was it a penalty? harry kane did really well to pick up harry kane did really well to pick up the _ harry kane did really well to pick up the rebound. we harry kane did really well to pick up the rebound.— harry kane did really well to pick u- the rebound. ~ . , , up the rebound. we heard yesterday, evenin: , up the rebound. we heard yesterday, evening. you — up the rebound. we heard yesterday, evening. you were — up the rebound. we heard yesterday, evening, you were planning _ up the rebound. we heard yesterday, evening, you were planning a - evening, you were planning a barbecue for lots of friends of yours. some english, some danish. what was the atmosphere lie? it was a treat what was the atmosphere lie? it was a great atmosphere. _ what was the atmosphere lie? it was a great atmosphere. everyone - what was the atmosphere lie? it was a great atmosphere. everyone was i a great atmosphere. everyone was happy and jolly. yes, but you could see when the game started, work
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people's hearts really were! fiifi people's hearts really were! ok, that's interesting. _ people's hearts really were! ok, that's interesting. sebastien, you and your brother yesterday when i spoke to you, you weren't100% sure about where your loyalties would lie once the game started? tell me about you. are you behind the danish team? 0r england? you. are you behind the danish team? or encland? ~ you. are you behind the danish team? 0r england?— or england? well, i can't lie, i was mostly on — or england? well, i can't lie, i was mostly on the _ or england? well, i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish _ or england? well, i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish side - or england? well, i can't lie, i was mostly on the danish side because| or england? well, i can't lie, i was i mostly on the danish side because it is my— mostly on the danish side because it is my mother— mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country _ mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country so _ mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country so i _ mostly on the danish side because it is my mother country so i was - mostly on the danish side because it| is my mother country so i was hoping for the _ is my mother country so i was hoping for the danish— is my mother country so i was hoping for the danish when _ is my mother country so i was hoping for the danish when but _ is my mother country so i was hoping for the danish when but i— is my mother country so i was hoping for the danish when but i wasn't- for the danish when but i wasn't angry— for the danish when but i wasn't angry at— for the danish when but i wasn't angry at the _ for the danish when but i wasn't angry at the english _ for the danish when but i wasn't angry at the english team, - for the danish when but i wasn't angry at the english team, they| angry at the english team, they played — angry at the english team, they played well _ angry at the english team, they played well. fire _ angry at the english team, they played well-— angry at the english team, they -la ed well. �* y., ., , played well. are you all in behind encland played well. are you all in behind england now _ played well. are you all in behind england now for _ played well. are you all in behind england now for the _ played well. are you all in behind england now for the final - played well. are you all in behind england now for the final on - played well. are you all in behind - england now for the final on sunday? yes, absolutely, it was nice also, if we had only been danish people in the house it would have been, but it was happy to see the other guys happy so it was a party anyway! it was a nice moment, wasn't it, when the two captains exchanged that
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shirt for christian eriksen, that was a really nice touch, wasn't it? absolutely, huge amount of respect and harry kane is a big friend of christian eriksen and a lot of the players knew each other, there was a lot of respect on the pitch. it was a good result. it could have gone either way but yes, so glad england got through into their first final in 55 years. super excited for sunday. in 55 years. super excited for sunda . �* , , ., , in 55 years. super excited for sunda. �*, , ., , ., in 55 years. super excited for sunda. ., , , sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with ou sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with you all — sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with you all again. _ sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with you all again. thank _ sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with you all again. thank you - sunday. it's been lovely to catch up with you all again. thank you so - with you all again. thank you so much and enjoy the game on sunday! thank you. much and en'oy the game on sunday! thank ou. . .,, much and en'oy the game on sunday! thank ou. . ., , ,, thank you. that was the smith famil , thank you. that was the smith family. who — thank you. that was the smith family, who live _ thank you. that was the smith family, who live north - thank you. that was the smith family, who live north of- family, who live north of copenhagen. we have been asking you to send in your tweets about what you're saying and one viewer says she will be watching the finals at home, i am she will be watching the finals at home, iam italian, my british friends will be supporting italy with me, and don't want to be seen in public doing that! and this from
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chris, i966, in public doing that! and this from chris, 1966, what an auspicious date who says i will be watching it on, probably behind the sofa! i think a lot of people might be doing that, or at least through their fingers, slightly nervously, it will be nail—biting. please let us know what your plans are for sunday. watching the final. do get in touch with me on twitter. use the hashtag bbc your questions. the headlines on bbc news. the long wait is over, england history makers beat denmark to reach their first major final since 1966. across the country from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fan zones, the nation celebrated a famous night or the three lions. japan �*s government declares a state of emergency for the tokyo area ahead of the olympic games.
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the uk chancellor rishi sunak who has been speaking this morning about the government's plans to cut the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. earlier, our chief political correspondent adam fleming gave us the latest. well, this an increase of universal credit of £20 a week which amounts to £1000 a year extra for about 6 million families was first introduced in spring 2020 and then extended after a bit of a discussion in government in spring 2021. but it is ending in september this year. and mr sunak has been doing interviews this morning where he has been giving the rationale for that. it was always the intention, this was a temporary measure, it was always intended to be a temporary measure and much like all the other things that we have done, there were the things that we put in place to deal with the crisis, to deal with the very difficult situation that we faced that started last year. and those things
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will come to an end, much like the furlough scheme, for example, which will also come to an end in september but it is only one part of our overall package of support and the reason i'm here talking to you today is a year ago today i outlined our plan forjobs and the good news is we have stuck to that plan and that plan is working. out and about, i'm here today at covent garden market, i was in the west midlands yesterday and everywhere i go, i see great opportunities, new kick starters starting theirjobs, apprentices learning new skills, people coming back from furlough, businesses that have received our support and are now looking forward to growing and expanding and creating newjobs for people and that's absolutely what we should be focused on now and we should have confidence because the plan is working. and, adam, the chancellor was also asked about whether the government would scrap the triple lock on pensions. perhaps for our viewers, you could remind them exactly what that means? and what your interpretation is of the fact he would not be drawn on that. he said he did not want to speculate on what
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the decision might ultimately be. so the triple lock means that the state pension goes up every year by the higher of 2.5% or inflation or the increase in wages nationally. so it is a guarantee that the state pension will always go up by at least 2.5% and it is the centrepiece of the tory manifesto and has been the centrepiece of the tory manifestoes of the past and is the commitment that the conservative prime ministers have always wanted to stick by. now, because of a statistical quirk of how the pandemic has affected wages and the recovery has affected wages, the increase in wages is currently 8% which would mean the government should be pencilling in an increase in the state pension of 8% next year, a decision that will be made later this year. so listen very carefully now to what mr sunak said when he was asked if the triple lock was definitely still going to be in place when the decision is made. the triple lock is the government's policy but i very much recognise people's concerns.
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what i would say is the numbers that you mentioned at this point are speculation because we have not actually got them yet, that happens later on but i recognise people's concerns on this, i think they are legitimate and fair concerns to raise and what i would say when we look at this properly at the appropriate time, your word is the right word, fairness, that will be absolutely driving what we do and we want to make sure the decisions we make in the decisions we have our fair both for pensioners and for taxpayers. it is that word fairness and taxpayers that suggest it is a pretty big hint from the chancellor there that state pensions will not go up by 8% next year which means the triple lock could be under a little bit of a threat. however, the decision will not be made until later in the year. who knows what the actual wages numbers may look like once the statistics have settled down or can the government find another way of interpreting the increase in wages that means that
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the bill could be much smaller and a little bit more sustainable? british mps have called on the government to take a much stronger stand on the government to take of the uyghur people and other muslim minorities in xinjiang. this follows a formal declaration by the british parliament in april that genocide was taking place. the cross—party foreign affairs committee is now calling for actions, including a ban on imports of cotton and for a fan boycott of the winter olympics in beijing. the government says it has already imposed sanctions against chinese officials. i can speak now to sir iain duncan smith, the co—founder of the inter—parliamentary alliance on china. thank on china. you forjoining us this morning. thank you forjoining us this morning. the foreign affairs committee as we have been reflecting once a much stronger stance against china on this so tell us about the steps you would like to see. can i save the inter-parliamentary - steps you would like to see. can i save the inter— parliamentary lines save the inter—parliamentary lines in china is a british thing, we have
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over 20 countries in it, including countries in africa. we are in agreement with this particular foreign affairs report, one of the big problems we have had as i think the uk government to be quite frank has been dragging its feet over where it really stands on china, on the one hand it has condemned orally some of the excesses and on the other hand it has shied away from declaring that in actual fact, china is committing genocide on the uighur people, it's already been operating like that into bed for decades but it's really going hard at the uighur people with the most terrible abuses, forced sterilisation, forced labour camps thousands of miles away from their homes, lots of products now produced by these forced labour chains and the guidance on government is weak in the sense the government is weak in the sense the government whilst it says it condemns this and says it's looking and export controls, what it absolutely appears to not have is
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import controls or actually any guidance to companies worried about their supply chain as to which companies are guilty of this or are suspected of being guilty of it. i agree with the committee report, we have got to get the un to look at this, the icc is one avenue, china says they are not a member so that causes a problem, they tend to block any reference to the un so the uk government has got to say it is genocide and now we are going to have to put import controls on products coming from china. you are basically saying _ products coming from china. you are basically saying words _ products coming from china. you are basically saying words are _ products coming from china. you are basically saying words are all - products coming from china. you are basically saying words are all very . basically saying words are all very well but back in april parliament declared genocide was taking place in xinjiang so time is absolutely of the essence. you talk about export controls. what about any action around the winter olympics? 0ut likely do you think it is boris johnson the prime minister would implement something like that? actually it's notjust export controls, the other port was import controls. i controls, the other port was import controls. , , ., controls, the other port was import controls. , ., controls. i beg your pardon, import controls, absolutely. _ controls. i beg your pardon, import controls, absolutely. bringing - controls, absolutely. bringing -roducts controls, absolutely. bringing products in —
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controls, absolutely. bringing products in from _ controls, absolutely. bringing products in from china - controls, absolutely. bringing products in from china that i controls, absolutely. bringing. products in from china that has controls, absolutely. bringing - products in from china that has got slave labour in it is wrong. 0n the olympics, i was very early on over a 0lympics, i was very early on over a year ago now, saying the british government needs to say it does not believe these 0lympics should take place in china. they should never have been granted in the first place to china. the uk government needs to step away, in other words, say we will not attend, no government ministers will attend, and we will not give it any national credibility. it's up to athletes themselves and the olympic committee to decide what to do in terms of that but the government itself could set the terms by saying the uk government will not acknowledge this. as an 0lympics. and believes the olympics should be moved to another country. d0 the olympics should be moved to another country.— the olympics should be moved to another country. do you really think the government _ another country. do you really think the government will _ another country. do you really think the government will do _ another country. do you really think the government will do that - another country. do you really think the government will do that if - another country. do you really think the government will do that if it - the government will do that if it has an impact on trade with china? this is of course exactly the nail we will hit on the head here which is the uk government is conflicted because it knows very well that the
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chinese president runs a brutal dictatorial, intolerant government, it's notjust committing what we believe to be genocide on the uighur people, or tibetans, believe to be genocide on the uighur people, ortibetans, it's putting pressure on inner mongolians, christians, have all felt the force of the authority, churches smashed, organ transfers forced on certain people and hong kong, they have trashed an international treaty, arresting peaceful democracy campaigners and yet the british government still refuses categorically to declare the chinese government is unacceptable in these regards and then of course the latest speech by the chinese president, if many of your viewers did not know, he said the other day any interference, any involvement by foreign governments would have their heads bashed against bloodied against a will of steel. he is absolutely determined on domination with the world �*s largest economy and the largest ministry as his
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ambitions so we have to be very careful what we are trading with and so i think we need to review all of our trade links with china. i so i think we need to review all of our trade links with china.- our trade links with china. i also if i ma our trade links with china. i also if i may want — our trade links with china. i also if i may want to _ our trade links with china. i also if i may want to ask _ our trade links with china. i also if i may want to ask you - our trade links with china. i also if i may want to ask you about i our trade links with china. i also i if i may want to ask you about the announcement from the government in the uk yesterday that it was removing that £20 top up to universal credit that was brought in. at the beginning of the coronavirus crisis. you were one of a number of former work and pensions secretary is to urge the government not to do that, you said the failure to act would mean not grasping this opportunity to invest in a future with more work and less poverty and would damage living standards, health and opportunities. is the government being short—sighted in doing this? i government being short-sighted in doin: this? ., government being short-sighted in doin: this? ~' ., doing this? i think the government needs to think _ doing this? i think the government needs to think again _ doing this? i think the government needs to think again about - doing this? i think the government needs to think again about this. i i needs to think again about this. i mean, let's get this straight. i brought universal credit in, i designed it, at the time of the then chancellor george osborne and the treasury, one of the reasons why i resigned, took significant amounts of money and pretty much what the uplift amounts to so this uplift in
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many senses simply restores what was originally intended for universal credit. and improves their its functioning. universal credit has been one of the great success stories during the pandemic, it's taken on an unbelievable extra number of people, it's cupped, people are getting their money on time, even stephen timms of the labour party said it has become a national asset and we need to invest in it and i agree. it's notjust an unemployment benefit, when the government talks about this, they talk about unemployment benefit, it's a back to work benefit so some of that money can't move into lowering what they call the tape at rates, the withdrawal rates as people go up the hours into work to encourage them to make those steps and help them as they go up. that would be a net positive and actually would be a net positive and actually would reduce the overall cost because as they go back into work and accelerate into work, they will pay taxes and they will be receiving so much if not any of that benefit as they enter full—time work so it's as they enter full—time work so it's a bit short—sighted to say we are just going to withdraw it and i
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heard something the other day that somebody said. cutting the benefit will mean people get into were quicker, not the case. universal credit is designed to help people into work. too often have big and significant problem satisfy this investment was a good idea and i never thought it would be temporary, i thought it should be permanent. sir iain duncan smith, thank you for your time today. let's talk briefly about the england denmark game in the year as last night. the semifinal. we see an audience 23.86 million viewers watched england �*s historic victory taking them through to the euros final against italy on sunday evening. that will be at wembley. an audience of 23.86 million watching last night. let me just at that point bring in a few more tweets about what you'll be doing on sunday. peter says i am from kenyan, england has been my all—time team, i have never watched england play any final since i was
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born, finally i get to watch them from my couch with a cold beer! and this from one viewer who says i will be watching the final, come on england, let's bring it home. and bethan who says the final falls on our wedding day but not to worry, we will be hosting a wedding euros party in the evening, let's hope they win to keep the spirits high! and she asked the hashtag bring it home for the mixed weenies! have a wonderful wedding day, and i hope there is even more to celebrate in there is even more to celebrate in the evening after the game. thank you for all of the streets, please send me some more on twitter. reports suggest that the government will be isuing new guidance to clinically extremely vulnerable and immunosuppressed people in england for what they should do after the latest lockdown easing begins on the 19th ofjuly. it comes after a meeting between england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam, and charities representing those affected. while the vaccine offers a level of protection against covid—19 for most people, for an estimated 500,000 in the uk —
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with a range of medical conditions — the jabs are unlikely to work. many of those people said they feel �*overlooked', and �*terrified' of the potential increased risk to them after restrictions ease. well, blood cancer uk is one of the groups representing people who will be affected by that change in guidance. their director of research, services and engagement, helen rowntree, joins me now. thank you very much for talking to us today at bbc news. after boris johnson's announcement on monday, we saw lots of people, groups representing clinically extremely vulnerable people or patients themselves are saying where are we and all of this? what sort of feedback have you had from the people you work with about the lack of information? the people you work with about the lack of information?— of information? the first thing to sa is that of information? the first thing to say is that announcement - of information? the first thing to say is that announcement there l of information? the first thing to i say is that announcement there was no mention of people who are immune
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compromised immune suppressed and what the 19th ofjuly would mean for them. what we have heard since there is a range of responses that many people felt fearful, abandoned, a sense of being left behind, left out of considerations, and what we want to see now is a real effort to ensure that these needs are addressed. 0ne ensure that these needs are addressed. one of the things that we have been particularly keen to emphasise is that for many people in the situation, they are not necessarily aware that the vaccines will provide potentially a lower level of protection for them compared to people who have a healthy immune system. in a survey we did a couple of weeks ago, around 80% of respondents told us that nobody had been in touch or had informed them that that was the case. we want to communication out
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to the 500,000 people who are immune compromised to let them know that thatis compromised to let them know that that is the case and also to provide information about how people can manage the risks, what steps they can take to ensure that they can be as safe as possible after the 19th ofjuly. the other thing we want to see the government do is put the necessary support in place. we heard earlier from the chancellor about the furlough system coming to an end. many people are not able to work at home, their employment is not necessarily covered 19 safe and we want to ensure that people are not feeling compelled to take unnecessary risks and adequate support is in place for them. more financial support is a very important part especially if people feel they cannot continue to work if the restrictions are eased. for those who have been at work, and are
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working, although they are immune suppressed, how big an issue will be, well the removal of facemasks be if they rely on public transport to get their place of work and what would you like the government to do? it is a huge issue and people are feeling very afraid about that prospect. there is no other option available to them other than public transport and for many people they work in work environments where if a facemask is not used, they are not going be covered 19 safe, for example if you work on a factory floor, a level of state protection for people. what we have been really heartened by is that we have heard from lots of people who are not immune suppressed who feel that they need to continue to wear a mask to
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keep others safe. we hope for the majority of the population that people understand that if you wear a facemask it is not about protecting you, it is about keeping other people safe around you. it has been very heartening to see messages from people like unison, and some of the charities medical organisations really supporting facemasks and we hope the government will listen to that and when other governments, we get to hear of plans from the scottish government, when they put their plans in place they take on board some of the feedback that the government in england has had. thank you very much for talking to us about that. more now on england's euro 2020 campaign. let's look ahead to sunday's final. we can talk now to football journalist alasdair mackenzie, who joins us from rome.
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good to have you with us today. was there expectation amongst the italian team that england would be the team that they would meet in the finals? i the team that they would meet in the finals? ., , finals? i think definitely. the were certainly considered _ finals? i think definitely. the were certainly considered favourites i certainly considered favourites going into the game, and people had conversations about what kind of challenge that would be. home advantage is a big thing for england in theirfavour, and england won an away game was in rome. a lot italians saw the europe ukraine game. they are more than aware of this england team and i don't think any one underestimated denmark after the tournament they've had. there is a lot of excitement around what this final is going to bring. gave us a sense of the atmosphere in
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rome. it gave us a sense of the atmosphere in rome. . , , ., ., rome. it has been amazing, quite euhoric rome. it has been amazing, quite euphoric at _ rome. it has been amazing, quite euphoric at times. _ rome. it has been amazing, quite euphoric at times. the _ rome. it has been amazing, quite euphoric at times. the opening i rome. it has been amazing, quite i euphoric at times. the opening game, i was working, it was spine tingling for my career, amazing, it was a big dealfor rome to for my career, amazing, it was a big deal for rome to host the opening match and the way actually performed in that game throughout the group stages has made people more excited. a lot of pride and joy about the way the actually team has been performing, no one expected them to get to the final pre—tournament, anything from this point is really important although they want to win it. after the semifinal win against spain, against belgium, the noise in the city as incredible. people driving with lags out of the windows, honking their horns,
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sirens, people screaming and it has brought the city to life. from sirens, people screaming and it has brought the city to life.— brought the city to life. from both perspectives. _ brought the city to life. from both perspectives, who _ brought the city to life. from both perspectives, who do _ brought the city to life. from both perspectives, who do you - brought the city to life. from both perspectives, who do you think i brought the city to life. from both | perspectives, who do you think the italian team will focus their attention on? presumably harry kane, raheem sterling, who were heavily marked last night, and in terms of italian targets, what you think england needs to look out for? it is an interesting _ england needs to look out for? it 3 an interesting question. raheem sterling as a player they are worried about because how fast he is and he can beat players on one—on—one situations and italy's defence are not strong in that. italy have been superb so far in dictating ball possession and playing their own game until they played against spain when they were on the back fit in that regard. the fans in terms of being able to dictate the game in their way a bit more against the english than they
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did against the spanish, they where the threat that england hold an attack, both teams pride themselves on their strong defences, personally, i can see it going beyond 90 minutes if i'm honest. it is no secret and actually the weapons that england have an attack and that is where most of the focus is. . japan has declared a state of emergency in tokyo that will extend throughout the olympic games. the japanese government says the city is facing a race between coronavirus vaccinations and the spread of the delta variant. the more infectious strain of covid, 19 now accounts for around a third of the cases. 0ur correspondent mariko 0i joins us from tokyo. that is the reason as i have elaborated there in terms of the rise in transmissions of the delta
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variant for these new measures. tell us what the measures will entail. taste us what the measures will entail. - understand that a full state of emergency will be in place from the 12th ofjuly, from monday until the 22nd of august covering the whole duration of the olympics and it will be lifted if it goes ahead as planned, it willjust be lifted just before the paralympic games. we do not know all the details just yet but we understand the government will request a ban on alcohol at bars because there were concerns among medical experts that if people start going out to stadiums and watching games and start drinking afterwards it could lead to more rise in covid—19 cases. we don't know what is going to happen with the spectator numbers. they originally said they would allow up to 10,000 spectators in the
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stadiums, it is likely they are going to change that but we are waiting for an official announcement. , ,., , ., ., announcement. keeping the population rotected is announcement. keeping the population protected is to — announcement. keeping the population protected is to ensure _ announcement. keeping the population protected is to ensure that _ announcement. keeping the population protected is to ensure that the - protected is to ensure that the competition can go ahead even if it means there are fewer spectators than ideally would be the case. yes. than ideally would be the case. yes, because when _ than ideally would be the case. yes, because when the _ than ideally would be the case. 1a: because when the government originally announced they would allow up to 10,000 spectators, there was public opposition, reporting a lot of japanese people feel against the game is going ahead in the first that they should be postponed or cancelled because of this rise in covid—19 cases. when the government said they are going to go ahead, guess what, they will allow spectators, there was a lot of criticism about that but from the government point of view, it spends 25 billion us dollars in preparation
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for the games, with no overseas spectators, it can't expect any financial benefit. ticket sales were one of the last revenues, so the government is hoping to make that revenue but the health and well—being of the population comes first. the government will have likely no spectators at the games. the prime minister as he announced the latest state of emergency said he would consider lifting it earlier if the vaccination roll—out continues as rapidly as it has been. the supply issue has been resilient. thank you very much. south africa's former president, jacob zuma, has handed himself over to police to begin serving a 15 month jail sentence for contempt of court. officers had warned they were prepared to arrest the 79—year—old if he failed to meet an overnight deadline. courtney bembridge has this report — and a warning it contains flashing images.
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less tha n less than an hour before the midnight deadline the president handed himself in. he spent his first night behind barsjust handed himself in. he spent his first night behind bars just over a week after a 15 month jail term for contempt of court. he was convicted for refusing to testify at a corruption enquiry for siphoning off state assets, allegations that he denies. i state assets, allegations that he denies. , ., ., , state assets, allegations that he denies._ southj denies. i plead not guilty. south africa has never— denies. i plead not guilty. south africa has never seen _ denies. i plead not guilty. south africa has never seen a - denies. i plead not guilty. south africa has never seen a former i africa has never seen a former presidentjail before and his supporters are determined that he would not be the first. his son had warned they would fight the ruling. we are not going to allow that. they will have to shed blood for that.
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zuma himself has said that sending him to jail at the age of 79 at the height of a pandemic as a death sentence. he was once an illustrious political figure who battled apartheid alongside with nelson mandela. he drew parallels between his conviction and apartheid. in jail without a trial, it is not different to the apartheid detention without trial.— different to the apartheid detention without trial. , , , . , ., , without trial. zuma's presidency was marked by scandal— without trial. zuma's presidency was marked by scandal and _ without trial. zuma's presidency was marked by scandal and he _ without trial. zuma's presidency was marked by scandal and he was i without trial. zuma's presidency was | marked by scandal and he was forced to resign after nine years in power. much of the country has praised the court's ruling for affirming south africa's democracy and demonstrating that no one is above the law. the headlines on bbc news...
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the long wait is over, england's history makers beat denmark, to reach theirfirst major final since 1966 across the country, from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fanzones, the nation celebrated a famous night for the three lions japan's government declares a state of emergency for the tokyo area ahead of the the olympic games holidaymakers and travel operators are expected to find out today, when fully vaccinated travellers from amber list destinations will no longer have to quarantine. the majority of countries around the world are currently on the amber list and questions remain about how the policy in england will work. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. 0nejab, twojab, nojab. at the moment, it doesn't make any difference to the rules you have to follow when you travel from another country to the uk. that depends on the traffic light system, and whether the country you are coming from is green, amber or red.
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but things could be about to change. today the government is expected to make an announcement about when people who are fully vaccinated might be able to travel from amber list countries, but not have to quarantine on arrival. at the moment, most countries in the world are on the amber list, including spain, greece and the usa. melanie lives in california and is fully vaccinated. she hasn't seen her daughter alana since she left for drama school in london in september. before christmas, melanie's husband thomas died, and alana couldn't come back for her father's funeral. melanie can't quarantine because of her work, but is hoping the rules change so she can visit later this month. it's just heartbreaking. sorry. because it keeps, you know, everything keeps being road blocked in some way. what would it mean to you if the rules did change, in time for you to be able to make this trip? it would mean everything. i miss her so much. we were, we are best friends.
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iam, like, missing my right arm, you know? it's very difficult, and i want to see her more than anything. the travel industry are hoping the policy will be introduced soon to help their summer bookings. this is an industry that's been absolutely beleaguered by the regulations around travel that have gone on for the past nearly 18 months now. and it's time that there was more of an opening up for travel. people have been confused by the regulations to date and we really look forward to a simpler regime going forward. the government has said that public health remains its priority, and it's taking a cautious approach on the resumption of international travel. there are still questions like whether under 18s can avoid quarantine, if travelling with fully vaccinated parents. and whether the scheme will be open just to those jabbed in the uk or to everyone who is fully vaccinated around the world. there will also be questions about what happens to all of those who aren't fully vaccinated yet, and who are hoping to
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jet off this summer. caroline davies, bbc news. kerry golds is the managing director of luxury travel company, abercrombie & kent. lovely to have you with us. the travel industry in particular among a number of sectors has had a really uncertain time for the last 18 months. clearly you are hoping to benefit from a vaccination bounce from people who have been fully vaccinated. what are you hoping for today? we vaccinated. what are you hoping for toda ? ~ ., ., , vaccinated. what are you hoping for toda ? ~ ., ., vaccinated. what are you hoping for toda ?~ ., ., today? we are hoping for some ositive today? we are hoping for some positive news, _ today? we are hoping for some positive news, like _ today? we are hoping for some positive news, like you - today? we are hoping for some positive news, like you say, i today? we are hoping for some positive news, like you say, 18| positive news, like you say, 18 months of pretty torrid times. every industry has suffered in the last 18 months but particularly the travel industry. little or no revenue for so much of the time other than the little reprieve last summer. we are desperately hoping for some positive
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news. howeversmall, desperately hoping for some positive news. however small, we can start to look forward and people have an ability to travel. we are falling behind the other countries like germany and portugal which are accepting fully vaccinated travellers without the need to quarantine. what we are looking at from the industry, despite our amazing achievement of the vaccination programme, why are the uk falling behind? and failing to reap the economic and social rewards? fingers crossed that we are going to get positive news and fully vaccinated travellers will not need to quarantine when they are returning from the green and amber list countries. share returning from the green and amber list countries.— list countries. are we talking about all amber list _ list countries. are we talking about all amber list countries _ list countries. are we talking about all amber list countries currently i all amber list countries currently on the list or some of them? there is a lot of confusion _ on the list or some of them? there is a lot of confusion between i on the list or some of them? there is a lot of confusion between the i is a lot of confusion between the
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government traffic light system and foreign office advice. that needs to be aligned because it is in conflict with itself sometimes. my understanding is that it is going to be forfully understanding is that it is going to be for fully vaccinated on all amber countries. it remains to be seen how the government comes out later today. the government comes out later toda . ~ . . the government comes out later toda .~ . ., . the government comes out later toda. . ., . today. what are your client saying at the moment _ today. what are your client saying at the moment and _ today. what are your client saying at the moment and what - today. what are your client saying at the moment and what is - today. what are your client saying at the moment and what is the i today. what are your client saying i at the moment and what is the level of uncertainty? people keen to get away but not quite sure where to go? exactly. people are very cautious. they are concerned about travelling and being called back again as we saw with portugal recently. a lot of uncertainty. people are desperate to go away, they want to see family and loved ones, to go on holiday. there is a huge amount of pent up demand. they are looking for certainty. for fully vaccinated travellers that
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will give confidence and clarity for them to start booking and to look for those countries that will give them that confidence that they are not going to get called back in a moment in time and they don't have the need to quarantine. the other area to look at is the pcr testing which is a barrier to travellers. briefly on the issue of reassurance, testing, wearing masks, we saw ryanair and easyjet saying they will still require all passengers to wear facemasks after the 19th ofjuly. what is the travel industry doing to reassure people that it's doing its best not to contribute to what we are told is going to be a rising number of cases? we are told is going to be a rising number of cases?— are told is going to be a rising number of cases? we are very supportive _ number of cases? we are very supportive of _ number of cases? we are very supportive of the _ number of cases? we are very supportive of the safe - number of cases? we are very supportive of the safe return i number of cases? we are very| supportive of the safe return to travel, we do not want to do anything that will impact public health. we are reassuring people
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that when you are in your destination, follow the local protocols, the airlines are wearing masks, as you have heard, the airports arejoining masks, as you have heard, the airports are joining together with virgin and british airways to speed up virgin and british airways to speed up the process and ensure that the airports did not have massive queues where social distancing is not achievable to try and protect consumers while they move through the airports. there is a lot of talk and masks will be required on all airlines, i think, and masks will be required on all airlines, ithink, because and masks will be required on all airlines, i think, because of the vicinity of passengers.- airlines, i think, because of the vicinity of passengers. thank you very much _ vicinity of passengers. thank you very much for— vicinity of passengers. thank you very much for all— vicinity of passengers. thank you very much for all of— vicinity of passengers. thank you very much for all of your - thoughts today. a 98—year—old british woman has been awarded france's highest honour for her top secret wartime work. betty webb was stationed at bletchley park during the second world war — decrypting enemy messages. she's now received the legion d'honneur for her services asjoanne writtle reports. i'd never heard of bletchley and i certainly didn't know what went on there. it was a complete surprise to me.
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bletchley park, secret home of the world war ii code breakers was where betty webb went aged 18. her mother had taught her to speak german as a child. when she joined up in wartime, it was to become a valuable skill. i was taken into the mansion to sign the official secrets act, which as you can imagine was a very formidable document. and i realised that from then on there was no way i was going to be able to tell even my parents where i was and what i was doing. until 1975. in fact, she was playing a critical role in intercepting and deciphering enemy messages and now she has been given france's highest accolade for her work. describe the atmosphere between you and your colleagues at bletchley park. i remember it being very friendly.
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we were all doing a job which we knew had to be done. but we were all very much in the dark. bearing in mind that we had signed the official secrets act, we could not talk about anything outside our own room. it was that strict. betty has since written her memoirs and received an mbe. when she lodged with a family near bletchley park, her lips remained sealed. ijust said i was doing a boring secretaryjob. that was my answer. i believe a lot of people adopted that attitude. later, she crossed the atlantic to serve at the pentagon. working was wonderful. i was one of 32,000 people in the pentagon. the working conditions were very modern and very pleasant. in the main, i got on very well with the americans. post—war, she became a school secretary at ludlow in shropshire for a boss who knew not to ask questions. the head happened to be an ex bletchley man himself so he didn't
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ask me any awkward questions. which was a godsend because a lot of prospective employers couldn't understand why i couldn't tell them what i'd been doing. in case you're wondering, betty is 98. her recollections are razor—sharp and her conversation compelling. a couple more tweets about how you are going to spend sunday night. i have a dilemma i am australian with an italian heritage but yesterday my british citizenship was accepted. who should i support? in 1966, my mum hit in the kitchen because she was so anxious she couldn't sit down. when england scored, she banged the kitchen pounds. i am
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getting my pots and pans ready for sunday. it is going to be a noisy night on sunday as england and italy play each other in the finals of the euros at wembley stadium. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. it was a fairly cloudy start to the day for many of us, but things are brightening up quite nicely with more of us in for some sunshine under this ridge of high pressure. but note the distinct lack of isobars so as we see further showers develop, they could be heavy and slow moving and then later, we've got a weather front coming into the west. so sunshine this afternoon across many parts of scotland, england and wales. you can see where we've got the showers, they will be less frequent than they were yesterday but we could see a few more in the south—eastern corner. for northern ireland, northern and western scotland, you are going to hang on to more cloud and at times it will be thick enough for drizzle. temperatures 15 to about 20 celsius. pollen levels today are high or very
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high across many parts of the uk. it is grass pollen at the moment. worth bearing that in mind if you are heading to wimbledon because today, the weather at wimbledon is set fair, there will be some sunny spells, there is, however, still the risk of a shower. top temperatures here up to 22. through this evening and overnight, we start off with all the showers and eventually a lot of them will fade. we'll have some clear skies, a lot more cloud out towards the west especially with the approaching weather front producing some showers as well and temperatures falling away to between 12 and 15 degrees. as we go into tomorrow, some of us will have some sunshine, some of us will start with some showers. showers out towards the west as well and that weather front slowly coming and introducing some showery outbreaks of rain across the isles of scilly and then into cornwall. temperatures 16 to 23. but note how the showers develop, especially in eastern areas through the afternoon. again, some of those
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could be heavy and thundery. friday into saturday sees our weather front moving across southern areas taking its rain with it. there will be some showers around and you can see that quite nicely on the graphics. rain pushing across the east of the country, eventually clearing into the north sea, but we will have a rash of showers following on behind and again we'll see some bright or sunny skies as well. temperatures 15 to about 21 degrees. into the rest of the weekend and early part of next week, well, on sunday there will be some sunshine and showers. later we could see some rain coming in from the west and it remains unsettled on monday.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11... schmeichel saves! kane is there to follow him! — the long wait is over, england's history makers beat denmark, to reach theirfirst major final since 1966. to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days, you know, we are here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet and we know we've got everybody with us. more than 23 million people watched the game on itv — making it one of the most watched broadcasts in the last decade. who'd have thought this? six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic. this isjust what the country needed.
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how are you feeling right now? how will you be watching the final? let us know your plans by tweeting me at @bbcjoannag or by using the hashtag bbcyourquestions. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. chancellor rishi sunak defends the decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. this was a temporary measure, it was always intended to be a temporary measure and much like all the other things that we have done, they were the things that we put in place to deal with the crisis. plans for how and when fully vaccinated travellers can go abroad without having to quarantine on their return are due to be set out within the next hour.
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hello, welcome. england have reached the final of euro 2020 after beating denmark 2—1, in front of more than 60,000 fans at wembley. captain harry kane hit the winner in extra time to secure a place against italy on sunday. if england win, it will be their first major tournament victory since the 1966 world cup — 55 years ago. 0ur sports news correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game at wembley. it was a night 55 years of heartache turned to pure euphoria. england into the final, and theirfans into dreamland. after waiting so long, how good was that? it's coming home! yeah! oh, it's fantastic. i'm absolutely amazed, i never thought that they would get this far. it's coming home, honestly, i can't believe it. it had been an evening
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of the rawest emotion, as more than 60,000 supporters, including the prime minister, created a spine—tingling atmosphere. but soon they were silenced. a brilliant free kick from mikkel damsgaard firing denmark ahead. the underdogs were roaring. could england regroup? well, they did, via raheem sterling. 0nly kasper schmeichel�*s brilliance denied him at first but moments later, it was sterling's pressure that put england level. denmark's simon kjaer bundling it into his own net. but fair to say, most in wembley didn't mind. and neither did millions watching around the country. and after the break, england began to dominate. harry maguire superbly denied by schmeichel. could nothing get past him? with every england chance, the tension inside wembley grew. before extra time and the decisive moment. a challenge on sterling, penalty, and up stepped harry kane.
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and just look what it meant. england into the lead and soon they were into the final. cue an outpouring of emotion from the pitch to the stands, to watching royalty, to fan parks around the country. a night and a result that for the team meant everything. we knew that we were never going to go through a whole tournament without conceding, and we were going to have to respond to setbacks in the right way, and they did. denmark have been a fantastic opponent, i have to say. and they've had an incredible tournament. but in the end it was our night. incredible, amazing night for this country, for this group of players, the staff, obviously our first final in the european championship. and to be at wembley, it's just a real special occasion. so credit to the boys. you know, we dug deep today, got the job done, but of course there's one more to go.
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so let's recover well and get ready for that one. well, what an incredible night here for england. they've had their fair share of semifinal heartache over the years. but now they're just one match from glory. # sweet caroline # the final now beckons against italy on sunday. but last night was about the thrill of getting there. # 30 years of hurt # never stops me dreaming # time for a sing song. football's coming home, they say. well, it's never been closer. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. let's speak to our sports correspondentjohn watson, who's at wembley. so muchjoy, so much joy, and so muchjoy, and is now so much hope. so much 'oy, and is now so much hoe. , , ., ., hope. indeed, yes. good morning from wemble . hope. indeed, yes. good morning from wembley- what _ hope. indeed, yes. good morning from wembley. what an _ hope. indeed, yes. good morning from wembley. what an atmosphere - hope. indeed, yes. good morning from wembley. what an atmosphere and i hope. indeed, yes. good morning from i wembley. what an atmosphere and what a night here at wembley. the 60,000
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fans packing in here were treated to something special. it wasn't easy, it was nerve—racking, as we saw there in andy's report stop raheem sterling once again in sensational form for england, and harry kane doing what he needed to do without winning a penalty, i'll be at it wasn't comfortable to watch. but the ball falling kindly for him as he was able to get that goal as england came through to — one. it was a lot easier against ukraine, winning 4—0. as gareth southgate was saying, it was unlikely they were going to go through the whole tournament without conceding a goal. perhaps they needed that challenge going into the final against italy on sunday. as we know, coming into this tournament, it was about moving past some of those bad memories and moments, the upsets and disappointments that have gone before with england. gareth southgate, the now england manager,
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missing his penalty here at euro 96. they wanted to move beyond that. he felt some of those images on the pitch last night, they are continuing to do that with every passing moment in this tournament. it was lovely to see declan rai sleeping on the shoulders of harry maguire. we saw connor cody in front of the crowd. it's those moments that will help england move past what has gone before. and we saw mason amount as well throwing his shirt into the crowd. and one lucky girl there grabbed it with glee. she looked almost moved to tears in that moment. it's a special moments like that. and that is what a major tournament does. it brings together a nation, it unifies, it's very hard to create that feeling and occasion that comes with a nation like england playing in this stage of a major tournament. and just seeing some of the flags around the stadium, all around the country, and at long last england have gone over
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the line and made it through to a majorfinal, for the first the line and made it through to a major final, for the first time in 55 years. and we wait to see what comes on sunday. i don't think it's going to be straightforward or easy, and i think it's going to be another nerve—racking moment, but for the 60,000 fans that will return here on sunday for that final, there can be no doubting that arguably england have the best chance ever to emulate the achievements of that 1966 world cup winning side. if that atmosphere is anything like it was last night, there can be no doubt that england will have all the tools they need now to get over the line at long last, joanna. now to get over the line at long last. joanna-— now to get over the line at long last, joanna. absolutely. as you sa , last last, joanna. absolutely. as you say. last night — last, joanna. absolutely. as you say, last night being _ last, joanna. absolutely. as you say, last night being that - last, joanna. absolutely. as you say, last night being that nervel say, last night being that nerve jangling after what happened against ukraine, when we could have believed it was going to be that straightforward going forward. what are the prospects now for the final? what are the bookies are saying? very tough, i think, when you look at the two teams. italy have been
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brilliant throughout. they were flawless through qualifying, maximum points in the group stages. they have that little wobble against austria. the real test came against belgium. it's the streetwise nature of this italian team. look at the way they close down that match against belgium. itjust goes to show that team without youth and experience can close out the match as effectively as they did. so they will be a real challenge with veteran defenders in there who are kind of know what it takes to get it over the line in these big games, and they have a brilliant midfield. and england will know they face a big challenge. when you consider the way england have not been challenged, didn't hit the dizzying heights in the early stages, but they came through with raheem sterling, harry kane, hadn't conceded a goal of course before it last night. they are hardened in
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this tournament as well, and both teams have made it through to the final. and it has been interesting, the way that it is the collective togetherness in both squads that have got them to this point. yes, england has stars, but there hasn't been one standout performer, and it has been that collective that has got england to the spinal. and that is the culture that gareth southgate has created in this squad. and you can say the same for italy, who were at rock bottom when they failed to qualify for the world cup in 2018. they have turned that around, and i think in many ways it is the final that you would like to see any major tournament, two great nations going head to head. and i think you have to say, england won't have a better chance, playing at home, playing here at wembley in front of 60,000 fans. you just wonder if that perhaps can prove the difference in sunday's final. perhaps can prove the difference in sunday's final-— more than 60,000 england fans were at wembley for last night's game, cheering and singing
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the three lions to victory. for the millions who couldn't make it to london, they packed out fanzones, bars and living rooms. jayne mccubbin watched the match at the pub which is owned by kieran trippier�*s brother. schmeichel saves, kane is there to follow in! these are memories to last a lifetime. look at this. epic, epic. who would have thought, right, before the tournament started, | that we would be going to the euro final? - would anyone here have thought that? is it coming home? ask them. are you emosh, are you emotional? yeah, yeah. you'll remember this, won't you, for the rest of your life? yeah, i will. commentator: another barrier broken, another night to savour. _ and only four sleeps
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to the final against italy. and, boy, did we need this moment. well, it's just brilliant to see people celebrating like this. it'sjust, who'd have thought this, six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic, this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. commentator: the long, long wait is over. - into the final of a major tournament. for the first time in 55 years. history in the making. this was euphoria. # it's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming, football's coming home!#
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and it was felt in garden bars. on london buses. in preston. they believed it, and they never gave in, did they? in croydon. england are in the final for the first time in, who cares how many years? in birmingham. in newcastle. we're confident, we're on form, we're going all the way. next stop, italy. in wembley, on sunday. and the first chance at a major trophy since 1966. we'll have plenty more reaction throughout the rest of the morning. now to other news... more than 100 scientists and doctors
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have signed a letter, published today in the lancet, accusing the uk government of conducting a "dangerous and unethical experiment" and urging it to reconsider its plans to abandon all restrictions. they claim the government's strategy of mass infection to a point when only half the uk population is fully vaccinated will entail "both acute and long—term illness". it says that any strategy that "tolerates high levels of infection is both unethical and illogical". joining me now is stephen reicher, a professor of social psychology at the university of st andrews. he's one of the people who signed that letter, and is also a member of the scientific advisory group for emergencies — sage — and advises both the scottish and uk governments on coronavirus. thank you forjoining us. so you obviously feel strongly that the government has got it wrong? i’m obviously feel strongly that the government has got it wrong? i'm not alone. government has got it wrong? i'm not alone- many — government has got it wrong? i'm not alone- many people — government has got it wrong? i'm not alone. many people signed _ government has got it wrong? i'm not alone. many people signed this i alone. many people signed this letter, including the chairman of the british medical association. if you look internationally, people are looking at some amazement at the united kingdom and in fact a very
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senior world health authority spokesperson said it was epidemiologically stupid and morally questionable at a point when infections are spiking, a point where they are now at 25,000 a day, that we are relaxing measures and indeed the health secretary seemed relaxed at the notion that we would have 100,000 infections a day. it seems to be based on the notion that somehow infections don't matter, but evenif somehow infections don't matter, but even if only one in 100 of the people who are infected are hospitalised that is still a thousand, a thousand hospitalisations a day, which will put an incredible load on are already stretched nhs, and that's not to talk of the impact in terms of long covid, about ten people get serious long covid, so we are talking about 10,000 people a day being affected. 0n talking about 10,000 people a day being affected. on top of that, the more that you let infections circulate, the greater the chances
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of new variants. and all of this seems particularly mad when we have the vaccine, and very quickly we could vaccinate people to the point where we are a much more safer, so to go for a strategy of getting immunity through infection with all those risks does seem extremely ill advisable and does seem in many ways to undermine the impact of the vaccine, which could give us immunity in a few short weeks without those risks. so immunity in a few short weeks without those risks.— immunity in a few short weeks without those risks. so how would ou without those risks. so how would you envisage _ without those risks. so how would you envisage the _ without those risks. so how would you envisage the vaccination i you envisage the vaccination programme rolling out from here? because i mentioned have the uk population is fully vaccinated, but when you look at the adult population it is actually 86.4% of adults have a single dose, and 65% of adults the double dose. so is the natural next step to start vaccinating under 18 is? is natural next step to start vaccinating under 18 is? is that the onl wa ? vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i — vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i do _ vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i do think _ vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i do think it _ vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i do think it would i vaccinating under 18 is? is that the only way? i do think it would be i only way? i do think it would be wise to vaccinate under 18. they are affected by a long covid, like anyone else, and they are affected
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by the impact of the pandemic on society at large. so i do think that would make sense. but the other thing i think it makes sense would be to increase the things that make us safe. 0ne be to increase the things that make us safe. one of the problems is that whenever we talk about covid measures, the assumption is that they are all about restrictions, so we get this debate about freedom and lockdown. actually, what we are advocating is increasing those things that support us and keep us safe, so things like having an effective test and trace a system, which we have never had, giving people support so they can self—isolate and they don't spread infection, making sure that public spaces are well ventilated, that we have clean air so we don't get infected, and many other countries are doing that. in belgium, they are insisting on carbon dioxide monitors which show whether you need ventilation or not in public buildings. in new york, they are going to put to air purifiers in every school. so we should be doing a lot more to keep people safe, and
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as i say, the notion that infections don't matter is extremely dangerous. not only is extremely dangerous in terms of policy, it sends a message to people that if the government is saying you can have 100,000 infections a day and it doesn't matter, why should we do the things that are necessary to keep ourselves safe? and as the modelling shows, if people were to change their behaviour completely, act as if covid wasn't there or didn't matter, that paradoxically would massively increase the load and probably mean that we would actually have to introduce more restrictions. so being sensible now, getting the level of vaccination up, having sensible public health safety is the best way to ensure that we don't have to go back into restrictions in the autumn. it is the anti—lockdown policy in many ways. so the autumn. it is the anti-lockdown policy in many ways-— policy in many ways. so when you talk about the _ policy in many ways. so when you talk about the behavioural - policy in many ways. so when you| talk about the behavioural aspects of this, the messages that get sent out, the way people respond. at the
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moment we are seeing huge football crowds, at the same time kids are isolating in huge numbers. these aren't new points being made, but it continues to impact obviously on the way people respond potentially when they are told to isolate, and there are predictions of 4.5 million are being asked to isolate between now and the 16th of august. what would be a smart system, do you think? for people to have faith in it, to keep the numbers as low as possible with the numbers as low as possible with the minimum amount of disruption and constraint, to enable society? your oint is a constraint, to enable society? your point is a very _ constraint, to enable society? your point is a very good _ constraint, to enable society? your point is a very good one, _ constraint, to enable society? wi;- point is a very good one, that the dangers of saying that infections don't matter is that impacts behaviour in a very powerful way, including impacting people getting vaccinated. we are beginning to see a drop off in vaccinations, and arguably that's due to the fact that young people are thinking, "why should i bother, because it doesn't matter anyway?" we need to get vaccinations up. we need to get
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vaccinations up. we need to get vaccinations up, we need to get search vaccinations, we don't need to be sending messages which undermine vaccination. the second thing we need to do is to increase public health protections, all the things i've been talking about. first of all, we don't get infected because we don't breathe in dirty air, and so we ventilate well. plus, if there are outbreaks, being able to get on top of the very quickly by getting people to isolate very quickly. if we have got those two things together, again, with sensible and proportionate protections, wearing masks in crowded places makes sense, distancing where you can't makes sense, but those things together and then quite quickly we would be in a much, much better place. you then quite quickly we would be in a much, much better place.- much, much better place. you said ou think much, much better place. you said you think it— much, much better place. you said you think it would _ much, much better place. you said you think it would be _ much, much better place. you said you think it would be wiser- much, much better place. you said you think it would be wiser to i you think it would be wiser to vaccinate under 18 is. how quickly would you like to see that ruled out, and how would you envisage the age groups under 18 being done
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effectively? flit age groups under 18 being done effectively?— age groups under 18 being done effectivel ? .., , ., , , effectively? of course, that depends u on effectively? of course, that depends uon bein: effectively? of course, that depends upon being able _ effectively? of course, that depends upon being able to _ effectively? of course, that depends upon being able to say _ effectively? of course, that depends upon being able to say the _ effectively? of course, that depends upon being able to say the vaccines. upon being able to say the vaccines are safe for those groups... thea;r are safe for those groups... they have been _ are safe for those groups... they have been cleared, _ are safe for those groups... they have been cleared, haven't they? are safe for those groups... they i have been cleared, haven't they? for have been cleared, haven't they? fr?" 12—year—olds. sol have been cleared, haven't they? fr?" 12—year—olds. so i think that would be sensible. i particularly think it's important to vaccinate vulnerable children, children with respiratory problems, for instance, with asthma. because for many people, what will happen after the 19th ofjuly, will be very scary indeed because they will feel under massive threat. we need to protect young people. the problem is that this policy of in a sense reaching immunity through mass infection is that it impacts most on the young because they are the ones that haven't been vaccinated. what we are embarking on is a policy that will leave potentially to millions of young people getting infected and even though thankfully very few of them will die of it and very few of them will die of it and very few of them will die of it and very few of them will be hospitalised from it, still a very large number of people
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will get long covid, and long covid as we know has got cognitive effects, it affects your ability to learn, it gives you circle brain fog. a policy which is about achieving immunity through vaccination is far more sensible than letting infections rip, affecting millions of people, and in particularly affecting young people. thank you very much indeed, professor. let mejust thank you very much indeed, professor. let me just bring you some breaking news. we arejust hearing that following on from the match last night, england against denmark, disciplinary proceedings have been opened by uefa. the fa have been opened by uefa. the fa have been opened by uefa. the fa have been charged by uefa. it's over the use of a laser that was appointed by england supporters. the
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disturbance caused by supporters during the national anthem, the lighting of fireworks by supporters. so these have been looked at and now uefa have decided to initiate disciplinary proceedings against england as a result of those actions by supporters at the match last night. at wembley stadium stop the case will be dealt with by the uefa control ethics and disciplinary body in due course. so we will find out a bit more about that and bring you more detail about exactly what that could mean as soon as we can. the number of people in england waiting for routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. 5.3 million people were waiting to start treatment at the end of may according to figures from nhs england. this is the highest number since records began in august 2007. a total of 207,188 urgent cancer referrals were made
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by gps in england in may, nearly double the number in may last year. and nearly 300,000 patients in england had been waiting more than six weeks for a key diagnostic test in may. chris hopson is the chief executive of nhs providers and joins us now. thank you forjoining us. it is a picture that's getting worse. what's our picture that's getting worse. what's your response? _ picture that's getting worse. what's your response? absolutely - picture that's getting worse. what's your response? absolutely full i picture that's getting worse. what's your response? absolutely full pelt| your response? absolutely full pelt at the _ your response? absolutely full pelt at the moment to recover those care backlogs _ at the moment to recover those care backlogs. we reduce the number of people _ backlogs. we reduce the number of people waiting over 18 weeks by 80.000 — people waiting over 18 weeks by 80,000 opened last month, and the number— 80,000 opened last month, and the number of— 80,000 opened last month, and the number of people waiting for more than 52_ number of people waiting for more than 52 weeks by 50,000, but the problem _ than 52 weeks by 50,000, but the problem at — than 52 weeks by 50,000, but the problem at the moment is that because — problem at the moment is that because of those people who did not come _ because of those people who did not come forward over the past 15 months. _ come forward over the past 15 months, the waiting list is growing, there _ months, the waiting list is growing, there is— months, the waiting list is growing, there is one — months, the waiting list is growing, there is one chief executive said to me the _ there is one chief executive said to me the other day, for every person we take _ me the other day, for every person we take off— me the other day, for every person we take off the list by treating them, — we take off the list by treating them, we are finding that two more -et them, we are finding that two more get added — them, we are finding that two more get added. so i'm afraid we will be in for— get added. so i'm afraid we will be in for a _ get added. so i'm afraid we will be in fora number of get added. so i'm afraid we will be in for a number of months where you will see _ in for a number of months where you will see a _ in for a number of months where you will see a big — in for a number of months where you will see a big waiting list in total grow— will see a big waiting list in total
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grow and — will see a big waiting list in total grow and where you will see a record number— grow and where you will see a record number coming each month for a number— number coming each month for a number of— number coming each month for a number of months, but nobody should interpret— number of months, but nobody should interpret that as meaning that the nhs isn't — interpret that as meaning that the nhs isn't doing absolutely everything it can to get through that backlog absolutely as quickly as we _ that backlog absolutely as quickly as we can, and we are obviously concentrating as you would expect on the most _ concentrating as you would expect on the most urgent cases. and obviously ou are the most urgent cases. and obviously you are operating _ the most urgent cases. and obviously you are operating under _ the most urgent cases. and obviously you are operating under constrained i you are operating under constrained circumstances, the distancing measurements imposed as a result of covid. and we are just hearing measurements imposed as a result of covid. and we arejust hearing on those figures that the number of covid hospital admissions has gone up covid hospital admissions has gone up 45% in the last seven days. so the sands are constantly shifting. what you're getting at the moment is a combination of five different things — a combination of five different things. we are going full pelt to recover— things. we are going full pelt to recover those care backlogs, we are also seeing — recover those care backlogs, we are also seeing record levels of emergency care demand, for example 27% increase compared to pre—covid levels _ 27% increase compared to pre—covid levels for _ 27% increase compared to pre—covid levels for ambulance traffic. at the
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same _ levels for ambulance traffic. at the same time, — levels for ambulance traffic. at the same time, we've got bed constraints and capacity— same time, we've got bed constraints and capacity constraints because of infection— and capacity constraints because of infection control. we've then got staff increasing problem at the moment— staff increasing problem at the moment is the number of staff having to self—isolate, and clearly those numbers — to self—isolate, and clearly those numbers will grow as the community infection— numbers will grow as the community infection rate grows, and then on top of— infection rate grows, and then on top of that, — infection rate grows, and then on top of that, we've got low numbers and we _ top of that, we've got low numbers and we would expect them to be nothing — and we would expect them to be nothing like the numbers that we have _ nothing like the numbers that we have seen— nothing like the numbers that we have seen in previous waves, but we are seeing, — have seen in previous waves, but we are seeing, again as community infection— are seeing, again as community infection rates of covid—19 rise, you will— infection rates of covid—19 rise, you will see increasing numbers of people _ you will see increasing numbers of people coming to hospital. less than in previous— people coming to hospital. less than in previous waves, but if the river is very— in previous waves, but if the river is very fult— in previous waves, but if the river is very full and the round is sodden, _ is very full and the round is sodden, it— is very full and the round is sodden, it doesn't take much more rain for— sodden, it doesn't take much more rain for the — sodden, it doesn't take much more rain for the river to overflow. it's really _ rain for the river to overflow. it's really striking when you talk to chief _ really striking when you talk to chief executives at the moment, they are just _ chief executives at the moment, they are just saying how under pressure their trusts — are just saying how under pressure their trusts are because of this combination of record levels of demand — combination of record levels of demand in many places, meet real constraints — demand in many places, meet real constraints. if i may, one really important — constraints. if i may, one really important point, we don't spend enough — important point, we don't spend enough time talking about the mental
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health— enough time talking about the mental health consequences of covid, and one of— health consequences of covid, and one of the — health consequences of covid, and one of the striking figures in today's— one of the striking figures in today's data release is that we are seeing _ today's data release is that we are seeing record levels of people coming — seeing record levels of people coming forward for access to mental health— coming forward for access to mental health services, so when i speak to mental— health services, so when i speak to mental health chief executives, what they say— mental health chief executives, what they say to _ mental health chief executives, what they say to me really clearly is we are in_ they say to me really clearly is we are in a _ they say to me really clearly is we are in a sense experiencing our own pandemic— are in a sense experiencing our own pandemic at— are in a sense experiencing our own pandemic at the moment in terms of the number— pandemic at the moment in terms of the number of people we need for mental— the number of people we need for mental health. so wherever you look, community— mental health. so wherever you look, community services, hospitals, ambulances, mental health trust, everybody— ambulances, mental health trust, everybody is under real pressure at a point _ everybody is under real pressure at a point where we have significant capacity— a point where we have significant capacity constraints.— a point where we have significant capacity constraints. what immediate -ractical capacity constraints. what immediate practical solutions? _ capacity constraints. what immediate practical solutions? imagine - capacity constraints. what immediate practical solutions? imagine a - practical solutions? imagine a number of staff having to self—isolate stop there has been a suggestion that medical staff treated differently in this regard. do you think that would be an idea, to protect them being able to go into work? also, what about looking at the way that the constraints are in terms of social distancing and
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society in general starts to reduce those measures, it will of course mean that more people can be treated. i mean that more people can be treated. ., , . , mean that more people can be treated. ~' , ., , treated. i think they are very good questions. — treated. i think they are very good questions. but _ treated. i think they are very good questions, but what _ treated. i think they are very good questions, but what we _ treated. i think they are very good questions, but what we need i treated. i think they are very good questions, but what we need to i treated. i think they are very good | questions, but what we need to do treated. i think they are very good i questions, but what we need to do is strike _ questions, but what we need to do is strike the _ questions, but what we need to do is strike the right balance. we need to remember— strike the right balance. we need to remember that the delta variant, which _ remember that the delta variant, which is _ remember that the delta variant, which is now the dominant one, is a 60% more _ which is now the dominant one, is a 60% more infectious than the alpha variant— 60% more infectious than the alpha variant that started in kent, and therefore — variant that started in kent, and therefore we need to be very, very careful— therefore we need to be very, very careful about the infection control that we _ careful about the infection control that we have in hospitals and another— that we have in hospitals and another health care settings to ensure — another health care settings to ensure that the virus doesn't spread to people _ ensure that the virus doesn't spread to people who either work in those health— to people who either work in those health care — to people who either work in those health care settings or people who are receiving treatment in them. so there _ are receiving treatment in them. so there is— are receiving treatment in them. so there is a _ are receiving treatment in them. so there is a really important balance to strike, — there is a really important balance to strike, but yes, two things, we need _ to strike, but yes, two things, we need to— to strike, but yes, two things, we need to keep constant eye on, have we got _ need to keep constant eye on, have we got the — need to keep constant eye on, have we got the right infection balance in terms — we got the right infection balance in terms of infection control measures, and secondly, do think that the _ measures, and secondly, do think that the question will get asked really— that the question will get asked really quite quickly, particularly as we _ really quite quickly, particularly as we move into peak leave season, because _ as we move into peak leave season, because people understandably with families— because people understandably with families and others want to have their— families and others want to have their holiday over the summer, we
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know— their holiday over the summer, we know that — their holiday over the summer, we know that this problem of staff shortages is going to grow over the next four, — shortages is going to grow over the next four, five, six, seven, eight weeks _ next four, five, six, seven, eight weeks since— next four, five, six, seven, eight weeks. since nhs staff were vaccinated first, we can go earlier than _ vaccinated first, we can go earlier than the — vaccinated first, we can go earlier than the 19th of august, 16th of which _ than the 19th of august, 16th of which is — than the 19th of august, 16th of which is the current state to allow people _ which is the current state to allow people not— which is the current state to allow people not to self—isolate if you have _ people not to self—isolate if you have been double jabbed and had a negative _ have been double jabbed and had a negative pcr test. i think nhs staff can have _ negative pcr test. i think nhs staff can have that data brought forward. would _ can have that data brought forward. would you _ can have that data brought forward. would you push the government for that? i would you push the government for that? “ would you push the government for that? ~ ., ., , that? i think at the moment we 'ust kind of want — that? i think at the moment we 'ust kind of want to i that? i think at the moment we 'ust kind of want to work i that? i think at the moment we 'ust kind of want to work out i that? i think at the moment we 'ust kind of want to work out what i that? i think at the moment we just kind of want to work out what is i that? i think at the moment we just kind of want to work out what is the ti l ht kind of want to work out what is the right balance between appropriate infection— right balance between appropriate infection control. no trust wants to ensure _ infection control. no trust wants to ensure that — infection control. no trust wants to ensure that somebody comes into a hospital— ensure that somebody comes into a hospital or— ensure that somebody comes into a hospital or community mental health setting, _ hospital or community mental health setting, catches covid while they are inside — setting, catches covid while they are inside the nhs, so we need to -et are inside the nhs, so we need to get this— are inside the nhs, so we need to get this balance right. and that is what _ get this balance right. and that is what we — get this balance right. and that is what we are in the middle of talking to our— what we are in the middle of talking to our chief— what we are in the middle of talking to our chief executives about. in the past — to our chief executives about. in the past couple of weeks, how many are saying _ the past couple of weeks, how many are saying to us that this problem
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of self— are saying to us that this problem of self isolating is a really growing and it's clearly going to grow— growing and it's clearly going to grow a — growing and it's clearly going to grow a lot — growing and it's clearly going to grow a lot more after we have relaxed — grow a lot more after we have relaxed restrictions on the 19th of july. relaxed restrictions on the 19th of jul . . ., relaxed restrictions on the 19th of jul . . ~' , ., , relaxed restrictions on the 19th of jul . ., ~' , . july. thank you very much. in the last few minutes, _ july. thank you very much. in the last few minutes, the _ july. thank you very much. in the last few minutes, the prime i july. thank you very much. in the i last few minutes, the prime minister has been speaking about last night's england victory. he was at the match. let's listen. we have a slight technical hitch. we will try to fix it and go back to boris johnson. but right now, let's catch up johnson. but right now, let's catch up with the weather. we have a technical hitch on that one, too. let mejust technical hitch on that one, too. let me just tell you that we are expecting to hear from let me just tell you that we are expecting to hearfrom grant let me just tell you that we are expecting to hear from grant shapps shortly in the comments. he is going to be outlining what is going to be happening in terms of isolating for vaccinated, double vaccinated people, in terms of holidays and going forward. so we will bring you that as soon as it happens. i think carroll is ready for us. although many of us started on a
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cloudy note, we will end up on a sunny note across many parts of the uk, the exception being northern ireland, northern and western scotland where we will hang a bit more cloud and drizzle from time from time to time. in the sunshine, as temperatures rise, that will spark off some showers and some of those could be heavy and slow—moving. fewerand those could be heavy and slow—moving. fewer and further between, though we could see more in the south—east compare to yesterday. through this evening and overnight, eventually a lot of those showers will fade but with clear skies, missed in fog patches forming, and tempers falling to between 12 and 15 degrees, so not a cold night. tomorrow, we will start off with brightness and sunshine, a fair bit of cloud across the north and the west producing some showers and then we have this weather front showing its hands, bringing in showery briggs of rainey through the day but the showers especially in eastern areas could be heavy and thundery with top temperatures of 23. i think
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we have fixed our technical gremlins with listening to what borisjohnson was saying, so let's listen in. i thought it was a most extraordinary game and i don't think i've ever seen an england team play with such creativity and flair in adversity and just keep going like that, you know, the way raheem sterling and harry kane just kept their energy levels up throughout their energy levels up throughout the 120 minutes or whatever it was, and it was a total nailbiter. i don't know about you, but when we conceded that goal early on, and then equalised, and then ran on right�*s the way into extra time and could have gone wrong at any time, but it didn't, and it was just euphoric, absolutely extraordinary, so i congratulate gareth southgate and the whole team. i thought they were stunning and obviously wishing them all the very best for sunday.
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you could learn a thing or two from gareth southgate's management style and is it likely to be sir gareth soon? i and is it likely to be sir gareth soon? ., . ,, and is it likely to be sir gareth soon? ., , , ., ., ., and is it likely to be sir gareth soon? ., _ ., ., ., ., soon? i obviously would not want to antici ate soon? i obviously would not want to anticipate anything _ soon? i obviously would not want to anticipate anything that _ soon? i obviously would not want to anticipate anything that the - soon? i obviously would not want to anticipate anything that the ownersl anticipate anything that the owners people may decide, but clearly i think that gareth southgate has done an absolutely outstanding job and what seems so amazing to me is how he varies it, he mixes it up and plays a different series of options depending on the match in question, so best of luck for sunday. bbang so best of luck for sunday. abang hofida so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for _ so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for the _ so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for the rest _ so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for the rest of _ so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for the rest of us - so best of luck for sunday. abang holiday for the rest of us on i holiday for the rest of us on monday? i holiday for the rest of us on monday?— holiday for the rest of us on monda ? ~ ., ., , monday? i think that would be testin: monday? i think that would be testing fate. _ monday? i think that would be testing fate. let's _ monday? i think that would be testing fate. let's see - monday? i think that would be testing fate. let's see what i testing fate. let's see what happens. testing fate. let's see what happens-— testing fate. let's see what hauens.�* ., happens. are you comfortable with the idea of ditching _ happens. are you comfortable with the idea of ditching the _ happens. are you comfortable with the idea of ditching the triple i happens. are you comfortable with the idea of ditching the triple lock. the idea of ditching the triple lock for pensions? i the idea of ditching the triple lock for pensions?— for pensions? i think we have to have fairness _ for pensions? i think we have to have fairness for _ for pensions? i think we have to have fairness for pensioners i for pensions? i think we have to| have fairness for pensioners and for pensions? i think we have to i have fairness for pensioners and for taxpayers, but i think you will have to wait and what the chancellor comes up with. in to wait and what the chancellor comes up with.—
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to wait and what the chancellor comes u- with. , ., ., ._ , comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowin: comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double _ comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double jab _ comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double jab to _ comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double jab to people - comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double jab to people not i comes up with. in terms of holidays, allowing double jab to people not to | allowing double jab to people not to have to quarantine, but at the same time enforcing self isolation until mid august, does that make any sense? i know how frustrated people are about this and i know that people obviously are fed up with covid restrictions, but we have to be prudent, we have to be cautious and one of the ways of restricting the spread of the disease, as you know, is to ask a context to self—isolate. that has been going on now for a long time. what we want to do isjust keep going now for a long time. what we want to do is just keep going for now for a long time. what we want to do isjust keep going for a now for a long time. what we want to do is just keep going for a little bit longer so we can get even more vaccinations into people's arms and give ourselves more protection, but as the health secretary has said, we are moving now from self isolation, from toa to a testing result. how confident are you that the app is not too
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sensitive? i are you that the app is not too sensitive?— are you that the app is not too sensitive? , ., ,, ., , , ., , sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people _ sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do- — sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do- i _ sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do. i hope _ sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do. i hope that i sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do. i hope that it i sensitive? i rely on the nhs app as many people do. i hope that it has| many people do. i hope that it has been useful, but the general system, whatever its frustrations and icon again, would repeat, i know how difficult it has been for people and i and sorry for the hassle that people have experienced as a result of this, it is coming to an end but what we want to do is use these next few weeks just to do more vaccinations until we are able to move from quarantining and isolation to a test and release system. briefly, regarding your holiday in mustique, will you be more careful about declaring freebies properly in future? i about declaring freebies properly in future? ., ., , future? i have not seen the conclusion _ future? i have not seen the conclusion of _ future? i have not seen the conclusion of that, - future? i have not seen the conclusion of that, but i future? i have not seen the conclusion of that, but as i | conclusion of that, but as i understand it, the committee has found there was no to answer. grand chaps has just
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grand chaps hasjust said grand chaps has just said fully vaccinated people will not have to isolate on their return to the uk from the 19th ofjuly though pcr testing will be a requirement. let's listen in now. the testing will be a requirement. let's listen in now-— listen in now. the change i am announcing — listen in now. the change i am announcing today _ listen in now. the change i am announcing today will - listen in now. the change i am| announcing today will prioritise those vaccinated in the united kingdom, however, as i made clear last week, we want to welcome international visitors back to the uk and are working to extend our approach to vaccinated passengers from important markets and holiday destinations later this summer such as the united states and the eu and i will update the house in due course on how we approach vaccinated individuals from other countries. when i highlighted the potential policy to the house last week, i explained we needed to take some additional time to look at how children and the evidence around children and the evidence around children who will not, of course, have been able to benefit from vaccines will be treated. i can tell
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the house today that children under 18 returning from amber list countries will not to have to isolate on their return, nor take a test. children between eight and ten will only take a day to test and children for under will be exempt from all testing requirements. i know this was a big concern with families and after working with scientists and public health experts, i am delighted to be able to offer that reassurance today. the success of our vaccination programme has been aided by those creating great advantages by being part of clinical trials without which we would not have the vaccine programme. we are needing to make sure they are not disadvantaged as a result of being part of the trials and i am delighted to announce that those on approved clinical trials in the uk will also not need to self—isolate or take that day eight
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test from an embolus country. passengers will need to, of course, be able to prove their vaccination status either through the covid pass, available on the main nhs app not the covid app, or yet the accessible letter which can be obtained by calling 119 four those without access to smartphones. passengers returning to england will be asked to include their vaccination status on their passenger locator form if they wish to benefit from the exemption to self—isolate and transport operators and carriers will be required to check passengers' proof of being fully vaccinated before they are able to get on any form of transport. the government has been working closely with international partners on restarting international travel safely through certification. i am pleased to announce to the house today that more than 30 countries and territories are now recognising vaccine certification as
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part of entry requirements and either accepting proof of vaccination letter or the nhs app itself. they will continue to increase that number so the nhs app becomes the default. passengers should, of course, check with the foreign office travel advice to understand the latest entry requirements and covid—19 rules at their destination. madam deputy speaker, we know that travel is important, that many people have not been able to travel for the last year and a half and this is not about only holidays, eager as we are, i am sure, for time in the sun, butabout reuniting are, i am sure, for time in the sun, but about reuniting families who have been apart throughout this pandemic. it is about helping businesses to trade and grow and about supporting aviation, a sector which hundreds of thousands ofjobs rely on. an industry which this government has backed a three £7 billion of support during this pandemic and, as the industry tell me, this support is very welcome but
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the only way to actually recover is to allow them to fly and for travel to allow them to fly and for travel to resume again which is why i am pleased to also announce today that from the 19th ofjuly, we will remove the guidance that people should not travel to countries on the amber list and this means that people will be able to travel for leisure, business and to see family to amber list countries. i am sure the whole house will welcome this development and an approach to international travel, however, development and an approach to internationaltravel, however, i want to be clear that as we begin to ease restrictions, travel will not be the same as it was before in, say, 2019. people should continue to check foreign office travel advice, travel when possible outside a busy weekend times and expect that their experience at the border will be different with longer waiting times are being necessitated even as we introduce and expand the number of eu gates available to read the
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declaration forms. it must also be clear that public health remains our key priority which is why we will not make any changes to requirements applying to those arriving from countries on the red list, even where they are fully vaccinated. the measures i have announced today have been designed in close cooperation with the health secretary along with medical and scientific experts to ensure we can continue to minimise the risk of new variants and, as many of us know from personal travel experience, the government will not hesitate to act if required and the data suggests this is required and to put this on the record, and amber country could still turn red, knesset dating a change in behaviour when we return to the uk and if a country goes into red, mandatory hotel quarantine. the uk has achieved many hard—won gains through our successful vaccination programme and the continued spirit of
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determination of the british people and to continue to encourage people to take up the vaccine when offered, not only to protect themselves but to restore previous freedoms more safely. 0n the 19th ofjuly, we will mark the next step of this cautious reopening of international travel and thanks to this government's incredible success with the vaccine programme, people in england will be able to travel more easily, visit family and friends they have not seen for a long time and get business moving again, kick—starting our economy while keeping the uk safe and supporting our wide—ranging jobs and industries in the process. madam deputy speaker, i commend this statement to the house. we madam deputy speaker, i commend this statement to the house.— statement to the house. we now go to the shadow secretary _ statement to the house. we now go to the shadow secretary of _ statement to the house. we now go to the shadow secretary of state, - statement to the house. we now go to the shadow secretary of state, jim i the shadow secretary of state, jim mcmahon. . ., the shadow secretary of state, jim mcmahon. ., ,, , ., the shadow secretary of state, jim mcmahon. . ~' . the shadow secretary of state, jim mcmahon. ., ., , , , mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy seaker. mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy speaker- can — mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy speaker- can i — mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy speaker. can i thank _ mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy speaker. can i thank the _ mcmahon. thank you, madam deputy speaker. can i thank the secretary i speaker. can i thank the secretary of state for advance sight of his aim of this morning? when i question the secretary of state on publishing the secretary of state on publishing the data, he said thejc vi and
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public health england published methodology and the data behind it is already published, however, the assessment to the 15th ofjune only has published a limited data on 23 countries. even with this very limited data, it shows absolutely no data for incoming passenger testing, no data for new variant testing for some of the countries which were moved from the green list including the balearics. the debate last time focused on india, pakistan and bangladesh, yet none of those countries have had their data published. nor have the countries which are critical to our economy including the us, canada and the vast majority of the eu. when the full data is published, will he ensure that it shows a very clear direction of travel for each and every country to ensure travel confidence once more and will he finally allow a full review of the
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delay in adding india to the red list alongside pakistan and bangladesh which led to the rapid spread of thejohnson variant which he spread of the johnson variant which he knows has delayed restrictions being eased here in the uk. it has also been noted that in just a week, the government has effectively taken our suggestion to effectively scrap the confused amber list, but it is not clear if some of the country is currently on the amber list should infax be moved to the red list. can he confirm that a country by country assessment was carried out prior to his statement today? as he will know, labour has been calling for the introduction of an international vaccine passport. he says that agreement has been reached with 30 countries to accept uk vaccination status but so far that this has not been published and it is not clear what pre—testing and arrival testing will be needed. i welcome a common—sense approach which will allow children to travel without vaccinated parents and carers. can
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he confirm that all of the 30 countries which he says will now accept the nhs vaccination status, that every one of them will allow children to travel without additional restrictions? he will know that in addition to the uncertainty around the travel list that the cost of testing is turning away would—be travellers. the pcr tests often cost more than £100 per person. the government could stop the rip—off we are seeing from private testing companies and use instead spare capacity in the nhs supported by an updated app which will confirm tested status alongside vaccination status. we know that testing is a critical element of protecting the spread of covid, so will he take forward the suggestions and, finally, make meaningful progress? when i ask the secretary of state what action is being taken to open transatlantic routes, he said a us uk working group has met
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the week before for the first time, but no update has been provided today, so can i ask how many more times they have met since then and what progress has been made? importantly, madam deputy speaker, international travel community and the tourism sector needed the government to really step up, but i am afraid ministers found themselves wanting. labour is clear that the government must follow the example of other countries by intervening and bringing forward a sectoral deal to protectjobs, but can i ask the minister why still the government have not brought forward such a deal when the chancellor promised it almost a year ago? when i visited heathrow last month, they noted that almost a quarter of their cost base was in fees and levy to government. if ministers want a full package which is holistic, can they at least look at the fees paid directly to government? and on eurostar, why have they not had the same business rate supports as aviation? it should
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be a level playing field for international travel. before end, be a level playing field for internationaltravel. before end, i wanted to touch on the fact that this announcement did not cover mask wearing. it is pretty clear that the government have been all over the place around mask wearing despite the fact that masks reduce the risk of passing on the virus to other people, especially on public transport stop why does the secretary of state believe it should only now be subjected to personal choice, unlike me, —— and like me, will he commit to continuing to a mask on public transport? secretary of state. thank _ mask on public transport? secretary of state. thank you. _ mask on public transport? secretary of state. thank you. the _ mask on public transport? secretary| of state. thank you. the honourable rentleman of state. thank you. the honourable gentleman mentions _ of state. thank you. the honourable gentleman mentions the _ of state. thank you. the honourable gentleman mentions the jcvi - of state. thank you. the honourable gentleman mentions the jcvi data i of state. thank you. the honourable i gentleman mentions the jcvi data and gentleman mentions thejcvi data and the data is on the website and i am sure that they will continue to publish a full range of analysis as more countries are moved about and, of course, we have the next review of course, we have the next review of the green, red and amber list in july. india, he brings this up every time that we speak, and it does not
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matter how many time you explain the fact that we put them on the red list of two weeks before they became a variant of concern, one week of them being even as variant of interest, and yet he still continues to come to this house and say that time and again. he mentions the list of 30 locations which are accepting either the nhs app or an nhs letter. they are already published and available on the website and it gives me an opportunity to stress that when someone travels to any location, they will want to use the fcd or website as the bible for what will be the requirements for departure an entry to that country. one late change so the house can 0ne late change so the house can note that it is notjust children travelling with adults but for all children who are exempt in the same way as someone who is double vaccinated. he mentions the costs of tests. i have come to this dispatch tests. i have come to this dispatch test for and said that tests were too expensive and costs are continuing to be driven down as over 400 providers have stepped up to the
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plate to produce these tests. i looked this morning and there were tests as inexpensive as £10, albeit tests as inexpensive as £10, albeit tests in person but quite a number of tests now for much lower prices than the ones that were previously being stated. the update on the working group, the us — uk group announced by the prime minister and joe biden, those meetings are taking place each and every week. there are quite a lot of technicalities to overcome, not least an executive order from the previous overcome, not least an executive orderfrom the previous us administration which bans travel for anyone who has been in the uk or europe for 14 days previous and we're working those issues with them at an official level currently. in terms of support for the industry, i think it is a pity today that the honourable gentleman did not reflect what the industry itself is saying. the airport operators association said this is a significant step forward, that they widely welcome it, they say that people will be
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able to get away on a well—deserved break. airlines uk, who represent airlines, say this is a positive move towards genuinely reopening the sector and they warmly welcome it once again. i have to say, when the honourable gentleman says labour have been clear, he says, it is anything but clear. what is clear is that there is a division between him and the shadow home secretary. first of all, they wanted quarantine lessons and then they wanted everyone in a hotel. then they wanted it to be done on a case—by—case basis. then they wanted to shutdown travel, open up travel, but everything on the red list and then everything on the green list. this is not policy, it isjust playing politics. this is not policy, it is 'ust playing politics.i this is not policy, it is 'ust playing politics. i welcome the statement today. this is the first step in opening up britain for business, but i note in his statement that he said people should expect their experience at
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the border to be different with longer waiting times than before. when queues at the border have been problems in the past, extra staff have been brought in, including from other government departments to support workforce. will my right honourable friend, on behalf of the government, guarantee that every effort will be made to bring in extra resources, deploy staff in different ways including changing staff routers at border force, in order to ensure there can be a smooth movement of people through our borders and that we do not see inordinately long queues? secretary of state. i welcome _ inordinately long queues? secretary of state. i welcome my _ inordinately long queues? secretary of state. i welcome my right - of state. i welcome my right honourable _ of state. i welcome my right honourable friend's - of state. i welcome my right i honourable friend's intervention of state. i welcome my right - honourable friend's intervention and she is absolutely right. in fact, i have been working with the home secretary and border force on exactly this issue. i should be more specific about where travellers might expect queues. quite a lot of the checking in can be done upstream, in other words, the checking in can be done upstream, in otherwords, before the checking in can be done upstream, in other words, before you board the aircraft or train or boat from your location you are coming
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back from and so queues at check in whilst you are abroad may, in fact, be the place where those problems most exist. i know that many of the airlines are developing systems to further automate that check—in, but they will be doing quite an importantjob, checking the important job, checking the passenger locator form importantjob, checking the passenger locator form against the book to still required on day two and, of course, vaccine status as well. ijust think it is fair to warn people who are travelling this summer that this is something we have not had to do before but she is absolutely right to say it is important that the borders at this end are as smooth as possible and, indeed, lots of effort is going into automating all of that.— automating all of that. gavin newlands- — automating all of that. gavin newlands. can _ automating all of that. gavin newlands. can i _ automating all of that. gavin newlands. can i also - automating all of that. gavin newlands. can i also thank i automating all of that. gavin i newlands. can i also thank the secretary of — newlands. can i also thank the secretary of state _ newlands. can i also thank the secretary of state for - newlands. can i also thank the j secretary of state for advanced newlands. can i also thank the i secretary of state for advanced site of the statement? i should start by saying i share the honourable member for olden�*s concerns about the lack
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of transparency in the data and i have to say the secretary of state's answers to a not good enough on that. we need to see more data and more quickly than we are at the moment. the secretary of state, whilst i do welcome the statement, he is being disingenuous when he says the industry says that support is welcome and they need to get flying again. that, in and of itself, is correct what he did not say is that industry is still crying out for further support because most of the industry has not had grant support despite being the hardest—hit sector in the economy. i have said a number of times now in the past few weeks that glasgow airport in my constituency has lost one third of its on—site workforce, 2000 jobs lost at the airport and 500 jobs beyond the airport connected to aviation and in terms of the scottish summer season, it is well over two weeks old and by the time this policy kicks in for england, teachers in my area will be
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backin england, teachers in my area will be back in school three weeks later, so it is a very short window, so the government must extend furlough for the sector, no ifs, no buts. while the sector, no ifs, no buts. while the announcement will help, the number of passengers is significantly down, so the need for a sector specific support package is very clear. the scottish government have said caution is required with international travel and people should think very carefully as situations can change. the scottish government will continue to work closely with the other home nations and are cautiously exploring options for the possibility to reduce restrictions for fully vaccinated passengers but only if systems are in place to ensure the safety of the scottish population. i have to say that rumours for months have circulated about cabinet discussions, robust discussions on international travel with, amongst others, the previous health secretary and the dutch duchy of lancaster on one side and the secretary of state on the other and one cannot help but note the change
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of pace in international travel restrictions now the new health secretary is in place, but i wonder, how can plans for ambitious returns of international travel if there is a rush to unlock domestic league means other countries close the borders to the uk travellers? lastly, as has been said, mask wearing on aircraft and on all public transport is, to most of us, a no—brainer and as this shadow secretary of state's west and was not addressed, i will ask again, will mask wearing be compulsory on aircraft and will the sexy of state confirmed that he will continue to mask of public transport? —— the secretary of state. the change of pace is that we have a majority of adults in the uk vaccinated which was not the case one month ago when the postpone step four and is now. i can confirm to the honourable gentleman that i was
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already discussing these changes with the previous health secretary, in fact. i did omit to mention about masks and i should just bring the house up to speed. we will still be in guidance providing information about mask wearing. we know it is sensible in more enclosed spaces and i will wear a mask personally where it is appropriate to do so and the airlines have already said it is a condition of carriage in the cases i have seen and where it is a condition of carriage, of course, one must always do so. if you are, however, only empty carriage on a long—distance train, people will use their common sense and on the side of the house, we will support that. i have to say, when i hear the honourable gentleman quite frequently, and he is a doughty campaignerfor frequently, and he is a doughty campaigner for glasgow airport and often challenges me on this, i have to say that he might want to look a little bit closer to home. it is only very recently in june
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little bit closer to home. it is only very recently injune that little bit closer to home. it is only very recently in june that the scottish government banned scots from travelling to manchester. as it is direct result, easyjet cancelled routes that would have connected a whole bunch of scottish airports and no wonder the scottish passenger agents association has said the scottish government is sacrificing them in their approach to aviation, so i think a lot of the answers he is looking for, i'm afraid, are closer to home and meanwhile the uk government has provided £7 billion of support to the sector and that opening up to date is yet to be reflected by announcements in the scottish government. if you really want to help, i think he can look closer to home.— want to help, i think he can look closer to home. re'oice, re'oice, this is a closer to home. rejoice, re'oice, this is a much-needed h closer to home. rejoice, rejoice, this is a much-needed shot - closer to home. rejoice, rejoice, this is a much-needed shot in i closer to home. rejoice, rejoice, | this is a much-needed shot in the this is a much—needed shot in the arm for those who have had two shots of the vaccine in their arm and for an industry and workforce who have
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been laid low during the pandemic perhaps more than other boats have always been steadfast in their belief that we can all travel safely again, so in welcoming this announcement, coming ask the secretary of state to also keep an ion the testing regime? we know for the last couple of months, those who have come back from aberdare, very few have tested positive, so perhaps can we look at the testing costs? they are still a barrier. it would be better if lateral flow could be used rather than pcr and that those who do test positive could then use a pcr test. those ideas, i would look for the secretary of state to keep championing and would he make sure the foreign office advice and website is as up—to—date as he is on this matter? i website is as up-to-date as he is on this matter?— this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does _ this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does a _ this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does a superb _ this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does a superb job - this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does a superb job as - this matter? i thank my honourable friend. he does a superb job as a i friend. he does a superb job as a share of the select committee and has been very consistent in his support for the aviation sector. he will be interested to know, as the whole house will, that we will have a further review date on this on the
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sist a further review date on this on the 31st ofjuly, a checkpoint for the rules themselves. currently the scientific evidence is that pcr tests, in addition to being a bit more accurate, are also the ones which can be quickly sequenced for the genome to look for variants as well and his points about the fcd o and making sure all the advice ties together is well understood and we will make sure we work closely with that. ., . will make sure we work closely with that. w a, ,~ will make sure we work closely with that. w a r' this will make sure we work closely with that._ this week, i will make sure we work closely with l that._ this week, but that. rachel maskell. this week, but the prime minister _ that. rachel maskell. this week, but the prime minister and _ that. rachel maskell. this week, but the prime minister and the _ that. rachel maskell. this week, but the prime minister and the health i the prime minister and the health secretary have... that the prime minister and the health secretary have. . ._ the prime minister and the health secretary have... that is the latest from the transport _ secretary have... that is the latest from the transport secretary, - secretary have... that is the latest| from the transport secretary, grant shapps, on what is happening in terms of travel and, basically, double vaccinated people will not have to quarantine after travel to an amber list country from the 19th ofjuly. pcr tests will still be a requirement, though. under18 ofjuly. pcr tests will still be a requirement, though. under 18 is will also not have to quarantine again, the testing applies for
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anyone vaccinated included. one important caveat therefrom grant shapps in terms of travel was that basically amber list countries now are fully opened up so there is no advice against travelling to them, so in one sense, they almost become green except for the other sense where the next step down from red list and grant shapps said travellers need to be aware that countries could be put on the red list, so that's obviously an important consideration. i will be speaking in a few moments to a travel journalist for speaking in a few moments to a traveljournalist for her perspective on what these changes will mean. reaction has been coming through. ba and easyjet have put out statements, airways chairman has said "we are pleased to see this common—sense approach which is already working safely for other countries, but there is already to do. the
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government needs to quickly extend this to all vaccinated travellers, agree a reciprocal deal with the us, and reduce the need for unnecessary expensive tests." easyjet, "we've already said that vaccine nation is the key to unlocking travel, and finally millions will be able to reunite with families and take that wanted to trip this summer. " that was something that was picked up on by one of the mps. only 0.4% of those who have gone through the testing regime have tested positive. a statement from heathrow. "this is excellent news that will give it a boost to people across britain, but the job isn't done to really
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kick—start the uk's economic recovery. global britain needs to get trading again, us business can get trading again, us business can get to the eu, but uk business remains cutoff." let's just recap on what grant shapps said just a few moments ago. i on what grant shapps said 'ust a few moments ago.— moments ago. i can confirm today that from the _ moments ago. i can confirm today that from the 19th _ moments ago. i can confirm today that from the 19th of _ moments ago. i can confirm today that from the 19th ofjuly, - moments ago. i can confirm today that from the 19th of july, uk - that from the 19th ofjuly, uk residents who are fully vaccinated through the uk vaccine roll out will no longer have two self—isolate when they return to england. they will still be required to take a test three days before returning, demonstrating they are negative before they travel, and a pcr test before they travel, and a pcr test before a day but they will no longer before a day but they will no longer be required to take a test. this means an essence for fully vaccinated travellers to requirement for a green and amber list countries are the same. to be clear, a full
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vaccination means 1a days have passed since your final dose of the vaccine, and it's also important to note that health matters are devolved, so decision—making and implementation may differ across uk administrations, and we will continue to work with the devolved administrations to ensure we achieve our shared objectives of robust return to international travel. let's get more on this from travel journalist and podcaster lisa francesa nand. i want to be very happy and excited, and i_ i want to be very happy and excited, and i think_ i want to be very happy and excited, and i think this is very good news, but its— and i think this is very good news, but it's only — and i think this is very good news, but it's only half the good news. there _ but it's only half the good news. there is— but it's only half the good news. there is a — but it's only half the good news. there is a lot of confusion and unanswered questions. is the foreign office _ unanswered questions. is the foreign office advice going to change as well? _ office advice going to change as well? that has a bearing on insurance, and that sort of thing. and also, — insurance, and that sort of thing. and also, people will still have to take pcr — and also, people will still have to take pcr tests, that is prohibitively expensive for a lot of people _ prohibitively expensive for a lot of people. so i think it's good news for a _ people. so i think it's good news for a start — people. so i think it's good news for a start. we need to get things moving — for a start. we need to get things moving. but there are a lot of things—
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moving. but there are a lot of things that need a little bit more explanation. things that need a little bit more explanation-_ things that need a little bit more explanation. and what about this business of _ explanation. and what about this business of travelling _ explanation. and what about this business of travelling to - explanation. and what about this business of travelling to and - explanation. and what about this i business of travelling to and amber country under new rules that make it almost like the green list countries, and yet there stilljust a notch down from red to list. and grant shapps said that amber list countries could turn to read. how much notice would be given? what are the criteria? basically, coming back from a red list country means quarantining in a hotel, so it's a completely different ball game. i completely different ball game. i think those things are not clear. we are iri— think those things are not clear. we are in the _ think those things are not clear. we are in the situation now where we have _ are in the situation now where we have got— are in the situation now where we have got the vaccine, travel should be different than this time last summer. — be different than this time last summer, and actually this does not look very— summer, and actually this does not look very different from this time last summer. there will also be a lot of— last summer. there will also be a lot of people who say, "i can't risk going _ lot of people who say, "i can't risk going to _ lot of people who say, "i can't risk going to and — lot of people who say, "i can't risk going to and amber list country and it potentially turning red."— it potentially turning red." we've had a pretty _ it potentially turning red." we've had a pretty warm _ it potentially turning red." we've had a pretty warm response - it potentially turning red." we've| had a pretty warm response from it potentially turning red." we've - had a pretty warm response from the travel companies but there is more that they want to see being done. in
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terms of how much... there is a huge appetite for travel, but in terms of how much booking has been done, what is the picture now?— is the picture now? people are bookint , is the picture now? people are booking, there _ is the picture now? people are booking, there is _ is the picture now? people are booking, there is that - is the picture now? people are booking, there is that appetite is the picture now? people are i booking, there is that appetite for traveh _ booking, there is that appetite for travel. people want to go see relatives. _ travel. people want to go see relatives, there is business to do, so bookings— relatives, there is business to do, so bookings are up unfortunately that means prices are up, but reports — that means prices are up, but reports i'm _ that means prices are up, but reports i'm getting back is that things— reports i'm getting back is that things are getting more expensive but no _ things are getting more expensive but no more than usual summer abroad, — but no more than usual summer abroad, because usually soon as the school— abroad, because usually soon as the school holidays start prices to rise — school holidays start prices to rise. anyone who booked a few weeks a-o, rise. anyone who booked a few weeks ago. or— rise. anyone who booked a few weeks ago. or even— rise. anyone who booked a few weeks ago, or even a view days ago, has actually— ago, or even a view days ago, has actually probably got a good deal. the other— actually probably got a good deal. the other parts are you can plan your trip, think it's all compliant with the rules, but then of course there is that stress factor of knowing that you need the negative test to go, and the picture here is really changing on that front. and actually, wejust really changing on that front. and actually, we just had some figures from the department of health on the number of alerts are sent out by the
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nhs contact tracing up in the week ending the 30th ofjune, the app sent out 356,000 results telling users to go into isolation, which compares with about 219,000 the previous week. so that has to be factored in as well?— previous week. so that has to be factored in as well? yes, there's so many things — factored in as well? yes, there's so many things that — factored in as well? yes, there's so many things that have _ factored in as well? yes, there's so many things that have to _ factored in as well? yes, there's so many things that have to be - factored in as well? yes, there's so l many things that have to be factored in. many things that have to be factored in we _ many things that have to be factored in we are _ many things that have to be factored in. we are allowed out of the country— in. we are allowed out of the country now, especially if you had youriahs. — country now, especially if you had yourjabs, but what about the country — yourjabs, but what about the country you're going into? i have people _ country you're going into? i have people at— country you're going into? i have people at the moment trying to get back into _ people at the moment trying to get back into spain, and it's really obligated _ back into spain, and it's really obligated and expensive. i think it's a _ obligated and expensive. i think it's a really good thing but it's not the — it's a really good thing but it's not the full picture, and when he next _ not the full picture, and when he next announcement comes, which possibly— next announcement comes, which possibly will be next thursday, that hasn't _ possibly will be next thursday, that hasn't been confirmed, we need that information, and we need more countries — information, and we need more countries turning green as well. in terms countries turning green as well. terms of countries turning green as well. in terms of what other countries are doing, the picture is also changing in terms of what is going on with their covid figures. greece has suddenly seen a change with the numbers taking up there. how much
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difference is there with different countries and how likely is it that they are also going to be deciding potentially to change the way that they are doing things? this potentially to change the way that they are doing things?— they are doing things? this is the thin. if they are doing things? this is the thing- if you _ they are doing things? this is the thing. if you cast _ they are doing things? this is the thing. if you cast your _ they are doing things? this is the thing. if you cast your mind - they are doing things? this is the thing. if you cast your mind back| they are doing things? this is the l thing. if you cast your mind back to the brexit— thing. if you cast your mind back to the brexit vote, we were all thinking _ the brexit vote, we were all thinking that the eu is this one a bil thinking that the eu is this one a big homogenous mass and they couldn't— big homogenous mass and they couldn't make their own decisions, and actually, unfortunately, everyone is making their own decisions _ everyone is making their own decisions. if you are booked to go somewhere and you want to go somewhere, double check before you io somewhere, double check before you go because _ somewhere, double check before you go because every single country is doing _ go because every single country is doing something different. they want as inn _ doing something different. they want as in. they— doing something different. they want as in, they need our money. spain and greece — as in, they need our money. spain and greece and italy will be doing their utmost to make sure we can travel— their utmost to make sure we can travel freely, their utmost to make sure we can travelfreely, but their utmost to make sure we can travel freely, but of course also at the same — travel freely, but of course also at the same time keeping in a on safety — the same time keeping in a on safety. they don't bother numbers to rise, safety. they don't bother numbers to rise. the _ safety. they don't bother numbers to rise, the same that we don't. thank ou ve rise, the same that we don't. thank you very much- _ dame irene hays is the chair of hays travel — what's your reaction to this announcement? what do you think about what grant shapps has announced? latte what do you think about what grant shapps has announced?— shapps has announced? we are absolutely _ shapps has announced? we are absolutely delighted. _ shapps has announced? we are absolutely delighted. i - shapps has announced? we are absolutely delighted. i think- shapps has announced? we are absolutely delighted. i think it | shapps has announced? we are| absolutely delighted. i think it is absolutely delighted. i think it is a huge step in the right direction. perfect timing for all of those
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people who booked their holidays in 2019, couldn't take it in 2020, had it transferred to this year and have been sitting there with their fingers crossed stop it's a huge announcement. i realise that there are some constraints but as i have said before, if people go to a reputable travel agent and get good advice, i think the main thing which i would stress is that good travel insurance. we only sell travel insurance. we only sell travel insurance with covid clauses within it. make sure that you have that insurance, particularly because of the uncertainty which has just been outlined in relation to potential movement. i hope that next week's announcement, though, will move some of those amber list countries up to green. 50 i'm hopeful about that. obviously there are still some testing to be done, but we have negotiated a very good deal and i know the immediate was suggesting
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there could be £400 for a family of four, but we have negotiated a deal with a government recommended laboratory so we have those tests for hays travel... laboratory so we have those tests for hays travel. . ._ laboratory so we have those tests | for hays travel. . ._ per for hays travel... that's £45? per nerson. for hays travel... that's £45? per person- that _ for hays travel... that's £45? per person- that is — for hays travel... that's £45? per person. that is a _ for hays travel... that's £45? per person. that is a significantly - person. that is a significantly lowerfigure than person. that is a significantly lower figure than you would have on the high street, for example. 50 we feel that that is less of a deterrent. clearly those tests need to be done on more than one occasion. when we have been speaking to people very regularly over the past couple of weeks, people are prepared to do that. they are prepared to do that. they are prepared to do that. they are prepared to make sure that they go through all of those processes and procedures in order that they can have that summer holiday. going back to what ou have that summer holiday. going back to what you were _ have that summer holiday. going back to what you were saying _ have that summer holiday. going back to what you were saying about - have that summer holiday. going back to what you were saying about good i to what you were saying about good travel insurance, potentially what could that cover? because, for instance, a family going to one of these amber list countries, it
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suddenly turns red. 50 in order to try to get back to avoid whatever the cut of date is in the hotel quarantine, with new flights be covered, and if they couldn't get back, which the cost of hotel quarantine be covered? it back, which the cost of hotel quarantine be covered? it differs, first of all. _ quarantine be covered? it differs, first of all, depending _ quarantine be covered? it differs, first of all, depending on - quarantine be covered? it differs, first of all, depending on the - quarantine be covered? it differs, first of all, depending on the tourj first of all, depending on the tour operators. in some instances, those will be covered by the tour operator. if anything changes from green or amber to red, the insurance will cover the cost of coming back if they need to come back before a certain date, for example. it would cover the cost of an alternative holiday, depending on how far through they are. it's really important that people take out that insurance and make sure that they have a look at the small print before they depart.— have a look at the small print before they depart. that's a very risky insurance. _ before they depart. that's a very risky insurance. presumably, i before they depart. that's a very risky insurance. presumably, it's not going to be cheap? l
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risky insurance. presumably, it's not going to be cheap?— risky insurance. presumably, it's not going to be cheap? i think that it's not not going to be cheap? i think that it's rrot out — not going to be cheap? i think that it's rrot out of— not going to be cheap? i think that it's not out of order, _ not going to be cheap? i think that it's not out of order, bearing - not going to be cheap? i think that it's not out of order, bearing in i it's not out of order, bearing in mind the potential cost of having to have a flight back into the uk. 50 mind the potential cost of having to have a flight back into the uk. sol think it is well worth having. and something that we strongly recommend to everyone who is travelling, particularly under the current circumstances.— particularly under the current circumstances. ., ., , circumstances. there are so many variables- — circumstances. there are so many variables- we _ circumstances. there are so many variables. we go _ circumstances. there are so many variables. we go on _ circumstances. there are so many variables. we go on holiday - circumstances. there are so many variables. we go on holiday to i circumstances. there are so many. variables. we go on holiday to have a relaxing time and kick back. this doesn't make for a very relaxing start to a holiday. what are you seeing with bookings? how many are being made? might some people, even now, even with this easing of restrictions, the side there are too many variables still?— many variables still? since the prime minister's _ many variables still? since the | prime minister's announcement many variables still? since the - prime minister's announcement on monday where he trailed the fact that we would be receiving an announcement, bookings have gone up
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significantly for 2021. announcement, bookings have gone up significantly for2021. priorto significantly for 2021. prior to that, we significantly for2021. priorto that, we had been doing well for 2022 and 2023. but the other issue is that loads of people have made enquiries in significant numbers, tens of thousands of people have made enquiries, ready to press the button, and they have done that in the knowledge that there would still be some constraints around their holiday. i don't think that anybody believes that this announcement would be made without any constraints in relation to testing or the individual requirements for each different country, because they are different. spain is different to the requirements for greece. and therefore making sure that the information that we have today is absolutely aligned with the foreign and commonwealth advice is really important. 50 that people know that they are able to travel and they have the right paperwork in place, they have the correct insurance in place, and they have booked their
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pcr tests to make sure they are compliant. but really, many of those things are not onerous, they are not. providing you go to a reputable travel agent, they would help out with all of that._ travel agent, they would help out with all of that. how stressful has this period _ with all of that. how stressful has this period been _ with all of that. how stressful has this period been for _ with all of that. how stressful has this period been for you _ with all of that. how stressful has this period been for you and - with all of that. how stressful has this period been for you and for. this period been for you and for your business? and actually, you are saying go to a reputable travel agent, that's what you are. are you hoping... one of these side effects of this might be that what you are talking about, there is so much to factor in, are you finding people are coming to you because it is a complicated process? absolutely. we would normally _ complicated process? absolutely. we would normally have _ complicated process? absolutely. we would normally have about _ complicated process? absolutely. we would normally have about 2096 - complicated process? absolutely. we would normally have about 2096 of i complicated process? absolutely. we l would normally have about 2096 of new would normally have about 20% of new customers to hays travel, we have a very loyal customer base because we have been around for 41 years. but we are finding that we have about 50% new customers coming into a high
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street shop because they want that advice, because they want that sense of security. and they want to know that the person knows them and cares about their booking. notjust that the person knows them and cares about their booking. not just the fact that they have booked a holiday, but that they have everything in place in order to make sure that they can go and enjoy that hospital with some peace of mind. so, for example, we have helped people to load their nhs covid pass, so for some people who have perhaps found that a bit challenging, we have given them help and advice about how they might do that and we have given advice around the paperwork that they need to, depending on the country that they need to go to. but that's not owner us, that's part of good customer service, and there are lots of travel agents across the country who i am sure will be receiving a new customers into their shops because they know that if you are dealing
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with a real person face to face you are going to get great customer service, and that's all part of it. thank you very much indeed. that's the chair of hays travel. do you have questions? we are going to be putting some of them to the sun's travel editor, and also the travel editor of the independent, at 3:30pm. do send your questions in using the hashtag. you can also e—mail us. they are both absolutely brilliant. if anyone knows the answer they will. we are digesting that news from grant shapps. from the 19th ofjuly, anyone who is double vaccinated will be able to return from an amber list
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country without having to quarantine. there will be a requirement for pcr tests, under 18 is can also travel without quarantine, but again with pcr testing. we will have more reaction to that. let's go to edinburgh, where first minister nicola sturgeon is holding a virtual coronavirus briefing. i want to reflect on our current covid situation. i will head briefly to the statement i will make to parliament next week. before any of that, i will summarise today's statistics. yesterday, there were 2802 positive cases reported, which is 8% of all the tests that were carried out. and the total number of confirmed cases now stands at 306,449. there are 401 people who are currently in hospital. that is 14 more than yesterday. and 38
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people are receiving intensive care, and that is for more than yesterday. sadly, forfurther and that is for more than yesterday. sadly, for further deaths were recorded over the past 24 hours, and that takes the total number of deaths registered under this daily definition to 7744. as always, i want to convey my thoughts and condolences to everyone who has been bereaved over the course of this pandemic. i will also briefly update on the progress of the vaccination programme. as of this morning, 3 million 900,864 people had received a first dose of vaccine. that is an increase of 10,688 cents yesterday. in addition, yesterday 16,984 people got the second dose, and that brings
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the total number of second doses to 2,825,000 886. as you can see from these numbers, the vaccine programme continues to make really good progress, and that should make us optimistic. for now, that optimism needs to be balanced by concern at the height case numbers we've seen recently, a pattern that is increasingly evident in other countries as well. however, on the upside, and while there will always be daily fluctuations as we can see, and that is why we looked most closely at the seven day averages, looking at the figures reported over the last few days, we can see the suggestion that the recent surge in cases may be to some extent levelling off now. today's reported figure for example represents 1432
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fewer cases than were reported on this day last week. and similarly, if we look at the seven day average, there does appear to be a slowdown in the rise in positive cases. so while we need to monitor this in the days to come, that is encouraging news. but obviously case numbers remain high, and that is a worry. we increasingly hear talk just remain high, and that is a worry. we increasingly hear talkjust now about learning to live with the virus, which we all want to be able to do. it is true, absolutely true, that we can't live a restricted way of life forever it's also true that vaccines are offering us an alternative way forward. however, that desire to just live with it cannot mean that we simply throw all caution to the wind and no longer worry at all about rising levels of
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infection. i want to just set out briefly why we can't simply throw all caution to the wind. firstly, this virus is still potentially dangerous. as we see almost every day, it is still taking lives, though mercifully, thanks to the vaccines, it is doing so in far fewer numbers than we saw in earlier stages. secondly, even though the majority, quite significant majority, quite significant majority, are now in younger people, who are much less likely to become acutely ill, the health impact can still be significant. many young people are suffering from a long covid, which of course experts still don't fully understand, so it would be wrong and irresponsible, because our young people are not guinea pigs, to have no concern at all about young people being infected with this virus. thirdly, even though far fewer people with covid are ending up in hospital now,
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around 3% of all cases compared to 13% earlier in the year, and that's mainly because the vaccines are giving protection to those that previously were more likely to fall seriously ill, it is still the case that 3% of a high number of positive cases will still put significant pressure on our nhs. that is a matter of basic arithmetic. because the nhs is much busier again with non—disease—macro care, which is a good thing, because we are trying to catch up on the back log created earlier in the pandemic when we had to stop a lot of non—covid—19 care, that pressure will be felt much more quickly. it is already being felt in the nhs. already, some hospitals are having to scale back a bit on covid elected care again. ijust want having to scale back a bit on covid elected care again. i just want to take this moment to pay tribute to everyone working hard in our nhs, up and down the country. for all of
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these reasons, while it is still the case, and this bit hasn't changed, vaccines are offering us the way out of this, hopefully soon. this is a moment for care and caution. that is not truejust here moment for care and caution. that is not true just here in scotland, although we are undoubtedly at the sharp end of this altec curve, but increasingly we see and hear other countries faced with an accelerated delta wave also reemphasised the need for caution. it is worth pointing out, and i'm doing this non—pejoratively, just as a statement of fact, and because the pressure is always there for scotland to follow suit, i think it is worth pointing out that the path of the uk government is embarking on for england, which is entirely a matterfor for england, which is entirely a matter for them, for england, which is entirely a matterfor them, a path of for england, which is entirely a matter for them, a path of notjust lifting all restrictions from the 19th ofjuly but removing the requirement for basic mitigations and facemasks and doing so against the backdrop of sharply increasing
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case numbers, is something of an exception. while i totally understand the desire that some have for us to follow suit in every single respect, we have to think carefully about the steps we do take at this juncture. myjob carefully about the steps we do take at thisjuncture. myjob is not to take the easy decisions in a quest for popularity, it is to do what i think is most likely to keep the country as safe as possible as we get to the end of the vaccination programme. you've heard me use the analogy before, and i'm farfrom programme. you've heard me use the analogy before, and i'm far from the only person to have used it, that this is a race between the virus and the vaccines, and over the next few weeks as we complete the vaccination programme it is really important that we don't let the virus out run us. that brings me onto the second issue i want to briefly cover today, which is the statement i will make to parliament next tuesday. as you know, when we published our revised strategic framework, we said that the 19th ofjuly was the indicative
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date for scotland's movie to level zero. next tuesday, ahead of that date, i will set out to parliament is the final decision that the cabinet will reach on tuesday morning on whether and to what extent that move is able to proceed. it's worth noting, and again, just as a statement of fact not because i want you to read anything particular into this, these decisions needn't always be binary. it is always possible to proceed with some planned changes but hold back on others if we think that is appropriate. obviously, ivery others if we think that is appropriate. obviously, i very much hope that we will be able to move ahead as planned and the apparent slowing down in the case numbers gives me more cause for optimism about that then i might have had a week ago. nevertheless, between now and tuesday, we will continue to monitor very closely the latest data on cases, but also on hospitalisations and deaths to see if that weakening of the link
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between cases and illness is continuing. that is a decision i will set out on tuesday stopped i don't want to pre—empt that decision any further today, but there is 1.1 do want to emphasise, particularly that i'm very aware that the media will be full of talk of so—called freedom day in relation to england, and i absolutely understand everybody�*s desire to get to what is called freedom day here as quickly as possible. as the case numbers show, covid is still with us, it is a still present across the globe, and it's going to be around for some time to come. so it is important i thinkjust to remind all of us that a move to level zero doesn't mean the immediate end of all restrictions. many of the baseline measures we use, things like face coverings, physical distancing,
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rigorous and hygiene, good ventilation, these are going to continue to be imported mitigations to protecting ourselves and others from the virus, perhaps for some time yet. so no matter what our decision is next week about the move to level zero, there won't be an abrupt end to these basic protective measures when we do move to level zero. obviously, iwill set measures when we do move to level zero. obviously, i will set out more about that in the statement i make next week. to finish, though, i want to mind every one of the three things all of us can do to help beat this virus. we hopefully are seeing a slowdown in the rate of increase we have had in the last couple of weeks. that's good news. the vaccination programme continues to go well, we have got to clinics in every part of mainland scotland to encourage people to come forward for vaccination. so we have a cause and reason to continue to be optimistic, but this is a moment in our path out
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of this pandemic for us to be careful and cautious. and all of us have a part to play. and ijust want to end by reiterating the things that all of us can do to help, and to help get us back to that position of normality as quickly as possible. the first is to get vaccinated as soon as you are invited to do so. if you are over 18 years of age, you should have had your invitation for the first jab should have had your invitation for the firstjab by now. you can self register on the nhs inform website, or you can go to one of the drop—in clinics. there are open clinics in all mainland health board areas and you can find details of the one nearest to you on the nhs inform website, or on the social media accounts of your own health board. these drop—in clinics are also available to anyone who has had a first dose eight weeks or more ago but hasn't yet had the second dose. i simply can't emphasise enough how
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important it is that we'll get vaccinated with both doses, so please get both jabs as soon as you can and the nhs inform website is the place to go if you need information on how to get yourjab. the second thing we are asking everyone to do is to take the opportunity to test yourself regularly. that is particularly important if you are planning to visit somebody or go somewhere. if you take a test before you go, you will reduce the risk of you inadvertently spreading the virus if you perhaps have it and don't have symptoms. it helps protect there is that you will be coming into contact with. you can get lateral load tests through the nhs inform website. do, through the nhs inform website. a cautious message there from nicola sturgeon as she paves the way for that decision next week on what scotland's next steps out of the restrictions will be. she said there will not be an abrupt end to basic protective measures when scotland
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moved to level zero. but no decision on that until next week. right, now it's time to say goodbye to viewers watching us on bbc two. and now we canjoin carroll for a watching us on bbc two. and now we can join carroll for a weather update. hello again. although many of us started on a cloudy note it will end up on a sunny note across many parts of the uk. the exception being across northern ireland, northern and western scotland, where we will hang on to a bit more cloud and some drizzle from time to time. but of course in the sunshine, as temperatures rise, that will spark off some showers and some of those could be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. fewer and farther between than yesterday but we could see a few more in the south east compared to yesterday. through this evening and overnight, eventually a lot of those showers will fade and some clear skies, some mist and fog patches forming and temperature—wise falling away to between 12 and 15 degrees, so not a cold night. tomorrow will start off
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with some brightness and some sunshine, still a fair bit of cloud across the north and through the west, producing some showers, and then we've got this weather front showing its hand, bringing in some showery outbreaks of rain later in the day. the showers, especially in eastern areas, could be heavy and thundery with top temperatures of 23.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: fully vaccinated people will no longer have to quarantine on their return to england from amber list countries. from the 19th ofjuly, uk residents who are fully vaccinated through the uk vaccine roll—out will no longer have to self—isolate when they return to england. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high. chancellor rishi sunak defends the decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal
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credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. the long wait is over. england's history makers beat denmark to reach theirfirst major final since 1966. more than 23 million people watched the game on itv, making it one of the most watched broadcasts in the last decade. england have reached the final of euro 2020 after beating denmark 2—1, in front of more than 60,000 fans at wembley. captain harry kane hit the winner in extra time to secure a place against italy on sunday. if england win, it will be their first major tournament victory since the 1966 world cup, 55 years ago. our sports news correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game at wembley. it was a night 55 years of heartache
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turned to pure euphoria. england into the final, and theirfans into dreamland. after waiting so long, how good was that? it's coming home! yeah! oh, it's fantastic. i'm absolutely amazed, i never thought that they would get this far. it's coming home, honestly, i can't believe it. it had been an evening of the rawest emotion, as more than 60,000 supporters, including the prime minister, created a spine—tingling atmosphere. but soon they were silenced. a brilliant free kick from mikkel damsgaard firing denmark ahead. the underdogs were roaring. could england regroup? well, they did, via raheem sterling. only kasper schmeichel�*s brilliance denied him at first but moments later, it was sterling's pressure that put england level. denmark's simon kjaer bundling it into his own net. but fair to say, most in wembley didn't mind. and neither did millions watching around the country.
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and after the break, england began to dominate. harry maguire superbly denied by schmeichel. could nothing get past him? with every england chance, the tension inside wembley grew. before extra time and the decisive moment. a challenge on sterling, penalty, and up stepped harry kane. and just look what it meant. england into the lead and soon they were into the final. cue an outpouring of emotion from the pitch to the stands, to watching royalty, to fan parks around the country. a night and a result that for the team meant everything. we knew that we were never going to go through a whole tournament without conceding, and we were going to have to respond to setbacks in the right way, and they did. denmark have been a fantastic opponent, i have to say. and they've had an incredible tournament.
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but in the end it was our night. incredible, amazing night for this country, for this group of players, the staff, obviously our first final in the european championship. and to be at wembley, it's just a real special occasion. so credit to the boys. you know, we dug deep today, got the job done, but of course there's one more to go. so let's recover well and get ready for that one. well, what an incredible night here for england. they've had their fair share of semifinal heartache over the years. but now they're just one match from glory. # sweet caroline # the final now beckons against italy on sunday. but last night was about the thrill of getting there. # 30 years of hurt # never stops me dreaming # time for a sing song. football's coming home, they say. well, it's never been closer.
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andy swiss, bbc news, wembley. earlier, our sports presenter john watson told me it was a tough night for the england team — but an amazing one for the fans who got to watch. what an occasion, what an atmosphere and what a night here at wembley. the 60,000 fans packing in here were treated to something special. it wasn't easy — it was nerve—racking, it's fair to say — as we saw there in andy's report — but the big players came to the fore when they needed. raheem sterling once again in sensational form for england, and captain harry kane needing to do what he did of course with that winning penalty — albeit it wasn't comfortable to watch, was it, when he saw his penalty saved by kasper schmeichel? but the ball falling kindly for him as he was able to get that goal as england came through 2—1. yes, it was obviously a lot easier against ukraine in the quarterfinal, winning 4—0 out in rome. but england hadn't conceded a goal yet, as gareth southgate was saying there — it was unlikely they were going to go through the whole tournament without conceding a goal. they have now, and perhaps they needed that challenge
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going into the final against italy on sunday. a very tough contest ahead. as we know, coming into this tournament, it was about moving past some of those bad memories and moments, the upsets and disappointments that have gone before with england. you think about italia 90 and chris waddle missing his penalty. and gareth southgate, the now—england manager, missing his penalty here at wembley back in euro 96. they wanted to move beyond that. and certainly, you felt with some of those images out on the pitch last night, they are continuing to do that with every passing moment in this tournament. it was lovely to see declan rice leaping on the shoulders of harry maguire, celebrating in front of the fans. we saw bukayo saka being lifted up by tyrone mings and conor coady in front of the crowd. it's those images and moments that i think will help england move past what has gone before. and we saw mason mount as well throwing his shirt into the crowd. and there was one lucky fan, a girl there, who grabbed it with glee. she looked almost moved to tears in that moment as she got hold of his shirt. it's special moments like that. and that is what a major tournament does, doesn't it, joanna?
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it brings together a nation, it's unifying, it's very hard to create that feeling and occasion that comes with seeing a nation like england playing at this stage of a major tournament. and just seeing some of the flags around this stadium, all around the country, people here to witness that moment, and at long last england have got over the line and made it through to a major final, for the first time in 55 years. and we wait to see what comes on sunday. let's cross to the house of commons now where borisjohnson is making a statement on afghanistan. training, funding, communications and inspiration and it was in the mountain ranges of this century that al-qaeda operated a formidable network of training camps, drilling and integrating thousands of recruits. the terrorists who acquired their murderous skills in afghanistan who were organised from its oil were dispersed across the world inflicting bloodshed and tragedy on three continents. they
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detonate truck bombs in nairobi and darragh salaam in 1988, killing 224 people. they attacked the us killing 17 people and then they perpetrated their most heinous atrocity, claiming almost 3000 lives in new york, pennsylvania and washington on september the 11th 2001. today, thankfully, the situation is very different. the training camps have been destroyed. what remains of al-qaeda's leadership no longer resides in afghanistan and no terrorist attacks against western targets have been mounted from afghan soil since 2001. we should never lucite of these essential facts. on the morning after september the 11th, few would have thought that no more terrorist attacks on that scale would be lost from afghanistan in the next 20 years. these gains were achieved by an american led military intervention mounted with
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overwhelming international support, including trips from dozens of countries and the first and only invoking of nato's article five security guarantee. and we can take pride that britain was part of that effort from the beginning. over the last two decades, 150,000 members of our armed forces have served in afghanistan, mainly in helmand province which was, from 2006 onwards, a focus of our operation. in the unforgiving desert of some of the world's harshest terrain and a shoulder to shoulder with the afghan security forces, our service men and women sought to bring development and stability. the house willjoin with me in commending their achievements. and paying heartfelt tribute to the 457 british service personnel who laid down their lives in afghanistan to keep us safe. we
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always acted in the closest partnership with the government of the people of afghanistan, and we own immense debt to the translators and other locally employed staff who risked their lives alongside british forces. we have already helped more than 1500 former afghan staff and theirfamilies to begin new lives here in the uk. this year, we adopted a new policy offering priority relocation to the uk to any current or formally foreign employed staff assessed to be under serious threat to their lives along with their close families. british diplomats and development experts worked alongside our allies to rebuild the country. opening schools and clinics where there had been none and bringing safe water and outer city to millions of people for the first time. —— safe water and
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electricity. anyone who lives in comfort as we do should not underestimate the importance of their advances. underestimate the importance of theiradvances. intel underestimate the importance of their advances. intel are bundled afghanistan, virtually no girls attended school. they were, as a matter of declared policy, driven from the classroom and forbidden from the classroom and forbidden from returning. today, 3.6 million girls are going to school in afghanistan, seizing the chance to escape from illiteracy and policy mistake my poverty. the girls' education fund established by the government has helped over a quarter of a million afghan girls into the classroom. and our priority now must be to work alongside our afghan and other partners to preserve these vital gains and the legacy of what has been achieved. under the taliban, women were excluded from governments. today, women hold over a quarter of the seats in
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afghanistan's parliament. and since 2002, over 5 million refugees have returned to afghanistan under the un's voluntary repatriations programme, aided by the fact that britain, the un and our afghan and international partners have together cleared over 8.4 million landmines or other unexploded munitions, restoring 340,000 acres of land for productive use. in 2018, here at province was declared free of mines after ten years of painstaking work by the halo trust based in dumfriesshire in a uk funded programme. so no one should doubt the gains of the last 20 years, but nor can we shrink from the hard reality of the situation today. the international military presence in afghanistan was never intended to be
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permanent. we and our nato allies were always going to withdraw our forces. the only question was when and there could never be a perfect moment. as long ago as 2013, the uk ceased all combat operations and brought the vast majority of our troops home, re—orientating our role and our involvement. about 700 service personnel stayed in afghanistan under nato's mission to train and assist the country's security forces. last year, the us decided to withdraw its troops from afghanistan while the taliban undertook to prevent, and i quote, any group or individual including al-qaeda from using the soil of afghanistan to threaten the security of the united states and its allies. president biden announced in april that all american forces would leave
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by september at the latest and the nato summit declared last month that the military operations in afghanistan were coming to an end. as a result, all british troops assigned to nato's mission in afghanistan are now returning home and, for obvious reasons, i will not disclose the timetable of our departure but i can tell the house that most of our personnel have already left. i hope that no one will leak to be false conclusion that the withdrawal of our forces somehow means the end of britain's commitment to afghanistan. we are not about to turn away, nor are we under any illusions about the perils of today's situation and what may lie ahead. we always knew that supporting afghanistan would be a generational undertaking and we were equally clear that the instruments in our hands would change over time. now, we shall use every diplomatic
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and humanitarian lever to support afghanistan's development and afg hanistan's development and stability. afghanistan's development and stability. we will back the afghan state with over £100 million of development assistance this year and £58 million for the afghan national security and defence forces. and we will, of course, continue to work alongside our afghan partners against the terrorist threat. our diplomats are doing everything they can to support a lasting peace settlement within afghanistan and they are working for regional stability, particularly by promoting better relations between afghanistan and pakistan. and here i commend general carter, the chief of the defence staff, for his steadfast efforts. i spoke to the president on the 17th ofjune two him of the uk's commitment and i was moved once again to hear his tribute to the
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british soldiers who strove so hard to give the afghan people better lives. we must be realistic about our ability alone to influence the course of events. it will take combined efforts of many nations, including afghanistan's neighbours including afg hanistan's neighbours to including afghanistan's neighbours to help the afghan people to build their future. to help the afghan people to build theirfuture. but to help the afghan people to build their future. but the threat that brought us to afghanistan in the first place has been greatly diminished by the valour and by the sacrifice of the armed forces of britain and many other countries. we are safer because of everything they did. now we must persevere, alongside ourfriends, did. now we must persevere, alongside our friends, for the same goal of a stable afghanistan but with different tools in our hands and i commend this statement to the house. brute and i commend this statement to the house. . ., and i commend this statement to the house. ~ ., .., and i commend this statement to the house. . ., _, ., and i commend this statement to the house. . ., ., ., , .,
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house. we now come to the opposition de . u house. we now come to the opposition deputy leader. — house. we now come to the opposition deputy leader, angela _ house. we now come to the opposition deputy leader, angela rayner. - house. we now come to the opposition deputy leader, angela rayner. thank. deputy leader, angela rayner. thank ou, mr deputy leader, angela rayner. thank you. mr speaker- _ deputy leader, angela rayner. thank you, mr speaker. can _ deputy leader, angela rayner. thank you, mr speaker. can i _ deputy leader, angela rayner. thank you, mr speaker. can i think- deputy leader, angela rayner. trims; you, mr speaker. can i think the prime ministerfor an you, mr speaker. can i think the prime minister for an advanced copy of his statement and can i also, first of all, give my apologies on behalf of the leader of the opposition who is on a long planned visit to northern ireland? i will also associate myself with the comments of the prime minister regarding the british service personnel and the collective efforts of our partners in nato. this is a profound moment for more than 150,000 uk personnel who have served in afghanistan during the last 20 years, including my honourable friend, the members for barnsley central and norwich south and many other honourable members across this house. my own brother served in the british army forces during that period, so i know how it feels to say goodbye to a loved one before a tour of duty. thankfully, mr speaker, i do not know how it feels
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not to see your loved one come home again and the pain that those families have gone through is unimaginable. hundreds of british men and women lost their lives in the service of our country. many more were wounded or injured and still suffer the physical and emotional scars. they have shown extraordinary bravery, skill and courage, so today, mr speaker, to everyone who served in afghanistan and to all that loved them and support them, we say a huge thank you. there have been moments of huge difficulty in the last two decades and the situation on the ground in afghanistan today is more concerning than at any other time in many years. that must not take away from the many positives of our engagement as brought to afghanistan and the real difference our services and development sector have made in the country that has suffered so much.
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we have a supported improvements in security, in governance, in economic development and, as the prime minister said, development and, as the prime ministersaid, in advancing development and, as the prime minister said, in advancing the rights of women and education for girls. yet these gains have not been secured. the taliban are making gains on the ground and serious questions remain about the future security of afghanistan. a security threat remains for the wider world including to the uk. and nobody wants to see british troops permanently stationed in afghanistan, but we cannot simply wash our hands or walk away. it is hard to see a future without bloody conflict and wider taliban control. already, they are on the brink of gaining control of provincial capitals and afghan security forces are at risk of being overwhelmed.
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this, mr speaker, spellsjeopardy this, mr speaker, spells jeopardy for the this, mr speaker, spellsjeopardy for the afghan people, particularly for the afghan people, particularly for afghan women and girls and all the things that the prime minister talked about earlier. in a just world, they would have had a the same rights as women anywhere and in the words of the prime minister himself, this is a situation fraught with risk and i understand that, so can he tell us if he argued for against the withdrawal of the us government within nato and what other steps he proposed? are british troops made enormous sacrifices and we believe, as a nation, we have a responsibility to our veterans. can the prime minister really tell them that our work as a nation in afghanistan is done? and their efforts will not be in vain? on their behalf, mr speaker, i ask the
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prime minister what plans are now in place to ensure that afghanistan does not become a failed state and a breeding ground for those that wish to oppress their own citizens and threaten ours and what additional threaten ours and what additional threat does our country now face? what diplomatic plans will be in place in the region to support the peace process and is the uk government engaging with the government engaging with the government of pakistan about its role and will the uk embassy in cabo remain and how will we keep our uk staff there safe? —— in kabul. afghanistan remains one of the poorest countries in the world, yet are a funding to that country is being cut by more than £100 million. he referred to today the uk funding a project of 6000 women that has already been cancelled. when he
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visited cabo as foreign secretary, he said that girls' education was our crowning achievement, so can the prime minister tell the house what impact his cuts to the aid budget will have on programmes there and will have on programmes there and will he not rethink those cuts again? mr speaker, i reiterate that we all want to see an end to uk military operations in afghanistan, but if we leave without putting a plan in place to ensure that afghanistan does not go back to the conflict and violence of the past, then we would have failed those that have given so much over the last 20 years. building and maintaining the peace and prosperity of afghanistan, protecting women and girls and, in
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turn, protecting our own nation should always be priority. to honour the legacy of those that have served and the lives that were lost, let's make sure, prime minister, we get this right. make sure, prime minister, we get this ritht. ~ , make sure, prime minister, we get this right-_ i - make sure, prime minister, we get this right-_ i am - this right. prime minister. i am very grateful — this right. prime minister. i am very grateful to _ this right. prime minister. i am very grateful to the _ this right. prime minister. i am very grateful to the right - very grateful to the right honourable lady for what she said and particularly the spirit in which she shared it. let me try to address some of her points. it is clear that what is happening now is a follow—up to what was very largely the withdrawal at the end of military operations in 2014. the present since then has been much smaller, but a great deal of good work has continued to be done by british aid workers, armed forces and diplomats and she is right to draw attention to the work of educating girls and young women and i think that the whole country can be proud of what
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has been achieved and i can reassure her by saying that actually this country will not only continue to fund education in afghanistan, to continue to support afghanistan to the tune of £100 million, as i said, but we will also increase our funding for the global partnership for education and we will be making further announcements about that later this month when the global partnership for education takes place here in london. she asks the most important question, which i think veterans of the afghan conflict will want to know, which is whether we think that the threat from afghanistan has now been reduced and the answer is yes, we do think the threat from al-qaeda is very substantially lower than it was in 2001. there remain threats, of course, from the islamic state as it
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is so called and other networks. of course, there remain terrorist threats from afghanistan, but the answer is to have a peaceful and negotiated solution and that is what our diplomats will continue to work for. �* ., , our diplomats will continue to work for. ., ,, for. boris johnson talking about the withdrawal of _ for. boris johnson talking about the withdrawal of british _ for. boris johnson talking about the withdrawal of british troops - for. boris johnson talking about the withdrawal of british troops from i withdrawal of british troops from afghanistan. you can continue to watch that debate on bbc. coming up, jane hill will be here with the bbc news at one. now, the weather. good afternoon. we're heading towards the middle of the summer now and the weather seems to be stuck in a bit of a pattern of sunshine and showers at the moment. but we have got some blue sky and some sunshine out there. this is the picture in gravesend in kent, taken recently by one of our weather watchers stop the shower cloud is building through the remainder of the day, and in fact, over the next few days, we are going to keep that theme. sunny spells and scattered showers. low pressure not far away. it's a sitting off to the east.
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we got a ridge of a slightly higher pressure starting to build in and squeeze away those showers, but certainly through the rest of the afternoon, into the evening, parts of england and wales, particularly towards the east, will see a few of those scattered showers. at wimbledon, i think most of them should stay towards the north so temperatures around about 22 celsius or so as we head through the early evening, and it should stay dry. just an outside chance of a passing shower. a few heavy showers, too, for eastern scotland for a time. they should largely fade away, most places are becoming dry with clear spells tonight and temperatures down to between 12—14 c. a little bit of showery rain into the far south—west first thing friday morning. it will be cloudier across western and northern parts of the uk tomorrow with a few spots of drizzly rain. central and eastern parts of england tending to brighten up with sunny spells, but similar to recent days, we are going to see those afternoon showers bubbling up, and they could be quite slow moving and heavy per parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. there is a small risk of some localised flooding around because the showers are not moving through in a hurry. and pollen levels are also going to be high or very high across much of england, wales, southern scotland, northern ireland, too. just moderate across central
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and northern scotland. but into friday evening, still some of these really heavy showers with thunder, lightning and hail across eastern areas. they will slowly fade away overnight on friday and on into the weekend as well. butjust in time for the weekend, this next area of low pressure arrives from the south—west. it looks like that's going to affect southern parts of england and wales initially on a saturday. quite heavy, persistent rain, too. slowly clearing eastwards. then we are left with another day of sunshine and hit and miss heavy, scattered downpours as well. most likely across parts of eastern scotland, eastern england, too. but we will see some of them cropping up further west later in the day. probably a little bit drier for northern ireland, and temperatures generally down a notch on recent days, perhaps into the low 20s. it remains unsettled. more rain towards the north on sunday. and further showers into the new working week. goodbye.
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england are into the final of a first major men's tournament in 55 years. schmeichel saves. harry kane is there to follow in! after a dramatic extra—time win against denmark last night, the team now faces italy at wembley on sunday. to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days. you know, we're here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet, and we know we've got everybody with us. around the country — the celebrations went on long into the night. who'd have thought this, you know, like, six months ago, in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic.
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this is just what the country needed.

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