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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines the long wait is over. england's historymakers beat denmark to reach their first major final since 1966 to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days, you know, we are here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet and we know we've got everybody with us. across the country, from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fanzones, the nation celebrates a famous night for the three lions who'd have thought this? six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic. this is just what the country needed. where will you be watching the final?
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let us know your plans by tweeting me... nhs leaders warn that more than five million people are waiting for treatment and the backlog will get worse as the number of coronavirus cases rise more than 100 scientists and doctors?accuse the uk government of conducting a dangerous and unethical experiment and urge it to reconsider its plans to abandon all restrictions chancellor rishi sunak defends the decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. this was a temporary measure, it was always intended to be a temporary measure and much like all the other things that we have done, they were the things that we put in place to deal with the crisis. plans for how and when fully vaccinated travellers can go abroad without having to quarantine
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on their return are to be set out later. good morning and welcome to bbc news. england have reached the final of euro 2020 after beating denmark 2—1 in front of more than 60,000 fans at wembley. captain harry kane hit the winner in extra time to secure a place against italy on sunday. if england win, it will be their first major tournament victory since the 1966 world cup, 55 years ago. 0ur sports news correspondent, andy swiss, was watching last night's game at wembley. it was a night 55 years of heartache turned to pure euphoria. england into the final,
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and theirfans into dreamland. after waiting so long, how good was that? it's coming home! yeah! oh, it's fantastic. i'm absolutely amazed, i never thought that they would get this far. it's coming home, honestly, i can't believe it. it had been an evening of the rawest emotion, as more than 60,000 supporters, including the prime minister, created a spine tingling atmosphere. but soon they were silenced. a brilliant free kick from mikkel damsgaard firing denmark ahead. the underdogs were roaring. could england regroup? well, they did, via raheem sterling. 0nly kasper schmeichel�*s brilliance denied him at first but moments later, it was sterling's pressure that put england level. denmark's simon kjaer bundling it into his own net. but fair to say, most in wembley didn't mind. and neither did millions watching around the country. and after the break, england began to dominate.
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harry maguire superbly denied by schmeichel. could nothing get past him? with every england chance, the tension inside wembley grew. before extra time and the decisive moment. a challenge on sterling, penalty, and up stepped harry kane. and just look what it meant. england into the lead and soon they were into the final. cue an outpouring of emotion from the pitch to the stands, to watching royalty, to fan parks around the country. a night and a result that for the team meant everything. we knew that we were never going to go through a whole tournament without conceding, and we were going to have to respond to setbacks in the right way, and they did. denmark have been a fantastic opponent, i have to say. and they've had an incredible tournament. but in the end it was our night.
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incredible, amazing night for this country, for this group of players, the staff, obviously our first final in the european championship. and to be at wembley, it's just a real special occasion. so credit to the boys. you know, we dug deep today, got the job done, but of course there is one more to go. so let's recover well and get ready for that one. well, what an incredible night here for england. they've had their fair share of semifinal heartache over the years. but now they're just one match from glory. # sweet caroline.# the final now beckons against italy on sunday. but last night was about the thrill of getting there. # 30 years of hurt. # never stops me dreaming.# time for a sing song. football's coming home, they say. well, it's never been closer. andy swiss, bbc news, wembley.
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0ur sports correspondent sally nugent is at wembley. good morning to you, with your friends beside you as ever, it had everything, that stress, tension, euphoria! it everything, that stress, tension, eu - horia! . , everything, that stress, tension, eu - horia! ., , ., everything, that stress, tension, euhoria! ., euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know _ euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know what _ euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know what it _ euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know what it was _ euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know what it was like - euphoria! it was mad, wasn't it? i don't know what it was like for - don't know what it was like for people watching at home but in the stadium it felt unreal, it felt like you were in a film because i've done so many of these tournaments over the years, you kind of prepare yourself for something to happen at this point or maybe even in the quarterfinals, when the luck does not go with england or theyjust don't play well enough but you know what? last night you would have to say they had luck on their side, didn't they? they went a goal down, they remained concentrated, they kept their focus, this they remained concentrated, they kept theirfocus, this man here, my friend gareth, told them to stay
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calm, keep calm, and i've seen england managers do that in the past and it did not work but what was significant last night was it worked, the players listened and when he said to them stay calm, they knew what that meant and they knew what to do and of course to — one, the score line in the end, it was stressful for the last half—hour, extra time, it was fantastic and my other friend extra time, it was fantastic and my otherfriend here, harry, didn't he step up when he scored the rebound of his penalty? you have to look at denmark and say they've had an incredible tournament considering they lost christian eriksen in the very first game in such terrible circumstances, how they regrouped and got themselves back together to even get to the semifinal is incredible and there were really touching scenes last night of the denmark players, going to their fans. contrast that with the jubilation, the celebration of the england players, singing to their friends and family, to the fans in the crowd. and that moment when it
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was just magical. the crowd. and that moment when it wasjust magical. it's the crowd. and that moment when it was just magical. it's only a semifinal but it was magical. it means that it's still coming home, the possibility is still there, it's the possibility is still there, it's the next step and the players and gareth southgate have a great relationship, there is a great relationship, there is a great relationship and the fans, who have been giving them so much energy and there was a beautiful moment after there was a beautiful moment after the game when mason mount gave something to a very lucky young fan? yes, it was gorgeous, it's interesting what you say about gareth southgate, he has spoken to this team about carrying the hope of a nation and being able to give fans some hope, he says the hope of this nation rests on your shoulders when you walk onto the pitch, considering for the year everybody has had and you are right, mason mount went into the crowd last night and there was one very lucky little girl called belle and there is a moment mason
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mount hans his shirt over to belle and she cannot believe it. she is with her father and she and she cannot believe it. she is with herfather and she is and she cannot believe it. she is with her father and she is overcome with her father and she is overcome with emotion. isn't that brilliant? it gets me every time. she will remember that forever. after the celebration, thoughts very quickly turning to the final on sunday, the preparations. what are your thoughts ahead of that? do you think the top match last night will help the england team prepare better? yes. match last night will help the england team prepare better? yes, it robabl england team prepare better? yes, it probably will — england team prepare better? yes, it probably will because _ england team prepare better? yes, it probably will because the _ probably will because the interesting thing about last night as they had to be resilient, mentally, they have proven to themselves they can come back from being a goal down and i think that won't harm them at all, they played an extra 30 minutes of course. the italians will have had an extra rest day by the time you work all of that out, the italians had extra time and penalties, that simply will not
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count on sunday. i saw the italians the other day, they came to wembley to train and they look superhuman! they are an incredible team. and if you look at it, it's probably the two best teams that had made it to the final, i think england might need to be more physical to rely on their physicality on sunday night. if they are to beat italy. just before you _ if they are to beat italy. just before you go. _ if they are to beat italy. just before you go, you - if they are to beat italy. just before you go, you got the prediction right yesterday morning, didn't you? you said to— one. you were on the money. i didn't you? you said to- one. you were on the money.— were on the money. i was on the mone , were on the money. i was on the money. i — were on the money. i was on the money, i thought _ were on the money. i was on the money, i thought you _ were on the money. i was on the money, i thought you were - were on the money. i was on the | money, i thought you were going were on the money. i was on the i money, i thought you were going to ask me for a prediction for sunday. i don't know! i ask me for a prediction for sunday. i don't know!— i don't know! i might do yet! i felt this morning _ i don't know! i might do yet! i felt this morning denmark— i don't know! i might do yet! i felt this morning denmark would - i don't know! i might do yet! i felt i this morning denmark would score, i felt england would concede but i did feel strongly that they would come back which they did!— feel strongly that they would come back which they did! well, we might ask ou for back which they did! well, we might ask you for a — back which they did! well, we might ask you for a prediction _ back which they did! well, we might ask you for a prediction between - back which they did! well, we might| ask you for a prediction between now and sunday but not right now! i will not put that on you right now but sally nugent, thank you so much for
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now, you were there at wembley for us. more than 60,000 england fans were at wembley for last night's game, cheering and singing the three lions to victory. for the millions who couldn't make it to london, they packed out fanzones, bars and living rooms. jayne mccubbin watched the match at the pub which is owned by kieran trippier�*s brother. schmeichel saves, kane is there to follow in! these are memories to last a lifetime. look at this. epic, epic. who would have thought, right, before the tournament started, that we would be going to the euro final? would anyone here have thought that? is it coming home? ask them. are you emosh, are you emotional? yeah, yeah. you'll remember this, won't you, for the rest of your life?
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yeah, i will. another barrier broken, another night to savour. and only four sleeps to the final against italy. and, boy, did we need this moment. well, it's just brilliant to see people celebrating like this. it'sjust, who'd have thought this, six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic, this isjust what the country needed. absolutely brilliant. absolutely fantastic. the long, long wait is over. into the final of a major tournament. for the first time in 55 years. history in the making. this was euphoria.
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# it's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming, football's coming home!# and it was felt in garden bars. on london buses. in preston. they believed it, and they never gave in, did they? in croydon. england are in the final for the first time in, who cares how many years? in birmingham. in newcastle. we are confident, we're on form, we are going all the way. next stop, italy. in wembley, on sunday. and the first chance at a major trophy since 1966. we can now talk to lynda
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courts, an england fan who was lucky enough to be at the game against denmark at wembley last night. i know you spoke to victoria yesterday ahead of the game and i spoke to you earlier in the tournament. last night, take us through your evening, it had everything, but that's what fans live for, games like that? it was 'ust live for, games like that? it was just absolutely _ live for, games like that? it was just absolutely incredible. - live for, games like that? it was just absolutely incredible. i've l just absolutely incredible. i've never experienced anything like that, i've been to wembley lots of times, i've been to the carling cup final but i think yesterday was just absolutely unbelievable. the atmosphere. it was so nerve—racking. that was the problem. i think because denmark scored and we were 1-0 because denmark scored and we were 1—0 down, that made the difference and you werejust 1—0 down, that made the difference and you were just on the edge of your seat all the way through. it was absolutely buzzing. i your seat all the way through. it was absolutely buzzing.- was absolutely buzzing. i was watchin: was absolutely buzzing. i was watching at — was absolutely buzzing. i was watching at home _ was absolutely buzzing. i was watching at home and - was absolutely buzzing. i was watching at home and every i was absolutely buzzing. i was - watching at home and every time was absolutely buzzing. i was watching at home and every time the camera cut to shots of the fans, people were standing there, bated breath, hands over their mouths,
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wondering what would happen next but talk to us about the atmosphere at the final whistle, that been incredible. i know you filmed on your phone some images of that moment. . . , your phone some images of that moment. ., ., , , ., , moment. that was unbelievable. you're just _ moment. that was unbelievable. you're just waiting _ moment. that was unbelievable. you're just waiting the _ moment. that was unbelievable. you're just waiting the last - moment. that was unbelievable. you're just waiting the last few l you're just waiting the last few seconds and the time on the clock, you can't tell how many seconds there are to go unless you time it on your phone and you can't take your eyes off the pitch, waiting for the referee to blow that final whistle and anybody around you, it's incredible. ijust don't know how to explain it, i've never known anything like that before. everybody was just absolutely ecstatic, really, the most amazing thing, and the team spirit, behind the team, thatis the team spirit, behind the team, that is what was needed, it's unbelievable.— that is what was needed, it's unbelievable. ., , ., , , that is what was needed, it's unbelievable. ., , , unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? _ unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? that _ unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? that is _ unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? that is a _ unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? that is a mate, - unbelievable. who is that beside you in the black hat? that is a mate, he | in the black hat? that is a mate, he travelled down _ in the black hat? that is a mate, he travelled down with _ in the black hat? that is a mate, he travelled down with me... - in the black hat? that is a mate, he travelled down with me... he - in the black hat? that is a mate, he travelled down with me... he looks| travelled down with me... he looks very happy. — travelled down with me... he looks very happy. i _
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travelled down with me... he looks very happy. i wish _ travelled down with me... he looks very happy. i wish we _ travelled down with me... he looks very happy, i wish we could - travelled down with me... he looks very happy, i wish we could have i very happy, i wish we could have seen your face at that point. what worked last night for the team, what do you think they need to work on ahead of the game against italy? i mean, i think they need to do more of the same, to be honest. we let a goal in, it is a shame really because we had kept a clean sheet so far up until that point but denmark were really out for it last night, i said yesterday, was all about christian eriksen and i think the fact that goal went in, maybe that hasn't hurt us in a way because it shows us we can fight back and we need to keep going, we can do it and bring on italy. i don't think they are as amazing as everybody thought they were, watching them against spain in the other semifinal but i really think we could do this. find really think we could do this. and the big question, have you got tickets for the final? i the big question, have you got tickets for the final?— the big question, have you got tickets for the final? i have! i am waitin: tickets for the final? i have! i am waiting for _ tickets for the final? i have! i am waiting for that _ tickets for the final? i have! i am waiting for that magic _ tickets for the final? i have! i am waiting for that magic e-mail- tickets for the final? i have! i am waiting for that magic e-mail for| waiting for that magic e—mail for the england fa, i can go online, put
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them through uefa, i should be there on sunday, it will be incredible. can i make an appointment now to speak to you on monday morning? {lilli speak to you on monday morning? (1)! god, what speak to you on monday morning? i god, what a state i will be in! i did not get in last night until 3am. you have done very well, i think a lot of people up early or very short on sleep but it has been so great to speak to you. enjoy it on sunday and we would love to hear from you again to tell us about your experience. thank you so much.— to tell us about your experience. i thank you so much._ the thank you so much. thank you. the time is 9:17am. _ thank you so much. thank you. the time is 9:17am. and _ thank you so much. thank you. the time is 9:17am. and schmeichel- time is 9:17am. and schmeichel saves! the long wait is over, the england history makers beat denmark to reach their first major final since 1966. nhs leaders won more than 5 million people are waiting for treatment and the backlog will get worse as the number of coronavirus cases rises. the
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chancellor rishi sunak defends a decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. let's pick up on that last headline. the chancellor rishi sunak has been speaking this morning about the government's plans to cut the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is at westminster. we know a number of previous work and pensions secretary is have urged the government not to do this, to keep that additional £20 payment to people in receipt of universal credit so what has the chancellor been saying?— been saying? this increased universal— been saying? this increased universal credit _ been saying? this increased universal credit of - been saying? this increased universal credit of £20 i been saying? this increased universal credit of £20 a i been saying? this increased i universal credit of £20 a week been saying? this increased - universal credit of £20 a week which amounts _ universal credit of £20 a week which amounts to— universal credit of £20 a week which amounts to £1000 extra a year for about— amounts to £1000 extra a year for about 6— amounts to £1000 extra a year for about 6 million families was first introduced in spring 2020 and then extended _ introduced in spring 2020 and then extended after a bit of a discussion
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in government in spring 2021 but it is ending _ in government in spring 2021 but it is ending in — in government in spring 2021 but it is ending in september this year. and rishi — is ending in september this year. and rishi sunak has been doing interviews this morning, he's been giving _ interviews this morning, he's been giving the — interviews this morning, he's been giving the rationale for that. it was always the intention, this was a temporary measure, it was always intended to be a temporary measure and punch like all the other things that we have done, there were the things that we put in place to deal with the crisis, to deal with the very difficult situation that we faced that started last year. and those things will come to an end, much like the further scheme, for example, which will also come to an end in september but it is only one part of our overall package of support and the reason i'm here talking to you today is a year ago today i outlined our plan forjobs and the good news is we have stuck to that plan and that plan is working. out and about, i'm here today at covent garden market, i was in the west midlands yesterday and everywhere i go, i see great opportunities, new kick starters starting theirjobs, apprentices learning new skills, people coming back from furlough, businesses
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that have received our support and are not looking forward to growing and expanding and creating newjobs for people and that's absolutely what we should be focused on now and they should have confidence because the plan is working. —— are now looking forward. the chancellor was also asked about whether the government would scrap the triple lock on pensions, perhaps you could remind our viewers what that means and what your interpretation of that, the fact he would not be drawn on that and he did not want to speculate what the decision might ultimately be. the trile lock decision might ultimately be. iie: triple lock means decision might ultimately be. tie: triple lock means the decision might ultimately be. iie: triple lock means the state decision might ultimately be. i“ie: triple lock means the state pension goes up every year by the hire of 2.5% or inflation or the increase in wages nationally. so it is a guarantee that the state pension will at least go up by two and a half percent and it is the centrepiece of the tory manifesto and has been the centrepiece of tory manifesto is in the past and it is the commitment conservative prime
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ministers have always wanted to stick by but now because of a statistical quirk, how the pandemic has affected wages and the recovery has affected wages and the recovery has affected wages and the recovery has affected wages, the increase in wages is currently a present which would mean the government should be pencilling in an increase in the state pension of 8% next year. a decision that will be made later this year. and so listen very carefully now to what rishi sunak said when he was asked if the triple lock was definitely going to still be in place when that decision is made. , ,, , made. the triple lock is the government _ made. the triple lock is the government 's _ made. the triple lock is the government 's policy - made. the triple lock is the government 's policy but i l made. the triple lock is the i government 's policy but i very made. the triple lock is the - government 's policy but i very much recognise _ government 's policy but i very much recognise people's concerns. what i would _ recognise people's concerns. what i would say _ recognise people's concerns. what i would say is — recognise people's concerns. what i would say is the numbers that you mentioned — would say is the numbers that you mentioned at this point are speculation because we have not actually— speculation because we have not actually got them yet, that happens later on— actually got them yet, that happens later on but i recognise people's concerns— later on but i recognise people's concerns on this, i think they are legitimate — concerns on this, i think they are legitimate and fair concerns to raise _ legitimate and fair concerns to raise and — legitimate and fair concerns to raise and what i would say when we look at _ raise and what i would say when we look at this— raise and what i would say when we look at this properly at the appropriate time, your word is the right— appropriate time, your word is the right word, — appropriate time, your word is the right word, fairness, that will be absolutely driving what we do and we want to _ absolutely driving what we do and we want to make sure the decisions we
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make _ want to make sure the decisions we make in_ want to make sure the decisions we make in the — want to make sure the decisions we make in the decisions we have our fair both— make in the decisions we have our fair both for— make in the decisions we have our fair both for pensioners and for taxuayers _ fair both for pensioners and for taxpayers. it�*s fair both for pensioners and for taxoayers-_ fair both for pensioners and for taxa ers. �*, ., ., ., ,, taxpayers. it's that word fairness and the word _ taxpayers. it's that word fairness and the word taxpayers - taxpayers. it's that word fairness and the word taxpayers which i and the word taxpayers which suggests it's a pretty big hint from the chancellor that state pensions will not go up by 8% next year. which means the triple lock could be under a little bit of a threat. however, the decision won't be made until later in the year, who knows what the actual wages numbers may look like once the statistics have settled down or can the government find another way of interpreting the increase in wages that means the bill could be much smaller and a little bit more sustainable? adam, thank ou. nhs providers, which represents hospital trusts in england, says a rise in covid cases will impact the speed in which they can tackle the backlog of non—urgent care. it comes after the health secretary warned the number of new cases could reach 100,000 a day after restrictions are eased. the department of health says
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the success of the vaccine programme is saving lives and has severely weakened the link between cases and hospitalisations. chris hopson is the chief executive of nhs providers which represents hospital trusts in england. if you talk to hospital chief executives, what they tell you as they are going absolutely full pelt to recover the care backlog. we have a very busy accident and emergency care, very striking how many people say they saw record numbers of people in their emergency departments injune. as you know, we had then got about 10,000 beds fewer than we normally have so we've lost about 10% of capacity because of infection control and what we have on top is this problem of the fact because community infection rates of covid are rising we have large numbers of staff self isolating and of course those numbers will increase if as after the restrictions get relaxed onjuly the 19th, what we will see is those numbers are people who have to
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self—isolate rising. if you add all of that together, what you find is that even relatively small numbers of covid—19 cases will put pressure on hospitals. just of covid-19 cases will put pressure on hospitals-— on hospitals. just to let you know around 9:30am _ on hospitals. just to let you know around 9:30am we _ on hospitals. just to let you know around 9:30am we are _ on hospitals. just to let you know around 9:30am we are expecting | on hospitals. just to let you know i around 9:30am we are expecting to get the latest waiting list figures for the nhs in england. this includes accident and emergency attendance figures forjune, also elective surgery waiting and cancer waiting for the month of may. we are expecting that those are going to be impacted because of the backlog from covid and of course demand continuing from covid patients in the nhs. more than 100 scientists and doctors have signed a letter published today in the lancet, accusing the uk government of conducting a dangerous and unethical experiment and urging it to reconsider its plans to abandon all restrictions. they claim the governments strategy of mass infection to a point when only half the uk population is fully vaccinated will entail both acute and long—term illness . it says that any strategy that tolerates high levels of infection is both unethical and illogical.
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one of the signatories of that letter is dr zubaida haque, a member of independent sage, a group of scientists providing scientific advice on the pandemic. shejoins me now. good morning to you. thank you for your time. the title of this letter is a memorandum against mass infection, tell us why you signed it. �* , 2 infection, tell us why you signed it. , �*, , infection, tell us why you signed it. because it's exactly what it is, at the moment, _ it. because it's exactly what it is, at the moment, it's _ it. because it's exactly what it is, at the moment, it's very - it. because it's exactly what it is, at the moment, it's very clear i it. because it's exactly what it is, l at the moment, it's very clear that with only half of the population vaccinated, the fact that the government are going to lift all restrictions and let's be clear what those restrictions are, that includes notjust opening up mass events but it also includes not having to wear facemasks any more, not having to socially distance, the government is going to get rid of all of those, even minor restrictions which given only half of the population are vaccinated,
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which given that we have now over 32 and a half thousand cases a day, it is escalating rapidly every single day which given that hospitalisations and deaths are going up, it's notjust negligent, it is mass infection. this is herd immunity through the back door, again. to immunity through the back door, aaain. ., , immunity through the back door, a.ain_ .,, , immunity through the back door, aaain. .,, ,~ ., ., again. to be absolutely clear, none ofthe again. to be absolutely clear, none of the final— again. to be absolutely clear, none of the final restrictions, _ again. to be absolutely clear, none of the final restrictions, the - of the final restrictions, the easing of those on the 19th ofjuly could go ahead, others should be kept? fist could go ahead, others should be ket? �* ., ~' could go ahead, others should be ket? �* ., ,, ., kept? at the moment, i think in an ideal situation _ kept? at the moment, i think in an ideal situation we _ kept? at the moment, i think in an ideal situation we should _ kept? at the moment, i think in an ideal situation we should really i kept? at the moment, i think in an ideal situation we should really be | ideal situation we should really be pausing because we heard sajid javid saying very soon we are going to be reaching 100,000 cases a day which incidentally, is the highest in this pandemic and already, already, we have more daily cases than the whole of the eu put together so yes, we should be pausing about what we are saying at the moment is look, let's go ahead but let's not get rid of
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everything. let's not get rid of social distancing, let's not get rid of facemasks, let's do much more about ventilation and much more importantly, let's pause and vaccinate many more people before we get rid of everything. vaccinating many more people will keep young people safer, will keep those who are vulnerable, clinically extremely vulnerable safer, will keep all of those people who are recovering from cancer, who have diabetes, who have asthma, all of those people a lot safer so we need to roll out the vaccination much more before we ease all restrictions. ads, vaccination much more before we ease all restrictions-— all restrictions. a report today su . . ests all restrictions. a report today suggests looking _ all restrictions. a report today suggests looking at _ all restrictions. a report today suggests looking at new- all restrictions. a report todayj suggests looking at new cases all restrictions. a report today i suggests looking at new cases of covid, there are more men than women, it seems, the suggestion is this is because more men are gathering together, whether it's in pubs or other venues, to watch the euros. what are your concerns around these mass events? are you more
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concerned about indoor gatherings to watch football, as opposed to people say gathering at wembley? weill. watch football, as opposed to people say gathering at wembley? well, yes, we know that — say gathering at wembley? well, yes, we know that indoor _ say gathering at wembley? well, yes, we know that indoor gatherings - say gathering at wembley? well, yes, we know that indoor gatherings are i we know that indoor gatherings are much more risky than outdoor gatherings and what we would really recommend right now is by all means get together to watch the football, you know, a few of us got together last night but open the windows, keep it really ventilated, try and where indoor masking if it's a big enough room, kind of thing. try and take a lot more care. remember, we are in the third wave and by the way, we are in a third way because this government wholly and completely failed to manage this pandemic. it's not restrictions that we should be blaming. what we should be blaming is why art their high cases? why hasn't the government done much more? by the way, with
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nonrestrictive things like test, trace and isolate. why didn't they do much more with that to bring the case is down? just like their chief scientific adviser advised them to do in february, when cases were coming down. do in february, when cases were coming down-— coming down. you know and our viewers know — coming down. you know and our viewers know some _ coming down. you know and our viewers know some of _ coming down. you know and our viewers know some of the i coming down. you know and our i viewers know some of the arguments that are made, people's mental health needing to return to some kind of normality. looking after the economy and someone. do you think there is a middle ground, it's hard to talk about a middle ground when we come to talk about viruses but you know, is there a middle ground where as you suggest, some of those restrictions like masks are kept and others are done away with? and if we look back to the news conference on monday when boris johnson look back to the news conference on monday when borisjohnson asked if not now, when, on the easing of restrictions, let me put that question to you, if not now, when? i will answer your questions and reverse of that is ok. if not now, when, as such an absurd thing to say when, as such an absurd thing to say
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when only half of the population is vaccinated. the plan is when the whole of the population is vaccinated. why have we got some health apartheid here, those who are vaccinated will be fine and by the way, not absolutely fine because the vaccination isn't100% effective which means there is still a small risk for those who are doubly vaccinated to get infection again. we've just had a member of independent sage who's just been reinfected even though he was double vaccinated. and also we know that vaccination does not prevent you from infection and transmission. so people aren't completely safe so thatis people aren't completely safe so that is the one. in terms of all the restrictions, like you say, there are non—sort of, restrictions that aren't so burdensome which are like facemasks, social distancing, which will make a huge difference, a huge difference to keeping cases down. we still need to recommend that if
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people can, they meet outdoors rather than endorse and more importantly than anything, we should be telling the government what has happened, we should be asking them, what has happened to test, trace and isolate? because we know that works. in southeast asia, they did not have national lockdown is, they only had local lockdown because they used effective test, trace and isolate. this government spent £38 billion and gave it to the private sector to undertake the test and trace and thatis undertake the test and trace and that is broken so the government needs to fix that because that is less invasive than national lockdown. less invasive than national lockdown-— less invasive than national lockdown. ., ., ,, , lockdown. doctor, thank you very much forjoining _ lockdown. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us _ lockdown. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us to _ lockdown. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us to talk - lockdown. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us to talk about| much forjoining us to talk about that letter. we wait to see what the government response is to it. thank you. some breaking news, first about the tokyo 0lympics, we understand that
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tokyo 0lympics, we understand that tokyois tokyo 0lympics, we understand that tokyo is to be under a virus emergency measures throughout the olympics. we thought this 0lympics. we thought this announcement was coming and now it has from the japanese prime minister. so the whole of tokyo to be under what are known as emergency measures throughout the tokyo 0lympics. measures throughout the tokyo olympics. the games go on ahead but obviously under the strictest controls. another piece of news is that you may remember the holiday, the controversial holiday that the prime minister took after his general election victory, just around the time, the end of 2019, the start of 2020 when the coronavirus was starting borisjohnson boris johnson handling of borisjohnson handling of the watchdog investigation into his holiday has been criticised by the commons committee on standards but the prime minister has been cleared
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of breaching the mp code of conduct. just to repeat, the holiday that he took at the end of 29, his handling of a watchdog investigation into that holiday has been criticised by the commons committee on standards but the prime minister has been cleared of breaching the mp code of conduct. when we get more detail on all of that, that is what we were hearing in the last couple of minutes. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. although many of us started on a cloudy note it will end up on a sunny note across many parts of the uk. the exception being across northern ireland, northern and western scotland, where we will hang on to a bit more cloud and some drizzle from time to time. but of course in the sunshine, as temperatures rise, that will spark off some showers and some of those could be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. fewer and farther between than yesterday but we could see a few more in the south compared to yesterday. through this evening and overnight, eventually a lot of those showers will fade and some clear skies, some mist and fog patches
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forming and temperature—wise falling away to between 12 and 15 degrees, so not a cold night. tomorrow will start off with some brightness and some sunshine, still a fair bit of cloud across the north and through the west producing some showers and then we've got this weather front showing its hand, bringing in some showery outbreaks of rain later in the day. the showers, especially in eastern areas, could be heavy and thundery with temperatures of 23. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: the long wait is over, england's history makers beat denmark, to reach theirfirst major final since 1966. across the country, from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fanzones, the nation celebrated a famous night for the three lions. nhs leaders warn that more
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than five million people are waiting for treatment — and the backlog will get worse as the number of coronavirus cases rise. more than 100 scientists and doctors?accuse the uk government of conducting a dangerous and unethical experiment — and urge it to reconsider its plans to abandon all restrictions. chancellor rishi sunak defends the decision to phase out the £20 weekly increase in universal credit introduced during the coronavirus crisis. plans for how and when fully vaccinated travellers can go abroad without having to quarantine on their return are to be set out later. sport and for a full round up, here's sally at wembley. good morning. welcome to wembley, as we've been hearing england have
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reached a first major final in 55 years. they came from behind to beat denmark 2—1 in their euro semi with harry kane scoring the winner after his penalty was saved in extra—time. it could not have been more dramatic. absolute scenes of pandemonium followed among the nearly 65,000 fans in wembley stadium. england will play italy here in the final on sunday night. joe lynskey reports. singing it has been 55 years but they never stop dreaming. the last time england reached a final it wasjuly 1966. through the decades there have been late nights and golden generations, now onlyjoy. mr; late nights and golden generations, now onlyjoy— now only 'oy. my emotions are all over the now only joy. my emotions are all over the place. _ now only joy. my emotions are all over the place. what _ now only joy. my emotions are all over the place. what a _ now only joy. my emotions are all over the place. what a night i now only joy. my emotions are all over the place. what a night and l now only joy. my emotions are all| over the place. what a night and a fully deserved win. it is over the place. what a night and a fully deserved win.— fully deserved win. it is the work ethic and the _ fully deserved win. it is the work ethic and the determination i fully deserved win. it is the work| ethic and the determination from each _ ethic and the determination from each and — ethic and the determination from each and every one of us. help your mate _ each and every one of us. help your mate out~ _ each and every one of us. help your mate out it — each and every one of us. help your mate out. it says a lot about this
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team _ mate out. it says a lot about this team |_ mate out. it says a lot about this team. ., ,., mate out. it says a lot about this team. ., , ., , ., , ., team. i am so proud. this group of -la ers team. i am so proud. this group of players deserve — team. i am so proud. this group of players deserve what _ team. i am so proud. this group of players deserve what has - team. i am so proud. this group of| players deserve what has happened team. i am so proud. this group of i players deserve what has happened to them _ players deserve what has happened to them fantastic— players deserve what has happened to them. fantastic from _ players deserve what has happened to them. fantastic from when _ players deserve what has happened to them. fantastic from when we - players deserve what has happened to them. fantastic from when we met i them. fantastic from when we met five weeks — them. fantastic from when we met five weeks ago _ them. fantastic from when we met five weeks ago. it _ them. fantastic from when we met five weeks ago. it was _ them. fantastic from when we met five weeks ago. it was our- them. fantastic from when we met five weeks ago. it was our night. . five weeks ago. it was our night. harry— five weeks ago. it was our night. harry kane's _ five weeks ago. it was our night. harry kane's spot _ five weeks ago. it was our night. harry kane's spot kick— five weeks ago. it was our night. harry kane's spot kick was - five weeks ago. it was our night. harry kane's spot kick was one l five weeks ago. it was our night. | harry kane's spot kick was one of his worst. how he finds ways to score is key to this team. and so is the man at the helm. throughout the match gareth southgate is calm and then at the end his release. iie match gareth southgate is calm and then at the end his release. he is match gareth southgate is calm and then at the end his release.- then at the end his release. he is a thinker and — then at the end his release. he is a thinker and he _ then at the end his release. he is a thinker and he listens _ then at the end his release. he is a thinker and he listens and - then at the end his release. he is a thinker and he listens and takes i then at the end his release. he is a thinker and he listens and takes on j thinker and he listens and takes on board. he has a ruthless streak which you have to have as a manager and it is the most difficult manager job in the world. it is great to see him enjoy the success because he really deserves it. england semifinal woes are over but there is one more hurdle. in italy who last beat them in the knockouts at euro 2012. the our own extraordinary form.- at euro 2012. the our own extraordinary form. at euro 2012. the our own extraordina form. , ., , , , extraordinary form. they are superb opposition- —
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extraordinary form. they are superb opposition- they _ extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have _ extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have not _ extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have not lost i extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have not lost in i extraordinary form. they are superb opposition. they have not lost in 33| opposition. they have not lost in 33 games. whatever standard of football you play, that is impressive. england have a great they had two giant defenders, will have to be very wary of that. it is a tough one to call. , . ., , ., to call. on the pitch and understand there were personal— to call. on the pitch and understand there were personal moments. i to call. on the pitch and understand i there were personal moments. mason mount gave his shirt away and calvin phillips put on a new one for his granny who died in february. many have had a year like him but after so long in the silence, the noise is backin so long in the silence, the noise is back in our country brought together by football. there is one more to go. what a game that will be at wembley on sunday, the final of the european championship, england against italy. could wimbledon have said a final goodbye to eight time champion roger federer? the swiss who's 39 years old has had to overcome
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injury problems and targeted being at this tournament. but he lost in straight sets to the fourteenth seed, hubert hurkacz. so will federer be back next year ? i don't know. i really don't know. i've got to regroup, you know, my goal was always for the last year and more to always try to play another wimbledon. the initial goal, like you know, was to play last year. that was never going to happen plus the pandemic hit, so... i'm actually very happy i made it as far as i did here. and that i actually was able to play wimbledon at the level that i did after everything that i went through, so, of course, i would like to play it again, but at my age, you are just never sure what's around the corner. defending champion novak djokovic had too much quality for the unseeded marton fucsovics of hungary, beating him in straight sets. he'll play tenth seed canada's denis shapovalov, who beat andy murray, in the semi—finals. mark cavendish has the chance to make history today by equalling the record for the number of stage wins at the tour de france.
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he managed to complete yesterday's tough mountain stage before the cut off time allowing him to start today's flat twelfth stage. tagi pogacar�*s lead is now more than five minutes after he finished fourth yesterday. before i go, let's have a reminder of that really special moment here at wembley last night when the players had beaten denmark, came out to celebrate with the fans and their families in the crowds. what work with the singing? sweet caroline that was a moment ofjoy inside wembley last night. see the fans singing that over time for the last
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couple of weeks. to see that player singing it now you get a sense of something very special that is happening now. it is giving its coming home a run for its money. some of the team prefer three lions but there is a lot of love for sweet caroline. a lot of scotland and irish fans have said it is their song, but i think it might be the song of the tournament. it is all good, it is all good. figures out this morning are expected to see a further lengthening of the nhs waiting list. the most up—to—date figures show 5.12 million people are on the waiting list. hospital bosses are also concerned about the pressure on a&e departments in recent weeks. with me is layla mccay, policy director at the nhs confederation —
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a membership organisation for nhs the confederation as saying the nhs exit experiencing winter and summer. it paints a picture of the pressure that services are under. yellow moat we know in winter there are increased pressures but they are telling us now that people have never seen anything like it with the amount of demand for urgent care which is exceeding anything that people could have expected. this which is exceeding anything that people could have expected. as well as havin: people could have expected. as well as having to — people could have expected. as well as having to work— people could have expected. as well as having to work on _ people could have expected. as well as having to work on reducing - people could have expected. as well as having to work on reducing the i as having to work on reducing the backlog of electives and seeing as many people as possible, and being prepared for covid—19 and the vaccine programme and staff vacancies and absences due to sickness, suddenly what we are seeing is an upswing in pressure across accident and emergency, ambulance services, gp practices, all the way across the whole system,
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it is really, really challenging right now. are we talking about demand being driven by a covid—19 issues? we are we talking about demand being driven by a covid-19 issues? we are lookin: at driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the _ driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the nhs _ driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the nhs and _ driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the nhs and how - driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the nhs and how well i driven by a covid-19 issues? we are looking at the nhs and how well it | looking at the nhs and how well it is coping at the moment. the focus on the media is only covid—19 figures, and there are people who are in hospital now with covid—19, they are mary moore seeing gps and access and community services. what we are seeing now is the known covid—19 demand in the nhs suddenly extremely high. we are seeing people coming and when the problems they may have had during the pandemic that they have not presented with until now are now urgent. people are socialising more and developing different challenges and they are needing to access urgent care. and if people need urgent care, they should be accessing it but we are seeing that they are doing it in such numbers that even if we factor
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in covid—19 related demand, the nhs is seeing a very challenging surge. with the predicted rise in daily covid—19 cases, 100,000 per day in the words of the secretary himself, what are your concerns at the confederation of the impact of all of that on the ability of the nhs to deliver the services whether it is to covid—19 patients are non—covid—19 patients? to covid-19 patients are non-covid-19 patients? to covid-19 patients are non-covid-19 atients? , ., , non-covid-19 patients? demand is so hiuh non-covid-19 patients? demand is so hi . h for non-covid-19 patients? demand is so high for non-covid-19 _ non-covid-19 patients? demand is so high for non-covid-19 related - non-covid-19 patients? demand is so high for non-covid-19 related issues. high for non—covid—19 related issues that some hospitals have had to issue black alerts to say that they are at the top of their capacity. what that means is that if there is a surge in people with covid—19 requiring care, that is going to make it all the more challenging. are you asking the government to keep some of the measures rather than get rid of all of them on the
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19th? the plans for england on the 19th? the plans for england on the 19th ofjuly. 19th? the plans for england on the 19th ofjuly-— 19th? the plans for england on the 19th ofjul. �* ., . , , 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers increase, 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers increase. the _ 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers increase, the number— 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers increase, the number of _ 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers increase, the number of people i 19th ofjuly. blanc as their numbers | increase, the number of people with covid—19 who need other types of hospital care and community care will increase, so it will be extremely challenging for the nhs to deal with that on top of everything else that is going on, so it would seem sensible to think hard about how to reduce those pressures in any way that is sensible.— way that is sensible. finally, there is a re ort way that is sensible. finally, there is a report in _ way that is sensible. finally, there is a report in the _ way that is sensible. finally, there is a report in the times _ way that is sensible. finally, there is a report in the times newspaper that nhs staff are having a difficult time because of the requirement to isolate. we know how many people are isolating at the moment because of covid—19. that number may well go up before the requirement to sell isolate ends if people are double vaccinated. how much of a problem is that at the
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moment in terms of the impact on staff rotors?— staff rotors? our members are tellin: staff rotors? our members are telling our _ staff rotors? our members are telling our staff _ staff rotors? our members are telling our staff throughout i staff rotors? our members are| telling our staff throughout the staff rotors? our members are i telling our staff throughout the nhs are having to itself isolate and thatis are having to itself isolate and that is leading to capacity problems. there are arguments on both sides, clearly there is a need to increase capacity in the nhs in this challenging time, but there is also the anxiety about whether that may impact the transmission of covid—19. we know the vaccines are very effective but they are not 100% effective which means that people can still develop covid—19. there are arguments on both sides and what we are looking for is the science and experts to look at the data and make the right decisions.— and experts to look at the data and make the right decisions. thank you very much- — what could england winning euro 2020 do to the economy? 0ne economist expects the economy
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to grow by at least 150 million and that spending could go up by 10 billion off the back of an england win. let's explore this some more. ramzan karmali is here with more. yesterday the estimated 9.7 million pints being pulled in pubs. those industries really needed the boost because over the last 15 months, it is one industry very hard hit. hundred and 43 million, other economies saying hundred and 50 million and spending. we have got all the spending that we haven't done during the pandemic. record number of savings at the moment, £200 billion in savings. some economists expect those savings will be unleashed because of the feel—good factor of football, our
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team is doing well, we should spend money to make ourselves feel better than we already do. it is notjust pubs, supermarkets as well are doing particularly well. they have done well during the pandemic because we could not go out because we had to shop there, but also because of the football, good sales and alcohol and snacks. we talked to the head at ccoopp supermarkets. the england victory last night must be great for you. victory last night must be great for ou. s , ,., y victory last night must be great for ou. s , ,., , , victory last night must be great for you. absolutely. it is safe to say we are expecting _ you. absolutely. it is safe to say we are expecting a _ you. absolutely. it is safe to say we are expecting a bumper- you. absolutely. it is safe to say i we are expecting a bumper weekend of sales at— we are expecting a bumper weekend of sales at the _ we are expecting a bumper weekend of sales at the co—op. there are probably— sales at the co—op. there are probably some sore heads out there this morning who do not want to hear me talking _ this morning who do not want to hear me talking about selling alcohol. we are expecting to sell! million drinks — are expecting to sell! million drinks on _ are expecting to sell! million drinks on sunday compared to our
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normal— drinks on sunday compared to our normal trading. drinks on sunday compared to our normaltrading. it is drinks on sunday compared to our normal trading. it is twice what we would _ normal trading. it is twice what we would normally expect to sell. if yesterday was anything to go by, those _ yesterday was anything to go by, those sales will be dominated by ear, those sales will be dominated by ear. but— those sales will be dominated by ear, but also cider. if the weather forecast _ ear, but also cider. if the weather forecast is — ear, but also cider. if the weather forecast is due to its word. and in a nod _ forecast is due to its word. and in a nod to _ forecast is due to its word. and in a nod to our— forecast is due to its word. and in a nod to our italian opponents we are expecting bumper sales on pro-seko, _ are expecting bumper sales on pro—seko, a quarter of a million bottles — pro—seko, a quarter of a million bottles between now and sunday. it bottles between now and sunday. [i is not bottles between now and sunday. is not just bottles between now and sunday. it is not just alcohol, bottles between now and sunday. it is notjust alcohol, the pubs were saying they could have sold more but because of the restrictions they could not have as many people there. people are staying at home and drinking and enjoying themselves instead. what types of sales have you seen and snacks? that must be high. you seen and snacks? that must be hiuh. �* , you seen and snacks? that must be hiuh. �* y ., ., you seen and snacks? that must be
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hiuh.�* , ., ., , high. anything to do with people caettin high. anything to do with people getting together _ high. anything to do with people getting together with _ high. anything to do with people getting together with friends i high. anything to do with people| getting together with friends and family. _ getting together with friends and family, sharing bags of snacks, up 30%. _ family, sharing bags of snacks, up 30%, pete — family, sharing bags of snacks, up 30%, pete says massively up, —— pizza _ 30%, pete says massively up, —— pizza massively up. it is all about getting _ pizza massively up. it is all about getting together. the other big thing _ getting together. the other big thing is — getting together. the other big thing is if we pull something amazing _ thing is if we pull something amazing out of the bag, will we have enough _ amazing out of the bag, will we have enough champagne in store? some parties _ enough champagne in store? some parties will carry on long into the evening — parties will carry on long into the evening on— parties will carry on long into the evening on sunday. we are expecting champagne _ evening on sunday. we are expecting champagne sales equivalent to a royal— champagne sales equivalent to a royal wedding and a world cup semifinal combined. english sparkling wine as well. be assured if you _ sparkling wine as well. be assured if you are — sparkling wine as well. be assured if you are nervous about getting out of the _ if you are nervous about getting out of the house to get provisions, online — of the house to get provisions, online home delivery is massive. home _ online home delivery is massive. home delivery sales through our shop
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website _ home delivery sales through our shop website are _ home delivery sales through our shop website are up 15% every time there is a euro— website are up 15% every time there is a euro game. sit back and relax and enjoy— is a euro game. sit back and relax and enjoy the game and enjoy a nice cold drink— and enjoy the game and enjoy a nice cold drink to go along with that. let's _ cold drink to go along with that. let's hope — cold drink to go along with that. let's hope we have cause for celebration.— let's hope we have cause for celebration. ., ,, , ., , . celebration. thank you very much, but i do celebration. thank you very much, but i do not _ celebration. thank you very much, but i do not relax _ celebration. thank you very much, but i do not relax when _ celebration. thank you very much, but i do not relax when i _ celebration. thank you very much, but i do not relax when i watch i celebration. thank you very much, l but i do not relax when i watch the game. but i do not relax when i watch the name. �* a, , but i do not relax when i watch the lame, �* a, , a, , but i do not relax when i watch the came.�* a, , i, , , game. i'm not sure many people relaxed last — game. i'm not sure many people relaxed last night. _ the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a record high, a total of 5.3 million people were waiting to start routine treatment at the end of the month of may according to nhs england. it is the highest number since records began in 2007. the number waiting
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more than 52 weeks, another measure to start treatment, stood at 336,733, that was down from the previous month, but around 13 times higher than the number waiting a year earlier. those foggers just in from nhs england. the commons standards committee says borisjohnson did not break parliament's code of conduct by accepting an offer from a businessman to use his villa for a holiday in the caribbean. but the committee said it was "regrettable" that a full explanation of the funding of the mustique trip had not been provided long ago. our political correspondent jonathan blake is at westminster early 2020, the prime minister went on holiday, we were starting to hear about covid—i9. figs
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on holiday, we were starting to hear about covid-19.— about covid-19. as you say, a hohda about covid-19. as you say, a holiday the — about covid-19. as you say, a holiday the prime _ about covid-19. as you say, a holiday the prime minister . about covid-19. as you say, a i holiday the prime minister took after the landslide election victory by the conservatives at the end of 2019. he and his partner went to the caribbean island and there has been an investigation ongoing firstly by the parliamentary commissioner for standards, independently appointed commissioner, who has has been looking at how the trip was declared around who provided and paid for the accommodation that they stayed in during that trip just after christmas into the new year of 2020. subsequently an investigation by the parliamentary committee for standards made up of mps and other members, and they have found that the pin the prime minister did not break the rules in paragraph iii break the rules in paragraph 1a which deals with how gifts and financial donations and the light
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are declared by mps, but they have criticised the prime minister for how he handled this. to read you what the committee said in their report, they find that boris johnson's registry in the members interests, the list of members interests, the list of members interests was accurate and complete but they criticised him for not providing clearer and fuller details sooner. essentially saying it is only after this was looked into in detail that the exact arrangements came to light. the committee found that david ross who is a friend of borisjohnson and donor to the conservative party provided the accommodation that they used even though it was not his villa, he facilitated the use of another villa. in the end what borisjohnson i declared was accurate. the committee described the arrangements as ad hoc and opaque and stressing
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at the edge of their report that it would have been better if he had come forward with more details sooner and reminding mps of their responsibility to declare accurately and fully any donations that they received. some more detail on the situation in tokyo. the japanese prime minister has confirmed a state of emergency for tokyo to start on monday the 12th ofjuly and will last until the 22nd of august, taking in the olympics. the state of emergency in japan is not a hard lockdown like in the uk last year, but it comes with restrictions including binding orders for businesses to shorten ours or a close, bars and restaurants serving alcohol and department stores apart from areas
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that sell food, will close, restaurants that do not sell alcohol will close early. transport earlier than usual, schools will stay open. tokyo residents being asked to stay at home including going to work. the country's vaccination rate stands at less than 15%. some detail on the state of emergency for tokyo during the olympics, what it entails. the time is 956. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. it was a fairly cloudy start to the day for many of us, but things are brightening up quite nicely with more of us in for some sunshine under this ridge of high pressure. but note the distinct lack of isobars so as we see further showers develop, they could be heavy and slow moving and then later, we've got a weather front coming into the west. so sunshine this afternoon across many parts of scotland, england and wales. you can see where we've got the showers, they will be less frequent than they were yesterday but we could see a few more in the south—eastern corner.
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for northern ireland, northern and western scotland, you are going to hang on to more cloud and at times it will be thick enough for drizzle. temperatures 15 to about 20 celsius. pollen levels today are high or very high across many parts of the uk. it is grass pollen at the moment. worth bearing that in mind if you are heading to wimbledon because today, the weather at wimbledon is set fair, there will be some sunny spells, there is, however, still the risk of a shower. top temperatures here up to 22. through this evening and overnight, we start off with all the showers and eventually a lot of them will fade. we'll have some clear skies, a lot more cloud out towards the west especially with the approaching weather front producing some showers as well and temperatures falling away to between 12 and 15 degrees. as we go into tomorrow, some of us will have some sunshine, some of us will start with some showers. showers out towards the west as well and that weather front slowly coming and introducing some showery outbreaks of rain across the isles of scilly and then into cornwall.
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temperatures 16 to 23. but note how the showers develop, especially in eastern areas through the afternoon. again, some of those could be heavy and thundery. friday into saturday sees our weather front moving across southern areas taking its rain with it. there will be some showers around and you can see that quite nicely on the graphics. rain pushing across the east of the country, eventually clearing into the north sea, but we will have a rash of showers following on behind and again we'll see some bright or sunny skies as well. temperatures 15 to about 21 degrees. into the rest of the weekend and early part of next week, well, on sunday there will be some sunshine and showers. later we could see some rain coming in from the west and it remains unsettled on monday.
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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the long wait is over, england's historymakers beat denmark to reach their first major final since 1966 to bring that happiness and to bring that excitement and to continue the journey for another four days, you know, we are here to the end, we didn't want to go home yet and we know we've got everybody with us. across the country, from pubs to living rooms, to town centres and fanzones, the nation celebrated a famous night for the three lions. who'd have thought this? six months ago? in the depths of the coronavirus pandemic. this is just what the country needed. where will you be watching the final? let us know your plans by tweeting me...

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