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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 7, 2021 11:00pm-11:30pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. england defeat denmark 2—1 in extra time at the euros, reaching their first final of a major tournament since 1966. cheering this was the moment fans throughout england saw harry kane score and book their place in sunday's final versus italy. more than 30,000 new covid cases today in the uk, but borisjohnson defends his controversial plan to remove restrictions in england. a "state of siege" has been declared in haiti, after the country's president was killed in his home. the islands borders are closed tonight as a manhunt is under way.
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and our correspondent is on the front line in the disputed south china sea. so, there's a chinese coast guard vessel that's watching us at the moment. it's done three sweeps — first of all 200 metres away, then 100 metres away, and now 50 metres away. hello, and welcome. i'm shaun ley. we begin with the football. england have reached theirfirst major tournament final since 1966. singing the final whistle was greeted around the country with jubilation. the team came from a goal
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down to beat denmark 2—1 after extra time at wembley, in front of a crowd of 60,000 people. many of them, due to covid assertions, were england fans. they'll play italy in the final on sunday. let's here from some fans who watched the match at a fan zone in london, they've been speaking to the bbc�*s chi chi izunder. how do you feel, watching that match? absolutely elated! this is the most amazing moment ever. england have made it through to the final... cheering this hasn't happened in so many years — this is iconic, what's just happened. can we stop talking about 1966 now? it's 2021, baby! singing gentleman, how do you feel? too good, too good! absolutely buzzing, i've never
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felt as good in my life - about a football game! amazing! the whole country's come together, i mean, you can look at the scenes... see how it brings the country together right here! - the adrenaline in my head is too much! i everyone feels it — you feel it, you feel it, everyone feels! that's the beauty about it. only football can make you feel like this, only football! lets head to wembley and the bbc�*sjohn watson. you probably had to fight your way out for hours. we are grateful for you to stay late for us like this. it started out with that goal in the first half which really kind of set a tone for the early part of the match, and i must admit it made a lot of england fans very nervous. it did indeed, you're right, and it's interesting throughout this
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tournament for england, the matches have passed with a certain amount of calm and serenity which doesn't often happen for england in major tournaments. but the big question coming into this match was, what would happen if england were to concede first? we haven't seen them concede first? we haven't seen them concede any goals in this tournament, so it proved in the end with that brilliant pre—kick that put denmark ahead in that first half - i put denmark ahead in that first half — i guess england then really had to show what they could produce at this major tournament if they were serious, if they saw themselves as genuine contenders for the final this year. and so it proved as they forced an equaliser towards the end of that first half, and it was brilliant work he broke into the danish box, crossed for raheem sterling who was looming, but the ball went into his own net, the defender, the denmark captain. we saw defender, the denmark captain. we sanack greer lish, anna, as we
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know he's been instrumental as a game changer for know he's been instrumental as a game changerfor england know he's been instrumental as a game changer for england and some of these matches. it went to extra time as we saw in the semifinal last night with italy against spain. no penalties needed this time, but the crucial goal did come from the penalty spot, it was raheem sterling who was bundled in the box. a soft penalty, you'd say, but harry kane who is usually ice cool from the penalty spot for club and country, it was michael who made the save, but harry kane was able to score from the rebound, reeling away in jubilant scenes of celebration, you can imagine what the scenes were like in the stands, as well, with some 60,000 fans, the majority of them england fans inside wembley, them england fans inside wembley, the increased number attending these semi finals, so that was the crucial goal. england in the end were able to close out that game, after coming through that quarterfinal against
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the czech republic and the searing heat, you wonder if that took it out of denmark's legs. they looked tire at the end of the match, but england were able to hold on for that win. and in doing so, they progressed to the first final in 55 years — we haven't uttered those words as of late, we know so much about the heartbreak and disappointment that seems to follow england in major tournaments, there is at semifinal appearance at the world cup a few years ago. but now, this team, this group of players have gone where very few england players have gone in the past, emulating the achievements motive actually of that 1966 winning team. now this team of players, this group will get the chance to do so on sunday when they go chance to do so on sunday when they 9° up chance to do so on sunday when they go up against italy. we willjust wait to see whether or not they can emulate their achievements to the fullest and go on and lift the
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trophy here on sunday night. what we do know on the basis of what we seen tonight, it'll be dramatic, i'm sure. �* , ., ., . sure. it'll be dramatic either way, these are two _ sure. it'll be dramatic either way, these are two teams _ sure. it'll be dramatic either way, these are two teams who - sure. it'll be dramatic either way, these are two teams who have i sure. it'll be dramatic either way, i these are two teams who have really impressed in these tournaments. give us a brief sketch of what you think might lie ahead on sunday? bier? might lie ahead on sunday? very difficult to say, _ might lie ahead on sunday? very difficult to say, i _ might lie ahead on sunday? very difficult to say, i think _ might lie ahead on sunday? - difficult to say, i think when you look at two informed teams, italy edging past spain last night on penalties, they have been the form decide when you look back at their qualifying campaign, they were follows through that, they talk to the group with maximum points, then came into the latter stage — that match against austria was taken into extra time, but it was that big result that they produced against belgium, winning 2—1 result that they produced against belgium, winning2—1where again, it was very clever how they managed that game in the closing stages, then came into that semifinal against spain. they did what they needed to do, albeit getting through on penalties. and it has been interesting, it seems as if it's been one of the themes of the
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tournament, the talent of the individuals, the likes of christiano ronaldo for portugal, killian mbappe for france — they are the players, not the teams gracing the big game on sunday, and it's the teams that have worked better as a collective, and that something england share with italy. so it'll be a fascinating matchup, no doubt about that. you have to say england will not get a better chance, considering that that final will be staged here at wembley on sunday, they'll be roared on again by huge home support, and gareth southgate and his players can obviously go back to their saint george's training base to prepare for that match fully on sunday. everything is going right for this team, gareth southgate seems to have got every decision right of the togetherness he's created and the culture within the group, and he seems to take the pressure the players. the talk will only grow in the lead up, but he seems to be very good at keeping
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this team's feet on the ground. it'll be a fascinating match, and one very hard to call when you look at trying to pick between those two sides come that final on sunday. john, i guess room service will be very busy in that hotel in hertfordshire tonight. a safe journey home, even if it's a solar one. look forward to speaking to you one. look forward to speaking to you on sunday. john watson at wembley for us. let's go straight to clapham, where england fans are going all—out in their celebrations. sorcha nelson is one of the fans joining in the celebrations, and joins us now. i won't ask you how you feel, it's obvious just looking at you how you feel. what was the best moment for you in this long, nerve—racking match? you in this long, nerve-racking match? ., , ., ., match? oh, when harry kane almost scored... beautiful, _ match? oh, when harry kane almost scored... beautiful, beautiful. - match? oh, when harry kane almost scored... beautiful, beautiful. are i scored... beautiful, beautiful. are ou, dare scored... beautiful, beautiful. are you. dare i— scored... beautiful, beautiful. are you. dare i say— scored... beautiful, beautiful. are you, dare i say it, _ scored... beautiful, beautiful. are you, dare i say it, a fairweather you, dare i say it, a fair weather football fan, orare you, dare i say it, a fair weather football fan, or are you a loyal and committed footballer?—
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committed footballer? been a fan throu~h committed footballer? been a fan through the _ committed footballer? been a fan through the league, _ committed footballer? been a fan through the league, and - committed footballer? been a fan through the league, and yeah, . committed footballer? been a fan through the league, and yeah, i l through the league, and yeah, i would support ireland as well, but i did have the opportunity to choose, so here i am supporting england. what are your hopes for sunday, and where will you be to watch it? i}!(. where will you be to watch it? ok, back here. — where will you be to watch it? ok, back here, number _ where will you be to watch it? ok, back here, number 66... where will you be to watch it? ok back here, number 66... 0f where will you be to watch it? ok back here, number 66... of italy to win with my best to make a best friend, sophie.— win with my best to make a best friend, sophie. thank you so much, en'o the friend, sophie. thank you so much, enjoy the rest _ friend, sophie. thank you so much, enjoy the rest of— friend, sophie. thank you so much, enjoy the rest of your _ friend, sophie. thank you so much, enjoy the rest of your night, - friend, sophie. thank you so much, enjoy the rest of your night, safe i enjoy the rest of your night, safe journey home and enjoy yourself on sunday, as well. there you go, we will bring you all of the action on sunday on bbc news. wherever you are, we will keep you updated. the england and italy match at wembley this sunday, don't be confused, the pandemic has delayed the competition by a year, so it's officially euros 2020 taking place in 2021.
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let's bring you some live pictures now from. the former south african president jacob zuma has been taken to the estcourt correctional centre to be detained. he left his house in a convoy which included his bodyguards and armed police. last week, the constitutional court found him guilty of contempt for defying its order to appear before a corruption inquiry. mr zuma said that sending him to jail at his age during a pandemic would be a death sentence. the president of haiti, jovenel moise, has been assassinated at his home in the capital port—au—prince. the government said the property was stormed overnight by unidentified armed men. mr moise had been in power since 2017. his critics had accused him of corruption, and he'd faced waves of often violent protests. 0ur north america correspondent sophie long reports. haiti is a country in chaos, where acts of everyday life have come to pose a mortal risk. accused of corruption and extending
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his presidency illegally, jovenel moise faced mass protests and demands from the opposition to step down. the interim prime minister described the assassination, which came after weeks of escalating violence, as a heinous, inhumane and barbaric act and declared a state of emergency. still recovering from the devastating earthquake of 2010 and the hurricane that struck six years later, parts of the country remain inaccessible, besieged by territorial battles between heavily armed gangs, violence that has forced more than 13,000 to flee there homes. yet the police have been largely invisible, the government silent. now the calls for the international community to act are getting louder. we need a lot more information, but it is very worrisome about the state of haiti. reporter: but does. the us have a role...? with covid cases surging in a country where the few hospital beds are often shared by strangers, and vaccinations are almost unheard
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of, the sense of insecurity on the streets were food and fuel is becoming increasingly difficult to find has now intensified. the shooting of the president and his wife proof that no one is safe. sophie long, bbc news. let's speak to rose delaney from bbc mundo, who is following developments from miami. rose, can you give us a rose, can you give us a sense rose, can you give us a sense of how unsettled this has left the people of haiti at a time of real political uncertainty?— of haiti at a time of real political uncertainty? yes, so as soon the assassination _ uncertainty? yes, so as soon the assassination took _ uncertainty? yes, so as soon the assassination took place, - uncertainty? yes, so as soon the assassination took place, the - assassination took place, the normally bustling streets of the capital were left deserted, and there were calls across social media and by officials for residents to remain in their homes due to the threat of armed gangs, which were now reportedly in control of one third of the capital. haitians are
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also in the biggest concentration of haitians in south florida, where i am now, the biggest concentration of haitians outside of haiti, have also said they fear that a further escalation of violence will in —— and sue. presidentjovenel moise's death has also left a clinical vacuum in haiti, and concern over who will be his... the current prime minister has taken over, and what makes this confusing is that shortly before his death, jovenel moise had appointed another prime minister, his name is rel henri, who was set to take over. but now, according to the constitution, haiti's parliament would have to confirm a new president — but they haven't been
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functional for more than a year now, so there's nobody in place to actually confirm a new president will stop in addition to this, another option would be the top judge in the country would take over the presidency as stated in the 1987 constitution. but he recently died of covid—19, so this has left the country in a state of confusion and disarray, and a lot of local reports have warned of further incidences of violence being quite likely. aha, violence being quite likely. a disturbing time for haitians. rose, thank you very much. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: we have a special report from the front line in the disputed south china sea. central london has been rocked by a series of terrorist attacks.
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police say there have been many casualties, and there is growing speculation that al-qaeda was responsible. germany will be the hosts of the 2006 football world cup. they've pipped the favourite, south africa, by a single vote. in south africa, the possibility of losing hadn't even been contemplated. celebration parties were cancelled. the man entered the palace l through a downstairs window and made his way to the queen's private bedroom, then _ he asked her for a cigarette — i and, on the pretext of arranging for some to be brought, - summoned a footman on duty who took the man away. one child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. education is the only solution.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines... england defeat denmark 2—1 in extra time at the euros, reaching its first final of a major tournament since 1966, facing italy in sunday's final. the world health organization has urged extreme caution when governments plan to ease restrictions because of a surge in new cases — even in countries with good vaccination rates such as the uk. the organisation's head of the emergencies, dr mike ryan, said the idea of letting people get infected with covid—19 earlier rather than later was a case of "stupidity". 0ur medical editor fergus walsh examines how big the third wave of infections could be. despite increasing levels of vaccination, coronavirus cases are doubling in the uk roughly every nine days. so how protected are we? the office for national statistics estimates that 89% of adults now
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have antibodies against coronavirus. the levels vary around the uk, but are the highest so far during the pandemic. antibodies will either be the result of prior infection or, increasingly, vaccination. but having some antibodies is not a guarantee against getting infected. a lot of these adults will have antibodies, but they will be low levels of antibodies, they will be waning antibodies from an original live infection. what we need for full protection from something like the delta variant is the kind of high—level neutralising antibodies that you get from two doses of vaccine. so how big will the third wave be? the government estimates that cases could rise from current levels to 50,000 a day by 19july, and perhaps 100,000 a day later in the summer. what really matters is the number of people who become seriously ill, and immunisation is ensuring a lower proportion of people
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are being admitted to hospital. even so, there could be 1,000 hospital admissions a day later this month, and perhaps double that if cases spiral upward. i do think that other places in europe and the world are going to see the uk as a bit of a test case here, to test exactly how effective the vaccines are at a fairly high but not complete vaccine roll—out stage, and to see whether this triggers, for example, the arising of new variants that are under pressure to get around that vaccine protection. so how many people might have to self—isolating the coming weeks? for every covid case, around three close contacts are identified. now, these are very rough estimates but if we hit 50,000 cases a day, that could mean nearly 1.5 million people a week being ordered to self—isolate. and if we hit 100,000
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cases a day by 16 august, the date at which the self—isolation rules are being relaxed, it could be nearer three million people a week. tomorrow, ministers are expected to announce a date when fully immunised people arriving in england from amber list countries will no longer have to quarantine. it would open up a travel to many tourist destinations and spark a scramble for holiday bookings. fergus walsh, bbc news. let s get some of the day's other news. a loud explosion has occured in the united arab emirates city of dubai. witnesses said it caused buildings to shake. the government's media office has confirmed that a fire broke out in a shipping container anchored at the port ofjebel ali in the south. unverified images and videos posted on social media show a huge fire ball rising into the sky. fire crews are working to put out the blaze. there are no reported injuries. in afghanistan, the taliban has launched a sustained assault on a provincial capital in the west of country.
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fierce fighting erupted in the capital of bardgiss province — with the governor saying the enemy has entered the city. it's the latest push by militants, as us and its allies pull out. the pentagon said on tuesday that 90% of us forces have left the country. five years ago next week, the philippines won a landmark legal victory over china concerning territorial incursions in the disputed south china sea. a tribunal at the permanent court of arbitration in the hague ruled that beijing had been unlawful in its occupation and blockade of traditional filipino fishing grounds, including scarborough shoal. both china and the philippines claim sovereignty over the large coral reef, while vietnamese claim it is their traditionalfishing grounds. the maritime territory is closest to the philippine coast, but since 2012, and despite the tribunal ruling, there has been a constant chinese coastguard presence there — with filipino fishermen reporting harassment by the authorities. china justifies its claims in the south china sea based on its controversial nine—dash—line map, first published
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after world war ii — it didn't take part in the 2016 tribunal or accept its findings. 0ur philippines correspondent, howard johnson, joined a filipino fishing crew to witness what's happening at scarborough shoal. we're on a fishing boat heading towards occupied maritime territory in the south china sea. we want to verify reports that chinese boats are unlawfully blockading a traditional filipino fishing ground, just 120 nautical miles from its coast. we sail with trepidation. this year, china has been swarming reefs and rocks in philippine waters with hundreds of its boats, many from its maritime militia. in this recent promotional video, the militia are seen firing automatic weapons and ramming what appears to be a small fishing boat during training exercises.
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we arrived at scarborough shoal the following morning. notice how waves from the deep blue ocean break on a lighter turquoise body of water — that's the limestone reef you can see in the satellite image. easier to spot is the chinese coast guard presence. so there's a chinese coast guard vessel that's watching us at the moment, it's done three sweeps — first of all, 200 metres away, then 100 metres away, and now 50 metres away. it's watching our every move. the boat leaves without incident — but our captain knows the lagoon is off limits. translation: we are the bandits in our own territory. _ why is that so? we steal our own territory? we steal our own fish? that's because we don't have our own coast guard there. 0n the last day at scarborough shoal, we entered into the blockaded eastern entrance. but after ten minutes, we noticed a boat moving
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on the horizon towards us. it's a maritime militia boat. by cross—referencing our footage with satellite data, it appears that the vessel that sailed towards us is called cheong sa nsha yu00311. sansha is where the maritime militia promotional video was filmed. five years on from a landmark legal ruling that found that china had been unlawfully disrupting traditional fishing by blockading scarborough shoal, ourjourney has revealed that beijing continues to flout international law. we put these allegations to the chinese embassy in london and received this reply... howard johnson reporting from scarborough shoal. and you can see more on that story in our world: battle
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for the south china sea, this weekend on bbc world news. let's bring you some breaking news now: the search for survivors after the building collapse near miami has ended, the mayor of the region has said. eight more victims have been found, bringing the death toll to sa. the mayor says the operation has transitioned from rescu e to recovery. it's been made clear that no further survivors will be found in that collapsed building in miami. a reminder of our top story: england have reached theirfirst major football tournament final in 55 years, beating denmark 2—1 after extra time in the second semifinal of the euro 2020 tournament. the match at wembley was hard—fought, with both sides having a number of chances after denmark had taken the lead. the game was decided by a penalty from the english captain, harry kane.
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england will now return to wembley on sunday to play italy and try to repeat the heroics of the world cup winners from 1966. well, quite a lot of pent—up energy in the atmosphere wednesday afternoon and evening. we had some thunderstorms, some really quite heavy downpours. you can see the showers — that was earlier in the last 10—12 hours or so. and then, towards the end of the day on wednesday, we saw those thunderstorms across some central and eastern areas, and the weather remains quite unsettled over the next few days. i say unsettled for a summer month. a fair bit of cloud out there across the atlantic heading our way, and we'll see further showers developing over the next few days with low pressure in charge of the weather. so, i think a showery day on the way for some of us on thursday, but actually, the showers will be very well scattered, so that does mean that many of us will miss them altogether. so, the forecast through the early
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hours shows a lot of dry weather across the uk. temperatures will be around 1a celsius or so across the south of the country, just a tad fresher in the north — around 11—12. now, the morning will become increasingly sunny right across the uk, but then fairweather clouds will start to develop, and as we head into the afternoon, those fairweather clouds will turn into storms. and some of the downpours really will be very heavy indeed, but as i say, they will be very well scattered. not too many of them around across much of scotland or northern ireland. maybe across the grampians here, but the showers certainly will be scattered across many areas of england and mostly away from the coasts, so places like western wales should end up having a pretty decent day, for example, in swansea. so, friday's weather forecast shows a very weak area of high pressure over us. that does mean, i think, fewer showers, at least early in the day, but then, come the afternoon, we are expecting 1—2 to develop once again. but particularly across the southwest of the country, there's actually a weak weather
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front approaching us here, so places like cornwall, maybe the western fringes of wales seeing some showers, and 1—2 eastern areas as well. now, the outlook into the weekend remains pretty showery, particularly on saturday across some southern areas of the uk. there's a small area of low pressure heading our way, so that will bring a lot of cloud to places like plymouth or london. sunday, also a chance of some showers, and actually, early next week — my goodness, we've got a low pressure close to us, and that's going to continue to bring further showers.
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this is bbc news with me, shaun ley.
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the headlines: england defeat denmark 2—1 in extra time at the euros, reaching their first final of a major tournament since 1966. england will face italy in sunday's final. haiti's president, jovenel moyees, has been assassinated inside his residence. the interim prime minister has declared a state of emergency. the white house called the killing �*horrific�* and offered to help with any investigation. the former south african president, jacob zuma, is in police custody, according to a police spokesperson. last week, the constitutional court found him guilty of contempt for defying its order to appear before a corruption inquiry. afghan security forces have carried out air strikes in bardgiss province to try to turn back an advance by the taliban. officials say special forces managed to dislodge taliban fighters who had taken over key government buildings.

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