Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 7, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

2:00 pm
england's footballers on the brink of sporting history tonight here at wembley as they take on denmark in the semi final of the european championship. victory for these players this evening would see england reach their first major tournament final in more than half a century. this time, things have been slightly different. teams have missed a couple of key chances, like when muller was through, and managed to get little breaks of the ball on occasions, and nothing has gone massively wrong, and if that continues, then it mightjust happen. there'll be 60,000 fans in the stadium — some of them danish but the vast majority cheering on england. i'm rebecca jones.
2:01 pm
the other main stories... labour says the easing of covid restrictions in england will cause a summer of chaos but the prime minister has defended his strategy. the government's confirmed that the £20 a week universal credit top—up will be phased out in the autumn. one of india's most accomplished and respected film stars, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98. good afternoon from wembley. england s footballers are two games from glory: beat denmark
2:02 pm
here at wembley tonight and they ll face italy on sunday in what would be england s first major final since 1966. cheering them on will be the vast majority of the 60,000 fans in the stadium behind me — plus more than 20 million watching on tv. it's going to be quite a night. 0lly foster reports. this england team don't like to dwell on the past, but they can afford to look back at the last three weeks as a job very well done. that will do nicely. the rise of raheem sterling. his first goals at a major tournament took them to the top of their group. and england lead. harry kane, the captainjoined the party quite late. in comes the captain! but what an entrance that was against germany. and pickford saves it. and in five matches
2:03 pm
they haven't conceded a goal. that quarterfinal in rome against ukraine last saturday sent them hurtling into the home straight on a wave of belief for their return to wembley tonight in front of 60,000 fans. we know that we will have tremendous support throughout the country, so that's a great feeling for us. i think we're ready for the game. i think the players are ready. they've got tremendous experience now themselves having been in this situation before. the word on wembley way today is that england will never have a better chance. and those supporters anticipating a special day in the team's history have arrived hours before kick—off. how are the nerves? terrible. absolutely terrible, to tell you the truth. i didn't sleep well last night. just being part of it is magical. it'sjust great. if we get knocked out i will be so sad. - semifinal defeats have become ingrained in england's identity. italia 90, euro 96 here at wembley,
2:04 pm
the world cup in russia three years ago, but the difference about this match is that england are huge favourites. denmark, though, will be tough opponents and highly motivated. what an emotional and inspirational tournament they have had. their star player, christian eriksen, collapsed on the pitch with a cardiac arrest during their first match. from fearing the worst, they are now playing every game for him, as he recovers at home. we try to fight the best we have learned through these emotions. we have played fantastic football. we have shown who we are. i'm very proud of these boys and i'm very proud of the people of denmark who have shown their love and support and compassion that we have been given that has helped us through this time. england are also feeding off theirfans. the thousands in wembley, the millions watching and listening at home, and they want to give something back. their drive comes without the drama of denmark's progress and they seem to have got the balance just right.
2:05 pm
aware of how close the prize is now, but taking nothing for granted. it doesn't matter what you think you know when you go into the match, it doesn't matter what you do, it doesn't always turn out as planned, but i think our players will be calm, they will be focused, and they willjust continue what they have been doing all the way through the tournament. and it's gareth southgate�*s character that runs through the team, his composure. he has the players�* complete trust. the tweaks in formation from match to match, substitutions, the all—important starting xi tonight. everyone picks their own england team, we all have different versions of it but the only person that matters is southgate and so far, tactically, and personnel—wise he has got everything spot on. and nothing has gone massively wrong. and if that continues, then it mightjust happen. that caution comes from past experience, falling at this hurdle before. but this team is about rewriting, not repeating history. 0llie foster, bbc news, wembley.
2:06 pm
six hours until kick—off and there are many fancy already. —— many supporters here already. let's speak to our sports correspondentjohn watson. who is going to go up front for england? it who is going to go up front for encland? , , england? it is interesting. southgate _ england? it is interesting. southgate seems - england? it is interesting. southgate seems to - england? it is interesting. southgate seems to have | england? it is interesting. i southgate seems to have got england? it is interesting. - southgate seems to have got the england? it is interesting. _ southgate seems to have got the big decisions right so far when he has brought players in and out of the team and we are getting reports that sakais team and we are getting reports that saka is likely to come back into the attacking line up later on in wembley in place ofjadon sancho attacking line up later on in wembley in place of jadon sancho who started in rome against ukraine when they won 4—0. saka has played brilliantly already in this tournament, he started against the czech republic and he was man of the match against germany as they beat germany in a knockout match for the first time in 55 years, so gareth southgate knows he can comfortably bring him in buti
2:07 pm
southgate knows he can comfortably bring him in but i think that will be the only change in the line—up. so much the same at spine of the team, the body of the team that has got england this far in this tournament, and as we know, this is the best opportunity for england, potentially, to reach a majorfinal for the first time since 1966. going so well for england. you look at the return to form of the captain harry kane, three goals in five matches, raheem sterling showing right southgate has put his faith in him in this tournament, and as southgate said, they are desperate to change the narrative and perception around the narrative and perception around the team, and that at long last they can finally challenge for major honours on the bigger stage. it was interesting, he said how young children are watching england in this tournament, they have seen them reach the semifinals at the world cup in 2018 and semifinals again now, and they think this is how it always is, but as we know, historically, it hasn't been, but england are changing their history to this tournament. they won their
2:08 pm
first match in a european chairmanship for the first time and before this tournament they had only won one knockout match in the euros before, until they beat germany, and then they scored four goals for the first time in a major tournament since they won it in 1966, so the history that had shackled england, they are getting rid of it now and creating more memorable stories for the current generation.— the current generation. indeed. we can delve more _ the current generation. indeed. we can delve more into _ the current generation. indeed. we can delve more into that _ the current generation. indeed. we can delve more into that history. i let's speak now to the former newcastle defender steve howey. he was a member of england's euro 96 squad — the last team to have made it to a european championship semi—final. thanks forjoining us. you think this squad and this team have got something a bit different from what your squad had in 1996, something a bit different from what yoursquad had in 1996, may something a bit different from what your squad had in 1996, may be psychologically, and an ability to overcome the pressure?- psychologically, and an ability to overcome the pressure? well, we had some unbelievable _
2:09 pm
overcome the pressure? well, we had some unbelievable players _ overcome the pressure? well, we had some unbelievable players in - overcome the pressure? well, we had some unbelievable players in 96, - overcome the pressure? well, we had some unbelievable players in 96, and| some unbelievable players in 96, and england have the same, with some very good players. they reach the semifinal of the world cup three years ago in russia and its superb and the vast majority are still together. so they can call on that experience and resource for tonight's game. just hearing the reporters there, i think the team will be pretty much settled, which has been the case, is it going to be jack grealish, phil foden, saka, jadon sancho? you hear on social media and tv that possibly saka, but gareth has got all of his choice was correct. this is a big call for what he does tonight. whichever player comes in, i'm pretty sure they will do very well, because i'm apprehensive about tonight, but i'm confident. i think we have got a very good squad, very good team, and without a doubt, denmark will be
2:10 pm
looking and thinking, for them to beat us, it would be a major upset. tell us about gareth southgate because he is proving to be a brilliant england manager. they have been so many doubts and people saying, too defensive, sticking with harry kane, too loyal to harry kane, too loyal to raheem sterling, but now supporters are coming round and thinking actually he is the man for thejob. thinking actually he is the man for the 'ob. ~ ,,., , thinking actually he is the man for the'ob. , ,., _ the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances _ the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances in _ the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances in which _ the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances in which he - the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances in which he got - the job. absolutely. obviously, the circumstances in which he got the i circumstances in which he got the job was not the best but he has taken it on. yes, he is loyal to his players. he is loyal to kane and i could not understand the questions in the first place, because he was never coming out of the team, he's that good, the same with raheem sterling. gareth has known a lot of these players for a long time, he had a lot of these in the under 21 team and he has nurtured them and make sure he has kept an eye on them or the way through. he has now got
2:11 pm
them in the senior team. the players seem to really respond to him. he treats them the way they should be treated, like adults, young adults, with obviously a lot of pressure on their shoulders for tonight, with obviously a lot of pressure on theirshoulders fortonight, but with obviously a lot of pressure on their shoulders for tonight, but at their shoulders for tonight, but at the same time they seem very relaxed. you look at them in the lions den and you watch them on youtube when they are talking, they look very relaxed and confident, very reassured, and rightly so, because they are an excellent bunch of players, a great group of lads and everyone seems together. yeah, with garrett and his team we could just go the extra step tonight. —— gareth. just go the extra step tonight. -- gareth. �* , just go the extra step tonight. -- gareth. h .,, just go the extra step tonight. -- gareth. �*, .,, ,., just go the extra step tonight. -- gareth. �*, ., ., gareth. let's hope so. thanks for “oininu gareth. let's hope so. thanks for joining us- _ gareth. let's hope so. thanks for joining us. steve _ gareth. let's hope so. thanks for joining us. steve harry, - gareth. let's hope so. thanks for joining us. steve harry, a - gareth. let's hope so. thanks forl joining us. steve harry, a member gareth. let's hope so. thanks for - joining us. steve harry, a member of the euro 96 squad. —— howey. well, around the country, fans in their millions are preparing to watch the match at home, or on big screens in pubs —
2:12 pm
providing a much needed boost to the hospitality industry. phil mackie reports. let's see your hands. england fans, it is time to get your shirts and flags at the ready and if you're heading out tonight i'm sure there will be some singing as well. # football's coming home again... #. although not everyone will have atomic kitten as the warm—up act. england's success in the euros has been massively important for the hospitality sector and this pub in birmingham says the money spent as the team has progressed has probably saved the business. this is one of about 10 million pints of beer that the british beer and pub association will sell today, about 7 million of them during the game. and they say it could have been a lot more if restrictions had been eased sooner, but nonetheless, england's success in the euros has been a real boon for the hospitality sector. most people will be watching
2:13 pm
the game tonight at home with friends and family as the nation, england, that is, prepares to stop to watch the game at eight o'clock. but many like paddy don't have a choice. he has to stay at home after being pinged but at least he will have his baby with him. over in sudbury at this primary school... i am really excited. i would love it if we went up against italy. if we get knocked out, it wouldn't be the best, to be honest. the last game was really good and harry kane scored, which was really good as well. i think we are going to win and i really hope that we make it to the end and win. inevitably, there are tales of divided loyalties as well. al is english, his wife catherine is danish. fortunately, all of us are going to wembley to watch the game. unfortunately from my point of view, we are all in the danish end, so i'm going to have to sit on my hands when harry kane knocks in the fourth goal. let's wait and see.
2:14 pm
don't underestimate the vikings, yeah? i think we are less confident - in denmark that we are going to win compared to what we see here, but there is no doubt that - when you experience a trauma like they did in the first match| that does bring the team together land they do play as a collective, i and most danes had fairly high expectations in advance. - home side advantage, i'm sure wembley will be on fire tonight, so they have just had such great momentum in the last few games. i'm hopeful that it's going to be an interesting post match discussion between the two of us. but i think england is going to win. so, there are only a few hours left to go before we know whether it will be a danish triumph... ..or it will be the end of 55 years of hurt for english fans.
2:15 pm
let's talk to our sports reporter, alex howell. 55 years of hurt, do you think it is coming to an end, is there something different about this england squad? i was in the press conference last night and gareth southgate said it does feel different, this is this team's third semifinal in recent years, after the nation's league and the world cup, and so this team expect to get this far. he has spoken about the pathway of the youth teams and the success of the england youth teams, coming through to the world cup and european success, this team is a product of that. gareth southgate was previously the england under 21 manager and he brought some of these players too and he also spoke about, we don't have as good a history as we don't have as good a history as we like to think of this would be the first european final they have
2:16 pm
ever got to come and he keeps hammering that point home, he says, this is a chance to write history. and for him personally, if they could win this semifinal and ideally be tournament, it would be personal vindication, because everyone has talked about his famous penalty miss. , , ., , ., talked about his famous penalty miss. , , ., ., ~ miss. yes, people have talked about that, miss. yes, people have talked about that. whether _ miss. yes, people have talked about that, whether he _ miss. yes, people have talked about that, whether he is _ miss. yes, people have talked about that, whether he is too _ miss. yes, people have talked about that, whether he is too defensive, i that, whether he is too defensive, and tactics, but we talk about the culture he has built in the team. he has been to see other teams like the all blacks and formula 1 teams and spoken to england rugby head coach eddiejones and he has brought the calmness in. if you speak to the players, everyone is speaking about the same message, they are not talking how patients do in the past, that may be they will be able to win —— they are not talking of how our players have done in the past. it is about taking it from the group stage to be final and they are two games away from achieving that and that
2:17 pm
comes from the top down. the group is really together. in the past there were a lot of cliques and teams from different places, battling and not getting on, but this is not the case, you have best friends, just look at declan rice who plays for west ham and mason mount of chelsea, two rivals, but they haven't grown up together, and those boundaries and inclusive attitude southgate has built within the team is really special and you are seeing that in the performances. not a single goal conceded so far in the tournament, how do you see the game going, going to be cagey? is england going to go on the attack? i think it will be very tight, the importance of the game, at 60,000 in there, the semifinal and the chance to write history, and denmark have changed their formation from game to game and within the game. jordan pickford has already won the golden gloves in the tournament keeping the most clean sheets, and i think gareth southgate has said, he has studied previous tournaments, and
2:18 pm
teams who win tournaments are not always the team that plays the best football but the one who conceives the less goals and england are doing that at the moment. —— who concedes. ideally conceding no goals throughout the whole tournament! thanks forjoining us. the supporters are streaming in. we can now see what the atmosphere is like in copenhagen. 0ur europe correspondent lucy williamson is at a fan zone in copenhagen. the fan zone is starting to fill up but support for the team tonight goes well beyond the normal football supporters, notjust because this country of 5.5 million has a team in the semifinal but because they did it without their star player. christian eriksen collapsed just minutes into the first game during this tournament and has not set foot on the pitch since. the mantra here now is, let's do it for christian. huge excitement and huge support,
2:19 pm
lots of emotion here. very few danish fans were able to travel to wembley mainly because of covid restrictions. 0ne professional footballer we spoke to said he did not mind that so much because he said that england have all the fans among them, they are going to be under pressure. and when england feel the pressure, he said, they tend to disappoint and that is what he hopes for tonight. we like to balance our coverage on the bbc and what better way to do that than to speak to a denmark supporter and a england supporter who are happy to be married. joining me is husband and wife jim and kirsten gower. jim will be supporting england and kirsten who is originally from denmark will be supporting the danes. is it going to be a tricky evening? no! ida is it going to be a tricky evening? no! ., ., ., ., ., , no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it no! no more than normal! it will be fine- it will— no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it will be _ no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it will be fine. _ no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it will be fine. a _ no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it will be fine. a good - no! no more than normal! it will be fine. it will be fine. a good game i fine. it will be fine. a good game of football. fine. it will be fine. a good game of football-— of football. how do you think denmark— of football. how do you think denmark are _ of football. how do you think denmark are going _ of football. how do you think denmark are going to - of football. how do you think denmark are going to do - of football. how do you think denmark are going to do this
2:20 pm
evening? england are the favourites, but are you confident?— but are you confident? absolutely, es. the but are you confident? absolutely, yes- they have _ but are you confident? absolutely, yes. they have got _ but are you confident? absolutely, yes. they have got the _ but are you confident? absolutely, yes. they have got the whole - but are you confident? absolutely, i yes. they have got the whole country behind them, so, yes, definitely. it is not the first time we have beaten the english here. at}! is not the first time we have beaten the english here.— the english here. of course, the terrible cardiac _ the english here. of course, the terrible cardiac arrest _ the english here. of course, the terrible cardiac arrest that - terrible cardiac arrest that christian eriksen suffered at the beginning of the tournament, that has given an emotional element to this danish team, and they are very much together as a team, and their supporters are very much with them. yes, they are, but to be honest, i don't really think it makes that much difference, because every time at the danish national team is playing in a competition or a friendly, the country seems to be behind them anyway. so perhaps it has made a bit of a difference but i still think that the kind of togetherness of the team and the support of the fans is something thatis
2:21 pm
support of the fans is something that is not new. it is part of our national psyche, really. haw that is not new. it is part of our national psyche, really. how do you see the game _ national psyche, really. how do you see the game going _ national psyche, really. how do you see the game going this _ national psyche, really. how do you see the game going this evening, i see the game going this evening, jim? england are favourites, are you confident? ., �* ., confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, _ confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, it _ confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, it is _ confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, it is going - confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, it is going to - confident? no, i'm not confident, because i think, it is going to be i confident? no, i'm not confident, | because i think, it is going to be a very tight — because i think, it is going to be a very tight game and i don't expect there _ very tight game and i don't expect there to _ very tight game and i don't expect there to be more than a goal in it, but ihr— there to be more than a goal in it, but i'm very— there to be more than a goal in it, but i'm very impressed with england and southgate. they have brought pride _ and southgate. they have brought pride hack— and southgate. they have brought pride back to english football in my opinion _ pride back to english football in my opinion. fortoo pride back to english football in my opinion. for too long, pride back to english football in my opinion. fortoo long, the pride back to english football in my opinion. for too long, the national team _ opinion. for too long, the national team created the impression that they were — team created the impression that they were turning up because maybe they were turning up because maybe they were _ they were turning up because maybe they were getting paid a lot of money — they were getting paid a lot of money. but these guys, they really seem _ money. but these guys, they really seem to _ money. but these guys, they really seem to he — money. but these guys, they really seem to be proud. you can see it when _ seem to be proud. you can see it when the — seem to be proud. you can see it when the anthem is played. sorryr
2:22 pm
seem to be proud. you can see it when the anthem is played. sorry to interru t, when the anthem is played. sorry to interrunt. and _ when the anthem is played. sorry to interrupt, and when _ when the anthem is played. sorry to interrupt, and when you _ when the anthem is played. sorry to interrupt, and when you saw - when the anthem is played. sorry to interrupt, and when you saw it - when the anthem is played. sorry to interrupt, and when you saw it was i interrupt, and when you saw it was going to be england playing denmark in the semifinal, and you are an anglo danish marriage, what was your reaction? what were your first thoughts? i reaction? what were your first thoughts?— reaction? what were your first thou~hts? ~ , ., . thoughts? i think it is fantastic. the danish _ thoughts? i think it is fantastic. the danish team _ thoughts? i think it is fantastic. the danish team is _ thoughts? i think it is fantastic. the danish team is absolutely i the danish team is absolutely relishing the idea of coming here to play. ijust think it is fantastic. under normal circumstances i would be supporting england and i second whatjim has said, i think southgate and his team have done a fantastic job, absolutely. i'm full of admiration for them but being a dane i have got to hope denmark are going to do it tonight. i have got to hope denmark are going to do it tonight-— to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it is — to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it is going _ to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it is going to _ to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it is going to go _ to do it tonight. score prediction? i think it is going to go to - i think it is going to go to penalties and then we have kasper schmeichel. penalties and then we have kasper schmeichel-_
2:23 pm
penalties and then we have kasper schmeichel._ i - penalties and then we have kasper| schmeichel._ i very schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope — schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope not. — schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope not, i _ schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope not, i hope _ schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope not, i hope no - schmeichel. jim? penalties? i very much hope not, i hope no extra i schmeichel. jim? penalties? ivery. much hope not, i hope no extra time. ithink— much hope not, i hope no extra time. i think it _ much hope not, i hope no extra time. i think it will — much hope not, i hope no extra time. i think it will be settled in the match — i think it will be settled in the match i_ i think it will be settled in the match. i think it would be a matter of a goat — match. i think it would be a matter of a goal. 0ne match. i think it would be a matter of a goal. one way or the other. a good _ of a goal. one way or the other. a good game — of a goal. one way or the other. a good game is what is needed. let�*s good game is what is needed. let's ho -e it is good game is what is needed. let's hope it is not _ good game is what is needed. let's hope it is not penalties _ good game is what is needed. let�*s hope it is not penalties otherwise it will be very tense in your household as you are watching that on the tv. irate household as you are watching that on the tv. ~ , household as you are watching that on the tv-_ she - household as you are watching that on the tv._ she will on the tv. we will be fine! she will run out to buy _ on the tv. we will be fine! she will run out to buy snacks _ on the tv. we will be fine! she will run out to buy snacks to _ on the tv. we will be fine! she will run out to buy snacks to calm - on the tv. we will be fine! she will run out to buy snacks to calm her i run out to buy snacks to calm her nerves _ run out to buy snacks to calm her nerves. ., y run out to buy snacks to calm her nerves. ., , ., ., ~ ., ., nerves. lovely to talk to both of ou. nerves. lovely to talk to both of you- thanks _ nerves. lovely to talk to both of you. thanks for _ nerves. lovely to talk to both of you. thanks forjoining - nerves. lovely to talk to both of you. thanks forjoining us. - england have been into semifinals in the euros, 1968 and 1996, will it be third time lucky this evening? they have got home advantage, and they have got home advantage, and they have not conceded a goal so far in the tournament. we will see what happens, but i got a feeling that
2:24 pm
football is coming home. studio: i admire your optimism! the government's covid strategy has been challenged in the commons by the labour leader sir keir starmer. he said the plans to ease covid restrictions in england later this month will lead to chaos and confusion. speaking at prime minister's questions, sir keir warned that if infections reach 100,000 every day, that will lead to huge numbers of people having to self—isolate. but borisjohnson said the vaccination programme makes the relaxation possible — and that he's taking decisions in a balanced way. here's our political correspondent helen catt. will hospitals cope with rising covid cases, prime minister? | can england win- the football tonight? the prime minister will be hoping the answer to both questions is yes. as he headed to the commons to defend his plan to lift all legal restrictions in england, potentially within a fortnight. the health secretary has said that
2:25 pm
cases could reach 100,000 per day. sir keir starmer wanted to know how many would end up in hospital or could die. it's certainly true that we are seeing a wave of cases because of the delta variant, but scientists are also absolutely clear that we have severed the link between infection and serious disease and death and currently there are only a 30th of the deaths that we were seeing at an equivalent position in previous waves of this pandemic. we know the link between infection rates and deaths has been weakened but hasn't been broken and the prime minister must and should know the answer to the question i asked. that he will not answer it here in the house does not inspire confidence in his plan. 0n the front pages this morning there was concern about opening up while keeping self isolation rules in place, even for those with two jabs, until mid—august. he ignored the problems in schools.
2:26 pm
now there's 700,000 children are off per week cos he ignored it and now he is ignoring the next big problem heading down the track and will affect millions of people who have to self—isolate. of course, we will continue with the programme of self isolation for as long as necessary. and i thank all those who are doing it. but, of course, what we are also doing is moving to a system of testing rather than self isolation and we can do that because of the massive roll—out of the vaccine. the prime minister repeatedly questioned if labour supported opening up. is he in favour of us moving forward, yes or no? it is impossible to tell. we want to open in a controlled way and keep in line baseline protections to keep down infections. in westminster, it's the prime minister who faces more questions this afternoon as he's quizzed by senior mps on the liaison committee. helen catt, bbc news.
2:27 pm
and at 3:30 this afternoon the prime minister will be appearing in front of mps on the commons liaison committee. we'll bring you that live here on bbc news. the conservative mpjames brokenshire has resigned as security minister. he has told borisjohnson that his recovery from lung cancer treatment is, and i quote, taking longer than anticipated, he said, so he has submitted his resignation as security minister to borisjohnson, security minister to boris johnson, thatis security minister to borisjohnson, that is the conservative mpjames brokenshire, telling him that his recovery from lung cancer treatment is taking longer than anticipated. it's been confirmed that the £20 top—up to universal credit that was introduced last year during the pandemic is going to be phased out. the work and pensions secretary therese coffey has told mps that it'll happen from september.
2:28 pm
let's get the latest from our political correspondent damian grammaticus. we know that letters will be going out to people saying that this payment will be stopped. it has amounted to £1000 per year and we believe that has helped perhaps up to 6 million people at a cost of £6 billion per year. and driving this is the treasury, who have borrowed vast amounts to give help during the pandemic, but do not want to see that turning into permanent spending that would have to be funded. they say it's right that it goes as other temporary measures are also going and they say it will only happen three months after restrictions are lifted this summer. so, we had conservative ministers saying today that this is an issue about getting finances in order and keeping things in control.
2:29 pm
but the opposition says removing it could tip many people into poverty and debt and that itself will impose costs. and you say that there has been opposition, six former conservative welfare secretaries have written to the government saying it should stay, this payment, and moving it contradicts the government's own levelling up agenda. so they want it to be kept. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. we are going to see hit and miss heavy showers and thunderstorms in the forecast over the next couple of days and no exception or the rest of the day, sunshine in between but if you catch a shower they could be torrential with hail and lightning and thunder mixed in. especially in parts of south—west england, wales, the midlands and towards the likes of lincolnshire, that is where you are most likely to catch the heavy showers. at wembley, still a few showers. at wembley, still a few showers around early evening, but they are fading away so things are drying up at wembley into the
2:30 pm
evening hours. 0vernight, showers fading away for most areas, more cloud moving and over parts of scotland and northern ireland. and a few misty patches posting but temperatures between 10—14 thursday morning. during thursday, quite a bit of sunshine for many, and brighter than it has been today, but once again hit and miss heavy showers and thunderstorms, most frequent for parts of eastern england. a bit drierfurther west and cloudier in the north—west of the uk. goodbye. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... england are hoping to make history tonight when they take on denmark at wembley in their euros semifinal. this time, things have been slightly different. teams have missed a couple of key chances, like when muller was through, and managed to get little breaks of the ball on occasions, and nothing has gone massively wrong, and if that continues,
2:31 pm
then it mightjust happen. there ll be 60,000 fans in the stadium, some of them danish, but the vast majority cheering on england. labour says the easing of covid restrictions in england will cause a summer of chaos but the prime minister has defended his strategy. the government's confirmed that the £20 a week universal credit top—up will be phased out in the autumn. one of india's most accomplished and respected film stars, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98. sport now, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. you will forgive us. it never ceases
2:32 pm
to amaze me but we are now five and a half hours before kick—off between england and denmark in this european championships semifinal and wembley way is feeling really busy. it was this morning as well. so many fans travelling without tickets, even though 60,000 have been sold for this match, just hoping to if not get a ticket at any price perhaps, but just to be get a ticket at any price perhaps, butjust to be a part of things here because it does feel like a very special day. england looking y sgwrs to get into their first major championship final since 1966 —— looking y sgwrs. how long have we been talking about that throughout this championship. england have dispensed with history along the way. they are in such a good place. italy are a fantastic team waiting for them in the final after that penalty shoot—out against spain last night but england just seems so composed for what this match will
2:33 pm
bring and perhaps a historic match on sunday as well. we are going to go closer to the stadium in just a moment but last night at the england team hotel, we heard from the captain, harry kane. we've got a fantastic squad. notjust the team that play, everyone who's in the fold, everyone who has been with us throughout the journey. and, obviously, we've had great clean sheets in this tournament. our aim is to try to get another one. obviously, there is a lot of talk going into the semifinal and there is a chance for us, obviously, to go one step further than what we did in russia in 2018. so it's a great opportunity for us to go and achieve that. harry kane obviously in the core of that squad that got to the semifinals three years ago at the world cup in russia and that experience, gareth southgate says, harry maguire says, is going to hold them in much better stead against them in much better stead against the danes. 1992 champions on their own very emotionaljourney
2:34 pm
progressing to the stage as well themselves but england will be huge favourites. let's talk to john watson, my colleague, he is a little closer to the stadium. it is all about now how gareth southgate, who has tweet this team throughout the last five games, how he is going to set them for this semifinal against the danes. , ., ., ., ., ., the danes. yes, good afternoon. it is interesting _ the danes. yes, good afternoon. it is interesting when _ the danes. yes, good afternoon. it is interesting when you _ the danes. yes, good afternoon. it is interesting when you talk- the danes. yes, good afternoon. it is interesting when you talk about | is interesting when you talk about how england has changed since that run to the semifinal at the last world cup and arguably it is the addition of some of those new players, the likes of mason mount, phil foden, in the squad that have made headlines. it is worth pointing out that saka is likely to return to the starting 11. he is likely to come in in place ofjayden sian —— jadon sancho. it was such an
2:35 pm
impressive performance against ukraine but saka really start against germany, he impressed before that as well when he started against the czech republic and it looks as if he will come back into the england side tonight. and start alongside harry kane and raheem sterling in attack. three goals each for them now in five matches in this tournament. harry kane seemingly hitting four just the tournament. harry kane seemingly hitting fourjust the right time and that could be integral if they are to try and reach the final. the midfield pivot has worked so well, so hard to score against england. still have not conceded any goals. just a one match drawn and the rest have been one. so impressive. you look to the defence as well and harry maguire alongsidejohn stones and kyle walker and luke shaw, who provided those crucial assists in that impressive win last time out in the quarterfinal. that is a major team news we are expecting and as you were saying, this is such a huge
2:36 pm
opportunity now for england and south —— gareth southgate, who has been looking to try and change the narrative around this england side. so many disappointments in the past but they seem to be changing that story, changing that narrative in this tournament and he will be hoping that once again they can put smiles on the faces of those england fans who will be willing england onto beat denmark later and booked their place in the final on sunday, where they will be playing italy. many thanks indeed. the word on wembley way is england will never have a better chance. team news about an hour and 20 minutes, we expect it before kick—off at eight o'clock years. the teams will arrive around two hours before this semifinal. semifinals here, many —— men's quarterfinal day at wimbledon. they are all under way at the moment.
2:37 pm
they are all under way at the moment-— they are all under way at the moment. , , ., moment. yes, the first of the quarterfinals _ moment. yes, the first of the quarterfinals under— moment. yes, the first of the quarterfinals under way - moment. yes, the first of the quarterfinals under way at. moment. yes, the first of the | quarterfinals under way at the moment and novak djokovic are making very short work it would appear of fucsovic on centre court. jock of a chasing yet more history. could this be the grand slam that brings him level with roger federer and the dial? he has barely put a foot wrong so far. in control against fucsovic. it is currently 1—1 in the second set. fucsovic, the only unseeded player left in the men possibly a straw. the first hungarian to reach the quarterfinal. he had that fantastic result in the last round with a five set win but this is a whole different challenge for him and novak djokovic looking comfortable at the moment. 0n court one, much more tense, really hard to call, as many predicted it would be. khachonov in action against
2:38 pm
shapovalov. shapovalov saved four break points midway through the first set. khachonov ran away with the second set before taking it 6—3. it is currently with serve in the third. so many admirers of shapovalov�*s game. left—handed with greater rhythm and movement. let's see if he can get past the big serving khachonov. i have seen a couple of people here with an england shirt. there are plenty who would quite likely tennis to be over in time for kick—off. let's see how long these quarterfinals last. it in time for kick—off. let's see how long these quarterfinals last. ii i long these quarterfinals last. if i know wimbledon, the all england club do not like showing the football anywhere on the ground. good luck with that around eight o'clock. a busy afternoon at wimbledon. wembley is getting busier all the time. uefa
2:39 pm
will be so relieved they have gone into the final stretch of this tournament without too much disruption. just think about the logistics of 11 different venues, different cities across the continent of europe, but not too much covid disruption. england had mason mount and bell in chilwell having to self—isolate, scotland's billy gilmore. that is how england were affected by it. it certainly uefa will be so happy that they have reached the stage without too much disruption. not so much the british lions tour to south africa. a member of their management has tested positive. two lions players in south africa are having to self—isolate. the south african side have had an outbreak as well within their ranks and their match against georgia has had to be cancelled. the lions match later today against sharks, one of their tour matches, goes ahead, but that depends on how many negative
2:40 pm
results they get back from their pcr tests. the lions tour down there, british and irish lions, really disrupted. point you towards the bbc sport website for all the latest developments on that. a lot of other sport as well. tour de france also today. we can see if england can finally climb back to the summit and getting past the danes to reach their first major championship final since 1966. we will be back in the next hour. the £20—a—week increase to universal credit will be "phased out" in the autumn, the government has said. work and pensions secretary therese coffey told mps the boost, introduced in april last year to help deal with the economic effects of covid, would face an "adjustment". we can now speak to the ceo of the child poverty action group, alison garnham.
2:41 pm
we are grateful for your time. thank you so much. your reaction to this news first of all. i you so much. your reaction to this news first of all.— news first of all. i think it is bad timin: news first of all. i think it is bad timing and _ news first of all. i think it is bad timing and also _ news first of all. i think it is bad timing and also out _ news first of all. i think it is bad timing and also out of _ news first of all. i think it is bad timing and also out of step - news first of all. i think it is bad timing and also out of step with j timing and also out of step with public opinion. we know the public have been saying they think it should stay. we have spoken to thousands of families during the lockdown and they have faced increased costs from heating, lighting, feeding kids who have been at home, many of them have lostjobs because they have been at home looking after children, so they are not in a great spot at the moment. and in october when the cut is about to applied, the lifeline is about to be removed, is pricey —— precisely when inferno is about to come to an and we expect to see and implement rising —— the furlough scheme. it is seriously bad timing for people. people have been grateful to get this extra help but i think the consequences of taking a look —— taking it away now are really worrying. taking it away now are really wor inc. taking it away now are really worrying-— taking it away now are really wor inc. ., ., ., worrying. telling more about what ou fear worrying. telling more about what you fear those _ worrying. telling more about what you fear those consequences - worrying. telling more about what | you fear those consequences might be. ~ , . ., ,
2:42 pm
you fear those consequences might be. ~ , . ., , ., ., [cii :: i: i: i: be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children — be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children in _ be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children in poverty _ be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children in poverty as _ be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children in poverty as a _ be. we expect to see around 300,000 more children in poverty as a result i more children in poverty as a result of it because it would effectively be a cut in money for people and of course, around 40% of people on universal credit who are getting this, about 6 million people, about 40% of them are already working, so they cannot work more to get in a better position and if we want to encourage a recovery, then people will not have any money to spend. it is a really bad idea to remove support from people just when we want there to be a recovery. i think people have understood during the furlough scheme just how non—generous the system is. an employment support for example is around 14% of average earnings. miles away from the 80% that has been covered by the furlough scheme pelmets. for example. the additional £20 has creeping back toward
2:43 pm
something more acceptable —— furlough scheme payments. we entered the pandemic in a bad way, being cutting social security benefits for the previous ten years and we arrived at a situation where you are spending 36 billion less on social security when we went into the pandemic. a little bit of extra help was desperately needed and there is not really a case or taking it away. we should be making up that ground in any case. the we should be making up that ground in an case. ., we should be making up that ground in any case-— in any case. the government says reducin: in any case. the government says reducing the _ in any case. the government says reducing the payments _ in any case. the government says reducing the payments will- reducing the payments will contribute to getting people back into work. don't they have a point? shouldn't that be the focus? than? shouldn't that be the focus? any hel on shouldn't that be the focus? in; help on getting people intojobs help on getting people into jobs would be gratefully received by people. i havejust said, nearly half of the people we are talking about already were, so it is not a big issue for them. the issue for them is having enough money to live on. yes, great to help people get into jobs put at the same time, you still need to be able to feed and close your children and be able to
2:44 pm
put food on the table and this is what —— that is what this is about, the generosity of our system and the fact that this is a real lifeline for people and this is a seriously bad time to think about taking it away. bad time to think about taking it awa . ~ . bad time to think about taking it awa . . ., ., bad time to think about taking it awa .~ ., ., ., away. what do you say to the argument _ away. what do you say to the argument that _ away. what do you say to the argument that additional - away. what do you say to the - argument that additional support cannotjust be in place indefinitely? figs cannotjust be in place indefinitely?— cannotjust be in place indefinitely? cannotjust be in place indefinitel ? �* , ., indefinitely? as i say, we are -la in: indefinitely? as i say, we are playing catch _ indefinitely? as i say, we are playing catch up _ indefinitely? as i say, we are playing catch up really - indefinitely? as i say, we are playing catch up really now. indefinitely? as i say, we are - playing catch up really now because our system has become... it has really fallen behind. we have had huge cuts made to the system, the £20 has really made up for the fact that when we went into the pandemic, it was really obvious that our system was not going to be adequate for those people who are going to find themselves on universal credit and the number of people claiming universal credit has doubled, so many more people have discovered what that is like and it has become essential that people have enough to be able to put food on the table. that is where we are now. it has been a lifeline and taking it away would be disastrous.—
2:45 pm
been a lifeline and taking it away would be disastrous. thank you very much forjoining _ would be disastrous. thank you very much forjoining us. _ would be disastrous. thank you very much forjoining us. good _ would be disastrous. thank you very much forjoining us. good to - would be disastrous. thank you very much forjoining us. good to hear. much forjoining us. good to hear your thoughts. the headlines on bbc news... england s footballers on the brink of sporting history tonight at wembley as they take on denmark in the semi final of the european championship. labour says the easing of covid restrictions in england will cause a summer of chaos but the prime minister has defended his strategy. the government's confirmed that the £20 a week universal credit top—up will be phased out in the autumn. one of the legends of indian cinema, the actor, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98. his roles from the 1940s onwards earned him a reputation for versatility, and he won more awards than any other indian performer. he also turned down an offer from the director, david lean, to play sherif ali in lawrence of arabia, a part that went to a then little—known
2:46 pm
egyptian actor, 0mar sharif. i'm nowjoined by mayank shekhar, who is a film critic, journalist and author. lovely to have you with us and i would love to know what you would say was his contribution, his main contribution, to indian cinema. his contribution, to indian cinema. f! 3 contribution, to indian cinema. f! 3 contribution is immense but i think of what india have lost today is a link with the whole post independent idea, which is what his movies are signified, particularly in the 19505, signified, particularly in the 1950s, and cinema has lost a link over the generations. he has been around through the 50s, 60s and 70s, 80s and 90s. there is a whole body
2:47 pm
of work but also a link with a certain type of india that is signified in his movies. the idea of a post independent india. besides the entertainment of course. he made a hue the entertainment of course. he made a huge contribution _ the entertainment of course. he made a huge contribution not _ the entertainment of course. he made a huge contribution not only _ the entertainment of course. he made a huge contribution not only to - a huge contribution not only to indian cinema but also to indian culture. from a cinema point of view, i think i am writing saying that before he came along, indian cinema had been very many drip —— melodramatic and operatic and he pioneered it in a way a new way of acting, something we refer to as method acting, didn't he? yes. acting, something we refer to as method acting, didn't he? yes, he is laruel method acting, didn't he? yes, he is largely considered _ method acting, didn't he? yes, he is largely considered by _ method acting, didn't he? yes, he is largely considered by everyone - method acting, didn't he? yes, he is largely considered by everyone as i largely considered by everyone as someone who really defined cinema,
2:48 pm
which was largely previously had its roots in theatre. but he was more restrained as an actor and something actors before him had not done. which is why he was offered —— often also compared to marlon brando, as a method actor. but marlon brando came around six or seven years after him. he was original and a lot of actors in subsequent generations have owed their aircraft to dilip kumar. he actually had no one to learn from. he devised his own way, which was far more understated than the actors before him, in the decades before him. �* , , ., , before him, in the decades before him. n, , ., before him, in the decades before him. absolutely, he was a pioneer. tell us a little _ him. absolutely, he was a pioneer. tell us a little bit _ him. absolutely, he was a pioneer. tell us a little bit more _ him. absolutely, he was a pioneer. tell us a little bit more about - him. absolutely, he was a pioneer. tell us a little bit more about why i tell us a little bit more about why he was less interested in taking on films in international cinema. i think by and large, actors in indian
2:49 pm
cinema have enjoyed a huge amount of popularity, notjust in india but also in the subcontinent and in the eastern hemisphere. they have not always found a reason to work in the west and have not had the time. but he was offered the part of lawrence arabia. he did not see it worthwhile because these actors were extremely busy. but the level of poverty out —— popular tv had outside india was one of the things that is known for, the popular te enjoyed in pakistan he was pakistan born. he was given the highest civilian honour in pakistan as well. in that sense, not necessarily the west. he was a
2:50 pm
fascinating figure. he wanted to be a football player and was very erudite and well read. you also spoke out on critical issues as well. absolutely. i think he had a full—bodied persona. he was notjust an actor. he was someone who was interested deeply in critical affairs as —— and as an artist he would put out his viewpoint, especially regarding religious harmony. he was hugely interested in poetry and that is another thing that great actors have, he had an amazing memory and would recite poetry. but beyond everything else, he was most widely left for his persona on screen, being the tragic king, as it were. he did a series of films that were essentially tragedies, unrequited love. 0ne
2:51 pm
films that were essentially tragedies, unrequited love. one of them is considered the most commercially successful film in the history of indian cinema, even now. and there are films that deal with social issues that he participated in. one was about the conflict between man and machine. but he also performed in comedies and musicals. he was a well—rounded figure on screen and on extreme e well—rounded figure off screen as well. yes. screen and on extreme e well-rounded figure off screen as well.— figure off screen as well. yes, we have not figure off screen as well. yes, we have got to _ figure off screen as well. yes, we have got to leave _ figure off screen as well. yes, we have got to leave it _ figure off screen as well. yes, we have got to leave it there. - figure off screen as well. yes, we have got to leave it there. thank| have got to leave it there. thank you so much for giving your thoughts and insight about dilip kumar. haiti's presidentjovenel mo se has been killed, according to a statement by interim prime minister claude joseph. the statement said mr mo se was shot dead during an attack on his private residence in the capital, port—au—prince. haiti s first lady, martine mo se, is said to be receiving
2:52 pm
treatment for wounds. details are still coming in. haiti has been racked by instability since president mo se began ruling by decree, after legislative elections due in 2018 were delayed. jacqueline charles, the haiti and caribbean correspondent for the miami herald, explained what we know so far. this assassination according to the prime minister, a group of unidentified assailants speaking in english and also in spanish entered the area where the president lives, and basically they said it is ide operation. these are not te agents, they are presumed to be mercenaries.
2:53 pm
they do not know who they were, who brought them in, and what are the motives. the president has been at the centre of controversy, constitutional and legal prices deepening in the country, and right now there is no constitutional, legal solution in terms of who is in charge. haiti is actually in between governments, just this week the president announced that he was going to be appointing a new prime minister, but he is yet to be sworn in. the official notices that the that he was mortally wounded. it usually takes around 10 years to develop a vaccine, but the team at oxford university managed it injust 10 months. the 0xford—astrazeneca vaccine has
2:54 pm
been crucial in protecting millions of people across the world from covid—19, but it hasn't all been plain—sailing. tim muffett looks back at the story so far. when covid first changed our world last year, it became clear that a vaccine offered the only realistic route back to normality. first of all, i think we've got to get a vaccine and that isn't two days away, it's not two months away. making a vaccine is a difficult, complicated process. it normally takes years or decades to produce a vaccine. they harmlessly show viruses or bacteria to the immune system. the body's defences recognise them as an invader and learn how to fight them. researchers at oxford university put small sections of the genetic code of the coronavirus into a harmless virus that infects chimpanzees. they hoped they had developed a safe virus that looked enough like the coronavirus to produce an immune response. we have used this vaccine technology before. we have seen it perform very well, so we think it's the best thing to use and that is why we are making the vaccine the way we are doing. we think it gives us
2:55 pm
the best chance. all we have to do, though, is test it. the first volunteer to be injected was elisa granato. i'm a scientist, so of course i want to try to support the scientific process whenever i can _ thousands of other volunteers then took part to test the oxford astrazeneca vaccine's safety and effectiveness. then, on december the 2nd, another key development. in the past few minutes, we have heard the first coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. that was a vaccine developed by pfizer and biontech. on december the 30th, the oxford astrazeneca jab was also approved. there have been concerns about a possible link between the oxford astrazeneca jab and very rare incidents of blood clots. france, germany and the netherlands say only people aged over 55 or 60 should get the jab. denmark has stopped using it. but regulators in europe and the uk
2:56 pm
say benefits outweigh any risk. crowds at wimbledon gave scientist sarah gilbert a round of applause last week. the normality we could only dream of 16 months ago seems closer than ever. tim muffett, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. we will continue to see some sunshine and some shower clouds. this was the picture a little earlier on. 0verthe this was the picture a little earlier on. over the next few days, keeping this theme of spells of sunshine but scattered heavy downpours around and that is because we have an area of low pressure that is quite slow moving and it is going to be remaining close to the uk through the remainder of the week. back to the rest of the afternoon
2:57 pm
and into this evening, the heaviest of the showers through the midlands, wales, lincolnshire, into eastern scotland as well. if you are lucky enough to be heading to wembley later on today, most of those showers should fade away by around about eight o'clock. we are expecting things to be largely dry and a similar story at wimbledon. most of the showers to be further north. sunny spells in the evening and drying out for many of us. keeping some of these heavy showers this evening and tonight. tending to fade away and for most of the uk, we have some clear spells, variable amounts of cloud and light winds and temperatures overnight between ten and 1a degrees. thursday, quite a bit of dry weather on the cards. elizabeth cloudy but further south across england and wales, more sunshine than today but —— a little
2:58 pm
bit cloudy. but some scattered showers and thunderstorms later on. temperatures 23 degrees. watch out for locally torrential downpours. heading on into friday and eventually an area of cloud pressure —— pressure builds in for a time. more france waiting in the atlantic. another day of sunny spells on friday. some scattered showers on friday. some scattered showers on friday. sunny spells is in between. temperatures between 16 and 22 degrees. still unsettled on friday and as we head into the weekend, more rain to come at times, especially on saturday. i enter something drier especially further south on sunday and into next week.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
england's footballers on the brink of sporting history tonight here at wembley as they take on denmark in the semi—final of the european championship. victory for these players this evening would see england reach their first major tournament final in more than half a century. this time, things have been slightly different. teams have missed a couple of key chances, like when muller was through, and managed to get little breaks of the ball on occasions, and nothing has gone massively wrong, and if that continues, then it mightjust happen. there'll be 60,000 fans in the stadium — some of them danish but the vast majority cheering on england. i'm rebecca jones. the other main stories...
3:01 pm
labour says the easing of covid restrictions in england will cause a summer of chaos but the prime minister has defended his strategy. and at 3:30 this afternoon the prime minister will be appearing in front of mps on the commons liaison committee. we'll bring you that live. the government's confirmed that the £20 a week universal credit top—up will be phased out in the autumn. one of india's most accomplished and respected film stars, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98.
3:02 pm
good afternoon from wembley. england's footballers are two games from glory: beat denmark here at wembley tonight and they'll face italy on sunday in what would england s first major final since 1966. cheering them on will be the vast majority of the 60,000 fans in the stadium behind me — plus more than 20 million watching on tv. in their homes or in pubs and bars and restaurants and fan zones. it's going to be quite a night. 0lly foster reports. this england team don't like to dwell on the past, but they can afford to look back at the last three weeks as a job very well done. that will do nicely! the rise of raheem sterling. his first goals at a major tournament took them
3:03 pm
to the top of their group. and england lead! harry kane, the captain, joined the party quite late. in comes the captain! but what an entrance that was against germany. and pickford saves it. and in five matches they haven't conceded a goal. that quarterfinal in rome against ukraine last saturday sent them hurtling into the home straight on a wave of belief for their return to wembley tonight in front of 60,000 fans. we know that we will have tremendous support throughout the country, so that's a great feeling for us. i think we're ready for the game. i think the players are ready. they've got tremendous experience now themselves having been in this situation before. the word on wembley way today is that england will never have a better chance. and those supporters anticipating a special day in the team's history have arrived hours before kick—off. how are the nerves? terrible. absolutely terrible,
3:04 pm
to tell you the truth. i didn't sleep well last night. just being part of it is magical. it'sjust great. if we get knocked out, i will be so sad. - semifinal defeats have become ingrained in england's identity. italia 90, euro 96 here at wembley, the world cup in russia three years ago, but the difference about this match is that england are huge favourites. denmark, though, will be tough opponents and highly motivated. what an emotional and inspirational tournament they have had. their star player, christian eriksen, collapsed on the pitch with a cardiac arrest during their first match. from fearing the worst, they are now playing every game for him, as he recovers at home. we try to fight the best we have learned through these emotions. we have played fantastic football. we have shown who we are. i'm very proud of these boys and i'm very proud of the people of denmark who have shown their love and support and compassion
3:05 pm
that we have been given, that has helped us through this time. england are also feeding off theirfans. the thousands in wembley, the millions watching and listening and they want to give something back. their drive comes without the drama of denmark's progress and they seem to have got the balance just right. aware of how close the prize is now, but taking nothing for granted. it doesn't matter what you think you know when you go into the match, it doesn't matter what you do, it doesn't always turn out as planned, but i think our players will be calm, they will be focused, and they willjust continue what they have been doing all the way through the tournament. and it's gareth southgate's character that runs through the team, his composure. he has the players�* complete trust. the tweaks in formation from match to match, substitutions, the all—important starting xi tonight. everyone picks their own england team, we all have different versions of it but the only person that matters is southgate and so far, tactically and personnel—wise he has got everything spot on. and nothing has gone massively wrong.
3:06 pm
and if that continues, then it mightjust happen. that caution comes from past experience, falling at this hurdle before. but this team is about rewriting, not repeating history. 0llie foster, bbc news, wembley. let's talk to our sports reporter, alex howell. a lot of the team, we know who is going to be in defence, pretty much in midfield, kane and sterling as well, but up front there is one place up for grabs. what is happening? it place up for grabs. what is happening?— place up for grabs. what is haueninu? , happening? it has been reported the 153-year-old — happening? it has been reported the 19-year-old arsenal _ happening? it has been reported the 19-year-old arsenal player - happening? it has been reported the 19-year-old arsenal player saka - 19—year—old arsenal player sa ka could 19—year—old arsenal player saka could be coming back into the team. he played against the czech republic and germany and had a big effect but he was ruled out of the game against ukraine with an injury. he was the only player who was if all may be fit for this one but it is reported that he might be, and this is a young player gareth southgate has so
3:07 pm
much faith in, he described him as special, that he can cover five or six positions, and that might be key for tonight. six positions, and that might be key fortonight. denmark six positions, and that might be key for tonight. denmark play for— 3—4, but they change it up during the game and with saka being able to play multiple positions he could be a key figure for england tonight because he can play fullback and attacking areas. jadon sancho did well against ukraine, and we have also seen a few other changes upfront. also seen a few other changes ufront, ., ,, also seen a few other changes u front. ., ,, ., also seen a few other changes ufront. ., ,, ., . , , upfront. embarrassment of riches up front. phil foden _ upfront. embarrassment of riches up front. phil foden can't _ upfront. embarrassment of riches up front. phil foden can't get _ upfront. embarrassment of riches up front. phil foden can't get in - upfront. embarrassment of riches up front. phil foden can't get in the - front. phil foden can't get in the team at the moment. we front. phil foden can't get in the team at the moment. we thought he was auoin team at the moment. we thought he was going to — team at the moment. we thought he was going to be _ team at the moment. we thought he was going to be the _ team at the moment. we thought he was going to be the poster _ team at the moment. we thought he was going to be the poster boy - team at the moment. we thought he was going to be the poster boy for. was going to be the poster boy for this tournament especially after the paul gascoigne style haircut but he hasn't featured in the last couple of games, not as much as he would like, but it is an embarrassment of riches for gareth southgate. he has been using it very well. jack grealish, he has protected him about brought him on at the right times and he has been effective. southgate has been having _ and he has been effective. southgate has been having an _ and he has been effective. southgate has been having an amazing - has been having an amazing tournament and many people were
3:08 pm
criticising him, saying england were too defensive and he was too loyal too defensive and he was too loyal to kane and sterling but now everyone loves southgate. iie to kane and sterling but now everyone loves southgate. he has done it his — everyone loves southgate. he has done it his way. _ everyone loves southgate. he has done it his way. people _ everyone loves southgate. he has done it his way. people were - done it his way. people were criticising, same was too defensive, and what is he doing, but southgate knows his players, he has been in this job five years now and he has been building this project and he understands what he wants from the team. he's a student tournament football. we spoke in the press conferences, it is not the best teams who make it to the final, sometimes the most pragmatic of the teams that concede the fewest goals and that is what he is going for. declan rice and kalvin phillips in the field, when they have been calls for more attack minded players further up the pitch, but he has been proven right and england are in the semifinal. taste been proven right and england are in the semifinal.— the semifinal. we have had world-class _ the semifinal. we have had world-class players - the semifinal. we have had world-class players puttingj the semifinal. we have had i world-class players putting in world—class players putting in previous tournaments but they have not managed to go the whole way. yes, these players are not as big in terms of name, but what you did not have which you had in previous
3:09 pm
teams, a real collective, they are ready together. southgate has studied other sports, formula 1, rugby, he spoke to eddiejames about trying to bring the culture and togetherness, and before club mates from rivals like manchester united and manchester city, they would not mix, but as soon as you get to the england camp that has gone and you are seeing that in the performances on the way they are playing. find on the way they are playing. and the are on the way they are playing. and they are enjoying it which is important, as well. alex, for now, thanks forjoining us. 60,000 supporters will be in the stadium. well, around the country, fans in their millions are preparing to watch the match at home, or on big screens in pubs, providing a much needed boost to the hospitality industry. let's cross to phil mackie. he's at a pub in birmingham. i'm at hennessy is indeed both in birmingham, a number of outdoor indoor bars in the city and they are
3:10 pm
expecting 500 people, notjust in this area but other areas within this area but other areas within this particular complex. you can see all the flags out. you can just about make out the danish flag. no england flag because they will be so many ones here and so many shirts on view at the beer and pub association reckoned 10 million pints will be drunk, 7 million during the game itself. laura hastings is the manager here. it is the quiet before the storm but you have been running around busy anyway already. there is around busy anyway already. there is a lot of preparation _ around busy anyway already. there is a lot of preparation going _ around busy anyway already. there is a lot of preparation going into - around busy anyway already. there is a lot of preparation going into a - a lot of preparation going into a game _ a lot of preparation going into a game as— a lot of preparation going into a game as busy as tonight so we have plastic— game as busy as tonight so we have plastic glasses, and it will be an intense — plastic glasses, and it will be an intense couple of hours, depending how far _ intense couple of hours, depending how far it _ intense couple of hours, depending how far it goes, extra time, panties, _ how far it goes, extra time, panties, but we have got all the beer_ panties, but we have got all the beer and — panties, but we have got all the beer and the staff and the glasses, so beer and the staff and the glasses, must— beer and the staff and the glasses, sojust waiting for the beer and the staff and the glasses, so just waiting for the customers beer and the staff and the glasses, sojust waiting for the customers —— extra _ sojust waiting for the customers —— extra time, — sojust waiting for the customers —— extra time, penalties. how so just waiting for the customers -- extra time, penalties.— extra time, penalties. how are you manauuin extra time, penalties. how are you managing to _ extra time, penalties. how are you managing to keep _ extra time, penalties. how are you managing to keep people - extra time, penalties. how are you managing to keep people behavingj managing to keep people behaving themselves?— managing to keep people behaving
3:11 pm
themselves? ., . ~ ., ., , , themselves? track and trace as they come in, especially _ themselves? track and trace as they come in, especially in _ themselves? track and trace as they come in, especially in this _ themselves? track and trace as they come in, especially in this room - themselves? track and trace as they come in, especially in this room at i come in, especially in this room at the other— come in, especially in this room at the other rooms, they are socially distance. — the other rooms, they are socially distance, and we ask them to stay seated. _ distance, and we ask them to stay seated. but — distance, and we ask them to stay seated, but if a goal happens, they celebrate. — seated, but if a goal happens, they celebrate, but to be fair, they are as good _ celebrate, but to be fair, they are as good as — celebrate, but to be fair, they are as good as gold, they celebrate and sit back— as good as gold, they celebrate and sit back down.— sit back down. they are not allowed to sin ? sit back down. they are not allowed to sing? well. _ sit back down. they are not allowed to sing? well. it — sit back down. they are not allowed to sing? well, it is _ sit back down. they are not allowed to sing? well, it is hard _ sit back down. they are not allowed to sing? well, it is hard to - sit back down. they are not allowed j to sing? well, it is hard to manage, but if they celebrate _ to sing? well, it is hard to manage, but if they celebrate a _ to sing? well, it is hard to manage, but if they celebrate a goal, - but if they celebrate a goal, there's— but if they celebrate a goal, there's not much you can do. it there's not much you can do. [i could there's not much you can do. could be a there's not much you can do. it could be a late night finish and you could be a late night finish and you could be a late night finish and you could be dealing with people who are elated or heartbroken. taste could be dealing with people who are elated or heartbroken.— elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff — elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff and _ elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff and there _ elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff and there are _ elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff and there are a - elated or heartbroken. we have a lot of door staff and there are a couple i of door staff and there are a couple of door staff and there are a couple of managers on site so each room has the required _ of managers on site so each room has the required staff it needs to keep those _ the required staff it needs to keep those measures in place. get the required staff it needs to keep those measures in place. get back to work, those measures in place. get back to work. laura- — those measures in place. get back to work. laura- i'm _ those measures in place. get back to work, laura. i'm sure _ those measures in place. get back to work, laura. i'm sure it _ those measures in place. get back to work, laura. i'm sure it will- those measures in place. get back to work, laura. i'm sure it will be - those measures in place. get back to work, laura. i'm sure it will be the i work, laura. i'm sure it will be the same across the country. perhaps not so much in scotland and wales, and maybe northern ireland, but in england, people will be out watching the game. england, people will be out watching the name. ., ., ., , we've focused a lot on england but let's talk about their opponents.
3:12 pm
let's speak now to klaus egelund, he's a danish footballjournalist. england are very much the favourites this evening but how confident are you that denmark can do it? taste this evening but how confident are you that denmark can do it? we have been to two — you that denmark can do it? we have been to two semifinals _ you that denmark can do it? we have been to two semifinals in _ you that denmark can do it? we have been to two semifinals in our - been to two semifinals in our history and we have never lost in regulation. the semi finals we have lost, we have lost on penalties, and i will take that against england any time. ~ . . i will take that against england any time. ., ,,, i will take that against england any time. ~ ., ,,, i will take that against england any time. ., , time. what is special about this danish team? _ time. what is special about this danish team? of _ time. what is special about this danish team? of course - time. what is special about this danish team? of course we - time. what is special about this i danish team? of course we sought time. what is special about this - danish team? of course we sought the danish team? of course we sought the team rally around christian eriksen after the terrible cardiac arrest he suffered at the start of taunton, has that made a difference and pondered them closer together? —— the start of the tournament, as that made a difference and bonded them close together?— made a difference and bonded them close together? yes, definitely. you can't take a — close together? yes, definitely. you can't take a positive _ close together? yes, definitely. you can't take a positive from _ close together? yes, definitely. you can't take a positive from such i close together? yes, definitely. you can't take a positive from such an i can't take a positive from such an accident like the one which happened with christian but the thing is, i heard you talking about team
3:13 pm
selection just before, and that is not even an issue. you don't really talk about team selection in denmark because this is something big in denmark. this is about a group of people coming together and performing as a group, and setting aside individual perspectives. that is actually quite interesting. reporters have observed that this has taken a back—seat to anything other than just performing on the pitch. other than 'ust performing on the itch. , ., ~ ~ other than 'ust performing on the itch. , ., ~ ,, ., , pitch. denmark, like england, they have not pitch. denmark, like england, they have got better _ pitch. denmark, like england, they have got better and _ pitch. denmark, like england, they have got better and better- pitch. denmark, like england, they have got better and better as i pitch. denmark, like england, they have got better and better as the l have got better and better as the tournament has gone on. yes. have got better and better as the tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously. _ tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously. they — tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously, they had _ tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously, they had big _ tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously, they had big obstacles i tournament has gone on. yes, sure. obviously, they had big obstacles to j 0bviously, they had big obstacles to get past the first two matches, playing against the number one side in the world, belgium, and then being forced to win the final group match to even progress. but since then, denmark have scored ten goals
3:14 pm
in the last three matches and things have really looked good from an attacking perspective. but this is also a testament to the fact that denmark has actually been progressing now for quite a long time, this is notjust a fluke. i know england is on a run of 11 matches unbeaten but one of the last teams to beat england was actually denmark at wembley. who teams to beat england was actually denmark at wembley.— teams to beat england was actually denmark at wembley. who would you sa are the denmark at wembley. who would you say are the key _ denmark at wembley. who would you say are the key men _ denmark at wembley. who would you say are the key men for— denmark at wembley. who would you say are the key men for denmark i denmark at wembley. who would you say are the key men for denmark this| say are the key men for denmark this evening? say are the key men for denmark this evenin: ? , ., , , ., say are the key men for denmark this eveninu? . ., , , ., , ., ,, evening? obviously, for denmark, we have maier on — evening? obviously, for denmark, we have maier on the _ evening? obviously, for denmark, we have maier on the left-hand - evening? obviously, for denmark, we have maier on the left-hand side i evening? obviously, for denmark, we have maier on the left-hand side of i have maier on the left—hand side of defence who has been a real handful, and we have a breakthrough player, and we have a breakthrough player, and it remains to be seen whether he will be starting, but he is really the one stepping in to fill the gap
3:15 pm
after christian ericsson but i also have to mention hallberg of tottenham who has actually been able to step into the creative role of creating chances and setting up his team—mates —— hojbjerg. i will be looking at those three for those three because i obviously think that denmark will be able to be an attacking side against england and thatis attacking side against england and that is what i'm looking at. from attacking side against england and that is what i'm looking at.- that is what i'm looking at. from a danish perspective, _ that is what i'm looking at. from a danish perspective, what - that is what i'm looking at. from a danish perspective, what are i that is what i'm looking at. from a danish perspective, what are the i danish perspective, what are the england side's real strengths? the defence that has not conceded or the attack with sterling, kane and saka? i have been blown away by raheem sterling, coming off a rocky end to his season at manchester city, and
3:16 pm
just being a really important player for the group stages. and he has made possible for the rest of the team to follow along for the knockout phases so i'm looking to raheem sterling from a danish perspective, we have got to keep him quiet, obviously. harry kane is a world—class striker as well. england have yet to be breached. the defence have yet to be breached. the defence have been rock—solid. but then again, going back to october, harry maguire did not look that comfortable against denmark and the danish way of playing and he was sent off after 30 minutes after getting two yellow cards. so we have got to keep england quiet in attack and then i think we actually can provide a challenge for the backline even though they look really, really solid. �* .
3:17 pm
even though they look really, really solid. �* , ., , , even though they look really, really solid. �*, .,, , ., even though they look really, really solid. �*, , ., . solid. let's hope it is not too much of a challenge _ solid. let's hope it is not too much of a challenge that _ solid. let's hope it is not too much of a challenge that denmark- solid. let's hope it is not too much i of a challenge that denmark provide for the england back line but thanks for the england back line but thanks forjoining us. the danish community in the uk will be watching alongside all the millions of england fans as well. now back to rebecca the studio. thanks forjoining us. the £20—a—week increase to universal credit will be "phased out" in the autumn, the government has said. work and pensions secretary therese coffey told mps the boost — introduced in april last year to help deal with the economic effects of covid — would face an "adjustment". we can speak now to the former conservative leader. and the former work and pensions secretary. iain duncan smith.
3:18 pm
a p pa re ntly apparently 2 million people and other benefits have not reached —— got the £20 uplift, so what about them? . . . got the £20 uplift, so what about them? , ., , got the £20 uplift, so what about them? , .,, ., , ., them? this was an uplift made because universal— them? this was an uplift made because universal credit i them? this was an uplift made because universal credit is i them? this was an uplift made because universal credit is not| them? this was an uplift made i because universal credit is notjust about those on low hours and as they move up paper universal credit, but the thing is that universal credit has taken the brunt of the increase, 6 million people now on the benefit, and it is that which has taken a heavy lifting. as a result of covid. the extra money, the 5 billion in fact, about £20 per week uplift is aimed at the moment for those who are completely out of work rather than those doing certain work, low hours. the way to justice is to spread it across both but not to get rid of it and the is twofold, the
3:19 pm
money replaces money that i resigned over because george osborne decided to cut the amount going into the benefits, so first and foremost it is restoring it to where it was meant to be, and the second point is this benefit gets money to those who need it the most in the most manageable and accurate way, far more accurately than the furlough scheme and with far less opportunity to have fraud take place in it, so it should be retained because it is also the dynamic. it will reduce as more people go back to work and they start paying tax so keeping it there and helping them get back to work is and helping them get back to work is a positive and in the dynamic it is notjust a positive and in the dynamic it is not just a a positive and in the dynamic it is notjust a single spending point. the government says reducing the payments would actually contribute to getting people back to work, so sure that not be the focus? ida. to getting people back to work, so sure that not be the focus? no, we not it u- sure that not be the focus? no, we got it up and _ sure that not be the focus? no, we got it up and running _ sure that not be the focus? no, we got it up and running yesterday i sure that not be the focus? no, we j got it up and running yesterday and we got stephen timms, a labour party member who was opposed at the time,
3:20 pm
he has now said this is a national asset we need to make sure that we invest in it and that is true. the point about it, you move it around. there are two elements, money for those who are out of work and then there is the money that they are paid as they go back up the hours into work, and it reduces as they 9°. into work, and it reduces as they go, but that gives them support. the idea of taking away the money completely does not necessarily send them back to work earlier, but what it does, if you keep the money in, it does, if you keep the money in, it means you can shift it to the taper and you can adjust as they go back to full—time work and then cease to be paid, so that is the logic of the benefit, and the idea that someone just says, take the money out and they will go back to work, white, why give —— well, why give them any money at all? those political statements do not work. universal credit was designed to get people back into work and that is why you need the investment. you
3:21 pm
desi . ned why you need the investment. you designed the _ why you need the investment. you designed the scheme and you have described it as a national asset. the system has been criticised, you will be aware of that, being overly complex, and the way you have described it is not immediately straightforward, perhaps, leaving many people disenfranchised, so i wonder how well do you think the system really was working before the pandemic? it system really was working before the andemic? . system really was working before the andemic? , ., , ., ~ pandemic? it must have been working well because — pandemic? it must have been working well because when _ pandemic? it must have been working well because when the _ pandemic? it must have been working well because when the pandemic i pandemic? it must have been working well because when the pandemic put i pandemic? it must have been working| well because when the pandemic put a million people in a matter of days onto the system it coped. it actually paid them all their money, the vast majority, over 90% of those who actually claimed and were deemed to require it, they got the money straightaway. so that is critical to the system, so the system clearly worked, and by the way, the national asset, it was not mine, it was that of stephen timms of the labour party who said this works. you have other countries now looking at it, like france and finland who have said they are interested, and america. it
3:22 pm
is the most modern system in the world because it is a digital system and much more flexible and it gives the opportunity to dwp people working on it to modify changes to assist those in difficult circumstances. no benefit system that will be perfect but this is easily the best system that we have had and it is available online which means people do not have to queue up, thus running the risk of catching covid, as they would have done if we have the odd legacy systems which have been waiting at job centres to make their claims. it is one of the reasons why it is actually working so well, and it is not perfect, nothing is, but putting and keeping that money in it will be making it where it was meant to be when it was originally instituted by myself before i resigned over the cuts. ~ . . myself before i resigned over the cuts. ~ , ., , cuts. we must leave it there but thank you _ cuts. we must leave it there but thank you very _ cuts. we must leave it there but thank you very much, _ cuts. we must leave it there but thank you very much, iain i cuts. we must leave it there but i thank you very much, iain duncan smith. ., ,
3:23 pm
a number of major theatre producers are calling on the government to bring forward the date when self—isolation rules in england will be eased for those who are double—jabbed. from the 16th august, anyone who is a close contact of someone who tests positive for covid will no longer need to isolate if they've had both vaccinations. however, theatre producers want the date changed tojuly 19th — when other restrictions are eased — to ensure that performances can go ahead. only this week hairspray in the west end had to cancel several shows when a member of the production team tested positive for covid. i'm nowjoined by sir howard panter who is the chief executive and creative director of the ambassador theatre group ltd. what are your concerns specifically and will six weeks make that much difference? ~ , ,., , and will six weeks make that much difference?— and will six weeks make that much difference? ~ ,,., , ,., ., difference? absolutely. the point to understand is _ difference? absolutely. the point to understand is that _ difference? absolutely. the point to understand is that the _ difference? absolutely. the point to understand is that the investment i understand is that the investment will have been made at this point, and thejobs will will have been made at this point, and the jobs will have been created and the jobs will have been created and we are talking about thousands of jobs, and we are talking about thousands ofjobs, not only in the theatre
3:24 pm
industry but every connected industry, hospitality and travel and so on, it is a major driver of the uk's gdp as i'm sure you are aware. the uncertainty for people who are investing in it and working in it and people who are connected with it is simply going to be yet again disproportionate and unsustainable economically as well as socially. can you give a sense, and we mentioned hairspray but i know the jersey boys is one of your musicals as well, can you give a sense of how much it costs to put on a show like that each week? and how much you are losing? that each week? and how much you are losin: ? ., ., ., , ., losing? you have the initial capital which is several _ losing? you have the initial capital which is several million _ losing? you have the initial capital which is several million pounds i losing? you have the initial capital| which is several million pounds and then you have several hundred thousand pounds per week, and that's before you are dealing with the interconnected industries which will also be affected badly and the idea of regenerating a london and other cities and towns across the country, theatre is a great driver of that, a
3:25 pm
magnet for regeneration, that simply won't occur, so the constant uncertainty and people won't know whether to come or not, and it will be, it is disproportionate again, because presently there are hospitalisations and mortalities are well done, and is it freedom day on the 19th or not? the government have made a great ballyhoo about it being freedom day but it is not freedom day at all because we are not saying that people don't have to wear masks and can't have first contact, are saying that is possible because vaccination works. the saying that is possible because vaccination works.— vaccination works. the health secretary _ vaccination works. the health secretary sajid _ vaccination works. the health secretary sajid javid - vaccination works. the health secretary sajid javid said i vaccination works. the health secretary sajid javid said he i vaccination works. the health i secretary sajid javid said he wanted to wait until mid august so that by then almost all adults will have had a chance to have had a second job. we can't because we have been encouraged by the 21st ofjune and now the 19th ofjuly == encouraged by the 21st ofjune and
3:26 pm
now the 19th ofjuly— encouraged by the 21st ofjune and now the 19th ofjuly- we i encouraged by the 21st ofjune and i now the 19th ofjuly- we have now the 19th ofjuly -- “ab. we have millions of— now the 19th ofjuly -- “ab. we have millions of jobs i now the 19th ofjuly -- “ab. we have millions ofjobs being i now the 19th ofjuly -- jab. we have millions ofjobs being dependent i now the 19th ofjuly -- jab. we have millions ofjobs being dependent on | millions ofjobs being dependent on being able to trade on the 19th of july and so we can't understand another six weeks, either it is safe and relaxing works, which it does, or isn't. it is just shilly—shallying around from the government. the shilly-shallying around from the government-— shilly-shallying around from the covernment. ., , ., _ government. the argument is that by the 16th of august _ government. the argument is that by the 16th of august cases _ government. the argument is that by the 16th of august cases will - government. the argument is that by the 16th of august cases will be i the 16th of august cases will be forwarding again and that has a knock—on effect because that will reduce the pressure on the nhs —— will be falling again. how optimistic are you that you will be heard? ~ ., ., , ., ,.,, , optimistic are you that you will be heard? ~ ., ., , ., , ., heard? what we are proposing is that eve sinale heard? what we are proposing is that every single day _ heard? what we are proposing is that every single day before _ heard? what we are proposing is that every single day before anybody i every single day before anybody comes into the venue, working in the venue, they will be tested, so they will not be able to come into a theatre unless they are negative, and this is our proposal, so that everybody, there won't be, they should not be a possibility of infection because they will be negative when they come into the theatre. so this rule can create
3:27 pm
uncertainty and disruption, this ruling, this proposal, it creates that, which is completely unnecessary, and if they only accept our offer, everyone will be negative in the building, i don't understand why we have to have this uncertainty and this lack of clarity and white freedom day as i keep saying, if it isn't freedom day. —— and why. are they going to bring in another restriction? it has a devastating effect on many businesses and many people's mental health and many livelihoods and the whole social fabric of the country. tithe livelihoods and the whole social fabric of the country.— livelihoods and the whole social fabric of the country. one of your shows has _ fabric of the country. one of your shows has been _ fabric of the country. one of your shows has been a _ fabric of the country. one of your shows has been a victim - fabric of the country. one of your shows has been a victim of i fabric of the country. one of your shows has been a victim of this i shows has been a victim of this already, somebody tested positive and you have had to close it, and i think it helps for people to have specific examples to understand a wider issue, so talk us through what happened, this person presumably got a positive test, so what then happens?— a positive test, so what then hauens? �* ., ., happens? i'm delighted to say none
3:28 pm
ofthe happens? i'm delighted to say none of the individuals _ happens? i'm delighted to say none of the individuals have _ happens? i'm delighted to say none of the individuals have been - happens? i'm delighted to say none of the individuals have been very i of the individuals have been very ill, none of them have needed to go to hospital, and i'm not minimising the fact they have had unpleasant symptoms, but essentially we had to send everybody home, lose all the income and continue to pay people, and it is an unsustainable position. imagine if in the bbc one of your technicians had it and you had to go home and the bbc had to close down, thatis home and the bbc had to close down, that is unsustainable as an idea. it is simply not a reasonable proposition and is not borne out by the medicalfacts. shy, proposition and is not borne out by the medical facts.— the medical facts. a final thought, we know the _ the medical facts. a final thought, we know the last _ the medical facts. a final thought, we know the last 16 _ the medical facts. a final thought, we know the last 16 months i the medical facts. a final thought, we know the last 16 months have i the medical facts. a final thought, i we know the last 16 months have been incredibly difficult for the entertainment industry, can you give a sense of the impact and how you see the future going forward? can it recover? it
3:29 pm
see the future going forward? can it recover? . . . see the future going forward? can it recover? ., , , ., , ., recover? it has been devastating. our company _ recover? it has been devastating. our company and _ recover? it has been devastating. our company and many _ recover? it has been devastating. our company and many like i recover? it has been devastating. our company and many like us i recover? it has been devastating. i our company and many like us have received none of the cultural recovery fund, and the theatre provides about 80% of theatre in this country but received about 2% of the cultural recovery fund, so we have got to continue to invest and we have kept the vast majority of our employees going, in part with the furlough scheme help, but there has been a huge adverse effect. how long will this take to recover? i don't know. this will set it back and it is completely unnecessary. 0f and it is completely unnecessary. of course, it is tragic if people go to hospital and of course i understand it and we all suffer from it in different ways, but this is a major economic and social blow. i different ways, but this is a ma'or economic and social blow. i suppose i do want economic and social blow. i suppose i do want to — economic and social blow. i suppose i do want to ask _ economic and social blow. i suppose i do want to ask you _ economic and social blow. i suppose i do want to ask you for— economic and social blow. i suppose i do want to ask you for people i i do want to ask you for people watching who think and i would like to go to the theatre but i feel a
3:30 pm
bit nervous about it. how can you reassure them that it is safe to go to the theatre?— reassure them that it is safe to go to the theatre? everybody working in the venue will— to the theatre? everybody working in the venue will have _ to the theatre? everybody working in the venue will have been _ to the theatre? everybody working in the venue will have been negative, l the venue will have been negative, and secondly we will do temperature checks and deep cleaning and all the normal hygiene activity that one would expect would continue. we will continue to remain vigilant and to the best of my knowledge, you mentioned a socially distanced show, death drop, and to the best of my knowledge, not a single member of the audience has contracted, has been positive, so that is all i know, and we will make every effort to make it as safe as it should be but the principal point is, the government says it is safe, the government says it is safe, the government says it is safe, the government says it is freedom day, so either it is or it isn't. sir howard. — so either it is or it isn't. sir howard, thanks forjoining us.
3:31 pm
conservative mpjames brokenshire has resigned as security minister. he told the prime minister boris johnson that is recovery from lung cancer treatment is taking longer than anticipated. he was first diagnosed with cancer in 2018 and he had a lung removed earlier this year. one of india's most accomplished and respected film stars, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98. born as yusuf khan, he acted in more than 60 films — he was nicknamed �*the tragedy king' and won the highest awards in the country. we are going to hearfrom prime
3:32 pm
minister borisjohnson, who is appearing before senior mps. minister boris johnson, who is appearing before senior mps. happy about the current _ appearing before senior mps. happy about the current situation - appearing before senior mps. happy about the current situation in - about the current situation in afghanistan, of course i don't. i am apprehensive. i think the situation is fraught with risks. we must hope that the parties in kabul can come together to reach an agreement and somehow or other, we must hope that a combination must be found eventually with the taliban, we have to be absolutely realistic about the situation that we are in and what we have to hope is that the blood and treasure spent by this country over decades in protecting the people of afghanistan has not been in vain. and that the legacy of their efforts is protected and that is what this government will try to do, as far as we possibly can, with our american
3:33 pm
friends. the situation is difficult. i will be making a statement tomorrow on it, probably be better not to anticipate any further the statement i will make and on the matter of the enquiry, we are ahead of... you are ahead of us there. those service men and women who lost their colleagues and their families will want — their colleagues and their families will want to know that lessons have been learned or lessons are being learned _ been learned or lessons are being learned and implemented. how will we make sure _ learned and implemented. how will we make sure that happens? we learned and implemented. how will we make sure that happens?— make sure that happens? we learn lessons make sure that happens? we learn lessens the — make sure that happens? we learn lessons the whole _ make sure that happens? we learn lessons the whole time _ make sure that happens? we learn lessons the whole time but - make sure that happens? we learn lessons the whole time but if - make sure that happens? we learn lessons the whole time but if you l lessons the whole time but if you are asking me to extend the rise and announcement now about an enquiry into afghanistan, i am not going to do that but what... i don't think the speaker would want me to anticipate the statement i intend... intend to make tomorrow and i know that you will be wanting to interrogate me and i think that'll be the right time. can interrogate me and i think that'll be the right time.—
3:34 pm
interrogate me and i think that'll be the right time. can i 'ust ask a very quick — be the right time. can i just ask a very quick supplementary - be the right time. can i just ask a very quick supplementary about | very quick supplementary about members of the armed forces going on operations— members of the armed forces going on operations now? most of our natal al of -- _ operations now? most of our natal al of -- allies— operations now? most of our natal al of —— allies are double jabbing personnel— of —— allies are double jabbing personnel before they go on operations and not relying on the civilien— operations and not relying on the civilian roll—out, in order to make sure _ civilian roll—out, in order to make sure that — civilian roll—out, in order to make sure that servicemen will be vaccinated. is this something you could _ vaccinated. is this something you could at— vaccinated. is this something you could at least take away and address? to could at least take away and address? ., , , ., could at least take away and address?— address? to the best of my knowledge. _ address? to the best of my knowledge, we _ address? to the best of my knowledge, we do - address? to the best of my knowledge, we do have... l address? to the best of my i knowledge, we do have... the address? to the best of my - knowledge, we do have... the strike group that we have just sent out around the world, they will be mixing with... doing operations with 40 mixing with... doing operations with a0 allies of us around the world, they have protection from the virus. thank you. i will crack on short questions _ thank you. i will crack on short questions and short answers and we will get _ questions and short answers and we will get through all the stuff we want _ will get through all the stuff we want. chris bryant.— will get through all the stuff we want. chris bryant. prime minister, any general — want. chris bryant. prime minister, any general election, _ want. chris bryant. prime minister, any general election, you _ want. chris bryant. prime minister, any general election, you told - any general election, you told miners — any general election, you told miners in _ any general election, you told miners in mansfield, - any general election, you told miners in mansfield, we - any general election, you told miners in mansfield, we will. any general election, you told - miners in mansfield, we will make sure no— miners in mansfield, we will make sure no one — miners in mansfield, we will make sure no one signed _ miners in mansfield, we will make sure no one signed up _ miners in mansfield, we will make sure no one signed up to- miners in mansfield, we will make sure no one signed up to the - miners in mansfield, we will make i sure no one signed up to the pension scheme _ sure no one signed up to the pension scheme is _ sure no one signed up to the pension scheme is out—of— pocket, _ sure no one signed up to the pension scheme is out—of— pocket, we - sure no one signed up to the pension
3:35 pm
scheme is out—of— pocket, we will. scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make _ scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure — scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure that _ scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure that all— scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure that all their- scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure that all their cash - scheme is out—of— pocket, we will make sure that all their cash is l make sure that all their cash is fully— make sure that all their cash is fully protected _ make sure that all their cash is fully protected and _ make sure that all their cash is fully protected and returned, l make sure that all their cash is fully protected and returned, i| make sure that all their cash is - fully protected and returned, i have looked _ fully protected and returned, i have looked into— fully protected and returned, i have looked into it — fully protected and returned, i have looked into it and _ fully protected and returned, i have looked into it and we _ fully protected and returned, i have looked into it and we will _ fully protected and returned, i have looked into it and we will ensure . looked into it and we will ensure that is— looked into it and we will ensure that is done _ looked into it and we will ensure that is done. when _ looked into it and we will ensure that is done. when is _ looked into it and we will ensure that is done. when is this- looked into it and we will ensure i that is done. when is this pledge, categorical— that is done. when is this pledge, categorical pledge, _ that is done. when is this pledge, categorical pledge, going - that is done. when is this pledge, categorical pledge, going to - that is done. when is this pledge, categorical pledge, going to be i categorical pledge, going to be honoured? _ categorical pledge, going to be honoured? . categorical pledge, going to be honoured?— categorical pledge, going to be honoured? ., ~ honoured? thanks, mr bryant. the... the mineworkers... _ honoured? thanks, mr bryant. the... the mineworkers... pension - honoured? thanks, mr bryant. the... the mineworkers... pension schemel the mineworkers... pension scheme members are receiving payments that were 33% higher than they would have been thanks to the government guarantee and on most occasions, the scheme has been in surplus but we remain resolutely committed to protecting the tensions of mineworkers and supporting their families. ., ., ., ., families. you guarantee that the additional money _ families. you guarantee that the additional money was _ families. you guarantee that the additional money was going - families. you guarantee that the additional money was going to i families. you guarantee that the | additional money was going to go families. you guarantee that the - additional money was going to go to them _ additional money was going to go to them and _ additional money was going to go to them and you — additional money was going to go to them and you were _ additional money was going to go to them and you were going _ additional money was going to go to them and you were going to - additional money was going to go to them and you were going to sort - additional money was going to go to| them and you were going to sort out them and you were going to sort out the issue _ them and you were going to sort out the issue which— them and you were going to sort out the issue which all— them and you were going to sort out the issue which all mps _ them and you were going to sort out the issue which all mps of— them and you were going to sort out the issue which all mps of all- the issue which all mps of all political— the issue which all mps of all political parties _ the issue which all mps of all political parties on _ the issue which all mps of all political parties on the - the issue which all mps of all political parties on the select committee _ political parties on the select committee agreed _ political parties on the select committee agreed to - political parties on the select committee agreed to a - political parties on the selectl committee agreed to a report political parties on the select - committee agreed to a report which said that _ committee agreed to a report which said that the — committee agreed to a report which said that the 51.2 _ committee agreed to a report which said that the {1.2 billion— committee agreed to a report which said that the {1.2 billion in- committee agreed to a report which said that the {1.2 billion in the - said that the £1.2 billion in the investment— said that the {1.2 billion in the investment reserve _ said that the {1.2 billion in the investment reserve fund - said that the {1.2 billion in thej investment reserve fund which said that the {1.2 billion in the - investment reserve fund which was put in _ investment reserve fund which was put in the — investment reserve fund which was put in the buy— investment reserve fund which was put in the buy minors— investment reserve fund which was put in the buy minors should - investment reserve fund which was put in the buy minors should go . investment reserve fund which was put in the buy minors should go to| put in the buy minors should go to miners _ put in the buy minors should go to miners and — put in the buy minors should go to miners and their— put in the buy minors should go to miners and their widows _ put in the buy minors should go to miners and their widows now, - put in the buy minors should go to miners and their widows now, not| put in the buy minors should go to. miners and their widows now, not to the government _ miners and their widows now, not to the government. will— miners and their widows now, not to the government. will you _
3:36 pm
miners and their widows now, not to the government. will you undertakej the government. will you undertake to honour— the government. will you undertake to honour that— the government. will you undertake to honour that pledge? _ the government. will you undertake to honour that pledge? is - the government. will you undertake to honour that pledge? is l - the government. will you undertake to honour that pledge?— to honour that pledge? as i told... as i told you. _ to honour that pledge? as i told... as i told you, the _ to honour that pledge? as i told... as i told you, the trustees - to honour that pledge? as i told... as i told you, the trustees do - to honour that pledge? as i told... as i told you, the trustees do have j as i told you, the trustees do have freedom to be less risk—averse with their investment strategy and i also will come back to you on the point you raise. will come back to you on the point ou raise. ., ., , you raise. the government has already told — you raise. the government has already told the _ you raise. the government has already told the subcommittee j you raise. the government has - already told the subcommittee were not going _ already told the subcommittee were not going to — already told the subcommittee were not going to honour— already told the subcommittee were not going to honour that _ already told the subcommittee were not going to honour that pledge. - already told the subcommittee were not going to honour that pledge. doj not going to honour that pledge. do you not— not going to honour that pledge. do you not know— not going to honour that pledge. do you not know facts _ not going to honour that pledge. do you not know facts of _ not going to honour that pledge. do you not know facts of this? - not going to honour that pledge. do you not know facts of this? i- not going to honour that pledge. do you not know facts of this? i am“ - you not know facts of this? i am tellin: you not know facts of this? i am telling you _ you not know facts of this? i am telling you that... _ you not know facts of this? i am telling you that... the _ you not know facts of this?“ telling you that... the mineworkers pension scheme already ensures that members receive payments higher than they would have done thanks to the government guarantee and we will continue to ensure that the scheme members... are looked after. i continue to ensure that the scheme members... are looked after. i think a lot of peeple _ members... are looked after. i think a lot of people will _ members... are looked after. i think a lot of people will be _ members... are looked after. i think a lot of people will be upset - members... are looked after. i think a lot of people will be upset but - a lot of people will be upset but anywaym — a lot of people will be upset but anywaym l— a lot of people will be upset but an a ., �* ~ a lot of people will be upset but anyway- - -_ anyway... i don't think that has really been _ anyway... i don't think that has really been answered. - anyway. .. i don't think that has really been answered. i - anyway. .. i don't think that has really been answered. i will- anyway... i don't think that has really been answered. i will be| anyway... i don't think that has - really been answered. i will be more than ha - really been answered. i will be more than happy to _ really been answered. i will be more than happy to write _ really been answered. i will be more than happy to write to _ really been answered. i will be more than happy to write to you. - really been answered. i will be more than happy to write to you. do - really been answered. i will be more than happy to write to you. do you l than happy to write to you. do you su ort than happy to write to you. do you support closing — than happy to write to you. do you support closing the _ than happy to write to you. do you support closing the loopholes - than happy to write to you. do you support closing the loopholes so i support closing the loopholes so that mps— support closing the loopholes so that mps suspended _ support closing the loopholes so that mps suspended for - support closing the loopholes so that mps suspended for the - support closing the loopholes so i that mps suspended for the house support closing the loopholes so - that mps suspended for the house for more than _ that mps suspended for the house for more than ten — that mps suspended for the house for more than ten days _ that mps suspended for the house for more than ten days for— that mps suspended for the house for more than ten days for sexual - more than ten days for sexual harassment— more than ten days for sexual harassment and _ more than ten days for sexual harassment and bullying - more than ten days for sexual harassment and bullying are i more than ten days for sexual - harassment and bullying are subject to the _
3:37 pm
harassment and bullying are subject to the recall — harassment and bullying are subject to the recall of _ harassment and bullying are subject to the recall of mps _ harassment and bullying are subject to the recall of mps act? _ harassment and bullying are subject to the recall of mps act? i _ harassment and bullying are sub'ect to the recall of mps afli to the recall of mps act? i know that work _ to the recall of mps act? i know that work is _ to the recall of mps act? i know that work is going _ to the recall of mps act? i know that work is going on _ to the recall of mps act? i know that work is going on to - to the recall of mps act? i know| that work is going on to address this matter and i certainly... this is a matter for the this matter and i certainly... this is a matterfor the house this matter and i certainly... this is a matter for the house and this matter and i certainly... this is a matterfor the house and i would urge the house to get on and do it. it would urge the house to get on and do it. .., would urge the house to get on and do it. ., , would urge the house to get on and do it. ., i, ., ., would urge the house to get on and do it. ., , , ., ., ., do it. it can only be a matter for the house _ do it. it can only be a matter for the house if— do it. it can only be a matter for the house if the _ do it. it can only be a matter for the house if the government - do it. it can only be a matter for. the house if the government tabled do it. it can only be a matter for- the house if the government tabled a motion _ the house if the government tabled a motion unsupported. _ the house if the government tabled a motion unsupported. infill— the house if the government tabled a motion unsupported.— the house if the government tabled a motion unsupported. will you support it? ithinkthat_ motion unsupported. will you support it? | think that the — motion unsupported. will you support it? i think that the leader _ motion unsupported. will you support it? i think that the leader of _ motion unsupported. will you support it? i think that the leader of the - it? i think that the leader of the houseis it? i think that the leader of the house is doing work on a way of closing the loophole and i certainly urge mps to get on and do that. you think the loophole should be closed? there _ think the loophole should be closed? there is— think the loophole should be closed? there is clearly— think the loophole should be closed? there is clearly a _ think the loophole should be closed? there is clearly a loophole _ think the loophole should be closed? there is clearly a loophole and - think the loophole should be closed? there is clearly a loophole and i- there is clearly a loophole and i see no reason why should not be close. that is a matter for parliament. it close. that is a matter for parliament.— close. that is a matter for parliament. ., i, . parliament. it can only be decided by parliament _ parliament. it can only be decided by parliament as _ parliament. it can only be decided by parliament as government - parliament. it can only be decided i by parliament as government allows time for— by parliament as government allows time for it— by parliament as government allows time for it but— by parliament as government allows time for it but i_ by parliament as government allows time for it but i take _ by parliament as government allows time for it but i take your— by parliament as government allows time for it but i take your point- time for it but i take your point that— time for it but i take your point that you — time for it but i take your point that you support— time for it but i take your point that you support that. - time for it but i take your point that you support that. at - time for it but i take your point that you support that. at the i time for it but i take your point- that you support that. at the moment we have _ that you support that. at the moment we have four— that you support that. at the moment we have four different _ that you support that. at the moment we have four different registers - that you support that. at the moment we have four different registers for. we have four different registers for ministers _ we have four different registers for ministers and _ we have four different registers for ministers and mps _ we have four different registers for ministers and mps to _ we have four different registers for ministers and mps to abide - we have four different registers for ministers and mps to abide by. - ministers and mps to abide by. ministers— ministers and mps to abide by. ministers interest, _ ministers and mps to abide by. ministers interest, hospitality, | ministers interest, hospitality, guests— ministers interest, hospitality, guests and _ ministers interest, hospitality, guests and the _ ministers interest, hospitality, guests and the commons - ministers interest, hospitality, i guests and the commons register ministers interest, hospitality, - guests and the commons register of members' _ guests and the commons register of members' interests. _ guests and the commons register of members' interests. they— guests and the commons register of members' interests. they all- guests and the commons register of| members' interests. they all publish these _ members' interests. they all publish these at _ members' interests. they all publish these at different _ members' interests. they all publish these at different times _ members' interests. they all publish these at different times at _ these at different times at intermittent _ these at different times at intermittent periods - these at different times at intermittent periods in - these at different times at - intermittent periods in different places _ intermittent periods in different
3:38 pm
places and _ intermittent periods in different places and according _ intermittent periods in different places and according to - intermittent periods in differentl places and according to different rules _ places and according to different rules isn't— places and according to different rules isn't it _ places and according to different rules. isn't it time _ places and according to different rules. isn't it time we _ places and according to different rules. isn't it time we had - places and according to different rules. isn't it time we had a - places and according to different i rules. isn't it time we had a single set of— rules. isn't it time we had a single set of rules— rules. isn't it time we had a single set of rules governing _ rules. isn't it time we had a single set of rules governing all- rules. isn't it time we had a single set of rules governing all of- rules. isn't it time we had a single set of rules governing all of these| set of rules governing all of these matters? — set of rules governing all of these matters? ~ ,, ., set of rules governing all of these matters? ~ ., , ., matters? well... some matters are clearl a matters? well... some matters are clearly a matter— matters? well... some matters are clearly a matter for. .. _ matters? well... some matters are clearly a matter for. .. for— clearly a matterfor... for parliament and concern the actions of mps and it would not be right for the... forthe of mps and it would not be right for the... for the executive, the government to... determine how those work, matters relating to the conduct of ministers are a matter for the executive and i think that is quite a sensible division. but it ends u- is quite a sensible division. but it ends up meaning _ is quite a sensible division. but it ends up meaning that _ is quite a sensible division. but it ends up meaning that two - is quite a sensible division. but it ends up meaning that two members of parliament— ends up meaning that two members of parliament sitting _ ends up meaning that two members of parliament sitting next _ ends up meaning that two members of parliament sitting next to _ ends up meaning that two members of parliament sitting next to each - parliament sitting next to each other— parliament sitting next to each other in— parliament sitting next to each other in the _ parliament sitting next to each other in the royal— parliament sitting next to each other in the royal box - parliament sitting next to each other in the royal box at - parliament sitting next to each . other in the royal box at linwood and for— other in the royal box at linwood and for instance _ other in the royal box at linwood and for instance register- other in the royal box at linwood and for instance register the - other in the royal box at linwood . and for instance register the matter incompletely— and for instance register the matter incompletely different _ and for instance register the matter incompletely different ways - and for instance register the matter incompletely different ways and - incompletely different ways and completely _ incompletely different ways and completely different _ incompletely different ways and completely different rules - incompletely different ways and completely different rules and i incompletely different ways and . completely different rules and are completely— completely different rules and are completely different _ completely different rules and are completely different places. - completely different rules and are completely different places. but i completely different rules and are | completely different places. but is not fair. it is _ completely different places. but is not fair. it is sensible _ completely different places. but is not fair. it is sensible there - not fair. it is sensible there should be a distension between the ventilation of the... of parliament and of the executive and it's... it
3:39 pm
is not surprising that there are... there are different approaches and different ways of doing this. the list of ministerial interest is only published — list of ministerial interest is only published twice _ list of ministerial interest is only published twice a _ list of ministerial interest is only published twice a year, - list of ministerial interest is only published twice a year, the - list of ministerial interest is only published twice a year, the list i list of ministerial interest is onlyl published twice a year, the list of members — published twice a year, the list of members interests _ published twice a year, the list of members interests is _ published twice a year, the list of members interests is publish - published twice a year, the list of. members interests is publish much more _ members interests is publish much more frequently _ members interests is publish much more frequently. the _ members interests is publish much more frequently. the time - members interests is publish much more frequently. the time the - members interests is publish much more frequently. the time the restj more frequently. the time the rest of material— more frequently. the time the rest of material interest _ more frequently. the time the rest of material interest appears, - more frequently. the time the rest of material interest appears, lots i of material interest appears, lots of material interest appears, lots of the _ of material interest appears, lots of the intros _ of material interest appears, lots of the intros that _ of material interest appears, lots of the intros that were _ of material interest appears, lots of the intros that were relevant i of material interest appears, lotsl of the intros that were relevant at one point— of the intros that were relevant at one point during _ of the intros that were relevant at one point during that— of the intros that were relevant at one point during that time - of the intros that were relevant at one point during that time are - of the intros that were relevant at one point during that time are no| one point during that time are no longer— one point during that time are no longer appearing _ one point during that time are no longer appearing in _ one point during that time are no longer appearing in the _ one point during that time are no longer appearing in the list - one point during that time are no longer appearing in the list at - one point during that time are no longer appearing in the list at all| longer appearing in the list at all because — longer appearing in the list at all because they _ longer appearing in the list at all because they are _ longer appearing in the list at all because they are apparently - longer appearing in the list at all - because they are apparently deemed no longer— because they are apparently deemed no longer to— because they are apparently deemed no longer to be — because they are apparently deemed no longer to be relevant, _ because they are apparently deemed no longer to be relevant, wouldn't. no longer to be relevant, wouldn't it make _ no longer to be relevant, wouldn't it make more _ no longer to be relevant, wouldn't it make more sense _ no longer to be relevant, wouldn't it make more sense to _ no longer to be relevant, wouldn't it make more sense to publish - no longer to be relevant, wouldn'tj it make more sense to publish the list of— it make more sense to publish the list of ministerial— it make more sense to publish the list of ministerial interest - it make more sense to publish the list of ministerial interest every. list of ministerial interest every month? — list of ministerial interest every month? lt— list of ministerial interest every month? , , . ., , list of ministerial interest every month? , ,. ., , ., month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am — month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am happy — month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am happy to _ month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am happy to look— month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am happy to look into - month? it is... it is certainly idea and i am happy to look into it - and i am happy to look into it but... the... the system at the moment is that mps and ministers have to publish their interests, the public can scrutinise them and that's entirely as it should be and i would encourage everybody to... to do that in their... in their mps interests in a timely way and as
3:40 pm
well as the ministerial interest. the list of ministerial interest for last year— the list of ministerial interest for last year has _ the list of ministerial interest for last year has not _ the list of ministerial interest for last year has not even _ the list of ministerial interest for last year has not even been - the list of ministerial interest for. last year has not even been accurate list of _ last year has not even been accurate list of ministers. _ last year has not even been accurate list of ministers. it— last year has not even been accurate list of ministers. it is— last year has not even been accurate list of ministers. it is updated - last year has not even been accurate list of ministers. it is updated so - list of ministers. it is updated so rarely— list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that— list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that it _ list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that it simply _ list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that it simply is _ list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that it simply is not... - list of ministers. it is updated so rarely that it simply is not... nol rarely that it simply is not... no member— rarely that it simply is not... no member of— rarely that it simply is not... no member of the— rarely that it simply is not... no member of the public— rarely that it simply is not... no member of the public can - rarely that it simply is not... no member of the public can spot i rarely that it simply is not... nol member of the public can spot in real time — member of the public can spot in real time what— member of the public can spot in real time what are _ member of the public can spot in real time what are the _ member of the public can spot in real time what are the interest . member of the public can spot in. real time what are the interest that might— real time what are the interest that might be _ real time what are the interest that might be affecting _ real time what are the interest that might be affecting the _ real time what are the interest that might be affecting the ministerial. might be affecting the ministerial decisions? — might be affecting the ministerial decisions? the _ might be affecting the ministerial decisions? , ., , ., decisions? the list of ministerial interests to _ decisions? the list of ministerial interests to the _ decisions? the list of ministerial interests to the best _ decisions? the list of ministerial interests to the best of - decisions? the list of ministerial interests to the best of my - interests to the best of my knowledge has only recently been published, it is there for your interest and for the public�*s information, people can look at it and draw all the conclusions they need to draw. i and draw all the conclusions they need to draw.— and draw all the conclusions they need to draw. ., ., , ., need to draw. i am glad you referred to it, the need to draw. i am glad you referred to it. the latest _ need to draw. i am glad you referred to it, the latest list _ need to draw. i am glad you referred to it, the latest list says _ need to draw. i am glad you referred to it, the latest list says there - to it, the latest list says there were — to it, the latest list says there were interests _ to it, the latest list says there were interests that _ to it, the latest list says there were interests that did - to it, the latest list says there were interests that did arise i to it, the latest list says there | were interests that did arise in relation — were interests that did arise in relation to— were interests that did arise in relation to the _ were interests that did arise in relation to the refurbishment i were interests that did arise ini relation to the refurbishment of were interests that did arise in - relation to the refurbishment of the flat in— relation to the refurbishment of the flat in downing _ relation to the refurbishment of the flat in downing street, _ relation to the refurbishment of the flat in downing street, as _ relation to the refurbishment of the flat in downing street, as set - relation to the refurbishment of the flat in downing street, as set out. flat in downing street, as set out in paragraph— flat in downing street, as set out in paragraph 32— flat in downing street, as set out in paragraph 32 of— flat in downing street, as set out in paragraph 32 of the _ flat in downing street, as set out i in paragraph 32 of the independent advisers _ in paragraph 32 of the independent advisers annual— in paragraph 32 of the independent advisers annual report. _ in paragraph 32 of the independent advisers annual report. 32 - in paragraph 32 of the independent advisers annual report. 32 then - in paragraph 32 of the independentl advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest — advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest did — advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest did rise _ advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest did rise but _ advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest did rise but does - advisers annual report. 32 then says an interest did rise but does not - an interest did rise but does not say what — an interest did rise but does not say what that _ an interest did rise but does not say what that interest _ an interest did rise but does not say what that interest was - an interest did rise but does not i say what that interest was because it says _ say what that interest was because it says that — say what that interest was because it says that by— say what that interest was because it says that by the _ say what that interest was because it says that by the time _ say what that interest was because it says that by the time of- it says that by the time of publication, _ it says that by the time of publication, which- it says that by the time of publication, which was i it says that by the time of-
3:41 pm
publication, which was delayed by many— publication, which was delayed by many many— publication, which was delayed by many many months, _ publication, which was delayed by many many months, this- publication, which was delayed by many many months, this was i publication, which was delayed by many many months, this was no. publication, which was delayed by i many many months, this was no longer relevant _ many many months, this was no longer relevant can _ many many months, this was no longer relevant can you — many many months, this was no longer relevant. can you talus _ many many months, this was no longer relevant. can you talus what _ many many months, this was no longer relevant. can you talus what was - many many months, this was no longer relevant. can you talus what was the i relevant. can you talus what was the interest _ relevant. can you talus what was the interest you — relevant. can you talus what was the interest you should _ relevant. can you talus what was the interest you should have _ relevant. can you talus what was the interest you should have declared, i interest you should have declared, how much— interest you should have declared, how much was— interest you should have declared, how much was it, _ interest you should have declared, how much was it, when _ interest you should have declared, how much was it, when was - interest you should have declared, how much was it, when was it- interest you should have declared, how much was it, when was it paid off and _ how much was it, when was it paid off and why— how much was it, when was it paid off and why was _ how much was it, when was it paid off and why was it _ how much was it, when was it paid off and why was it not _ how much was it, when was it paid off and why was it not registered i how much was it, when was it paid| off and why was it not registered in the parliamentary— off and why was it not registered in the parliamentary register- off and why was it not registered in the parliamentary register of- the parliamentary register of members _ the parliamentary register of members interests? - the parliamentary register of members interests? for- the parliamentary register of members interests?- the parliamentary register of members interests? ., , members interests? for the very good reason that there _ members interests? for the very good reason that there is _ members interests? for the very good reason that there is a _ members interests? for the very good reason that there is a ministerial i reason that there is a ministerial register and all that needed to be registered was duly registered as the adviser on ministerial interests has confirmed.— has confirmed. that is not actually what he says- _ has confirmed. that is not actually what he says. he _ has confirmed. that is not actually what he says. he produces - has confirmed. that is not actually what he says. he produces an i what he says. he produces an entirely— what he says. he produces an entirely circular— what he says. he produces an entirely circular argument- what he says. he produces an i entirely circular argument between paragraph — entirely circular argument between paragraph 32 — entirely circular argument between paragraph 32 of _ entirely circular argument between paragraph 32 of one _ entirely circular argument between paragraph 32 of one report - entirely circular argument between paragraph 32 of one report and i paragraph 32 of one report and another— paragraph 32 of one report and another paragraph _ paragraph 32 of one report and another paragraph in _ paragraph 32 of one report and another paragraph in another. paragraph 32 of one report and i another paragraph in another report and neither— another paragraph in another report and neither of— another paragraph in another report and neither of which _ another paragraph in another report and neither of which reveals... i another paragraph in another reportj and neither of which reveals... both of which _ and neither of which reveals... both of which say— and neither of which reveals... both of which say they _ and neither of which reveals... both of which say they was _ and neither of which reveals... both of which say they was an _ and neither of which reveals... both of which say they was an interest i of which say they was an interest that should — of which say they was an interest that should have _ of which say they was an interest that should have been— of which say they was an interest that should have been declared i of which say they was an interest i that should have been declared and it has— that should have been declared and it has not— that should have been declared and it has not now— that should have been declared and it has not now be _ that should have been declared and it has not now be declared. - that should have been declared and it has not now be declared. i- that should have been declared and it has not now be declared.- it has not now be declared. i have nothina it has not now be declared. i have nothing to — it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add — it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add to _ it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add to what _ it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add to what i _ it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add to what i have i it has not now be declared. i have nothing to add to what i have just | nothing to add to what i have just said and everything that should have been registered has been registered in the proper way. final been registered has been registered
3:42 pm
in the properway— in the proper way. final question from me. — in the proper way. final question from me, when _ in the proper way. final question from me, when a _ in the proper way. final question from me, when a minister- in the proper way. final question from me, when a minister lies, l in the proper way. final question i from me, when a minister lies, they should _ from me, when a minister lies, they should correct— from me, when a minister lies, they should correct the _ from me, when a minister lies, they should correct the record _ from me, when a minister lies, they should correct the record and - should correct the record and presumably— should correct the record and presumably you _ should correct the record and presumably you agree? - should correct the record and presumably you agree? tits i should correct the record and presumably you agree? as course. they might — presumably you agree? as course. they might do _ presumably you agree? as course. they might do so _ presumably you agree? as course. they might do so inadvertently, i presumably you agree? as course. i they might do so inadvertently, that is the _ they might do so inadvertently, that is the general— they might do so inadvertently, that is the general assumption _ they might do so inadvertently, that is the general assumption of- they might do so inadvertently, that is the general assumption of how i they might do so inadvertently, thatj is the general assumption of how we do business — is the general assumption of how we do business in — is the general assumption of how we do business in parliament, _ is the general assumption of how we do business in parliament, no- do business in parliament, no minister— do business in parliament, no minister deliberately- do business in parliament, no minister deliberately lies, i do business in parliament, no- minister deliberately lies, though they have — minister deliberately lies, though they have been _ minister deliberately lies, though they have been incidents- minister deliberately lies, though they have been incidents where i minister deliberately lies, though i they have been incidents where that has happened — they have been incidents where that has happened and _ they have been incidents where that has happened and the _ they have been incidents where that has happened and the minister- they have been incidents where that has happened and the minister hasl has happened and the minister has been _ has happened and the minister has been forced — has happened and the minister has been forced to _ has happened and the minister has been forced to resign. _ has happened and the minister has been forced to resign. it— has happened and the minister has been forced to resign. it seems- has happened and the minister hasl been forced to resign. it seems that you very— been forced to resign. it seems that you very rarely — been forced to resign. it seems that you very rarely correct _ been forced to resign. it seems that you very rarely correct the _ been forced to resign. it seems that you very rarely correct the record, i you very rarely correct the record, why is— you very rarely correct the record, why is that? — you very rarely correct the record, why is that? l— you very rarely correct the record, why is that?— why is that? i think i am going to need ou why is that? i think i am going to need you to _ why is that? i think i am going to need you to give _ why is that? i think i am going to need you to give me _ why is that? i think i am going to need you to give me chapter i why is that? i think i am going to need you to give me chapter and | need you to give me chapter and verse there, as they say.- need you to give me chapter and verse there, as they say. there are len of verse there, as they say. there are plenty of instances _ verse there, as they say. there are plenty of instances where - verse there, as they say. there are plenty of instances where you i verse there, as they say. there are plenty of instances where you have j plenty of instances where you have been _ plenty of instances where you have been told _ plenty of instances where you have been told by— plenty of instances where you have been told by various _ plenty of instances where you have been told by various independent i plenty of instances where you have i been told by various independent and outside _ been told by various independent and outside bodies — been told by various independent and outside bodies that _ been told by various independent and outside bodies that the _ been told by various independent and outside bodies that the precise - outside bodies that the precise words — outside bodies that the precise words that— outside bodies that the precise words that you _ outside bodies that the precise words that you have _ outside bodies that the precise words that you have used i outside bodies that the precise words that you have used havej outside bodies that the precise i words that you have used have not been _ words that you have used have not been the _ words that you have used have not been the full — words that you have used have not been the full and _ words that you have used have not been the full and accurate - words that you have used have not been the full and accurate versionl been the full and accurate version of events — been the full and accurate version of events. let _ been the full and accurate version of events. , ., ., of events. let me give you an example _ of events. let me give you an
3:43 pm
example of... _ of events. let me give you an example of... i _ of events. let me give you an example of... i think, - of events. let me give you an example of... i think, with i of events. let me give you an| example of... i think, with the greatest respect of you, i am not entirely sure that question is in order. it is commonly asserted for instance that when we put the figure of £350 million per week on the side of £350 million per week on the side of a bus that went round this country, causing a great deal of who her, that was erroneous and that it would... that did not reflect the true figure. that is properly one of the things you are thinking of. he. the things you are thinking of. no, i am thinking _ the things you are thinking of. no, i am thinking of _ the things you are thinking of. no, i am thinking of sacking matt hancock _ i am thinking of sacking matt hancock. . ., , ,., hancock. let me continue this point. did ou hancock. let me continue this point. did you sack — hancock. let me continue this point. did you sack matt _ hancock. let me continue this point. did you sack matt hancock _ hancock. let me continue this point. did you sack matt hancock was i hancock. let me continue this point. did you sack matt hancock was two l did you sack matt hancock was two let me _ did you sack matt hancock was two let me give — did you sack matt hancock was two let me give you _ did you sack matt hancock was two let me give you an _ did you sack matt hancock was two let me give you an example, - did you sack matt hancock was two let me give you an example, the i did you sack matt hancock was two i let me give you an example, the £350 million _ let me give you an example, the £350 million per— let me give you an example, the £350 million per week _ let me give you an example, the £350 million per week. this— let me give you an example, the £350 million per week.— million per week. this was a figure that related _ million per week. this was a figure that related to _ million per week. this was a figure that related to the _ million per week. this was a figure that related to the gross _ million per week. this was a figure that related to the gross sum i million per week. this was a figure that related to the gross sum that l that related to the gross sum that the uk gave the eu budget, it was... subject of lively controversy during the referendum campaign five years ago, as you remember, actually, it
3:44 pm
turned out if anything to be a slight underestimate and by this year, the gross figure... did you sack matt _ year, the gross figure... did you sack matt hancock? _ year, the gross figure... did you sack matt hancock? on - year, the gross figure. .. did you sack matt hancock? on your- year, the gross figure... did you i sack matt hancock? on your question about mr hancock, _ sack matt hancock? on your question about mr hancock, the _ sack matt hancock? on your question about mr hancock, the former- sack matt hancock? on your question about mr hancock, the former health | about mr hancock, the former health secretary, let mejust about mr hancock, the former health secretary, let me just go back to what i said many, many times and i think i said on the floor of the house of commons, which was that we read about it and i think you read about it, we already about it, the story concerning mr hancock and... and cctv and so forth... on i think the friday and we had a new health secretary on the saturday. and considering that we are in the middle of a global pandemic, it is quite a thing to move your health secretary, i think that was quiet quite fast going. that is all i have to say on that matter. but quite fast going. that is all i have to say on that matter.— quite fast going. that is all i have to say on that matter. but you said ou to say on that matter. but you said you sacked — to say on that matter. but you said you sacked him. _ to say on that matter. but you said you sacked him. you _ to say on that matter. but you said you sacked him. you had _ to say on that matter. but you said you sacked him. you had your - to say on that matter. but you said | you sacked him. you had your time. thank ou you sacked him. you had your time. thank you very _ you sacked him. you had your time.
3:45 pm
thank you very much. _ you sacked him. you had your time. thank you very much. prime - you sacked him. you had your time. l thank you very much. prime minister, i am auoin thank you very much. prime minister, i am going to — thank you very much. prime minister, i am going to move — thank you very much. prime minister, i am going to move onto _ thank you very much. prime minister, i am going to move onto the - thank you very much. prime minister, i am going to move onto the subject l i am going to move onto the subject of the _ i am going to move onto the subject of the government _ i am going to move onto the subject of the government possibly - i am going to move onto the subject of the government possibly has - of the government possibly has policies — of the government possibly has policies on _ of the government possibly has policies on climate _ of the government possibly has policies on climate change. - of the government possibly has i policies on climate change. before of the government possibly has - policies on climate change. before i came _ policies on climate change. before i came into _ policies on climate change. before i came into this— policies on climate change. before i came into this place, _ policies on climate change. before i came into this place, my— policies on climate change. before i came into this place, my mantra - policies on climate change. before ll came into this place, my mantra was that past— came into this place, my mantra was that past performance _ came into this place, my mantra was that past performance was _ came into this place, my mantra was that past performance was no- came into this place, my mantra was that past performance was no guidel that past performance was no guide to the _ that past performance was no guide to the future — that past performance was no guide to the future. when _ that past performance was no guide to the future. when the _ that past performance was no guide| to the future. when the government responded _ to the future. when the government responded to — to the future. when the government responded to the _ to the future. when the government responded to the climate _ to the future. when the government responded to the climate changes i responded to the climate changes committee — responded to the climate changes committee report— responded to the climate changes committee report recently, - responded to the climate changes committee report recently, the i committee report recently, the government— committee report recently, the government pointed _ committee report recently, the government pointed to - committee report recently, the government pointed to the - committee report recently, the - government pointed to the historic success— government pointed to the historic success which _ government pointed to the historic success which is _ government pointed to the historic success which is laudable - government pointed to the historic success which is laudable in - success which is laudable in reducing _ success which is laudable in reducing reliance _ success which is laudable in reducing reliance on - success which is laudable in . reducing reliance on renewable energy~ — reducing reliance on renewable energy~ given— reducing reliance on renewable energy. given the _ reducing reliance on renewable energy. given the cosy - reducing reliance on renewable energy. given the cosy crisis i reducing reliance on renewable i energy. given the cosy crisis delay -- covid _ energy. given the cosy crisis delay -- covid crisis _ energy. given the cosy crisis delay —— covid crisis delay— energy. given the cosy crisis delay —— covid crisis delay on _ energy. given the cosy crisis delay —— covid crisis delay on deliveringl —— covid crisis delay on delivering against _ —— covid crisis delay on delivering against the — —— covid crisis delay on delivering against the admirable _ —— covid crisis delay on delivering against the admirable target - —— covid crisis delay on delivering against the admirable target of. —— covid crisis delay on delivering . against the admirable target of 78% reduction _ against the admirable target of 78% reduction in — against the admirable target of 78% reduction in emissions _ against the admirable target of 78% reduction in emissions by— against the admirable target of 78% reduction in emissions by 1990, - against the admirable target of 78% i reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we _ reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we expect — reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we expect you _ reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we expect you all— reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we expect you all your _ reduction in emissions by 1990, when can we expect you all your ministers. can we expect you all your ministers to start _ can we expect you all your ministers to start delivering _ can we expect you all your ministers to start delivering to _ can we expect you all your ministers to start delivering to this _ can we expect you all your ministers to start delivering to this house - to start delivering to this house the policies _ to start delivering to this house the policies that _ to start delivering to this house the policies that are _ to start delivering to this house the policies that are required i to start delivering to this housej the policies that are required to .et the policies that are required to get us — the policies that are required to get us to— the policies that are required to get us to 78%_ the policies that are required to get us to 78% question - the policies that are required to get us to 78% question mark i the policies that are required to - get us to 78% question mark thanks very much — get us to 78% question mark thanks ve much. ., ., , .,
3:46 pm
very much. you will have seen what the government _ very much. you will have seen what the government announced - very much. you will have seen what the government announced in - very much. you will have seen what the government announced in the l very much. you will have seen what l the government announced in the ten point plan that i set out last november and you will have seen what is happening with investments in green technology in this country, just in the last week, you have seen nissan concerning in sunderland that they are going to be launching a massive investment in green vehicles, in battery—powered vehicles, in battery—powered vehicles, you saw what is happening with the gigerfactory, vehicles, you saw what is happening with the giger factory, in vehicles, you saw what is happening with the gigerfactory, in ellesmere port, in terms of delivery on wind power and our objective of becoming the saudi arabia of wind, there are... there are huge investments going on now and the secretary of state has a mandate to produce lio gigawatts of wind, which is enough to supply the domestic needs, the energy needs of every single
3:47 pm
household in this country by 2030. that is an incredible ambition. but i am sure that we can do it because, you know, you have been out to... to the coast of... the north—east, around the country, you can see the incredible potential of the uk, you can see what we could do in dog land and elsewhere, and we will do it. you make the point about the historic achievement and it is absolutely enormous. don't forget that... i think the uk has cut co2 emissions by more than 40% on 1990 levels, while the economy has grown tjy levels, while the economy has grown by 75% and we are confident that green technology and green investments are the root notjust to cutting co2 but to long—term job creation anti comic growth. i
3:48 pm
cutting c02 but to long-term 'ob creation anti comic growth. i think ou are creation anti comic growth. i think you are right _ creation anti comic growth. i think you are right that _ creation anti comic growth. i think you are right that there _ creation anti comic growth. i think you are right that there is -- - creation anti comic growth. i think you are right that there is -- that| you are right that there is —— that there _ you are right that there is —— that there is— you are right that there is —— that there is enormous— you are right that there is —— that there is enormous potential- you are right that there is —— that there is enormous potential for. you are right that there is —— that i there is enormous potential for the private _ there is enormous potential for the private sector— there is enormous potential for the private sector to _ there is enormous potential for the private sector to work _ there is enormous potential for the private sector to work with - private sector to work with government _ private sector to work with government in— private sector to work with government in investing. private sector to work with government in investing in private sector to work with - government in investing in new technologies— government in investing in new technologies but— government in investing in new technologies but they - government in investing in new technologies but they cannot. government in investing in newl technologies but they cannot do government in investing in new. technologies but they cannot do so in the _ technologies but they cannot do so in the absence _ technologies but they cannot do so in the absence of— technologies but they cannot do so in the absence of clarity— technologies but they cannot do so in the absence of clarity about - technologies but they cannot do sol in the absence of clarity about what the government— in the absence of clarity about what the government demands - in the absence of clarity about what the government demands signals. in the absence of clarity about what i the government demands signals will be the government demands signals will he and _ the government demands signals will he and what — the government demands signals will he and what the _ the government demands signals will be and what the strategies _ the government demands signals will be and what the strategies will - the government demands signals will be and what the strategies will be - be and what the strategies will be in place — be and what the strategies will be in place. wherever— be and what the strategies will be in place. wherever you _ be and what the strategies will be in place. wherever you look, - be and what the strategies will be - in place. wherever you look, whether it is the _ in place. wherever you look, whether it is the hydrogen _ in place. wherever you look, whether it is the hydrogen strategy, _ in place. wherever you look, whether it is the hydrogen strategy, the - it is the hydrogen strategy, the building — it is the hydrogen strategy, the building strategy, _ it is the hydrogen strategy, the. building strategy, understanding it is the hydrogen strategy, the - building strategy, understanding how we will— building strategy, understanding how we will cope — building strategy, understanding how we will cope with _ building strategy, understanding how we will cope with energy— building strategy, understanding how we will cope with energy efficiency. we will cope with energy efficiency of homes, — we will cope with energy efficiency of homes, which _ we will cope with energy efficiency of homes, which is _ we will cope with energy efficiency of homes, which is a _ we will cope with energy efficiency of homes, which is a massive - we will cope with energy efficiencyl of homes, which is a massive task, 19 million— of homes, which is a massive task, 19 million homes— of homes, which is a massive task, 19 million homes need _ of homes, which is a massive task, 19 million homes need retrofitting, j 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the _ 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the moment— 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the moment there _ 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the moment there is _ 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the moment there is a _ 19 million homes need retrofitting, at the moment there is a book- 19 million homes need retrofitting, i at the moment there is a book owner, we do _ at the moment there is a book owner, we do not _ at the moment there is a book owner, we do not have — at the moment there is a book owner, we do not have these _ at the moment there is a book owner, we do not have these policies- at the moment there is a book owner, we do not have these policies out- we do not have these policies out there _ we do not have these policies out there the — we do not have these policies out there. the sector— we do not have these policies out there. the sector is— we do not have these policies out there. the sector is not— we do not have these policies out there. the sector is not yet- we do not have these policies out there. the sector is not yet in- we do not have these policies out there. the sector is not yet in a l there. the sector is not yet in a position— there. the sector is not yet in a position to _ there. the sector is not yet in a position to invest. _ there. the sector is not yet in a position to invest. did - there. the sector is not yet in a position to invest.— there. the sector is not yet in a position to invest. did you see -- did ou position to invest. did you see -- did you say _ position to invest. did you see -- did you say laguna? _ position to invest. did you see -- did you say laguna? we - position to invest. did you see -- did you say laguna? we want - position to invest. did you see -- did you say laguna? we want to. did you say laguna? we want to eradicate... if i may say so! it forms a key part of our objectives. back to the point, prime minister. i back to the point, prime minister. am... i back to the point, prime minister. am... lam back to the point, prime minister. i am... i am grateful... back to the point, prime minister. i
3:49 pm
am... lam grateful... i... there is am... iam grateful... i... there is am... iam grateful... i... there is a huge... there is a huge opportunity for this country to lead in low carbon technology but also to drive jobs and... in low carbon technology but also to drivejobs and... and growth... and thatis drivejobs and... and growth... and that is what we are... that is what we are doing and if you look at what we have done since... this new government since i came into years ago, the ten point plan... you say we have not set out the framework yet. we have set out the framework, it is there. people can see what we need to do. it is green vehicles and thatis need to do. it is green vehicles and that is a big thing in itself. that means basically electrifying our feet and you could not have a more powerful signal on vehicles than what the government said. we are moving to green... electric vehicles by 2030 in this country. that was the government sending the signal and making the market. there is no other country in europe adopting such a brave and bold timetable and what has happened much to our
3:50 pm
satisfaction and relief is that the automotive sector in the uk and around the world have responded and they are investing and i get back to what i said about the nissan investments and what is happening elsewhere, we will work to ensure that we bring... this is the key thing, we have the scale of manufacture in this country to allow the price of green technology goods to come down. and then there is domestic heating power. i to come down. and then there is domestic heating power.- to come down. and then there is domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late _ domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late -- — domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late -- next _ domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late -- next -- _ domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late -- next -- left - domestic heating power. i have 30 seconds late -- next -- left and i l seconds late —— next —— left and i want _ seconds late —— next —— left and i want to— seconds late —— next —— left and i want to get— seconds late —— next —— left and i want to get more _ seconds late —— next —— left and i want to get more questions - seconds late —— next —— left and i want to get more questions in- seconds late —— next —— left and i| want to get more questions in full relation _ want to get more questions in full relation to— want to get more questions in full relation to cop _ want to get more questions in full relation to cop 26, _ want to get more questions in full relation to cop 26, this _ want to get more questions in full relation to cop 26, this is - want to get more questions in full relation to cop 26, this is your. relation to cop 26, this is your opportunity— relation to cop 26, this is your opportunity to— relation to cop 26, this is your opportunity to be _ relation to cop 26, this is your opportunity to be on - relation to cop 26, this is your opportunity to be on the - relation to cop 26, this is your| opportunity to be on the world relation to cop 26, this is your- opportunity to be on the world stage with representation _ opportunity to be on the world stage with representation —— _ with representation —— representatives - with representation —— representatives of- with representation —— i representatives of every with representation —— - representatives of every nation with representation —— _ representatives of every nation on world _ representatives of every nation on world you — representatives of every nation on world you need _ representatives of every nation on world. you need to— representatives of every nation on world. you need to be _ representatives of every nation on i world. you need to be demonstrating the uk _ world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is _ world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is leading— world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is leading on— world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is leading on all— world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is leading on all the _ world. you need to be demonstrating the uk is leading on all the other- the uk is leading on all the other areas _
3:51 pm
the uk is leading on all the other areas which — the uk is leading on all the other areas which where _ the uk is leading on all the other areas which where the _ the uk is leading on all the other areas which where the strategiesj the uk is leading on all the other. areas which where the strategies are not in _ areas which where the strategies are not in place. — areas which where the strategies are not in place. so _ areas which where the strategies are not in place, so ali _ areas which where the strategies are not in place, so ali going _ areas which where the strategies are not in place, so ali going to - areas which where the strategies are not in place, so ali going to see - not in place, so ali going to see these _ not in place, so ali going to see these coming _ not in place, so ali going to see these coming out _ not in place, so ali going to see these coming out beforehand, i not in place, so ali going to see . these coming out beforehand, the hydrogen— these coming out beforehand, the hydrogen strategy— these coming out beforehand, the hydrogen strategy for— these coming out beforehand, the hydrogen strategy for example? l these coming out beforehand, the i hydrogen strategy for example? i’m“ hydrogen strategy for example? i'm afraid hydrogen strategy for example? afraid i've got to disagree with you. completely. the uk... the uk was the first country in the world... the first major developed economy to set a net zero target by 2050. when this government took over the running... this government took over the running, only 30% of the global economy was committed to net zero by 2050 and it is now 70% and we have a hailed... on hydrogen, it is there in the ten point plan, we had a very strong hydrogen strategy... had a very strong hydrogen strategy- - -_ had a very strong hydrogen stratea ., ., ., , , , strategy... you have not published et. that strategy... you have not published yet- that the _ strategy... you have not published yet. that the point. _ strategy... you have not published yet. that the point. if _ strategy... you have not published yet. that the point. if you - strategy... you have not published yet. that the point. if you look - strategy... you have not published yet. that the point. if you look at l yet. that the point. if you look at the storage _ yet. that the point. if you look at the storage of — yet. that the point. if you look at the storage of hydrogen, - yet. that the point. if you look at the storage of hydrogen, green l the storage of hydrogen, green hydrogen, in the north—east and elsewhere, i think you are right,
3:52 pm
hydrogen is a big part of... you have not _ hydrogen is a big part of... you have not published a strategy. hydrogen is a big part of... you l have not published a strategy. it hydrogen is a big part of... you . have not published a strategy. it is onl one have not published a strategy. it is only one of — have not published a strategy. it is only one of the _ have not published a strategy. it 3 only one of the horses... that we are betting on. i only one of the horses... that we are betting on-— are betting on. i have a final question- — are betting on. i have a final question- i _ are betting on. i have a final question. ithink— are betting on. i have a final question. i think we - are betting on. i have a final question. i think we can - are betting on. i have a final. question. i think we can agree, are betting on. i have a final- question. i think we can agree, you were _ question. i think we can agree, you were as _ question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked _ question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked as _ question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked as i _ question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked as i was _ question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked as i was to - question. i think we can agree, you were as shocked as i was to see - were as shocked as i was to see reports — were as shocked as i was to see reports of— were as shocked as i was to see reports of amazon _ were as shocked as i was to see reports of amazon destroying. were as shocked as i was to see - reports of amazon destroying unsold consumer— reports of amazon destroying unsold consumer electronics— reports of amazon destroying unsold consumer electronics from _ reports of amazon destroying unsold consumer electronics from a - consumer electronics from a warehouse _ consumer electronics from a warehouse less _ consumer electronics from a warehouse less than - consumer electronics from a warehouse less than an - consumer electronics from a| warehouse less than an hour consumer electronics from a - warehouse less than an hour away from _ warehouse less than an hour away from glasgow _ warehouse less than an hour away from glasgow is— warehouse less than an hour away from glasgow. is there _ warehouse less than an hour away from glasgow. is there anything . warehouse less than an hour away l from glasgow. is there anything you can do— from glasgow. is there anything you can do as _ from glasgow. is there anything you can do as a — from glasgow. is there anything you can do as a uk — from glasgow. is there anything you can do as a uk government- from glasgow. is there anything you can do as a uk government to - from glasgow. is there anything you can do as a uk government to holdl can do as a uk government to hold global— can do as a uk government to hold global corporate _ can do as a uk government to hold global corporate to _ can do as a uk government to hold global corporate to account - can do as a uk government to hold global corporate to account for- global corporate to account for their— global corporate to account for their environmental— global corporate to account for their environmental footprint? j global corporate to account for- their environmentalfootprint? i... their environmental footprint? i. .. i read that — their environmental footprint? i. .. i read that and _ their environmental footprint? i. .. i read that and i _ their environmental footprint? i. .. i read that and i was _ their environmental footprint? i read that and i was absently horrified, though i noticed amazon tried to clear it up in some way and it was not as it was initially presented. i don't other reality of the position but i obviously destroying consumer electronics in the landfill in that way is absently insane that what we have done and this is what we did at the g7, we for the first time have got global
3:53 pm
agreement that... that there should be a tax on the sales of internet giants such as amazon on the basis of... of the sales in markets, so in the uk, and this is a massive achievement led by the chancellor to get a global agreement on taxing... the internet giants and about time too. ., ~' , ., the internet giants and about time too. ., ~ , ., good the internet giants and about time too._ good afternoon, l too. thank you. good afternoon, prime minister. _ too. thank you. good afternoon, prime minister. to _ too. thank you. good afternoon, prime minister. to continue - too. thank you. good afternoon, prime minister. to continue withj too. thank you. good afternoon, - prime minister. to continue with the theme _ prime minister. to continue with the theme of— prime minister. to continue with the theme of moving _ prime minister. to continue with the theme of moving towards _ prime minister. to continue with the theme of moving towards zero - prime minister. to continue with the . theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking _ theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking at— theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking at the — theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking at the situation _ theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking at the situation in _ theme of moving towards zero carbon, looking at the situation in housing, - looking at the situation in housing, housing _ looking at the situation in housing, housing is— looking at the situation in housing, housing is responsible _ looking at the situation in housing, housing is responsible for- looking at the situation in housing, housing is responsible for about. looking at the situation in housing, i housing is responsible for about 15% of carbon— housing is responsible for about 15% of carbon emissions. _ housing is responsible for about 15% of carbon emissions. the _ housing is responsible for about 15% l of carbon emissions. the commission, climate _ of carbon emissions. the commission, climate change — of carbon emissions. the commission, climate change commission, _ of carbon emissions. the commission, climate change commission, said - of carbon emissions. the commission, climate change commission, said in i climate change commission, said in december— climate change commission, said in december that _ climate change commission, said in december that there _ climate change commission, said in december that there have - climate change commission, said in december that there have been - december that there have been minimal— december that there have been minimal progress— december that there have been minimal progress in— december that there have been minimal progress in recent - december that there have beenl minimal progress in recent years december that there have been - minimal progress in recent years in reducing _ minimal progress in recent years in reducing the — minimal progress in recent years in reducing the level— minimal progress in recent years in reducing the level of— minimal progress in recent years in reducing the level of emissions - minimal progress in recent years in. reducing the level of emissions from housing _ reducing the level of emissions from housing and — reducing the level of emissions from housing and what _ reducing the level of emissions from housing and what we _ reducing the level of emissions from housing and what we need _ reducing the level of emissions from housing and what we need and - reducing the level of emissions from housing and what we need and we i reducing the level of emissions from. housing and what we need and we are coming _ housing and what we need and we are coming back— housing and what we need and we are coming back to — housing and what we need and we are coming back to the _ housing and what we need and we are coming back to the point _ housing and what we need and we are coming back to the point from - coming back to the point from before, — coming back to the point from before, and _ coming back to the point from before, and agreement - coming back to the point from before, and agreement on - coming back to the point from before, and agreement on a l coming back to the point from - before, and agreement on a green framework, — before, and agreement on a green framework, not _ before, and agreement on a green
3:54 pm
framework, not on _ before, and agreement on a green framework, not on what _ before, and agreement on a green framework, not on what we - before, and agreement on a green framework, not on what we want i before, and agreement on a greenl framework, not on what we want to achieve _ framework, not on what we want to achieve at _ framework, not on what we want to achieve at how _ framework, not on what we want to achieve at how we _ framework, not on what we want to achieve at how we will _ framework, not on what we want to achieve at how we will achieve - framework, not on what we want to achieve at how we will achieve it. . achieve at how we will achieve it. where _ achieve at how we will achieve it. where can— achieve at how we will achieve it. where can i— achieve at how we will achieve it. where can i find _ achieve at how we will achieve it. where can i find that _ achieve at how we will achieve it. where can i find that framework, j where can i find that framework, however — where can i find that framework, however we _ where can i find that framework, however we going _ where can i find that framework, however we going to _ where can i find that framework, however we going to get - where can i find that framework, however we going to get to - where can i find that framework, however we going to get to zero, where can i find that framework, - however we going to get to zero, net zero in _ however we going to get to zero, net zero in housing — however we going to get to zero, net zero in housing because _ however we going to get to zero, net zero in housing because mark- however we going to get to zero, net zero in housing because mark first i zero in housing because mark first of all. _ zero in housing because mark first of all. i_ zero in housing because mark first of all. i am — zero in housing because mark first ofall. lam going— zero in housing because mark first of all, i am going to _ zero in housing because mark first of all, i am going to disagree - zero in housing because mark first of all, i am going to disagree with| of all, i am going to disagree with you timidly— of all, i am going to disagree with you timidly about _ of all, i am going to disagree with you timidly about what _ of all, i am going to disagree with you timidly about what has - of all, i am going to disagree with. you timidly about what has happened already _ you timidly about what has happened alread . �* .., , you timidly about what has happened alread . �* .. , ., , you timidly about what has happened alread. �* , , you timidly about what has happened alread . �* , ., , , ., already. because there has been a massive reduction _ already. because there has been a massive reduction in _ already. because there has been a massive reduction in emissions - already. because there has been a l massive reduction in emissions from housing and it has been,... if you look at the proportion of emissions now that come from transport, that is because we force down emissions of c02 is because we force down emissions of co2 emissions, from domestic heating and also commercial property. the... let me give you one statistic, 14% of homes in england are now above energy performance certificate band c, up from 12% in 2009. �* ., .., ,, ., certificate band c, up from 12% in 2009. �* ., ,, ., 2009. but what the commission said was that the — 2009. but what the commission said was that the last _ 2009. but what the commission said was that the last five _ 2009. but what the commission said was that the last five years _ 2009. but what the commission said was that the last five years has - was that the last five years has been _ was that the last five years has been minimal— was that the last five years has been minimal progress. - was that the last five years has been minimal progress. that. was that the last five years hasj been minimal progress. that is was that the last five years has i been minimal progress. that is in the report — been minimal progress. that is in the report-—
3:55 pm
been minimal progress. that is in thereort. . . �* the report. well... what i'm saying is there is massive _ the report. well... what i'm saying is there is massive progress - the report. well... what i'm saying is there is massive progress that i is there is massive progress that has been made and... and continues to be made and what we are doing now... i am going to be frank, this is that is very difficult to pull off because what we need to do is to ensure that we are able to heat people's homes, provide them with power in an affordable way whilst also reducing co2 and you know perfectly well... you know perfectly well that the ways of doing that... through ground source, he claims, through hydrogen, as for divorce, these are the principal alternatives that we have and what we are doing is building a market, working with producers, with manufacturer's, with the whole sector to ensure that... just as we are doing with electric vehicles money factor is, we drive the... what we can't have is a situation in which ordinary
3:56 pm
homeowners, ordinary people, living in their own home are suddenly faced with an unexpected and unreasonable cost to put in a...— cost to put in a... prime minister... _ cost to put in a... prime minister... how- cost to put in a... prime minister... how are - cost to put in a... prime minister... how are we | cost to put in a... prime - minister... how are we going to cost to put in a... prime _ minister... how are we going to do it, prime minister. .. how are we going to do it, prime minister— minister... how are we going to do it, prime minister question - minister... how are we going to do it, prime minister question of - minister... how are we going to do it, prime minister question of such| it, prime minister question of such climate _ it, prime minister question of such climate change _ it, prime minister question of such climate change commission- it, prime minister question of such climate change commission has. it, prime minister question of such. climate change commission has said, we have _ climate change commission has said, we have to _ climate change commission has said, we have to get — climate change commission has said, we have to get all— climate change commission has said, we have to get all homes _ climate change commission has said, we have to get all homes not - climate change commission has said, we have to get all homes not using . we have to get all homes not using fossil— we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel— we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel bowlers— we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel bowlers by— we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, - we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that i we have to get all homes not using fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is| fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is 25 million— fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is 25 million homes. _ fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is 25 million homes. that— fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is 25 million homes. that —— - fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is 25 million homes. that —— last - fossil fuel bowlers by 2033, that is i 25 million homes. that —— last year, they were _ 25 million homes. that —— last year, they were 38,000 — 25 million homes. that —— last year, they were 38,000 heat _ 25 million homes. that —— last year, they were 38,000 heat pumps. - 25 million homes. that —— last year, - they were 38,000 heat pumps. 38,000. the hydrogen— they were 38,000 heat pumps. 38,000. the hydrogen bowlers _ they were 38,000 heat pumps. 38,000. the hydrogen bowlers are _ they were 38,000 heat pumps. 38,000. the hydrogen bowlers are not— the hydrogen bowlers are not currently— the hydrogen bowlers are not currently available. _ the hydrogen bowlers are not currently available. you - the hydrogen bowlers are not currently available.— the hydrogen bowlers are not currently available. you are right but what we _ currently available. you are right but what we are _ currently available. you are right but what we are doing _ currently available. you are right but what we are doing is - currently available. you are right but what we are doing is working with the manufacturers and working with the manufacturers and working with the manufacturers and working with the market... can it be achieved? to ensure that we have the heat pumps insufficient quantity to bring the price down. these things
3:57 pm
cost about ten grand a pop at the moment, this is a lot of money. for ordinary people. we have got to make sure that when we embark on this programme that we have a solution thatis programme that we have a solution that is affordable and works with people and we won't do it... we will be imposing it until we... 50 people and we won't do it... we will be imposing it untilwe..._ be imposing it until we. .. so the 2033 target _ be imposing it until we. .. so the 2033 target is — be imposing it until we. .. so the 2033 target is going _ be imposing it until we. .. so the 2033 target is going to - be imposing it until we. .. so the 2033 target is going to be - 2033 target is going to be delivered? _ 2033 target is going to be delivered? [— 2033 target is going to be delivered?— 2033 target is going to be delivered? ,, .. ., ., delivered? i think we can do it in a ve raid delivered? i think we can do it in a very rapid time — delivered? i think we can do it in a very rapid time skill _ delivered? i think we can do it in a very rapid time skill and _ delivered? i think we can do it in a very rapid time skill and that - delivered? i think we can do it in a very rapid time skill and that is - very rapid time skill and that is what we are doing but it takes a great deal of determination, it means working with... the producers, it means driving down the costs and as i was saying to philip about electric vehicles, it means setting the markets and the parameters and at the moment, the prices are too high. at the moment, the prices are too hiuh. ., , at the moment, the prices are too hiuh. . , ., ~ at the moment, the prices are too hiuh. ., , ., ~ ., high. can i 'ust talk about future ”lannin high. can i just talk about future planning because _ high. can i just talk about future planning because one _ high. can i just talk about future l planning because one organisation looking _ planning because one organisation looking at— planning because one organisation looking at planning... _ planning because one organisation looking at planning... you - planning because one organisation| looking at planning... you properly will not _ looking at planning... you properly will not have — looking at planning... you properly will not have heard _ looking at planning... you properly will not have heard of _ looking at planning... you properly will not have heard of them. - looking at planning... you properly will not have heard of them. i- will not have heard of them. i appreciate _ will not have heard of them. i appreciate that. _ will not have heard of them. i appreciate that. but - will not have heard of them. i appreciate that. but they - will not have heard of them. i| appreciate that. but they have will not have heard of them. i- appreciate that. but they have about 1 million— appreciate that. but they have about 1 million homes— appreciate that. but they have about 1 million homes in— appreciate that. but they have about 1 million homes in their— appreciate that. but they have about 1 million homes in their response - 1 million homes in their response ability _ 1 million homes in their response ability they— 1 million homes in their response ability. they have _ 1 million homes in their response ability. they have looked - 1 million homes in their response ability. they have looked at - 1 million homes in their response ability. they have looked at whatj 1 million homes in their response l ability. they have looked at what it would _ ability. they have looked at what it
3:58 pm
would cost — ability. they have looked at what it would cost them _ ability. they have looked at what it would cost them about _ ability. they have looked at what it would cost them about their - ability. they have looked at what it. would cost them about their business plan to— would cost them about their business plan to get— would cost them about their business plan to get a — would cost them about their business plan to get a zero— would cost them about their business plan to get a zero carbon _ would cost them about their business plan to get a zero carbon homes - would cost them about their business plan to get a zero carbon homes by l plan to get a zero carbon homes by 2050. _ plan to get a zero carbon homes by 2050, 40 _ plan to get a zero carbon homes by 2050, 40 million— plan to get a zero carbon homes by 2050, 40 million homes, - plan to get a zero carbon homes by 2050, 40 million homes, they- 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate — 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate it _ 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate it was _ 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate it was going - 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate it was going to - 2050, 40 million homes, they calculate it was going to be . 2050, 40 million homes, they. calculate it was going to be £104 billion, _ calculate it was going to be £104 billion, only— calculate it was going to be £104 billion, only one _ calculate it was going to be £104 billion, only one of— calculate it was going to be £104 billion, only one of them - calculate it was going to be £104 billion, only one of them could l calculate it was going to be £104| billion, only one of them could do it without — billion, only one of them could do it without going _ billion, only one of them could do it without going bankrupt. - billion, only one of them could do it without going bankrupt. where i billion, only one of them could do. it without going bankrupt. where is the financial— it without going bankrupt. where is the financial plan _ it without going bankrupt. where is the financial plan to _ it without going bankrupt. where is the financial plan to enable - it without going bankrupt. where is the financial plan to enable social. the financial plan to enable social housing _ the financial plan to enable social housing providers _ the financial plan to enable social housing providers who _ the financial plan to enable social housing providers who want - the financial plan to enable social housing providers who want to i the financial plan to enable socialj housing providers who want to do the financial plan to enable social- housing providers who want to do the film housing providers who want to do the right thing _ housing providers who want to do the right thing to — housing providers who want to do the right thing to be _ housing providers who want to do the right thing to be able _ housing providers who want to do the right thing to be able to— housing providers who want to do the right thing to be able to plan- housing providers who want to do the right thing to be able to plan ahead . right thing to be able to plan ahead and do _ right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it— right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it question _ right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it question mark— right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it question mark in - right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it question mark in a - right thing to be able to plan ahead and do it question mark in a way, l and do it question mark in a way, you are _ and do it question mark in a way, you are repeating _ and do it question mark in a way, you are repeating what _ and do it question mark in a way, you are repeating what i - and do it question mark in a way, you are repeating what ijust - and do it question mark in a way, | you are repeating what ijust said. where _ you are repeating what ijust said. where is — you are repeating what ijust said. where is the — you are repeating what ijust said. where is the plan? _ you are repeating what ijust said. where is the plan? the _ you are repeating what i 'ust said. where is the plan?_ where is the plan? the plan is to work with the _ where is the plan? the plan is to work with the manufacturer's. .. l work with the manufacturer's... where is the financial plan? work with the manufacturer's. .. where is the financial plan? and... we will be — where is the financial plan? and... we will be bringing _ where is the financial plan? and... we will be bringing forward... - where is the financial plan? and... we will be bringing forward... we l we will be bringing forward... we will be bringing forward a plan... before car, you will be getting a plan on the decarbonisation of the domestic market and what i am saying to you and i think people will be interested in this, this government is determined to keep bills low. and
3:59 pm
that is... that is a priority for the only way to do that is to build the only way to do that is to build the market in a very systematic way make sure that we have the technology and make sure that it is affordable and there are some big bets that we may need to place, some bets that we may need to place, some bets that we may need to place on hydrogen but also some bets on ground source and s4c pumps. yes, there are models and solutions that may be very different across different types of housing, different types of housing, different housing stocks... you know all the arguments. you will see it long before cop 26.— all the arguments. you will see it long before cop 26. good, we look forward to it- _ long before cop 26. good, we look forward to it. are _ long before cop 26. good, we look forward to it. are you _ long before cop 26. good, we look forward to it. are you hoping - long before cop 26. good, we look forward to it. are you hoping for i forward to it. are you hoping for any gender—
4:00 pm
forward to it. are you hoping for any gender specific— forward to it. are you hoping for any gender specific outcomes i forward to it. are you hoping for. any gender specific outcomes from cop 26— any gender specific outcomes from cop 26 and — any gender specific outcomes from cop 26 and how— any gender specific outcomes from cop 26 and how will _ any gender specific outcomes from cop 26 and how will they- any gender specific outcomes from cop 26 and how will they be - cop 26 and how will they be measured? _ cop 26 and how will they be measured?— cop 26 and how will they be measured? . , . ~ measured? thanks very much. i think that the--- — measured? thanks very much. i think that the... cop — measured? thanks very much. i think that the... cop 26... _ measured? thanks very much. i think that the... cop 26... programme - measured? thanks very much. i think that the... cop 26... programme is l that the... cop 26... programme is one that will be of immense benefit to all of humanity but i believe that in helping to tackle... a climate change, it will help to tackle economic inequality and i think that it will inevitably be of massive benefit to those who have tended to suffer the most, women in particular, who... who don't get... when it comes to their education for instance, caroline, don't get, in my view, as much... investment as they need. one of the things we did at the g7 was to ensure that we put another 2.5 million into the global
4:01 pm
partnership for education, the bulk of which is to be spent on female education around the world. that is something i have campaigned on for a very long time and i think that everybody coming to cop 26 will understand that there is a... there is a clear link between economic progress, sorting out climate change, addressing climate change, and empowering and advancing women, ending the injustice that... that so many young girls around the world received far less investment in their education than young boys of their education than young boys of the same age. we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those _ we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? — we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? "— we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? —— will— we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? —— will the _ we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? —— will the cuts. - we ought the cuts to uk aid to help those girls? —— will the cuts. the i those girls? -- will the cuts. the uk is actually _ those girls? —— will the cuts. uk is actually putting those girls? —— will the cuts. the uk is actually putting more those girls? —— will the cuts.- uk is actually putting more money into education, female education, £453 million into the global partnership for education, and the
4:02 pm
kenyan leader is coming to london in just a few days' time to help us raise even more.— just a few days' time to help us - raise even more._ moving raise even more. thank you. moving on. thank raise even more. thank you. moving on- thank you. _ raise even more. thank you. moving on. thank you, mr— raise even more. thank you. moving on. thank you, mr chairman. - raise even more. thank you. moving on. thank you, mr chairman. at - raise even more. thank you. moving on. thank you, mr chairman. at the | on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 ou on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did — on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did not _ on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did not manage _ on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did not manage to _ on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did not manage to get - on. thank you, mr chairman. at the g7 you did not manage to get any i on. thank you, mr chairman. at the j g7 you did not manage to get any of our six _ g7 you did not manage to get any of our six closest — g7 you did not manage to get any of our six closest allies _ g7 you did not manage to get any of our six closest allies to _ g7 you did not manage to get any of our six closest allies to pledge - g7 you did not manage to get any of our six closest allies to pledge to i our six closest allies to pledge to abandon— our six closest allies to pledge to abandon cult _ our six closest allies to pledge to abandon cult use, _ our six closest allies to pledge to abandon cult use, how— our six closest allies to pledge to abandon cult use, how do - our six closest allies to pledge to abandon cult use, how do you - our six closest allies to pledge to i abandon cult use, how do you think you will— abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage _ abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage to _ abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage to get _ abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage to get china - abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage to get china to - abandon cult use, how do you think you will manage to get china to dol you will manage to get china to do something — you will manage to get china to do something similar? _ you will manage to get china to do something similar? in— you will manage to get china to do something similar? in glasgow? i you will manage to get china to dol something similar? in glasgow? —— coal _ something similar? in glasgow? -- coal. ., , ., something similar? in glasgow? -- coal. . , ., ., coal. china is a huge global economy. _ coal. china is a huge global economy, the _ coal. china is a huge global economy, the fastest - coal. china is a huge global. economy, the fastest growing coal. china is a huge global— economy, the fastest growing emitter and we have got to address that problem. and we have got to address that roblem. ., ., i. ., ., ., problem. how are you going to do that? through _ problem. how are you going to do that? through engagement, - problem. how are you going to do that? through engagement, and ij that? through engagement, and i think what you — that? through engagement, and i think what you can't _ that? through engagement, and i think what you can't do _ that? through engagement, and i think what you can't do is - that? through engagement, and i think what you can't do is simply l think what you can't do is simply push china away and say that we will have nothing to do with china. china
4:03 pm
is a member of the p5 and it sits on the un security council quite rightly, and we have got to engage with china and make the case to them. one of the most important things to come out of the g7 was the idea of the build back better, and the clean green initiative, and that is in a way... i’m the clean green initiative, and that is in a way---_ the clean green initiative, and that is in a way... i'm going to go to my auestion is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is. — is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is. if— is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is, if you _ is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is, if you will _ is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is, if you will forgive - is in a way... i'm going to go to my question is, if you will forgive me. | question is, if you will forgive me. it is your— question is, if you will forgive me. it is your prerogative. _ question is, if you will forgive me. it is your prerogative. i’m“ - it is your prerogative. i'm interested _ it is your prerogative. i'm interested in _ it is your prerogative. i'm interested in the - it is your prerogative. i'm interested in the answer to my questions _ interested in the answer to my questions and _ interested in the answer to my questions and not _ interested in the answer to my questions and not to _ interested in the answer to my questions and not to the - interested in the answer to my- questions and not to the questions you wish— questions and not to the questions you wish i'd — questions and not to the questions you wish i'd asked. _ questions and not to the questions you wish i'd asked. you _ questions and not to the questions you wish i'd asked. you said - questions and not to the questions you wish i'd asked. you said in - questions and not to the questionsl you wish i'd asked. you said in 2019 that digital— you wish i'd asked. you said in 2019 that digital authoritarianism - you wish i'd asked. you said in 2019 that digital authoritarianism is - you wish i'd asked. you said in 2019 that digital authoritarianism is not. that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff— that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff of— that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff of fantasy, _ that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff of fantasy, but _ that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff of fantasy, but the - that digital authoritarianism is not the stuff of fantasy, but the stuffl the stuff of fantasy, but the stuff of reality. — the stuff of fantasy, but the stuff of reality how _ the stuff of fantasy, but the stuff of reality, how is _ the stuff of fantasy, but the stuff of reality, how is that _ the stuff of fantasy, but the stuffj of reality, how is that compatible with the — of reality, how is that compatible with the recent _ of reality, how is that compatible with the recent decision - of reality, how is that compatible with the recent decision not - of reality, how is that compatible with the recent decision not to i of reality, how is that compatible i with the recent decision not to call in newport— with the recent decision not to call in newport for— with the recent decision not to call in newport for investigation? - with the recent decision not to call
4:04 pm
in newport for investigation? thisl in newport for investigation? this relates to a _ in newport for investigation? this relates to a chip _ in newport for investigation? relates to a chip manufacturer in wales and we are looking into it. i've asked the national security adviser to review. it is i've asked the national security adviser to review.— adviser to review. it is being reviewed? — adviser to review. it is being reviewed? we _ adviser to review. it is being reviewed? we will— adviser to review. it is being reviewed? we will look - adviser to review. it is being reviewed? we will look at i adviser to review. it is being reviewed? we will look at it | adviser to review. it is being - reviewed? we will look at it again, but don't forget... _ reviewed? we will look at it again, but don't forget... thanks - reviewed? we will look at it again, but don't forget... thanks to... i but don't forget... thanks to... they rather sweetly asked us to do with it, but what i can tell you, thanks to this government and our prudence in passing the national security and investment bill which i'm sure you voted for. i security and investment bill which i'm sure you voted for.— security and investment bill which i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able — i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to _ i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to take _ i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to take action. - i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to take action. it - i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to take action. it is - i'm sure you voted for. i did. good. we are able to take action. it is a i we are able to take action. it is a very important — we are able to take action. it is a very important bill. _ we are able to take action. it is a very important bill. i _ we are able to take action. it is a very important bill. i want - we are able to take action. it is a very important bill. i want to - very important bill. i want to stress, very important bill. i want to stress. and _ very important bill. i want to stress, and on _ very important bill. i want to stress, and on this _ very important bill. i want to stress, and on this issue, i very important bill. i want to l stress, and on this issue, and very important bill. i want to - stress, and on this issue, and there will be others, don't forget, when i came in, we took the difficult and painful step and greg will know all about this as you were the business secretary, we took the difficult step of having to extricate this
4:05 pm
country from the public huawei situation, and so we are spending a lot of taxpayers money to make sure that we get huawei out of our telecommunications network and out of the critical... you telecommunications network and out of the critical. . .— of the critical... you are going over history- _ of the critical... you are going over history. i— of the critical... you are going over history. i want _ of the critical... you are going over history. i want to - of the critical... you are going over history. i want to make l of the critical... you are going over history. i want to make aj of the critical... you are going i over history. i want to make a very im ortant over history. i want to make a very important point. — over history. i want to make a very important point, because - over history. i want to make a very important point, because i- over history. i want to make a very important point, because i do i over history. i want to make a very important point, because i do not. important point, because i do not want us and i do not want anti—china spirit to lead to us trying to pitchfork away every investment from china into this country. ii i pitchfork away every investment from china into this country.— china into this country. if i may, there's a difference _ china into this country. if i may, there's a difference between i there's a difference between investment_ there's a difference between investment which— there's a difference between investment which is - there's a difference between investment which is looking i there's a difference between . investment which is looking for there's a difference between - investment which is looking for a investment which is looking fora normal_ investment which is looking for a normal return, _ investment which is looking for a normal return, to _ investment which is looking for a normal return, to the _ investment which is looking for a normal return, to the purchase l investment which is looking for a | normal return, to the purchase of technology, — normal return, to the purchase of technology, and _ normal return, to the purchase of technology, and what _ normal return, to the purchase of technology, and what we - normal return, to the purchase of technology, and what we are - normal return, to the purchase of. technology, and what we are seeing from experience _ technology, and what we are seeing from experience is— technology, and what we are seeing from experience is a _ technology, and what we are seeing from experience is a company- technology, and what we are seeing from experience is a company which is mostly— from experience is a company which is mostly owned _ from experience is a company which is mostly owned by _ from experience is a company which is mostly owned by the _ from experience is a company which is mostly owned by the chinese - from experience is a company whichl is mostly owned by the chinese state backed _ is mostly owned by the chinese state backed firm, — is mostly owned by the chinese state backed firm, we _ is mostly owned by the chinese state backed firm, we are _ is mostly owned by the chinese state backed firm, we are seeing _ is mostly owned by the chinese state backed firm, we are seeing a - is mostly owned by the chinese statel backed firm, we are seeing a chinese state _ backed firm, we are seeing a chinese state backed — backed firm, we are seeing a chinese state backed entity— backed firm, we are seeing a chinese state backed entity buying _ backed firm, we are seeing a chinese
4:06 pm
state backed entity buying a - state backed entity buying a manufacturer— state backed entity buying a manufacturer at _ state backed entity buying a manufacturer at a _ state backed entity buying a manufacturer at a time - state backed entity buying a manufacturer at a time of. state backed entity buying a - manufacturer at a time of global shortage — manufacturer at a time of global shortage when _ manufacturer at a time of global shortage when beijing _ manufacturer at a time of global shortage when beijing is - manufacturer at a time of global shortage when beijing is alreadyj shortage when beijing is already looking — shortage when beijing is already looking to — shortage when beijing is already looking to stockpile _ shortage when beijing is already looking to stockpile conductors, | shortage when beijing is already- looking to stockpile conductors, and so if china _ looking to stockpile conductors, and so if china thinks _ looking to stockpile conductors, and so if china thinks it _ looking to stockpile conductors, and so if china thinks it is _ looking to stockpile conductors, and so if china thinks it is essential- so if china thinks it is essential to their— so if china thinks it is essential to their security— so if china thinks it is essential to their security and _ so if china thinks it is essential to their security and of- so if china thinks it is essential to their security and of italy . so if china thinks it is essentiall to their security and of italy and brussels — to their security and of italy and brussels and _ to their security and of italy and brussels and the _ to their security and of italy and brussels and the united - to their security and of italy and brussels and the united statesl to their security and of italy and i brussels and the united states and other— brussels and the united states and other countries— brussels and the united states and other countries agree _ brussels and the united states and other countries agree and - brussels and the united states and other countries agree and other. other countries agree and other entities — other countries agree and other entities agree, _ other countries agree and other entities agree, why _ other countries agree and other entities agree, why don't - other countries agree and other entities agree, why don't you? i other countries agree and other| entities agree, why don't you? i entities agree, why don't you? i think entities agree, why don't you? think semiconductors are of entities agree, why don't you?" think semiconductors are of huge importance to this country and one of the things i wanted to look out immediately when i became prime minister was whether or not we could become more self—reliant. i'm told it cost about £9 billion to build a proper semiconductorfactory, a lot of money, especially during a pandemic, and we are thinking about what to do. there is a company and they make a lot of semiconductors in ireland, as you know, but there is a company in newport, we have got to judge whether the stuff they are making use of real intellectual property value and interest to china
4:07 pm
and whether there are security implications and i've asked the national security adviser to look at it. ., ., h, . ., it. you mentioned the pandemic and i'm delighted _ it. you mentioned the pandemic and i'm delighted you — it. you mentioned the pandemic and i'm delighted you did _ it. you mentioned the pandemic and i'm delighted you did because - it. you mentioned the pandemic and i'm delighted you did because your | i'm delighted you did because your decision— i'm delighted you did because your decision on— i'm delighted you did because your decision on 0.7, _ i'm delighted you did because your decision on 0.7, down— i'm delighted you did because your decision on 0.7, down to _ i'm delighted you did because your decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, - i'm delighted you did because your decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that| decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that must _ decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that must have — decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that must have been— decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that must have been difficult— decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that must have been difficult because i decision on 0.7, down to 0.5, that. must have been difficult because you committed _ must have been difficult because you committed so — must have been difficult because you committed so frequently— must have been difficult because you committed so frequently to - must have been difficult because you committed so frequently to the - committed so frequently to the former — committed so frequently to the former we _ committed so frequently to the former. we are _ committed so frequently to the former. we are seeing - committed so frequently to the former. we are seeing a - committed so frequently to the former. we are seeing a cut. committed so frequently to the former. we are seeing a cut inl committed so frequently to the i former. we are seeing a cut in the budget— former. we are seeing a cut in the budget going _ former. we are seeing a cut in the budget going to _ former. we are seeing a cut in the budget going to tropical _ former. we are seeing a cut in the budget going to tropical medicine i budget going to tropical medicine and global— budget going to tropical medicine and global vaccines _ budget going to tropical medicine and global vaccines at _ budget going to tropical medicine and global vaccines at a - budget going to tropical medicine and global vaccines at a time - budget going to tropical medicine i and global vaccines at a time when we note _ and global vaccines at a time when we note the — and global vaccines at a time when we note the interconnectedness i and global vaccines at a time when we note the interconnectedness of| we note the interconnectedness of our health. — we note the interconnectedness of our health. it _ we note the interconnectedness of our health, it is _ we note the interconnectedness of our health, it is going _ we note the interconnectedness of our health, it is going from - we note the interconnectedness of our health, it is going from £150 . our health, it is going from £150 million. — our health, it is going from £150 million, down _ our health, it is going from £150 million, down to _ our health, it is going from £150 million, down to £17 _ our health, it is going from £150 million, down to £17 million, - our health, it is going from £150 . million, down to £17 million, when we are _ million, down to £17 million, when we are seeing— million, down to £17 million, when we are seeing variants— million, down to £17 million, when we are seeing variants from - million, down to £17 million, when we are seeing variants from all- million, down to £17 million, when. we are seeing variants from all over the world _ we are seeing variants from all over the world and — we are seeing variants from all over the world and we _ we are seeing variants from all over the world and we are _ we are seeing variants from all over the world and we are likely- we are seeing variants from all over the world and we are likely to - we are seeing variants from all over the world and we are likely to see . the world and we are likely to see more _ the world and we are likely to see more in _ the world and we are likely to see more in the — the world and we are likely to see more in the near— the world and we are likely to see more in the near future. - the world and we are likely to see more in the near future. will- the world and we are likely to see more in the near future. will youi the world and we are likely to see . more in the near future. will you be looking _ more in the near future. will you be looking to _ more in the near future. will you be looking to reverse _ more in the near future. will you be looking to reverse such _ more in the near future. will you be looking to reverse such cuts - more in the near future. will you be looking to reverse such cuts which l looking to reverse such cuts which undermine — looking to reverse such cuts which undermine the _ looking to reverse such cuts which undermine the national— looking to reverse such cuts which undermine the national security i looking to reverse such cuts whichj undermine the national security of this country— undermine the national security of this country as _ undermine the national security of this country as quickly _ undermine the national security of this country as quickly as - undermine the national security ofl this country as quickly as possible? i'm this country as quickly as possible? i'm going _ this country as quickly as possible? i'm going to— this country as quickly as possible? i'm going to disagree _ this country as quickly as possible? i'm going to disagree with - this country as quickly as possible? i'm going to disagree with you - this country as quickly as possible? i'm going to disagree with you in. i'm going to disagree with you in your characterisation of what this government is doing. actually, we
4:08 pm
talk about vaccines, and we have put 1.5 billion of uk taxpayers money into supporting covax and a further 450 into supporting covax and a further a50 into... into supporting covax and a further 450 into... . , into supporting covax and a further 450 int0- - -— into supporting covax and a further 450 int0---_ i - into supporting covax and a further| 450 into..._ i would 450 into... that is prudent. i would remind peeple _ 450 into... that is prudent. i would remind people watching, _ 450 into... that is prudent. i would remind people watching, of - 450 into... that is prudent. i would remind people watching, of the - 450 into... that is prudent. i would remind people watching, of the 1.5| remind people watching, of the 1.5 billion vaccines that the developed nation so far have distributed around the world, roughly a third are as a result of the efforts of the uk government, and the deal we did with oxford, so those vaccines are distributed at cost. that is the direct result of uk government action and i think people should be proud of that. action and i think people should be proud of that-— proud of that. extremely proud of that. we proud of that. extremely proud of that- we are _ proud of that. extremely proud of that. we are talking _ proud of that. extremely proud of that. we are talking about - proud of that. extremely proud of that. we are talking about big - proud of that. extremely proud of l that. we are talking about big sums of money in — that. we are talking about big sums of money in a _ that. we are talking about big sums of money in a pandemic— that. we are talking about big sums of money in a pandemic when - that. we are talking about big sums of money in a pandemic when we i that. we are talking about big sums i of money in a pandemic when we have had to spend £407 billion looking after the jobs had to spend £407 billion looking after thejobs and had to spend £407 billion looking after the jobs and livelihoods and the well—being and welfare of
4:09 pm
families in this country as well. rightly proud of the vaccines... thank— rightly proud of the vaccines... thank you — rightly proud of the vaccines... thank you very _ rightly proud of the vaccines... thank you very much. - rightly proud of the vaccines... thank you very much. meg - rightly proud of the vaccines... i thank you very much. meg hillier. thank— thank you very much. meg hillier. thank you — thank you very much. meg hillier. thank you. you have talked about the ambitions _ thank you. you have talked about the ambitions for— thank you. you have talked about the ambitions for net _ thank you. you have talked about the ambitions for net zero _ thank you. you have talked about the ambitions for net zero but _ thank you. you have talked about the ambitions for net zero but 57 - ambitions for net zero but 57 billion— ambitions for net zero but 57 billion of— ambitions for net zero but 57 billion of revenue _ ambitions for net zero but 57 billion of revenue per- ambitions for net zero but 57 billion of revenue per year. ambitions for net zero but 57 billion of revenue per year is| billion of revenue per year is consumption _ billion of revenue per year is consumption on _ billion of revenue per year is consumption on the - billion of revenue per year is consumption on the dash - billion of revenue per year is - consumption on the dash dependent billion of revenue per year is _ consumption on the dash dependent on the consumption — consumption on the dash dependent on the consumption of _ consumption on the dash dependent on the consumption of various _ consumption on the dash dependent on the consumption of various things - the consumption of various things and 28 _ the consumption of various things and 28 billion— the consumption of various things and 28 billion is— the consumption of various things and 28 billion is fuel— the consumption of various things and 28 billion is fuel duty- the consumption of various things and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, i and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, so can— and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, so can you — and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, so can you give _ and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, so can you give the _ and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, so can you give the british - and 28 billion is fuel duty alone, | so can you give the british public an idea _ so can you give the british public an idea of— so can you give the british public an idea of how— so can you give the british public an idea of how you _ so can you give the british public an idea of how you can— so can you give the british public an idea of how you can fill- so can you give the british public an idea of how you can fill the i so can you give the british public. an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue — an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue as— an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue as we _ an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue as we go— an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue as we go greener? i an idea of how you can fill the gap in revenue as we go greener? 33. in revenue as we go greener? 37 billion in revenue as we go greener? billion from fuel duty? in revenue as we go greener? 57 billion from fuel duty? 28 i in revenue as we go greener? 57 billion from fuel duty? 28 from | in revenue as we go greener? 57 i billion from fuel duty? 28 from fuel du . you billion from fuel duty? 28 from fuel duty- you are _ billion from fuel duty? 28 from fuel duty. you are making _ billion from fuel duty? 28 from fuel duty. you are making an _ billion from fuel duty? 28 from fuel duty. you are making an incredibly| duty. you are making an incredibly aood oint duty. you are making an incredibly good point and _ duty. you are making an incredibly good point and you _ duty. you are making an incredibly good point and you are _ duty. you are making an incredibly good point and you are talking i duty. you are making an incredibly l good point and you are talking about our fiscal impact of moving to green technology and the implications of that. as you phase out hydrocarbon vehicles and internal combustion engine vehicles, you phase out...
4:10 pm
what are your thoughts about how we io what are your thoughts about how we go forward? _ what are your thoughts about how we go forward? i— what are your thoughts about how we to forward? ., ., . ., , ., go forward? i wanted to clarify for everybody- _ go forward? i wanted to clarify for everybody- down _ go forward? i wanted to clarify for everybody. down the _ go forward? i wanted to clarify for everybody. down the line - go forward? i wanted to clarify for everybody. down the line the i everybody. down the line the exchequer will start to see a loss of revenue but what i don't want to do and let it be said now, and i sought some misreporting about this, misunderstanding i should say, i don't want to see fuel bills going up don't want to see fuel bills going up to compensate if you see what i mean. that is not the way forward. is there anything on the table? that is a matter. — is there anything on the table? that is a matter, and _ is there anything on the table? that is a matter, and i— is there anything on the table? is a matter, and i would not is there anything on the table?- is a matter, and i would not presume to anticipate the fiscal options of the chancellor at a budget or any other fiscal event.— the chancellor at a budget or any other fiscal event. something to be said for encouraging _ other fiscal event. something to be said for encouraging the _ other fiscal event. something to be said for encouraging the chancellor| said for encouraging the chancellor to make _ said for encouraging the chancellor to make a — said for encouraging the chancellor to make a major statement about how we're _ to make a major statement about how we're going _ to make a major statement about how we're going to plan a public
4:11 pm
expenditure and taxation over the next decade. expenditure and taxation over the next decade-— next decade. can't fault him for makin: next decade. can't fault him for making major— next decade. can't fault him for making major statements i next decade. can't fault him for making major statements in i next decade. can't fault him for| making major statements in the next decade. can't fault him for- making major statements in the last few months. you making major statements in the last few months— making major statements in the last few months. ., ., .., ., few months. you would encourage him to do that? i — few months. you would encourage him to do that? ithink— few months. you would encourage him to do that? i think you _ few months. you would encourage him to do that? i think you will _ few months. you would encourage him to do that? i think you will find - to do that? i think you will find that he has _ to do that? i think you will find that he has a _ to do that? i think you will find that he has a lot _ to do that? i think you will find that he has a lot to _ to do that? i think you will find that he has a lot to say - to do that? i think you will find that he has a lot to say in i to do that? i think you will find that he has a lot to say in duel that he has a lot to say in due course. , ., ., ~ that he has a lot to say in due course. , . ., ., that he hasalot to say in due course. , . ., ., ., course. very good. we are now going to move on — course. very good. we are now going to move on to — course. very good. we are now going to move on to covid _ course. very good. we are now going to move on to covid secondary i to move on to covid secondary impacts— to move on to covid secondary impacts and the covid pandemic. can i impacts and the covid pandemic. can i start— impacts and the covid pandemic. can i start with _ impacts and the covid pandemic. can i start with greg clarke? good afternoon. — i start with greg clarke? good afternoon, prime _ i start with greg clarke? good afternoon, prime minister. i i start with greg clarke? good afternoon, prime minister. 1. i start with greg clarke? good afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to— afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to ask— afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to ask you _ afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to ask you about _ afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to ask you about the _ afternoon, prime minister. iwould like to ask you about the lessons l like to ask you about the lessons that can — like to ask you about the lessons that can be — like to ask you about the lessons that can be learned _ like to ask you about the lessons that can be learned so _ like to ask you about the lessons that can be learned so far- like to ask you about the lessons that can be learned so far in- that can be learned so far in responding _ that can be learned so far in responding to _ that can be learned so far in responding to the _ that can be learned so far in responding to the pandemicj that can be learned so far in- responding to the pandemic but before — responding to the pandemic but before i— responding to the pandemic but before i do. _ responding to the pandemic but before i do, can _ responding to the pandemic but before i do, can i _ responding to the pandemic but before i do, can i ask— responding to the pandemic but before i do, can i ask you - responding to the pandemic but before i do, can i ask you a i responding to the pandemic but i before i do, can i ask you a couple of quick— before i do, can i ask you a couple of quick questions _ before i do, can i ask you a couple of quick questions of— before i do, can i ask you a couple of quick questions of current - of quick questions of current concern~ _ of quick questions of current concern~ why— of quick questions of current concern. why should - of quick questions of current concern. why should not i of quick questions of current i concern. why should not double vaccinated — concern. why should not double vaccinated british _ concern. why should not double vaccinated british people - concern. why should not double vaccinated british people be i concern. why should not double i vaccinated british people be able to id vaccinated british people be able to go on _ vaccinated british people be able to go on holiday— vaccinated british people be able to go on holiday to _ vaccinated british people be able to go on holiday to spain _ vaccinated british people be able to go on holiday to spain this - vaccinated british people be able toi go on holiday to spain this summer? the double _ go on holiday to spain this summer? the double vaccination _ go on holiday to spain this summer? the double vaccination is— go on holiday to spain this summer? the double vaccination is a _ the double vaccination is a potential and a great liberator in principle and in practice i think it will be great, and it already is,
4:12 pm
you can see the benefits, to vaccines, whether of pfizer or astrazeneca. .. vaccines, whether of pfizer or astrazeneca. . .— vaccines, whether of pfizer or astrazeneca. . . vaccines, whether of pfizer or astrazeneca... �* , ., astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to sain? astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what _ astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what you _ astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what you will _ astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what you will find - astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what you will find is i astrazeneca. .. why can't people go to spain? what you will find is if i to spain? what you will find is if ou can to spain? what you will find is if you can contain _ to spain? what you will find is if you can contain your— to spain? what you will find is if| you can contain your impatience, to spain? what you will find is if i you can contain your impatience, the secretary of state for transport may be saying more about that in the course of the next few days, maybe even tomorrow. i would not want to steal his thunder. irate even tomorrow. i would not want to steal his thunder.— steal his thunder. we know it will be about quarantining _ steal his thunder. we know it will be about quarantining but - steal his thunder. we know it will be about quarantining but i'm i be about quarantining but i'm wondering _ be about quarantining but i'm wondering what _ be about quarantining but i'm wondering what is _ be about quarantining but i'm wondering what is your- be about quarantining but i'm. wondering what is your instinct be about quarantining but i'm i wondering what is your instinct on the guidance _ wondering what is your instinct on the guidance for— wondering what is your instinct on the guidance for and _ wondering what is your instinct on the guidance for and at _ wondering what is your instinct on the guidance for and at least i the guidance for and at least countries _ the guidance for and at least countries which _ the guidance for and at least countries which state - the guidance for and at least countries which state you i the guidance for and at least - countries which state you should not travel _ countries which state you should not travel to _ countries which state you should not travel to and — countries which state you should not travel to and published _ countries which state you should not travel to and published countries, i travel to and published countries, your instinct — travel to and published countries, your instinct is _ travel to and published countries, your instinct is to _ travel to and published countries, your instinct is to get _ travel to and published countries, your instinct is to get rid - travel to and published countries, your instinct is to get rid of- travel to and published countries, your instinct is to get rid of it? i your instinct is to get rid of it? -- amber— your instinct is to get rid of it? -- amber list— your instinct is to get rid of it? —— amber list countries. - your instinct is to get rid of it? -- amber list countries.- your instinct is to get rid of it? -- amber list countries. what i can sa , i -- amber list countries. what i can say. i repeat— -- amber list countries. what i can say, i repeat what _ -- amber list countries. what i can say, i repeat what i _ -- amber list countries. what i can say, i repeat what i have _ -- amber list countries. what i can say, i repeat what i have said - say, i repeat what i have said already, double vaccination offers massive potential.— massive potential. there is a difference — massive potential. there is a difference between - massive potential. there is a difference between the - massive potential. there is a - difference between the guidance?
4:13 pm
yes, difference between the guidance? yes. you — difference between the guidance? yes. you will— difference between the guidance? yes, you will see _ difference between the guidance? yes, you will see a _ difference between the guidance? yes, you will see a lot— difference between the guidance? yes, you will see a lot more - difference between the guidance? yes, you will see a lot more on. yes, you will see a lot more on that. the crucial thing, is to remember that currently we need to contain the pandemic and we need... i have one question on that. the 16th _ i have one question on that. the 16th of— i have one question on that. the 16th of august. _ i have one question on that. the 16th of august, when _ i have one question on that. the 16th of august, when contacts . i have one question on that. the| 16th of august, when contacts of people _ 16th of august, when contacts of people with _ 16th of august, when contacts of people with covid _ 16th of august, when contacts of people with covid no _ 16th of august, when contacts of people with covid no longer - 16th of august, when contacts ofi people with covid no longer have 16th of august, when contacts of i people with covid no longer have to isolate, _ people with covid no longer have to isolate, is _ people with covid no longer have to isolate, is the — people with covid no longer have to isolate, is the 16th _ people with covid no longer have to isolate, is the 16th of _ people with covid no longer have to isolate, is the 16th of august - people with covid no longer have to isolate, is the 16th of august the i isolate, is the 16th of august the date that— isolate, is the 16th of august the date that you _ isolate, is the 16th of august the date that you expect _ isolate, is the 16th of august the date that you expect us - isolate, is the 16th of august the date that you expect us to - isolate, is the 16th of august the date that you expect us to reach| date that you expect us to reach herd _ date that you expect us to reach herd immunity? _ date that you expect us to reach herd immunity?— herd immunity? that is not the consideration. _ herd immunity? that is not the consideration. what _ herd immunity? that is not the consideration. what is - herd immunity? that is not the consideration. what is the - consideration. what is the consideration _ consideration. what is the consideration then? - consideration. what is the consideration then? it - consideration. what is the consideration then? it is l consideration. what is the l consideration then? it is the consideration. what is the - consideration then? it is the time b which consideration then? it is the time by which we _ consideration then? it is the time by which we feel— consideration then? it is the time by which we feel there _ consideration then? it is the time by which we feel there will - consideration then? it is the time by which we feel there will have l by which we feel there will have been much more progress made in vaccination. been much more progress made in vaccination-— vaccination. more than the 19th of jul ? vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes. — vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes. even — vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes, even more, _ vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes, even more, and - vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes, even more, and all- vaccination. more than the 19th of july? yes, even more, and all of. july? yes, even more, and all of these decisions _ july? yes, even more, and all of these decisions are _ july? yes, even more, and all of these decisions are a _ july? yes, even more, and all of these decisions are a balance . july? yes, even more, and all of these decisions are a balance of| these decisions are a balance of risk, and by the 16th of august we will have got many more jabs into arms and many more young and healthy
4:14 pm
people will be vaccinated which is a good thing, because it means... 17 good thing, because it means... ? they are the most robust against covid, _ they are the most robust against covid, though _ they are the most robust against covid. though-— they are the most robust against covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry they have — covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry they have had _ covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry they have had to _ covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry they have had to wait. _ covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry they have had to wait. what - covid, though. yes, and i'm sorry| they have had to wait. what about they have had to wait. what about the consequences _ they have had to wait. what about the consequences of _ they have had to wait. what about the consequences of that, - they have had to wait. what about the consequences of that, rather. the consequences of that, rather than _ the consequences of that, rather than the — the consequences of that, rather than the weight. _ the consequences of that, rather than the weight. is _ the consequences of that, rather than the weight. is it _ the consequences of that, rather than the weight. is it the - the consequences of that, rather than the weight. is it the case i the consequences of that, rather. than the weight. is it the case that until we _ than the weight. is it the case that until we get— than the weight. is it the case that until we get to _ than the weight. is it the case that until we get to that _ than the weight. is it the case that until we get to that point, - than the weight. is it the case that until we get to that point, on - than the weight. is it the case that until we get to that point, on the i until we get to that point, on the 16th of— until we get to that point, on the 16th of august. _ until we get to that point, on the 16th of august, people _ until we get to that point, on the 16th of august, people who - until we get to that point, on the 16th of august, people who have i until we get to that point, on the - 16th of august, people who have been jabbed _ 16th of august, people who have been jabbed twice _ 16th of august, people who have been jabbed twice will— 16th of august, people who have been jabbed twice will have _ 16th of august, people who have been jabbed twice will have to _ 16th of august, people who have been jabbed twice will have to isolate - jabbed twice will have to isolate even _ jabbed twice will have to isolate even if — jabbed twice will have to isolate even if they— jabbed twice will have to isolate even if they have _ jabbed twice will have to isolate even if they have had _ jabbed twice will have to isolate even if they have had a - jabbed twice will have to isolate | even if they have had a negative covid _ even if they have had a negative covid test? _ even if they have had a negative covid test? we _ even if they have had a negative covid test?— even if they have had a negative covid test? ~ . . , ., , ., covid test? we are asking people to isolate and l — covid test? we are asking people to isolate and i know _ covid test? we are asking people to isolate and i know how _ covid test? we are asking people to isolate and i know how frustrating i isolate and i know how frustrating it is. ~ , isolate and i know how frustrating it is.- because, _ isolate and i know how frustrating it is.- because, i'm - isolate and i know how frustrating it is. lathe? because, i'm afraid, it is. why? because, i'm afraid, this is a highly _ it is. why? because, i'm afraid, this is a highly contagious - it is. why? because, i'm afraid, this is a highly contagious disease, and we have to do what we can to stop it spreading. flan and we have to do what we can to stop it spreading.— stop it spreading. can you give an estimate as _ stop it spreading. can you give an estimate as to _ stop it spreading. can you give an estimate as to how _ stop it spreading. can you give an estimate as to how many - stop it spreading. can you give an| estimate as to how many contacts will have — estimate as to how many contacts will have to — estimate as to how many contacts will have to isolate _ estimate as to how many contacts will have to isolate during - estimate as to how many contacts will have to isolate during that - will have to isolate during that extra — will have to isolate during that extra 28 — will have to isolate during that extra 28 days _ will have to isolate during that extra 28 days after _ will have to isolate during that extra 28 days after the - will have to isolate during that extra 28 days after the 19th i will have to isolate during that extra 28 days after the 19th of| extra 28 days after the 19th of
4:15 pm
july? — extra 28 days after the 19th of jul ? . , . , ., july? clearly that will depend on the spread _ july? clearly that will depend on the spread of — july? clearly that will depend on the spread of the _ july? clearly that will depend on the spread of the virus. - july? clearly that will depend on the spread of the virus. have . july? clearly that will depend on | the spread of the virus. have you seen an estimate? _ the spread of the virus. have you seen an estimate? i _ the spread of the virus. have you seen an estimate? i have - the spread of the virus. have you seen an estimate? i have not - the spread of the virus. have you | seen an estimate? i have not seen an data seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and _ seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and it _ seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and it will _ seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and it will depend - seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and it will depend on - seen an estimate? i have not seen any data and it will depend on the | any data and it will depend on the numbers. . ,, . . , numbers. the health secretary said there could — numbers. the health secretary said there could be _ numbers. the health secretary said there could be around _ numbers. the health secretary said there could be around 100,000 - there could be around 100,000 infections — there could be around 100,000 infections per— there could be around 100,000 infections per day— there could be around 100,000 infections per day and - there could be around 100,000 infections per day and if - there could be around 100,000 infections per day and if each i there could be around 100,000i infections per day and if each of those _ infections per day and if each of those has — infections per day and if each of those has two _ infections per day and if each of those has two contacts - infections per day and if each of those has two contacts each, i infections per day and if each of l those has two contacts each, that infections per day and if each of - those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 _ those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 per— those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 per day, _ those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 per day, so— those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 per day, so over- those has two contacts each, that is 200,000 per day, so over the - those has two contacts each, that is. 200,000 per day, so over the course of that— 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28— 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28 days. — 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28 days, the _ 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28 days, the extra _ 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28 days, the extra days - 200,000 per day, so over the course of that 28 days, the extra days that l of that 28 days, the extra days that have treen— of that 28 days, the extra days that have been imposed, _ of that 28 days, the extra days that have been imposed, that _ of that 28 days, the extra days that have been imposed, that is - of that 28 days, the extra days that have been imposed, that is over. of that 28 days, the extra days that have been imposed, that is over 5. have been imposed, that is over 5 million _ have been imposed, that is over 5 million people _ have been imposed, that is over 5 million people. is— have been imposed, that is over 5 million people. is that _ have been imposed, that is over 5 million people. is that a _ have been imposed, that is over 5. million people. is that a reasonable step and _ million people. is that a reasonable step and have — million people. is that a reasonable step and have you _ million people. is that a reasonable step and have you considered - million people. is that a reasonable step and have you considered how. step and have you considered how many— step and have you considered how many hospital— step and have you considered how many hospital admissions - step and have you considered how many hospital admissions that - step and have you considered how many hospital admissions that is i many hospital admissions that is going _ many hospital admissions that is going to — many hospital admissions that is going to prevent? _ many hospital admissions that is going to prevent? tilte— many hospital admissions that is going to prevent?— going to prevent? we have been lookin: at going to prevent? we have been looking at all— going to prevent? we have been looking at all the _ going to prevent? we have been looking at all the data _ going to prevent? we have been looking at all the data and - going to prevent? we have been looking at all the data and trying to strike a balance and... the two sides are that you could simply say, we are going to dispense altogether with self isolation and move straight to a testing regime and not
4:16 pm
bother with asking people to do that in england but the difficulty with thatis in england but the difficulty with that is that you would be effectively allowing many more people to be vectors of disease, and by continuing as we are with our plans. by continuing as we are with our lans. ., . , . plans. how many fewer hospital admissions _ plans. how many fewer hospital admissions will _ plans. how many fewer hospital admissions will result _ plans. how many fewer hospital admissions will result from - plans. how many fewer hospital. admissions will result from that? i can't admissions will result from that? can't give you that number but admissions will result from that?“ can't give you that number but what i can certainly say is that we believe that the programme of test, trace in isolate has made a massive difference to the disease. i trace in isolate has made a massive difference to the disease.— difference to the disease. i know ou difference to the disease. i know you respect _ difference to the disease. i know you respect john _ difference to the disease. i know you respect john bell— difference to the disease. i know you respect john bell at - difference to the disease. i know you respect john bell at oxford, | difference to the disease. i know- you respect john bell at oxford, and you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said _ you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at— you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at the — you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at the very— you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at the very least _ you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at the very least you - you respectjohn bell at oxford, and he said at the very least you should i he said at the very least you should be able _ he said at the very least you should be able to— he said at the very least you should be able to be — he said at the very least you should be able to be tested _ he said at the very least you should be able to be tested and _ he said at the very least you should be able to be tested and released l be able to be tested and released from covid — be able to be tested and released from covid rather— be able to be tested and released from covid rather than _ be able to be tested and released from covid rather than to - be able to be tested and released from covid rather than to have . be able to be tested and released from covid rather than to have to| from covid rather than to have to isolate _ from covid rather than to have to isolate for — from covid rather than to have to isolate for that _ from covid rather than to have to isolate for that period _ from covid rather than to have to isolate for that period and - from covid rather than to have to isolate for that period and what i from covid rather than to have to. isolate for that period and what he said was, — isolate for that period and what he said was, it — isolate for that period and what he said was, it is— isolate for that period and what he said was, it is more _ isolate for that period and what he said was, it is more likely- isolate for that period and what he said was, it is more likely that - said was, it is more likely that people — said was, it is more likely that people will— said was, it is more likely that people will complied - said was, it is more likely that people will complied with - said was, it is more likely that people will complied with the| people will complied with the guidance _ people will complied with the guidance if— people will complied with the guidance if there _ people will complied with the guidance if there is _ people will complied with the guidance if there is a - people will complied with the guidance if there is a way- people will complied with the guidance if there is a way outi people will complied with the . guidance if there is a way out of it, guidance if there is a way out of it. rather— guidance if there is a way out of it, rather than—
4:17 pm
guidance if there is a way out of it, ratherthan if— guidance if there is a way out of it, rather than if they _ guidance if there is a way out of it, rather than if they test - it, rather than if they test negative, _ it, rather than if they test negative, so _ it, rather than if they test negative, so would - it, rather than if they test negative, so would you i it, rather than if they test - negative, so would you consider taking _ negative, so would you consider taking his — negative, so would you consider taking his expert— negative, so would you consider taking his expert advice? - negative, so would you consider taking his expert advice? we . negative, so would you consider taking his expert advice? we are movin: to taking his expert advice? we are moving to testing, _ taking his expert advice? we are moving to testing, rather- taking his expert advice? we are moving to testing, rather than i moving to testing, rather than isolating. moving to testing, rather than isolatina. �* ., ' ~ ., isolating. before the 16th of au~ust? isolating. before the 16th of august? we _ isolating. before the 16th of august? we keep _ isolating. before the 16th of august? we keep all- isolating. before the 16th of august? we keep all data . isolating. before the 16th of - august? we keep all data under review and _ august? we keep all data under review and we _ august? we keep all data under review and we are _ august? we keep all data under review and we are always - august? we keep all data under review and we are always open. august? we keep all data under. review and we are always open to looking at the data but that is what we think is the sensible approach. we want to retain the tools of asking people to protect others from the disease. it has been effective, and i think we should stick with it. let me ask you one last question. we are obviously— let me ask you one last question. we are obviously going _ let me ask you one last question. we are obviously going to _ let me ask you one last question. we are obviously going to have _ let me ask you one last question. we are obviously going to have the - are obviously going to have the public— are obviously going to have the public inquiry _ are obviously going to have the public inquiry that _ are obviously going to have the public inquiry that will- are obviously going to have the public inquiry that will look- are obviously going to have the i public inquiry that will look back on all— public inquiry that will look back on all of— public inquiry that will look back on all of this, _ public inquiry that will look back on all of this, but _ public inquiry that will look back on all of this, but it _ public inquiry that will look back on all of this, but it is _ public inquiry that will look backi on all of this, but it is important to learn— on all of this, but it is important to learn lessons _ on all of this, but it is important to learn lessons on _ on all of this, but it is important to learn lessons on the - on all of this, but it is important to learn lessons on the way- on all of this, but it is important to learn lessons on the way and| on all of this, but it is important. to learn lessons on the way and the science _ to learn lessons on the way and the science and — to learn lessons on the way and the science and technology _ to learn lessons on the way and the science and technology committee i to learn lessons on the way and the i science and technology committee at the health— science and technology committee at the health and — science and technology committee at the health and social— science and technology committee at the health and social care _ the health and social care committees— the health and social care committees conducting . the health and social care| committees conducting an the health and social care - committees conducting an inquiry into that, — committees conducting an inquiry into that, what _ committees conducting an inquiry into that, what would _ committees conducting an inquiry into that, what would you - committees conducting an inquiry into that, what would you do - into that, what would you do differently _ into that, what would you do differently given _ into that, what would you do differently given experience i into that, what would you do . differently given experience and what _ differently given experience and what would _ differently given experience and what would you _ differently given experience and
4:18 pm
what would you do _ differently given experience and what would you do the - differently given experience and what would you do the same? . differently given experience and i what would you do the same? that differently given experience and what would you do the same? that is a ve bi what would you do the same? that is a very big question. _ what would you do the same? that is a very big question. if— what would you do the same? that is a very big question. if you _ what would you do the same? that is a very big question. if you ask- what would you do the same? that is a very big question. if you ask me - a very big question. if you ask me what things, how we started to do differently, and where we have really adapted.— really adapted. what have you learned from _ really adapted. what have you learned from the _ really adapted. what have you learned from the experience. | really adapted. what have you | learned from the experience. it really adapted. what have you . learned from the experience. it is really adapted. what have you - learned from the experience. it is a aood learned from the experience. it is a good question _ learned from the experience. it is a good question and _ learned from the experience. it is a good question and what _ learned from the experience. it is a good question and what have - learned from the experience. it is a good question and what have we i good question and what have we learned since the start of the pandemic, that is obvious, to begin with, it was clear that we did not have all the data that we needed and we did not have it all in one place and all in the right place. every morning now i go straight into a meeting where i can see pretty much what is happening in any hospital in the country and i can see the breakdown by age, bite variant type, and i can see exactly what is happening pretty much in real time __ by happening pretty much in real time —— by variant type. we have the data
4:19 pm
that we did not have, and now we have it. diagnostics is an obvious thing. we did not even know how to make a lateral flow test when we began. we did not have the technology in this country. we now do. we have a diagnostics industry which is growing. ppe, you know, we remember how difficult and traumatic that was. , ., , ,., , ., that was. these are lessons learned on the way? — that was. these are lessons learned on the way? we _ that was. these are lessons learned on the way? we have _ that was. these are lessons learned on the way? we have the _ that was. these are lessons learned on the way? we have the ability - that was. these are lessons learned| on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 — on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 of— on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 of our— on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 of our ppe _ on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 of our ppe in - on the way? we have the ability now to make 8096 of our ppe in this - to make 80% of our ppe in this country. to say nothing of vaccine technology which is obviously developing. the single most important thing and i know how much you care about this and you are right, the single most important thing we have learnt, but i have learned, is the massive benefits to
4:20 pm
our country and to our economy by investing, and you could not have it any clearer. the impact from the oxford vaccine and the ability that is giving us to open up our economy in ways that we couldn't.— in ways that we couldn't. thank you very much- — in ways that we couldn't. thank you very much- we _ in ways that we couldn't. thank you very much. we are _ in ways that we couldn't. thank you very much. we are running - in ways that we couldn't. thank you | very much. we are running overtime but we will — very much. we are running overtime but we will press _ very much. we are running overtime but we will press on _ very much. we are running overtime but we will press on as _ very much. we are running overtime but we will press on as as _ very much. we are running overtime but we will press on as as possible. | but we will press on as as possible. last october... but we will press on as as possible. last october. . .— last october... inaudible it was last october. . . inaudible it was recommended - last october... inaudible it was recommended the l last october... inaudible . it was recommended the £20 last october... inaudible _ it was recommended the £20 universal credit uplift _ it was recommended the £20 universal credit uplift should _ it was recommended the £20 universal credit uplift should be _ it was recommended the £20 universal credit uplift should be made _ credit uplift should be made permanent _ credit uplift should be made permanent and _ credit uplift should be made permanent and last - credit uplift should be madel permanent and last weekend credit uplift should be made - permanent and last weekend all six of the _ permanent and last weekend all six of the conservative _ permanent and last weekend all six of the conservative former- of the conservative former secretaries _ of the conservative former secretaries for _ of the conservative former secretaries for work - of the conservative former secretaries for work and l of the conservative former- secretaries for work and pension made _ secretaries for work and pension made the — secretaries for work and pension made the same _ secretaries for work and pension made the same call, _ secretaries for work and pension made the same call, so - secretaries for work and pension made the same call, so how- secretaries for work and pension made the same call, so how dol secretaries for work and pension i made the same call, so how do you respond _ made the same call, so how do you respond to— made the same call, so how do you respond to that _ made the same call, so how do you respond to that cool? _ made the same call, so how do you respond to that cool? i _ made the same call, so how do you respond to that cool?— respond to that cool? i understand ve much respond to that cool? i understand very much white _ respond to that cool? i understand
4:21 pm
very much white people _ respond to that cool? i understand very much white people want - respond to that cool? i understand very much white people want to i respond to that cool? i understand i very much white people want to keep investing in and helping the poorest investing in and helping the poorest in our society and that is what we are going to do —— white people. we will continue with the increase in pay for the lowest paid workers which we have done by increasing the national living wage, and we have given councils huge sums to help those in greatest need. [i given councils huge sums to help those in greatest need. 4 million families have been helped to pay their council tax bills, and you refer to the universal credit uplift, amongst many other things that we have done, and they are huge, and they are part of the 407 billion, but i want to stress that as we come towards the inflection point in this pandemic, when we start to lift the non—pharmaceutical
4:22 pm
interventions and we start to lift the restraints on society and start to lift the government imposed addict at that told people they could not go to work —— diktats. we now have to have a different emphasis and the emphasis has got to be on getting people into work and getting people intojobs. do be on getting people into work and getting people into jobs.— getting people into 'obs. do you think the likes _ getting people into 'obs. do you think the likes of _ getting people into jobs. do you think the likes of iain _ getting people into jobs. do you think the likes of iain duncan i getting people into jobs. do you i think the likes of iain duncan smith do not _ think the likes of iain duncan smith do not understand? _ think the likes of iain duncan smith do not understand? i— think the likes of iain duncan smith do not understand?— do not understand? i have huge admiration _ do not understand? i have huge admiration from _ do not understand? i have huge admiration from all— do not understand? i have huge admiration from all of— do not understand? i have huge admiration from all of these i do not understand? i have huge i admiration from all of these people and —— for all admiration from all of these people and —— forall of admiration from all of these people and —— for all of these people and i understand where they are coming from, but the emphasis the government is placing is on coming out of the pandemic with a strong jobs lead recovery. if out of the pandemic with a strong jobs lead recovery.— out of the pandemic with a strong jobs lead recovery. if the cut goes ahead in three _ jobs lead recovery. if the cut goes ahead in three months' _ jobs lead recovery. if the cut goes ahead in three months' time, i ahead in three months' time, unemployment _ ahead in three months' time, unemployment support- ahead in three months' time, unemployment support will. ahead in three months' time, i unemployment support will be at ahead in three months' time, - unemployment support will be at its lowest _ unemployment support will be at its lowest level — unemployment support will be at its lowest level in _ unemployment support will be at its lowest level in real _ unemployment support will be at its lowest level in real terms _ unemployment support will be at its lowest level in real terms for - unemployment support will be at its lowest level in real terms for over. lowest level in real terms for over 30 years. — lowest level in real terms for over 30 years. just _ lowest level in real terms for over 30 years. just as _ lowest level in real terms for over 30 years, just as the _ lowest level in real terms for over 30 years, just as the end - lowest level in real terms for over 30 years, just as the end of- lowest level in real terms for over 30 years, just as the end of the l 30 years, just as the end of the furlough — 30 years, just as the end of the furlough scheme _ 30 years, just as the end of the furlough scheme increases - furlough scheme increases unemployment, _ furlough scheme increases unemployment, and - furlough scheme increases i unemployment, and according furlough scheme increases - unemployment, and according to furlough scheme increases _ unemployment, and according to the joseph— unemployment, and according to the joseph rowntree _ unemployment, and according to the joseph rowntree foundation - unemployment, and according to the joseph rowntree foundation half- unemployment, and according to the joseph rowntree foundation half a i joseph rowntree foundation half a million _ joseph rowntree foundation half a million people _ joseph rowntree foundation half a million people will— joseph rowntree foundation half a million people will be _ joseph rowntree foundation half a million people will be pushed - joseph rowntree foundation half a i million people will be pushed below
4:23 pm
the poverty— million people will be pushed below the poverty line _ million people will be pushed below the poverty line by— million people will be pushed below the poverty line by taking _ million people will be pushed below the poverty line by taking the - million people will be pushed below the poverty line by taking the £20 l the poverty line by taking the £20 away _ the poverty line by taking the £20 away including _ the poverty line by taking the £20 away including 200,000 - the poverty line by taking the £20 away including 200,000 childrenl the poverty line by taking the £20 i away including 200,000 children and universal— away including 200,000 children and universal credit _ away including 200,000 children and universal credit allowance _ away including 200,000 children and universal credit allowance for - away including 200,000 children and universal credit allowance for those i universal credit allowance for those under— universal credit allowance for those under 25_ universal credit allowance for those under 25 has — universal credit allowance for those under 25 has been— universal credit allowance for those under 25 has been hard _ universal credit allowance for those under 25 has been hard hit- universal credit allowance for those under 25 has been hard hit by- universal credit allowance for those under 25 has been hard hit byjob i under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses— under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and — under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that _ under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that will _ under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that will be _ under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that will be cut - under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that will be cut by- under 25 has been hard hit byjob losses and that will be cut by a i losses and that will be cut by a quarter~ — losses and that will be cut by a quarter~ can— losses and that will be cut by a quarter. can all— losses and that will be cut by a quarter. can all of— losses and that will be cut by a quarter. can all of that - losses and that will be cut by a| quarter. can all of that damage really— quarter. can all of that damage really be — quarter. can all of that damage really be justified? _ quarter. can all of that damage really be justified? the - quarter. can all of that damage really be justified?— quarter. can all of that damage really be justified? really be 'ustified? the answer to that and really be justified? the answer to that and i understand _ really be justified? the answer to that and i understand what i really be justified? the answer to that and i understand what you i really be justified? the answer to. that and i understand what you are saying, but the answer is to get people into work and if you look at what is happening, in the last few months, you have seen that unemployment and the projections for unemployment and the projections for unemployment which you are rightly worried about, but they are 2 million fewer than we were told they were going to be and we have lower unemployment than virtually all of the rest of the g7 and the vacancy rates are up at precrisis levels. the number of people on the payroll has been rising forfive the number of people on the payroll has been rising for five consecutive months, and so it is true there are now 2 million people still on the furlough scheme and you are right to draw attention to that, that is a considerable number. if you look at
4:24 pm
what is actually happening, though, thejobs what is actually happening, though, the jobs market, what is actually happening, though, thejobs market, what is happening thejobs market, what is happening thejobs market, what is happening the jobs market, thejobs market, what is happening thejobs market, the problem at the moment is, most colleagues would testify, a shortage of labour, not a shortage ofjobs. that is what we need to emphasise. do shortage of jobs. that is what we need to emphasise.— need to emphasise. do you think takin: need to emphasise. do you think taking £20 _ need to emphasise. do you think taking £20 away _ need to emphasise. do you think taking £20 away will— need to emphasise. do you think taking £20 away will cause i need to emphasise. do you think. taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number— taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number of— taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number of people? _ taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number of people? the - taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number of people?— taking £20 away will cause hardship to a number of people? the best way forward is to — to a number of people? the best way forward is to get _ to a number of people? the best way forward is to get to _ to a number of people? the best way forward is to get to the _ to a number of people? the best way forward is to get to the few _ to a number of people? the best way forward is to get to the few people i forward is to get to the few people into high skilled and high paid jobs and that is the ambition of this government —— the best way forward is to get more people into higher skilled and higher paid jobs. that skilled and higher paid 'obs. that is not the point i skilled and higher paid 'obs. that is not the point of i skilled and higher paid jobs. that is not the point of view of iain duncan — is not the point of view of iain duncan smith, _ is not the point of view of iain duncan smith, and _ is not the point of view of iain duncan smith, and he - is not the point of view of iain duncan smith, and he is- is not the point of view of iain i duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 _ duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 to— duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 to he _ duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 to be retained. _ duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 to be retained. are - duncan smith, and he is calling for the £20 to be retained. are you i the £20 to be retained. are you going _ the £20 to be retained. are you going to — the £20 to be retained. are you going to review— the £20 to be retained. are you going to review this? _ the £20 to be retained. are you going to review this? we - the £20 to be retained. are you going to review this?— going to review this? we keep everything _ going to review this? we keep everything under _ going to review this? we keep everything under constant i going to review this? we keep i everything under constant review but i have given you a clear steer about what my instincts are. we are also, by the way, developing and pushing forward a lot of excellent schemes
4:25 pm
forward a lot of excellent schemes for getting people into work, so not just kick—start, but restart and the job entry training scheme, to help people into work, and i think that should be our mission and our crusade. ., ., , should be our mission and our crusade. . ., , ., , crusade. can i raise a different oint? crusade. can i raise a different point? in _ crusade. can i raise a different point? in february— crusade. can i raise a different point? in february you - crusade. can i raise a different point? in february you made l crusade. can i raise a different l point? in february you made the point _ point? in february you made the point in — point? in february you made the point in the _ point? in february you made the point in the chamber, _ point? in february you made the point in the chamber, rightly, i point? in february you made the i point in the chamber, rightly, that the government— point in the chamber, rightly, that the government is— point in the chamber, rightly, that the government is worried - point in the chamber, rightly, that the government is worried about l point in the chamber, rightly, that i the government is worried about the increase _ the government is worried about the increase in— the government is worried about the increase in online _ the government is worried about the increase in online fraud. _ the government is worried about the increase in online fraud. we - the government is worried about the increase in online fraud. we work i increase in online fraud. we work and pensions _ increase in online fraud. we work and pensions committee - increase in online fraud. we work and pensions committee and i increase in online fraud. we work and pensions committee and the | and pensions committee and the treasury— and pensions committee and the treasury committee _ and pensions committee and the treasury committee and - and pensions committee and the treasury committee and the i and pensions committee and the i treasury committee and the governor of the _ treasury committee and the governor of the bank— treasury committee and the governor of the bank of— treasury committee and the governor of the bank of england, _ treasury committee and the governor of the bank of england, the _ of the bank of england, the financial— of the bank of england, the financial conduct _ of the bank of england, the| financial conduct authority, of the bank of england, the - financial conduct authority, they have _ financial conduct authority, they have all — financial conduct authority, they have all called _ financial conduct authority, they have all called for— financial conduct authority, they have all called for the _ financial conduct authority, they have all called for the online i have all called for the online safety — have all called for the online safety hill _ have all called for the online safety bill to _ have all called for the online safety bill to tackle - have all called for the online safety bill to tackle scams, i have all called for the online i safety bill to tackle scams, so have all called for the online - safety bill to tackle scams, so why is the _ safety bill to tackle scams, so why is the government _ safety bill to tackle scams, so why is the government unwilling - safety bill to tackle scams, so why is the government unwilling to i safety bill to tackle scams, so why. is the government unwilling to make that change — is the government unwilling to make that change to — is the government unwilling to make that change to the _ is the government unwilling to make that change to the bill? _ is the government unwilling to make that change to the bill? i’m“ - is the government unwilling to make that change to the bill?— that change to the bill? i'm not aware that _ that change to the bill? i'm not aware that we _ that change to the bill? i'm not aware that we are _ that change to the bill? i'm not aware that we are failing i that change to the bill? i'm not aware that we are failing to i that change to the bill? i'm not aware that we are failing to do | that change to the bill? i'm not i aware that we are failing to do that but i... i'm concerned that we should tackle forward and indeed i'm told that the online safety bill
4:26 pm
does just that. it told that the online safety bill does just that.— does just that. it does it for a small part — does just that. it does it for a small part of _ does just that. it does it for a small part of the _ does just that. it does it for a small part of the problem i does just that. it does it for a i small part of the problem which is user generated _ small part of the problem which is user generated content— small part of the problem which is user generated content but- small part of the problem which is user generated content but it i user generated content but it doesn't — user generated content but it doesn't do _ user generated content but it doesn't do it— user generated content but it doesn't do it for— user generated content but it doesn't do it for online - user generated content but it i doesn't do it for online advertising and that— doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems _ doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems to _ doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems to be _ doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems to be on _ doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems to be on a - doesn't do it for online advertising and that seems to be on a much i and that seems to be on a much longer— and that seems to be on a much longer term _ and that seems to be on a much longer term track— and that seems to be on a much longer term track and _ and that seems to be on a much longer term track and it - and that seems to be on a much longer term track and it is - and that seems to be on a much i longer term track and it is causing huge _ longer term track and it is causing huge problems— longer term track and it is causing huge problems so— longer term track and it is causing huge problems so i— longer term track and it is causing huge problems so i wonder- longer term track and it is causing i huge problems so i wonder whether you could _ huge problems so i wonder whether you could have _ huge problems so i wonder whether you could have a _ huge problems so i wonder whether you could have a look— huge problems so i wonder whether you could have a look at _ huge problems so i wonder whether you could have a look at the - huge problems so i wonder whether you could have a look at the current online _ you could have a look at the current online safety— you could have a look at the current online safety bill— you could have a look at the current online safety bill and _ you could have a look at the current online safety bill and see _ you could have a look at the current online safety bill and see whether. online safety bill and see whether it could _ online safety bill and see whether it could he — online safety bill and see whether it could be changed _ online safety bill and see whether it could be changed to _ online safety bill and see whether it could be changed to tackle i online safety bill and see whether. it could be changed to tackle online fraud _ it could be changed to tackle online fraud [”in— it could be changed to tackle online fraud. �* ., ., ., . ,, fraud. i'm told that it will tackle a wide range — fraud. i'm told that it will tackle a wide range of— fraud. i'm told that it will tackle a wide range of content - fraud. i'm told that it will tackle a wide range of content and i fraud. i'm told that it will tackle i a wide range of content and takes fraud. i'm told that it will tackle - a wide range of content and takes a focused approach to tackling online fraud but if you feel it is in some way inadequate eye more than happy to look at it but i know one of the key objectives of the online safety bill is to tackle online fraud —— i'm more than happy to look at it. robert halfon. education. goad robert halfon. education. good afternoon- _ robert halfon. education. good afternoon. we _ robert halfon. education. good afternoon. we have _ robert halfon. education. good afternoon. we have got - robert halfon. education. good afternoon. we have got argentinian levels _ afternoon. we have got argentinian levels of— afternoon. we have got argentinian levels of hyperinflation _ afternoon. we have got argentinian levels of hyperinflation in _ afternoon. we have got argentinian levels of hyperinflation in our - levels of hyperinflation in our
4:27 pm
schools — levels of hyperinflation in our schools with _ levels of hyperinflation in our schools with 640,000 - levels of hyperinflation in our schools with 640,000 pupils| levels of hyperinflation in our - schools with 640,000 pupils being sent home — schools with 640,000 pupils being sent home this— schools with 640,000 pupils being sent home this week _ schools with 640,000 pupils being sent home this week compared - schools with 640,000 pupils being sent home this week compared to. sent home this week compared to 385.000 — sent home this week compared to 385.000 the _ sent home this week compared to 385,000 the week— sent home this week compared to 385,000 the week before, - sent home this week compared to 385,000 the week before, and i sent home this week compared tol 385,000 the week before, and the scent_ 385,000 the week before, and the scent of— 385,000 the week before, and the scent of a — 385,000 the week before, and the scent of a social _ 385,000 the week before, and the scent of a socialjustice _ 385,000 the week before, and the scent of a socialjustice have - scent of a socialjustice have identified _ scent of a socialjustice have identified 93,500 _ scent of a socialjustice have identified 93,500 ghost - scent of a socialjustice have - identified 93,500 ghost children who for the _ identified 93,500 ghost children who for the most — identified 93,500 ghost children who for the most part— identified 93,500 ghost children who for the most part have _ identified 93,500 ghost children who for the most part have not _ identified 93,500 ghost children who for the most part have not returned i for the most part have not returned to schoot— for the most part have not returned to school since _ for the most part have not returned to school since they _ for the most part have not returned to school since they were _ for the most part have not returned to school since they were fully - to school since they were fully opened — to school since they were fully opened on _ to school since they were fully opened on the _ to school since they were fully opened on the 8th _ to school since they were fully opened on the 8th of- to school since they were fully opened on the 8th of march i to school since they were fully| opened on the 8th of march —— to school since they were fully - opened on the 8th of march —— the centre _ opened on the 8th of march —— the centre we — opened on the 8th of march —— the centre. we also _ opened on the 8th of march —— the centre. we also have _ opened on the 8th of march —— the centre. we also have exam - opened on the 8th of march —— the| centre. we also have exam orphans missing _ centre. we also have exam orphans missing one — centre. we also have exam orphans missing one in— centre. we also have exam orphans missing one in four— centre. we also have exam orphans missing one in four days _ centre. we also have exam orphans missing one in four days of- missing one in four days of face—to—face _ missing one in four days of face—to—face teaching, - missing one in four days ofj face—to—face teaching, and missing one in four days of. face—to—face teaching, and of missing one in four days of- face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 _ face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 bittion— face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 billion catch _ face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 billion catch up _ face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 billion catch up programme - face—to—face teaching, and of course the 3 billion catch up programme is i the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely— the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely wetcome _ the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely welcome but _ the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely welcome but what _ the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely welcome but what is - the 3 billion catch up programme is hugely welcome but what is your i hugely welcome but what is your tong-term — hugely welcome but what is your tong-term pian— hugely welcome but what is your long—term plan to _ hugely welcome but what is your long—term plan to address - hugely welcome but what is your i long—term plan to address endemic peopie _ long—term plan to address endemic peopte absence? _ long—term plan to address endemic people absence? those _ long—term plan to address endemic people absence? those peoples - long—term plan to address endemicl people absence? those peoples who have not— people absence? those peoples who have not even— people absence? those peoples who have not even been _ people absence? those peoples who have not even been back— people absence? those peoples who have not even been back to - people absence? those peoples who have not even been back to school, i have not even been back to school, and to _ have not even been back to school, and to establish _ have not even been back to school, and to establish a _ have not even been back to school, and to establish a level _ have not even been back to school, and to establish a level playing - and to establish a level playing field so — and to establish a level playing field so that _ and to establish a level playing field so that will— and to establish a level playing field so that will students - and to establish a level playing field so that will students have j and to establish a level playing i field so that will students have a fair crack— field so that will students have a fair crack of _ field so that will students have a fair crack of the _ field so that will students have a fair crack of the whip _ field so that will students have a fair crack of the whip doing - field so that will students have a i fair crack of the whip doing exams next year— fair crack of the whip doing exams next year west _ fair crack of the whip doing exams next year west might _ fair crack of the whip doing exams next year west might —— - fair crack of the whip doing exams next year west might —— those . next year west might —— those pupits — next year west might -- those --uils. . ~' next year west might -- those ..uils. ., next year west might -- those --uils. . ~ ,., ~ ., next year west might -- those --uils. . ~' ~ ., next year west might -- those pupils. thank you. i know you care on this issue _ pupils. thank you. i know you care on this issue and _ pupils. thank you. i know you care on this issue and you _ pupils. thank you. i know you care on this issue and you campaign - pupils. thank you. i know you care on this issue and you campaign on| on this issue and you campaign on issue and you are right. what has happened over the last 18 months has
4:28 pm
been for many children a really debilitating, there is no question they have lost unconscionable amounts of teaching and learning time. we must remediate that and make it better. it is probably the single most important investment we can make, so in addition to the 14 billion we are putting into education that we began with as the government, we have a catch up plan for £3 billion, a £3 billion catch up for £3 billion, a £3 billion catch up plan, and so far, before we come to any thing the chancellor might do later this year. what the focus is on, i think the thing that works and the thing i have found that parents and teachers and pupils respond to is more direct one—to—one, one to two tuition, and focusing on the
4:29 pm
needs of the individual child and drawing out where they are going wrong and really trying to focus on that. i wrong and really trying to focus on that. . ., , , wrong and really trying to focus on that. , , , ., that. i completely, i support that catch u- that. i completely, i support that catch pp plan. — that. i completely, i support that catch up plan, and _ that. i completely, i support that catch up plan, and 3— that. i completely, i support that catch up plan, and 3 billion - that. i completely, i support that catch up plan, and 3 billion is - that. i completely, i support that catch up plan, and 3 billion is a i catch up plan, and 3 billion is a significant _ catch up plan, and 3 billion is a significant sum _ catch up plan, and 3 billion is a significant sum of— catch up plan, and 3 billion is a significant sum of money, - catch up plan, and 3 billion is a significant sum of money, butl catch up plan, and 3 billion is a . significant sum of money, but we know— significant sum of money, but we know the — significant sum of money, but we know the catch _ significant sum of money, but we know the catch up _ significant sum of money, but we know the catch up programme i significant sum of money, but we i know the catch up programme thus significant sum of money, but we - know the catch up programme thus far isiust_ know the catch up programme thus far is just reaching — know the catch up programme thus far is just reaching 44% _ know the catch up programme thus far isjust reaching 44% of— know the catch up programme thus far is just reaching 44% of pupils - know the catch up programme thus far is just reaching 44% of pupils on - isjust reaching 44% of pupils on free school— isjust reaching 44% of pupils on free school meals _ isjust reaching 44% of pupils on free school meals and _ isjust reaching 44% of pupils on free school meals and surely- isjust reaching 44% of pupils on free school meals and surely it i free school meals and surely it should — free school meals and surely it should be _ free school meals and surely it should be focused _ free school meals and surely it should be focused on- free school meals and surely it should be focused on the - free school meals and surely it should be focused on the most disadvantaged. _ should be focused on the most disadvantaged. it _ should be focused on the most disadvantaged. it doesn't - should be focused on the most. disadvantaged. it doesn't address the endemic— disadvantaged. it doesn't address the endemic absence, _ disadvantaged. it doesn't address the endemic absence, the - disadvantaged. it doesn't address| the endemic absence, the 93,500 children— the endemic absence, the 93,500 children who — the endemic absence, the 93,500 children who have _ the endemic absence, the 93,500 children who have barely - the endemic absence, the 93,500 children who have barely been - the endemic absence, the 93,500 children who have barely been in. children who have barely been in school, — children who have barely been in school, and _ children who have barely been in school, and who _ children who have barely been in school, and who haven't - children who have barely been in school, and who haven't been i children who have barely been in school, and who haven't been in| school, and who haven't been in school _ school, and who haven't been in school for — school, and who haven't been in school for most _ school, and who haven't been in school for most of _ school, and who haven't been in school for most of the _ school, and who haven't been in school for most of the time, - school, and who haven't been in| school for most of the time, and school, and who haven't been in - school for most of the time, and the centre _ school for most of the time, and the centre of— school for most of the time, and the centre of social— school for most of the time, and the centre of socialjustice _ school for most of the time, and the centre of socialjustice has _ centre of socialjustice has identified _ centre of socialjustice has identified that, _ centre of socialjustice has identified that, so - centre of socialjustice has identified that, so why- centre of socialjustice has identified that, so why not centre of socialjustice has - identified that, so why not redirect the weight— identified that, so why not redirect the weight the _ identified that, so why not redirect the weight the catch _ identified that, so why not redirect the weight the catch up _ identified that, so why not redirectl the weight the catch up programme identified that, so why not redirect. the weight the catch up programme is running _ the weight the catch up programme is running and _ the weight the catch up programme is running and also — the weight the catch up programme is running and also expand _ the weight the catch up programme is running and also expand the - the weight the catch up programme is running and also expand the troubledl running and also expand the troubled families— running and also expand the troubled families programme _ running and also expand the troubled families programme to _ running and also expand the troubled families programme to get _ running and also expand the troubled families programme to get these - families programme to get these children— families programme to get these children back— families programme to get these children back into _ families programme to get these children back into school? - families programme to get these children back into school? —— - children back into school? —— redirect — children back into school? —— redirect the _ children back into school? —— redirect the way _ children back into school? —— redirect the way to _ children back into school? —— redirect the way to catch - children back into school? —— redirect the way to catch up i redirect the way to catch up programme _ redirect the way to catch up programme is _ redirect the way to catch up programme is running. - redirect the way to catch up programme is running. i- redirect the way to catch up programme is running. i know how frustratin: programme is running. i know how frustrating it _ programme is running. i know how frustrating it is _ programme is running. i know how frustrating it is for _
4:30 pm
programme is running. i know how frustrating it is for parents - programme is running. i know how frustrating it is for parents of - frustrating it is for parents of pupils at the moment because of the numbers that are out of school because of the isolation policy that greg and myself were talking about just now. and the bubbles being sent home. i understand why schools have been taking the actions they have, and they want to stop the spread of covid and they are quite right, and ifully support them. covid and they are quite right, and i fully support them. but the best thing is to move as i think the secretary of state for education said yesterday, from bubbling to testing, is the answer, and as i said to greg, that is one thing that will help us to keep more kids in school. there are other, plenty of other children who are losing school time for other reasons, as i think you are hinting, and we need to deal with that in a very determined way and we need, they will be more we
4:31 pm
want to do, on time in school and making sure that we invest in the school timetable as well. just finally, just to be clear, you will have — just finally, just to be clear, you will have a — just finally, just to be clear, you will have a focus _ just finally, just to be clear, you will have a focus on _ just finally, just to be clear, you will have a focus on the - just finally, just to be clear, you | will have a focus on the 100,000 kids that — will have a focus on the 100,000 kids that have _ will have a focus on the 100,000 kids that have not _ will have a focus on the 100,000 kids that have not been- will have a focus on the 100,000 kids that have not been in- will have a focus on the 100,000| kids that have not been in school, even _ kids that have not been in school, even when — kids that have not been in school, even when they— kids that have not been in school, even when they fully _ kids that have not been in school, even when they fully reopened . kids that have not been in school, even when they fully reopened in| even when they fully reopened in march, _ even when they fully reopened in march, but — even when they fully reopened in march, but do _ even when they fully reopened in march, but do you _ even when they fully reopened in march, but do you not _ even when they fully reopened in march, but do you not think - even when they fully reopened in| march, but do you not think there should _ march, but do you not think there should be — march, but do you not think there should be a — march, but do you not think there should be a long—term _ march, but do you not think there should be a long—term plan - march, but do you not think there should be a long—term plan for. should be a long—term plan for education _ should be a long—term plan for education that— should be a long—term plan for education that a _ should be a long—term plan for education that a significant - should be a long—term plan for| education that a significant part should be a long—term plan for. education that a significant part of it would _ education that a significant part of it would require _ education that a significant part of it would require a _ education that a significant part of it would require a longer- education that a significant part of it would require a longer school. it would require a longer school day. _ it would require a longer school day, not — it would require a longer school day, notjust— it would require a longer school day, notiust for— it would require a longer school day, not just for academic - it would require a longer schoolj day, not just for academic catch it would require a longer school. day, not just for academic catch up but for— day, not just for academic catch up but for extra — day, not just for academic catch up but for extra curricular _ day, not just for academic catch up but for extra curricular activities, l but for extra curricular activities, such— but for extra curricular activities, such as _ but for extra curricular activities, such as sport _ but for extra curricular activities, such as sport and _ but for extra curricular activities, such as sport and well— but for extra curricular activities, such as sport and well being - but for extra curricular activities, such as sport and well being and | such as sport and well being and what _ such as sport and well being and what more — such as sport and well being and what more needs— such as sport and well being and what more needs to _ such as sport and well being and what more needs to be - such as sport and well being and what more needs to be done - such as sport and well being and what more needs to be done to. what more needs to be done to convince — what more needs to be done to convince you _ what more needs to be done to convince you as _ what more needs to be done to convince you as prime - what more needs to be done to convince you as prime minister| what more needs to be done to- convince you as prime minister and the treasury — convince you as prime minister and the treasury that _ convince you as prime minister and the treasury that they _ convince you as prime minister and the treasury that they fully - convince you as prime minister and the treasury that they fully funded | the treasury that they fully funded tong-term — the treasury that they fully funded tong-term pian— the treasury that they fully funded long—term plan with _ the treasury that they fully funded long—term plan with a _ the treasury that they fully funded long—term plan with a longer - the treasury that they fully funded i long—term plan with a longer school day is _ long—term plan with a longer school day is worth— long—term plan with a longer school day is worth supporting _ long—term plan with a longer school day is worth supporting and - long—term plan with a longer school day is worth supporting and giving l day is worth supporting and giving proper— day is worth supporting and giving proper resources _ day is worth supporting and giving proper resources to? _ day is worth supporting and giving proper resources to? we - day is worth supporting and giving proper resources to?— day is worth supporting and giving proper resources to? we are doing... we are looking _ proper resources to? we are doing... we are looking at _ proper resources to? we are doing... we are looking at the _ proper resources to? we are doing... we are looking at the evidence - proper resources to? we are doing... we are looking at the evidence and i we are looking at the evidence and is absolutely frank with you and the committee, to begin with, some of
4:32 pm
the evidence was not as good as it could have been. the evidence on timetable, the evidence on lengthening the school day was not as powerful as it was on... on tuition. for instance. but that does not mean it is the right thing to do. i do think it is the right thing to do. the question is, how you do it, what sort of activities, is it enrichment, academic, what is the mixture? as you rightly say. we are doing a proper review of all that to get the evidence that we want but in the meantime over the summer, as you know, the... all the summer schools comedy holiday activities fund, a big effort to try to help kids to catch up before september as well. will you look at the family's programme _ will you look at the family's programme to _ will you look at the family's programme to try _ will you look at the family's programme to try and - will you look at the family's programme to try and grabl will you look at the family's i programme to try and grab the students — programme to try and grab the students back— programme to try and grab the students back into _ programme to try and grab the students back into school, - programme to try and grab the i students back into school, close programme to try and grab the - students back into school, close to 100,000 _ students back into school, close to 100,000 not— students back into school, close to 100,000 not being _ students back into school, close to 100,000 not being in— students back into school, close to 100,000 not being in school-
4:33 pm
students back into school, close to 100,000 not being in school at - students back into school, close to 100,000 not being in school at all| 100,000 not being in school at all and other— 100,000 not being in school at all and other means _ 100,000 not being in school at all and other means to _ 100,000 not being in school at all and other means to try _ 100,000 not being in school at all and other means to try and - 100,000 not being in school at all and other means to try and get. 100,000 not being in school at all. and other means to try and get them back into _ and other means to try and get them back into school? _ and other means to try and get them back into school? they— and other means to try and get them back into school? they are _ and other means to try and get them back into school? they are not - and other means to try and get them back into school? they are not goingj back into school? they are not going to be _ back into school? they are not going to be helped — back into school? they are not going to be helped try— back into school? they are not going to be helped by the _ back into school? they are not going to be helped by the catch—up - back into school? they are not going to be helped by the catch—up fund i back into school? they are not goingj to be helped by the catch—up fund as it is. to be helped by the catch-up fund as it is. ., ., ., ,, ., , it is. you are making a very good oint it is. you are making a very good point and — it is. you are making a very good point and you — it is. you are making a very good point and you get _ it is. you are making a very good point and you get into _ it is. you are making a very good point and you get into a - it is. you are making a very good point and you get into a risk - it is. you are making a very good point and you get into a risk of l it is. you are making a very good point and you get into a risk of a | point and you get into a risk of a circular problem, you keep missing the same group, sol circular problem, you keep missing the same group, so i will certainly look at what we handle.— the same group, so i will certainly look at what we handle. thank you. prime minister, _ look at what we handle. thank you. prime minister, can _ look at what we handle. thank you. prime minister, can we _ look at what we handle. thank you. prime minister, can we spare - look at what we handle. thank you. prime minister, can we spare a - prime minister, can we spare a thought— prime minister, can we spare a thought for the teachers because the health— thought for the teachers because the health service gets all the limelight, but the teachers have taken _ limelight, but the teachers have taken a — limelight, but the teachers have taken a hell of a burden... the}t taken a hell of a burden... they have. taken a hell of a burden... they have- you _ taken a hell of a burden... they have. you are _ taken a hell of a burden... they have. you are completely - taken a hell of a burden... tue: have. you are completely right. taken a hell of a burden... they - have. you are completely right. and the support — have. you are completely right. and the support staff. and _ have. you are completely right. and the support staff. and the _ have. you are completely right. and the support staff. and the support i the support staff. and the support staff and they _ the support staff. and the support staff and they have _ the support staff. and the support staff and they have done - the support staff. and the support staff and they have done an - staff and they have done an incredible job and what is so interesting as you go to some schools and you can see the challenge that they have because some kids... some children really are incredibly resilient, just bounce through it without any problems at all, but that is not the case by any means for every child in
4:34 pm
his country and it has a big impact. could you ask your education secretary— could you ask your education secretary to make sure that they get a tfreak— secretary to make sure that they get a break this— secretary to make sure that they get a break this summer from initiatives from his— a break this summer from initiatives from his department, which have very often _ from his department, which have very often been _ from his department, which have very often been contradictory and had to respond _ often been contradictory and had to respond fast moving, pandemic of course, _ respond fast moving, pandemic of course, but — respond fast moving, pandemic of course, but they long for a period of stability — course, but they long for a period of stability and predictability and can you — of stability and predictability and can you have a word with him and see if he can— can you have a word with him and see if he can provide them with a little respect? _ if he can provide them with a little respect? l— if he can provide them with a little resect? ., , .., respect? i will do everything i can and i respect? i will do everything i can and i totally _ respect? i will do everything i can and i totally understand _ respect? i will do everything i can and i totally understand that - respect? i will do everything i can| and i totally understand that point and i totally understand that point and all i would bleed in... for... in mitigation and forgiveness from our wonderful teachers as it has been difficult to work out how to keep some things going on how to do examinations, but your point is well made. . ~ examinations, but your point is well made. . ,, ,., examinations, but your point is well made. . ,, ., ., made. thank you and could i add the challenae made. thank you and could i add the challenge that _ made. thank you and could i add the challenge that many _ made. thank you and could i add the challenge that many teachers - made. thank you and could i add the challenge that many teachers face i challenge that many teachers face currently — challenge that many teachers face currently which _ challenge that many teachers face currently which is _ challenge that many teachers face currently which is that _ challenge that many teachers face currently which is that they - challenge that many teachers face currently which is that they are - challenge that many teachers face currently which is that they are off school _ currently which is that they are off school with — currently which is that they are off school with covid _ currently which is that they are off school with covid and _ currently which is that they are off school with covid and that - currently which is that they are off school with covid and that is - school with covid and that is causing _ school with covid and that is causing huge _ school with covid and that is causing huge difficulties - school with covid and that is causing huge difficulties for| causing huge difficulties for schools— causing huge difficulties for schools and _ causing huge difficulties for schools and compounding i causing huge difficulties for.
4:35 pm
schools and compounding the causing huge difficulties for- schools and compounding the issues of catch _ schools and compounding the issues of catch up _ schools and compounding the issues of catch up and — schools and compounding the issues of catch up and i_ schools and compounding the issues of catch up and i absolutely- schools and compounding the issues of catch up and i absolutely echo - of catch up and i absolutely echo what _ of catch up and i absolutely echo what the — of catch up and i absolutely echo what the select _ of catch up and i absolutely echo what the select committee - of catch up and i absolutely echo what the select committee has l of catch up and i absolutely echo i what the select committee has said and wanted — what the select committee has said and wanted to — what the select committee has said and wanted to ask _ what the select committee has said and wanted to ask you _ what the select committee has said and wanted to ask you about - what the select committee has said and wanted to ask you about that l what the select committee has said | and wanted to ask you about that as well on _ and wanted to ask you about that as well on behalf— and wanted to ask you about that as well on behalf of _ and wanted to ask you about that as well on behalf of petitioners. - and wanted to ask you about that as well on behalf of petitioners. it - and wanted to ask you about that as well on behalf of petitioners. it is. well on behalf of petitioners. it is calibrated — well on behalf of petitioners. it is calibrated the _ well on behalf of petitioners. it is calibrated the education - well on behalf of petitioners. it isj calibrated the education catch—up spending — calibrated the education catch—up spending per— calibrated the education catch—up spending per head _ calibrated the education catch—up spending per head in— calibrated the education catch—up spending per head in england - calibrated the education catch—up spending per head in england is. spending per head in england is around — spending per head in england is around l9% _ spending per head in england is around 19% of _ spending per head in england is around 19% of what _ spending per head in england is around 19% of what the - spending per head in england is around 19% of what the us - spending per head in england is around 19% of what the us is i around 19% of what the us is spending _ around 19% of what the us is spending on _ around 19% of what the us is spending on 12% _ around 19% of what the us is spending on 12% of- around 19% of what the us is spending on 12% of what - around 19% of what the us is spending on 12% of what the | spending on12% of what the netherlands— spending on 12% of what the netherlands are _ spending on 12% of what the netherlands are spending. i spending on 12% of what the i netherlands are spending. how spending on 12% of what the - netherlands are spending. how do spending on 12% of what the _ netherlands are spending. how do you explain _ netherlands are spending. how do you explain that? _ netherlands are spending. how do you explain that? l— netherlands are spending. how do you exlain that? ., �* netherlands are spending. how do you exolain that?— explain that? i don't recognise those figures _ explain that? i don't recognise those figures and _ explain that? i don't recognise those figures and i _ explain that? i don't recognise those figures and i don't. .. - explain that? i don't recognise those figures and i don't. .. i l explain that? i don't recognise . those figures and i don't. .. i don't those figures and i don't... i don't agree with them because... i can rive ou agree with them because... i can give you the _ agree with them because... i can give you the actual _ agree with them because... i can give you the actual figures. - agree with them because... i can give you the actual figures. they| give you the actual figures. they don't take account _ give you the actual figures. they don't take account of _ give you the actual figures. they don't take account of the - give you the actual figures. don't take account of the 40 give you the actual figures.- don't take account of the 40 billion that we invested in education as soon as i became prime minister, which took funding for every primary school pupil at the £4000 per head, funding for every secondary school pupil up to £5,000 per head, so we... we began with massive investments and we have added another 3 billion and there will be more to come.—
4:36 pm
more to come. yes, the overall spending _ more to come. yes, the overall spending on — more to come. yes, the overall spending on catcher _ more to come. yes, the overall spending on catcher for - more to come. yes, the overall spending on catcher for english j spending on catcher for english pupils— spending on catcher for english pupils is— spending on catcher for english pupils is £310 _ spending on catcher for english pupils is £310 ahead _ spending on catcher for english pupils is £310 ahead and - spending on catcher for english pupils is £310 ahead and nus, i spending on catcher for english - pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head _ pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head we — pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head. we know— pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head. we know the _ pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head. we know the impact- pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600 per head. we know the impact of- pupils is £310 ahead and nus, £1600j per head. we know the impact of this pandemic— per head. we know the impact of this pandemic has — per head. we know the impact of this pandemic has been— per head. we know the impact of this pandemic has been enormous- per head. we know the impact of this pandemic has been enormous on- pandemic has been enormous on children— pandemic has been enormous on children and _ pandemic has been enormous on children and young _ pandemic has been enormous on children and young people. - pandemic has been enormous on children and young people. whyl pandemic has been enormous on. children and young people. why is it that the _ children and young people. why is it that the prime — children and young people. why is it that the prime minister— children and young people. why is it that the prime minister feels - children and young people. why is it that the prime minister feels we - children and young people. why is it that the prime minister feels we dol that the prime minister feels we do not need _ that the prime minister feels we do not need to— that the prime minister feels we do not need to invest _ that the prime minister feels we do not need to invest in _ that the prime minister feels we do not need to invest in helping - that the prime minister feels we do not need to invest in helping themi not need to invest in helping them catch— not need to invest in helping them catch up— not need to invest in helping them catch up and — not need to invest in helping them catch up and make _ not need to invest in helping them catch up and make the _ not need to invest in helping them catch up and make the best - not need to invest in helping them catch up and make the best of- not need to invest in helping them i catch up and make the best of going forward _ catch up and make the best of going forward in _ catch up and make the best of going forward in the — catch up and make the best of going forward in the future? _ catch up and make the best of going forward in the future?— forward in the future? that's obviously — forward in the future? that's obviously not _ forward in the future? that's obviously not how— forward in the future? that's obviously not how i - forward in the future? that's obviously not how i see - forward in the future? that's obviously not how i see it. . forward in the future? that'sl obviously not how i see it. we forward in the future? that's - obviously not how i see it. we are making... the thick end of £20 billion investment already and there will be more to come. so billion investment already and there will be more to come.— will be more to come. so moving on to the impact _ will be more to come. so moving on to the impact of— will be more to come. so moving on to the impact of current _ will be more to come. so moving on to the impact of current covid - to the impact of current covid numbers— to the impact of current covid numbers and _ to the impact of current covid numbers and also _ to the impact of current covid numbers and also the - to the impact of current covid i numbers and also the potential impact — numbers and also the potential impact when _ numbers and also the potential impact when the _ numbers and also the potential impact when the restrictions i numbers and also the potentiall impact when the restrictions are released — impact when the restrictions are released on— impact when the restrictions are released on the _ impact when the restrictions are released on the 19th _ impact when the restrictions are released on the 19th of- impact when the restrictions are released on the 19th ofjuly, - impact when the restrictions are released on the 19th ofjuly, i. impact when the restrictions are i released on the 19th ofjuly, i know you said _ released on the 19th ofjuly, i know you said on — released on the 19th ofjuly, i know you said on many— released on the 19th ofjuly, i know you said on many occasions - released on the 19th ofjuly, i know you said on many occasions you - released on the 19th ofjuly, i know. you said on many occasions you don't actually— you said on many occasions you don't actually have — you said on many occasions you don't actually have the _ you said on many occasions you don't actually have the data, _ you said on many occasions you don't actually have the data, which - you said on many occasions you don't actually have the data, which is - actually have the data, which is quite _ actually have the data, which is quite concerning _ actually have the data, which is quite concerning because - actually have the data, which is quite concerning because the l actually have the data, which is - quite concerning because the impact on current— quite concerning because the impact on current covid _ quite concerning because the impact on current covid levels _ quite concerning because the impact on current covid levels in _ quite concerning because the impact on current covid levels in regions- on current covid levels in regions like the _ on current covid levels in regions like the north—east _ on current covid levels in regions like the north—east where - on current covid levels in regions like the north—east where we - on current covid levels in regions like the north—east where we arej like the north—east where we are
4:37 pm
seeing _ like the north—east where we are seeing a — like the north—east where we are seeing a surge, _ like the north—east where we are seeing a surge, we _ like the north—east where we are seeing a surge, we are _ like the north—east where we are seeing a surge, we are already. seeing a surge, we are already seeing — seeing a surge, we are already seeing businesses _ seeing a surge, we are already seeing businesses unable - seeing a surge, we are already seeing businesses unable to i seeing businesses unable to function, _ seeing businesses unable to function, hospitality- seeing businesses unable to . function, hospitality businesses having — function, hospitality businesses having to — function, hospitality businesses having to close, _ function, hospitality businesses having to close, nurseries - function, hospitality businesses having to close, nurseries for l having to close, nurseries for example. _ having to close, nurseries for example. they— having to close, nurseries for example, they have - having to close, nurseries for example, they have to - having to close, nurseries for. example, they have to maintain having to close, nurseries for - example, they have to maintain legal ratios— example, they have to maintain legal ratios of— example, they have to maintain legal ratios of staff — example, they have to maintain legal ratios of staff to _ example, they have to maintain legal ratios of staff to children _ example, they have to maintain legal ratios of staff to children in _ example, they have to maintain legal ratios of staff to children in order- ratios of staff to children in order to stay— ratios of staff to children in order to stay open— ratios of staff to children in order to stay open and _ ratios of staff to children in order to stay open and the _ ratios of staff to children in order to stay open and the early- ratios of staff to children in order to stay open and the early yearsl to stay open and the early years sector— to stay open and the early years sector has— to stay open and the early years sector has a _ to stay open and the early years sector has a young _ to stay open and the early years sector has a young workforce, . to stay open and the early years - sector has a young workforce, many of whom _ sector has a young workforce, many of whom are — sector has a young workforce, many of whom are not _ sector has a young workforce, many of whom are not double _ sector has a young workforce, many of whom are not double vaccinated. | of whom are not double vaccinated. cases _ of whom are not double vaccinated. cases are _ of whom are not double vaccinated. cases are skyrocketed _ of whom are not double vaccinated. cases are skyrocketed and - of whom are not double vaccinated. | cases are skyrocketed and nurseries are literally — cases are skyrocketed and nurseries are literally having _ cases are skyrocketed and nurseries are literally having to _ cases are skyrocketed and nurseries are literally having to turn _ are literally having to turn families _ are literally having to turn families away— are literally having to turn families away in _ are literally having to turn families away in order - are literally having to turn families away in order to i are literally having to turn - families away in order to maintain legal— families away in order to maintain legal ratios — families away in order to maintain legal ratios l— families away in order to maintain legal ratios-— legal ratios. i thank them for all the are legal ratios. i thank them for all they are doing _ legal ratios. i thank them for all they are doing in _ legal ratios. i thank them for all they are doing in the _ legal ratios. i thank them for all i they are doing in the communities. as i was saying to greg earlier on, we have to make sure that we use the tools we have in the form of isolation to get through this particular face will submit won't last long. you talk about businesses... hospitality businesses closing, actually thanks to the vaccine roll—out we were able to get through to the step three and now it
4:38 pm
looks as though... we will take the final decision on driver 12 but it looks as though we will get through to step four which will allow them to step four which will allow them to open up fully without the need for the one metre rule and that is the most positive thing we can have. but that is all in theory because the reality— but that is all in theory because the reality is— but that is all in theory because the reality is that _ but that is all in theory because the reality is that businesses i but that is all in theory because i the reality is that businesses are facing _ the reality is that businesses are facing huge _ the reality is that businesses are facing huge staffing _ the reality is that businesses are facing huge staffing issues - the reality is that businesses are facing huge staffing issues with. facing huge staffing issues with many— facing huge staffing issues with many having _ facing huge staffing issues with many having to _ facing huge staffing issues with many having to isolate - facing huge staffing issues with many having to isolate and - facing huge staffing issues with- many having to isolate and therefore not able _ many having to isolate and therefore not able to _ many having to isolate and therefore not able to function _ many having to isolate and therefore not able to function as _ many having to isolate and therefore not able to function as businesses. l not able to function as businesses. it is not able to function as businesses. it is in _ not able to function as businesses. it is in the — not able to function as businesses. it is in the hospitality— not able to function as businesses. it is in the hospitality industry- it is in the hospitality industry and many— it is in the hospitality industry and many other— it is in the hospitality industry and many other industries - it is in the hospitality industryj and many other industries but it is in the hospitality industry- and many other industries but the degree _ and many other industries but the degree those _ and many other industries but the degree those industries _ and many other industries but the degree those industries were - and many other industries but the degree those industries were a i and many other industries but the| degree those industries were a lot of young _ degree those industries were a lot of young people _ degree those industries were a lot of young people are _ degree those industries were a lot of young people are employed. i degree those industries were a lot i of young people are employed. does the prime _ of young people are employed. does the prime minister— of young people are employed. does the prime minister have _ of young people are employed. does the prime minister have the - of young people are employed. does the prime minister have the data i of young people are employed. does the prime minister have the data for| the prime minister have the data for the prime minister have the data for the relaxations— the prime minister have the data for the relaxations he _ the prime minister have the data for the relaxations he is— the prime minister have the data for the relaxations he is proposing i the prime minister have the data for the relaxations he is proposing and| the relaxations he is proposing and how those — the relaxations he is proposing and how those businesses _ the relaxations he is proposing and how those businesses are - the relaxations he is proposing and how those businesses are going i the relaxations he is proposing and how those businesses are going to| the relaxations he is proposing and i how those businesses are going to be affected _ how those businesses are going to be affected over— how those businesses are going to be affected over the _ how those businesses are going to be affected over the next _ how those businesses are going to be affected over the next two _ how those businesses are going to be affected over the next two to - how those businesses are going to be affected over the next two to three i affected over the next two to three months. _ affected over the next two to three months. giving _ affected over the next two to three months. giving we _ affected over the next two to three months, giving we are _ affected over the next two to three months, giving we are already i affected over the next two to three i months, giving we are already seeing the impact _ months, giving we are already seeing the impact of— months, giving we are already seeing the impact of higher— months, giving we are already seeing the impact of higher covid _ months, giving we are already seeing the impact of higher covid levels- months, giving we are already seeing the impact of higher covid levels in. the impact of higher covid levels in areas _ the impact of higher covid levels in areas like — the impact of higher covid levels in areas like the — the impact of higher covid levels in areas like the north— the impact of higher covid levels in areas like the north east? - the impact of higher covid levels in areas like the north east? if- the impact of higher covid levels in areas like the north east? if i i areas like the north east? ifi may--- l _ areas like the north east? ifi may... i don't _ areas like the north east? may... i don't think it is areas like the north east?“ may... i don't think it is possible to argue simultaneously that... businesses need to... be able to be
4:39 pm
more open and... and at the same time to oppose the relaxations... i am asking the prime minister, an artist _ am asking the prime minister, an artist -- — am asking the prime minister, an artist -- that— am asking the prime minister, an artist —— that is— am asking the prime minister, an artist —— that is not— am asking the prime minister, an artist —— that is not the _ am asking the prime minister, an artist —— that is not the argument time _ artist —— that is not the argument time making _ artist -- that is not the argument time making-— artist -- that is not the argument time making. you can't have it both wa s. time making. you can't have it both ways- you — time making. you can't have it both ways- you are _ time making. you can't have it both ways. you are either— time making. you can't have it both ways. you are either in _ time making. you can't have it both ways. you are either in favour- time making. you can't have it both ways. you are either in favour of... | ways. you are either in favour of... of opening up. i ways. you are either in favour of... of opening up— of opening up. i am asking for the data. i of opening up. i am asking for the data- l have _ of opening up. i am asking for the data. i have already _ of opening up. i am asking for the data. i have already been - of opening up. i am asking for the data. i have already been very i of opening up. i am asking for the l data. i have already been very clear that we have _ data. i have already been very clear that we have data _ data. i have already been very clear that we have data about _ that we have data about hospitalisations and deaths, we have data about our predictions for... where they might go, but... they are available... you can look at them but they are speculative. at the moment, we are tracking in about the middle of the projections that... were made for the third way, if we went ahead with all the openings, so
4:40 pm
the middle to low end of the predictions... projections that they made, if you look at the graphs. so the current crisis has put many new parents. _ the current crisis has put many new parents. the — the current crisis has put many new parents, the degree _ the current crisis has put many new parents, the degree mother- the current crisis has put many new parents, the degree mother is i the current crisis has put many new parents, the degree mother is at i parents, the degree mother is at risk of— parents, the degree mother is at risk of redundancy, _ parents, the degree mother is at risk of redundancy, and - parents, the degree mother is at risk of redundancy, and two i parents, the degree mother is ati risk of redundancy, and two years a-o risk of redundancy, and two years ago the _ risk of redundancy, and two years ago the amount _ risk of redundancy, and two years ago the amount announced - risk of redundancy, and two years ago the amount announced they. risk of redundancy, and two years - ago the amount announced they would extend _ ago the amount announced they would extend redundancy— ago the amount announced they would extend redundancy protection - ago the amount announced they would extend redundancy protection for- ago the amount announced they would extend redundancy protection for newi extend redundancy protection for new mothers _ extend redundancy protection for new mothers returning _ extend redundancy protection for new mothers returning to _ extend redundancy protection for new mothers returning to work— extend redundancy protection for new mothers returning to work to - extend redundancy protection for new mothers returning to work to six - mothers returning to work to six months — mothers returning to work to six months that _ mothers returning to work to six months. that was _ mothers returning to work to six months. that was two _ mothers returning to work to six months. that was two years - mothers returning to work to sixi months. that was two years ago. mothers returning to work to six - months. that was two years ago. when is this— months. that was two years ago. when is this going _ months. that was two years ago. when is this going to — months. that was two years ago. when is this going to happen? _ months. that was two years ago. when is this going to happen? we _ months. that was two years ago. when is this going to happen?— is this going to happen? we want to hel new is this going to happen? we want to help new mothers _ is this going to happen? we want to help new mothers to _ is this going to happen? we want to help new mothers to return - is this going to happen? we want to help new mothers to return to - is this going to happen? we want to | help new mothers to return to work, but we want to help everybody... when is the redundancy protection going _ when is the redundancy protection going to _ when is the redundancy protection goihg to happen— when is the redundancy protection going to happen that _ when is the redundancy protection going to happen that has - when is the redundancy protection going to happen that has been - going to happen that has been promised? _ going to happen that has been promised? i— going to happen that has been promised?— going to happen that has been romised? .. ., , ., promised? i cannot give you the answer to _ promised? i cannot give you the answer to that _ promised? i cannot give you the answer to that particular... - answer to that particular... particular payment but what i can certainly tell you is that at the moment the problem is... as i said earlier on, the problem is not so much a shortage of... of earlier on, the problem is not so much a shortage of... ijobs or a lack of vacancies, the problem is a shortage of labour and that is what we need to address. that
4:41 pm
shortage of labour and that is what we need to address.— we need to address. that does not sto we need to address. that does not step women _ we need to address. that does not stop women returning _ we need to address. that does not stop women returning from - we need to address. that does not i stop women returning from maternity leave being _ stop women returning from maternity leave being made _ stop women returning from maternity leave being made redundant. - stop women returning from maternity leave being made redundant. [- stop women returning from maternity leave being made redundant.- leave being made redundant. i don't want to see — leave being made redundant. i don't want to see that _ leave being made redundant. i don't want to see that happen. _ leave being made redundant. i don't want to see that happen. can - leave being made redundant. i don't want to see that happen. can you i leave being made redundant. i don't| want to see that happen. can you let us know when _ want to see that happen. can you let us know when you _ want to see that happen. can you let us know when you are _ want to see that happen. can you let us know when you are going - want to see that happen. can you let us know when you are going to - want to see that happen. can you let us know when you are going to bring| us know when you are going to bring that end? _ us know when you are going to bring that end? gf us know when you are going to bring that end? .., , i. that end? of course, i will let you know about _ that end? of course, i will let you know about that, _ that end? of course, i will let you know about that, but _ that end? of course, i will let you know about that, but our - that end? of course, i will let you | know about that, but our intention is to help everybody coming back from maternity leave to get into work or back into work as fast as possible. work or back into work as fast as ossible. . ~ work or back into work as fast as ossible. ., ,, , ., work or back into work as fast as ossible. ., ,, i. ~ , possible. thank you, prime minister. thank ou, possible. thank you, prime minister. thank you, bernard. _ possible. thank you, prime minister. thank you, bernard. can _ possible. thank you, prime minister. thank you, bernard. can you - possible. thank you, prime minister. thank you, bernard. can you tell- possible. thank you, prime minister. thank you, bernard. can you tell me | thank you, bernard. can you tell me what _ thank you, bernard. can you tell me what specific — thank you, bernard. can you tell me what specific initiatives _ thank you, bernard. can you tell me what specific initiatives ministers - what specific initiatives ministers are bringing _ what specific initiatives ministers are bringing forward _ what specific initiatives ministers are bringing forward to— what specific initiatives ministers are bringing forward to build - what specific initiatives ministers| are bringing forward to build back in a more — are bringing forward to build back in a more feminine _ are bringing forward to build back in a more feminine and _ are bringing forward to build back in a more feminine and gender. in a more feminine and gender neutral— in a more feminine and gender neutral way? _ in a more feminine and gender neutral way?— in a more feminine and gender neutralwa ? ., ., ., ., neutralway? caroline, we are doing eve hinu neutralway? caroline, we are doing everything that _ neutralway? caroline, we are doing everything that we _ neutralway? caroline, we are doing everything that we can _ neutralway? caroline, we are doing everything that we can to... - neutralway? caroline, we are doing everything that we can to... ensure| everything that we can to... ensure that we have a recovery that is... as i was saying just now, gets our
4:42 pm
women back into the workforce, i know that they have had particular problems, making sure that we get everybody back to work in a way that is... as i say, fair across both sexes. actually, if you look at what has happened with... with... thurlow, i think according to the resolution foundation, 52%... resolution foundation, 52%. .. furlough resolution foundation, 52%... furlough has generally attracted more female recipients than male so far, which i think is... which i think is positive. it far, which i think is... which i think is positive.— far, which i think is... which i think is positive. it is evidence prime minister _ think is positive. it is evidence prime minister that _ think is positive. it is evidence prime minister that women . think is positive. it is evidence i prime minister that women were think is positive. it is evidence - prime minister that women were more likely to _ prime minister that women were more likely to be _ prime minister that women were more tikety to be in— prime minister that women were more likely to be in sectors _ prime minister that women were more likely to be in sectors that _ prime minister that women were more likely to be in sectors that were - likely to be in sectors that were shutdown — likely to be in sectors that were shutdown longer. _ likely to be in sectors that were shutdown longer. what - likely to be in sectors that were shutdown longer. what level. likely to be in sectors that were shutdown longer. what level of| shutdown longer. what level of female — shutdown longer. what level of female employment _ shutdown longer. what level of female employment do - shutdown longer. what level of female employment do you - shutdown longer. what level of. female employment do you regard shutdown longer. what level of- female employment do you regard as evidence _ female employment do you regard as evidence that — female employment do you regard as evidence that we _ female employment do you regard as evidence that we have _ female employment do you regard as evidence that we have built _ female employment do you regard as evidence that we have built back- female employment do you regard as evidence that we have built back in i evidence that we have built back in a more _ evidence that we have built back in a more feminine _ evidence that we have built back in a more feminine way? _
4:43 pm
evidence that we have built back in a more feminine way?— evidence that we have built back in a more feminine way? well, caroline, we want to make _ a more feminine way? well, caroline, we want to make sure _ a more feminine way? well, caroline, we want to make sure that _ a more feminine way? well, caroline, we want to make sure that we - a more feminine way? well, caroline, j we want to make sure that we have... female employment rising across—the—board and have employment rising across—the—board and just to quote what the resolution foundation said, they said that the economic impact of covid—i9 has been surprisingly equalfor impact of covid—i9 has been surprisingly equal for men and women and that is not mean that there are not specific problems like the one that has just been referred to on returning from maternity leave, that we must address and we will. but our own we must address and we will. but your own ministers won't publish economic— your own ministers won't publish economic impact _ your own ministers won't publish economic impact assessments i your own ministers won't publish| economic impact assessments on furlough, — economic impact assessments on furlough, so— economic impact assessments on furlough, so we _ economic impact assessments on furlough, so we don't _ economic impact assessments on furlough, so we don't know- economic impact assessments on furlough, so we don't know froml economic impact assessments on i furlough, so we don't know from the government's— furlough, so we don't know from the government's own _ furlough, so we don't know from the government's own figures _ furlough, so we don't know from the government's own figures what i furlough, so we don't know from the government's own figures what the i government's own figures what the impact _ government's own figures what the impact has — government's own figures what the impact has been _ government's own figures what the impact has been across _ government's own figures what the impact has been across different i impact has been across different genders — impact has been across different genders i— impact has been across different lenders. ., ., ., genders. i am quoting from the resolution _ genders. i am quoting from the resolution foundation... - genders. i am quoting from the resolution foundation... how i genders. i am quoting from the i resolution foundation... how about uuuotin resolution foundation... how about quoting from _ resolution foundation... how about quoting from the _ resolution foundation. .. how about quoting from the economic- resolution foundation... how about quoting from the economic impactl quoting from the economic impact assessments _ quoting from the economic impact assessments of— quoting from the economic impact assessments of your— quoting from the economic impact assessments of your own - quoting from the economic impactl assessments of your own ministers and the _ assessments of your own ministers and the government— assessments of your own ministers and the government equalities i and the government equalities office? — and the government equalities office? as_ and the government equalities office? �* , and the government equalities office? a ,, ., ., .,
4:44 pm
office? as you know, caroline... all... office? as you know, caroline... all- -- all— office? as you know, caroline... all... all policies _ office? as you know, caroline... all... all policies must... - office? as you know, caroline... all... all policies must... under| all... all policies must... under the public sector equality act be scrutinised for their impact on... on different groups but the information i have is the gender pay gap is at a record low, we have 1.9 million women in work than they were in 2010 and women for instance on ftse 350 more dashboards is up around 50%, a 50% increase injust five years. which i think is quite fast going and those are, i think, a pretty useful metrics, caroline. should policies for recovery be in the round — should policies for recovery be in the round or— should policies for recovery be in the round or should _ should policies for recovery be in the round or should they- should policies for recovery be in the round or should they be i should policies for recovery be in i the round or should they be targeted at those _ the round or should they be targeted at those who — the round or should they be targeted at those who are _ the round or should they be targeted at those who are most _ the round or should they be targeted at those who are most impacted i the round or should they be targeted at those who are most impacted by i at those who are most impacted by covid? _ at those who are most impacted by covid? trite —
4:45 pm
at those who are most impacted by covid? ~ ., ., ., ., , covid? we want to have a recovery that looks after _ covid? we want to have a recovery that looks after everybody - covid? we want to have a recovery that looks after everybody in i that looks after everybody in society, everyone, everywhere, and the... i think back to 28 and that crisis, i think when we came out of it, i am crisis, i think when we came out of it, lam not crisis, i think when we came out of it, i am not certain that we did deal with people's sense of injustice and inequality had we have a hugejob to do now as injustice and inequality had we have a huge job to do now as a government, as a conservative government, as a conservative government to level up and you're right across the whole country and thatis right across the whole country and that is what we are going to do. you cannot point — that is what we are going to do. you cannot point out a single policy initiative — cannot point out a single policy initiative that _ cannot point out a single policy initiative that is _ cannot point out a single policy initiative that is going - cannot point out a single policy initiative that is going to - cannot point out a single policy initiative that is going to help l cannot point out a single policy. initiative that is going to help you build _ initiative that is going to help you build back— initiative that is going to help you build back in— initiative that is going to help you build back in a _ initiative that is going to help you build back in a more _ initiative that is going to help you build back in a more feminine i initiative that is going to help you | build back in a more feminine and gender— build back in a more feminine and gender neutral _ build back in a more feminine and gender neutral way? _ build back in a more feminine and gender neutral way? one? - build back in a more feminine and gender neutral way? one? l... i build back in a more feminine and gender neutral way? one? gender neutralway? one? i... i... i mentioned--- _ gender neutralway? one? i... i... i mentioned... they _ gender neutralway? one? i... i... i mentioned... they are _ gender neutralway? one? i... i... i mentioned. .. they are your- gender neutralway? one? i... i... i mentioned... they are your words, | mentioned... they are your words, prime minister. _ mentioned. .. they are your words, prime minister. i— mentioned... they are your words, prime minister. i mentioned i mentioned... they are your words, | prime minister. i mentioned already about what we _ prime minister. i mentioned already about what we have _ prime minister. i mentioned already about what we have done _ prime minister. i mentioned already about what we have done reducing l prime minister. i mentioned already i about what we have done reducing the gender pay gap to an all—time low. if you look at... i will give you an example, look at the... look at the
4:46 pm
foreign office for its instance, we now have female... which shows... if you want to look at a more feminine approach to tackling climate change, it is our diplomats around the world in washington, in new york, in beijing... they are female... and they are the people... they are the people... they are the people at the tip of the uk mission to build back betterfor tip of the uk mission to build back better for the tip of the uk mission to build back betterfor the world. i tip of the uk mission to build back better for the world. i think you look back at our climate change negotiators, caroline, half of them are female and they are doing a fantasticjob, as i was saying earlier on. they have succeeded in building back betterfor earlier on. they have succeeded in building back better for britain and the world, by getting 70% of the world economy to commit to getting the net zero by 2050. that is a
4:47 pm
fantastic achievement by british women. �* , ., ., women. but you did not get the financial pledges _ women. but you did not get the financial pledges from - women. but you did not get the financial pledges from the i women. but you did not get thej financial pledges from the g7... women. but you did not get the l financial pledges from the g7... i .et financial pledges from the g7... get the feeling you will find financial pledges from the g7...” get the feeling you will find fault with almost anything that we did, caroline, with the greatest possible respect to you, and we did get the... get the... we get that did get the hundred billion and we are... ithink get the hundred billion and we are... i think we will surprise you on the upside, british women are represented in this government, as they are abundantly, they will surprise you on the up by what they achieve to build back better and a more feminine way. if you can think of a way of saying it back in a pity away then sent me a postcard. fiur away then sent me a postcard. our sole role is — away then sent me a postcard. our sole role is to _ away then sent me a postcard. our sole role is to find fault so that you can — sole role is to find fault so that you can make things even better, prime _ you can make things even better, prime minister.— you can make things even better, prime minister. prime minister, you talk about building _ prime minister. prime minister, you talk about building back— prime minister. prime minister, you talk about building back better i prime minister. prime minister, you talk about building back better and l talk about building back better and tevetting _ talk about building back better and tevetting up. — talk about building back better and levelling up, what _ talk about building back better and levelling up, what is _ talk about building back better and levelling up, what is your- talk about building back better and levelling up, what is your message to people — levelling up, what is your message to peopte tiving _ levelling up, what is your message to people living in— levelling up, what is your message to people living in seriously- to people living in seriously overcrowded _
4:48 pm
to people living in seriously. overcrowded accommodation to people living in seriously- overcrowded accommodation who to people living in seriously— overcrowded accommodation who since the time _ overcrowded accommodation who since the time you _ overcrowded accommodation who since the time you had — overcrowded accommodation who since the time you had been— overcrowded accommodation who since the time you had been mayor— overcrowded accommodation who since the time you had been mayor of- the time you had been mayor of london — the time you had been mayor of london and _ the time you had been mayor of london and prime _ the time you had been mayor of london and prime minister- the time you had been mayor ofj london and prime minister have the time you had been mayor of- london and prime minister have seen toddlers— london and prime minister have seen toddlers going — london and prime minister have seen toddlers going to _ london and prime minister have seen toddlers going to teenagers, - london and prime minister have seen toddlers going to teenagers, while i toddlers going to teenagers, while working _ toddlers going to teenagers, while working but— toddlers going to teenagers, while working but cannot _ toddlers going to teenagers, while working but cannot afford - toddlers going to teenagers, while working but cannot afford the i working but cannot afford the private — working but cannot afford the private rents _ working but cannot afford the private rents and _ working but cannot afford the private rents and cannot i working but cannot afford the i private rents and cannot afford to buy? _ private rents and cannot afford to buy? your— private rents and cannot afford to buy? your government _ private rents and cannot afford to buy? your government has - private rents and cannot afford to| buy? your government has fuelled house _ buy? your government has fuelled house purchases. _ buy? your government has fuelled house purchases. what _ buy? your government has fuelled house purchases. what support i buy? your government has fuelledi house purchases. what support are you going _ house purchases. what support are you going to— house purchases. what support are you going to give _ house purchases. what support are you going to give to _ house purchases. what support are you going to give to those - house purchases. what support are you going to give to those people i you going to give to those people who need — you going to give to those people who need better— you going to give to those people who need better housing. - you going to give to those people who need better housing. don't. who need better housing. don't foruet... who need better housing. don't forget... first _ who need better housing. don't forget. .. first of— who need better housing. don't forget... first of all, _ who need better housing. don't forget... first of all, you - forget... first of all, you mentioned my time as mayor... it gives me the opportunity to point out the paucity of the current labour... out the paucity of the current labour- - -_ out the paucity of the current labour... ~ , ., labour... prime minister, i am actually asking _ labour... prime minister, i am actually asking about - labour... prime minister, i am actually asking about what i labour... prime minister, i amj actually asking about what you labour... prime minister, i am i actually asking about what you are doingm _ actually asking about what you are doingm i— actually asking about what you are doing... i mentioned, _ actually asking about what you are doing... i mentioned, it— actually asking about what you are doing... i mentioned, it does- actually asking about what you are doing... i mentioned, it does not| doing... i mentioned, it does not mean~~~ — doing... i mentioned, it does not mean~~~ prime— doing... i mentioned, it does not mean... prime minister... - doing... i mentioned, it does not mean... prime minister... prime| mean... prime minister... prime minister. — mean... prime minister... prime minister. if— mean... prime minister... prime minister. if you— mean... prime minister... prime minister, if you want _ mean... prime minister... prime minister, if you want to - mean... prime minister... prime minister, if you want to talk i mean... prime minister... primel minister, if you want to talk about your record — minister, if you want to talk about your record as _ minister, if you want to talk about your record as mayor, _ minister, if you want to talk about your record as mayor, that - minister, if you want to talk about your record as mayor, that was i minister, if you want to talk about i your record as mayor, that was when your record as mayor, that was when you defined — your record as mayor, that was when you defined affordable _ your record as mayor, that was when you defined affordable housing i your record as mayor, that was when you defined affordable housing if- you defined affordable housing if you defined affordable housing if you let _ you defined affordable housing if you let me — you defined affordable housing if you let me finish, _ you defined affordable housing if you let me finish, you _ you defined affordable housing if you let me finish, you do - you defined affordable housing if you let me finish, you do find i you let me finish, you do find affordable _ you let me finish, you do find affordable housing _ you let me finish, you do find affordable housing is- you let me finish, you do find affordable housing is 80% i you let me finish, you do find affordable housing is 80% of| you let me finish, you do find i affordable housing is 80% of local private _ affordable housing is 80% of local private rents~ _ affordable housing is 80% of local private rents. do _ affordable housing is 80% of local private rents. do you _ affordable housing is 80% of local private rents. do you know- affordable housing is 80% of local private rents. do you know what i private rents. do you know what private — private rents. do you know what private rents _ private rents. do you know what private rents are _ private rents. do you know what private rents are in _ private rents. do you know what private rents are in london? i private rents. do you know what| private rents are in london? this private rents. do you know what private rents are in london? this is the government... _ private rents are in london? this is the government... this _ private rents are in london? this is the government... this is -
4:49 pm
private rents are in london? this is the government... this is the - the government... this is the government that actually just increase local housing allowance again, don't forget, in order to again, don't forget, in orderto actually again, don't forget, in order to actually tackle precisely that... that does not tackle the overcrowding, _ that does not tackle the overcrowding, prime - that does not tackle the - overcrowding, prime minister. that does not tackle the _ overcrowding, prime minister. the surlplv _ overcrowding, prime minister. the su -l . ., overcrowding, prime minister. the su--l. ., ., ~ ., overcrowding, prime minister. the su..l_ ., , ., supply. you talk about supply... you talk about the _ supply. you talk about supply... you talk about the record _ supply. you talk about supply... you talk about the record of _ supply. you talk about supply... you talk about the record of the - talk about the record of the previous mayor of london and the current mayor of london, that is banned apparently... you current mayor of london, that is banned apparently. . .— current mayor of london, that is banned apparently... you are the big boss now, prime _ banned apparently... you are the big boss now, prime minister. _ banned apparently... you are the big boss now, prime minister. across . banned apparently... you are the big| boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... boss now, prime minister. across the uk. we... last— boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... last year, _ boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... last year, we _ boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... last year, we had - boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... last year, we had a - boss now, prime minister. across the uk, we... last year, we had a record| uk, we... last year, we had a record number of housing starts and let —— never let it be forgotten that the conservatives... never let it be forgotten that the conservatives. . .— never let it be forgotten that the conservatives. . . conservatives... prime minister, my oint conservatives... prime minister, my point ism — conservatives... prime minister, my point ism your— conservatives... prime minister, my point is... your own _ conservatives... prime minister, my point is... your own government... | point is... your own government... prime _ point is... your own government... prime ministerm _ point is... your own government... prime minister... prime _ point is... your own government... j prime minister... prime minister... your_ prime minister... prime minister... your government— prime minister... prime minister... your government cannot _ prime minister... prime minister... your government cannot even - prime minister... prime minister... your government cannot even tell. prime minister... prime minister... | your government cannot even tell is how many— your government cannot even tell is how many social_ your government cannot even tell is how many social housing _ your government cannot even tell is how many social housing units - your government cannot even tell is how many social housing units have | how many social housing units have been _ how many social housing units have been built — how many social housing units have been built you _ how many social housing units have been built. you are _ how many social housing units have been built. you are fuelling - how many social housing units have been built. you are fuelling supplyl been built. you are fuelling supply for purchase, _ been built. you are fuelling supply for purchase, which _ been built. you are fuelling supply for purchase, which is— been built. you are fuelling supply for purchase, which is fine - been built. you are fuelling supply for purchase, which is fine for- for purchase, which is fine for those — for purchase, which is fine for those who— for purchase, which is fine for those who can _ for purchase, which is fine for those who can purchase - for purchase, which is fine for those who can purchase but l for purchase, which is fine for. those who can purchase but for for purchase, which is fine for- those who can purchase but for many people _ those who can purchase but for many pe0ple inexrwensive _ those who can purchase but for many people inexpensive parts— those who can purchase but for many people inexpensive parts of- those who can purchase but for many people inexpensive parts of the - people inexpensive parts of the country. — people inexpensive parts of the country. they— people inexpensive parts of the country, they cannot _ people inexpensive parts of the country, they cannot purchase. people inexpensive parts of the i
4:50 pm
country, they cannot purchase and cannot _ country, they cannot purchase and cannot rent~ — country, they cannot purchase and cannot rent-— country, they cannot purchase and cannot rent. don't forget, we build more council _ cannot rent. don't forget, we build more council homes _ cannot rent. don't forget, we build more council homes in _ cannot rent. don't forget, we build more council homes in one - cannot rent. don't forget, we build more council homes in one year. cannot rent. don't forget, we build l more council homes in one year than your labour party... your labour party did in13 your labour party... your labour party did in 13 years. 0k, your labour party... your labour party did in 13 years. ok, so your labour party... your labour party did in 13 years. 0k, sol your labour party... your labour party did in 13 years. ok, so i will not take any lessons about building social homes. it is not take any lessons about building social homes.— social homes. it is not enough, prime minister. _ social homes. it is not enough, prime minister. i— social homes. it is not enough, prime minister. i have - social homes. it is not enough, prime minister. i have done - social homes. it is not enough, i prime minister. i have done more than the current _ prime minister. i have done more than the current mayor _ prime minister. i have done more than the current mayor has - prime minister. i have done more than the current mayor has done l than the current mayor has done and... by the way, i disagree with you, respectfully, about... people's ambitions for home ownership by do think social housing is of massive importance and we must build more social housing and that is totally right but i think ultimately lots of people in this country, in their 20s, thirties...— people in this country, in their 20s, thirties... ~ , , ., 20s, thirties... prime minister, you are playing — 20s, thirties... prime minister, you are playing games _ 20s, thirties... prime minister, you are playing games with _ 20s, thirties... prime minister, you are playing games with my - 20s, thirties... prime minister, you are playing games with my words i 20s, thirties... prime minister, you i are playing games with my words will buy have _ are playing games with my words will buy have nothing _ are playing games with my words will buy have nothing against _ buy have nothing against homeownership- buy have nothing against homeownership and - buy have nothing againstl homeownership and many buy have nothing against - homeownership and many people buy have nothing against _ homeownership and many people simply can't not _ homeownership and many people simply can't not afford _ homeownership and many people simply can't not afford it. _ homeownership and many people simply can't not afford it. i— homeownership and many people simply can't not afford it.— can't not afford it. i think you have made — can't not afford it. i think you have made your _ can't not afford it. i think you have made your point. - can't not afford it. i think you have made your point. can i can't not afford it. i think you l have made your point. can we can't not afford it. i think you - have made your point. can we move onto the _ have made your point. can we move onto the post looks at impact and we io onto the post looks at impact and we go to— onto the post looks at impact and we go to this _ onto the post looks at impact and we go to this chair of the scottish
4:51 pm
seiect— go to this chair of the scottish select committee?— go to this chair of the scottish select committee? thank you. since brexit has happened, _ select committee? thank you. since brexit has happened, there - select committee? thank you. since brexit has happened, there has - select committee? thank you. since| brexit has happened, there has been a whole _ brexit has happened, there has been a whole load — brexit has happened, there has been a whole load of— brexit has happened, there has been a whole load of activity _ brexit has happened, there has been a whole load of activity around - a whole load of activity around strengthening _ a whole load of activity around strengthening the _ a whole load of activity around strengthening the you - a whole load of activity around strengthening the you —— - a whole load of activity around i strengthening the you —— union. a whole load of activity around - strengthening the you —— union. it becomes— strengthening the you —— union. it becomes clear _ strengthening the you —— union. it becomes clear that— strengthening the you —— union. it becomes clear that the _ strengthening the you —— union. it becomes clear that the scotland i strengthening the you —— union. it. becomes clear that the scotland does not want _ becomes clear that the scotland does not want the — becomes clear that the scotland does not want the union _ becomes clear that the scotland does not want the union strengthening. . becomes clear that the scotland does not want the union strengthening. i i not want the union strengthening. i and not want the union strengthening. and not sure that is at all true and... we have had many conjectures on this in the past but i think that... the... there was a vote in 2014, i think it was pretty clear what the people of scotland wanted, it was decisive and in terms of the union... you know... just look at it, you know, in a dispassionate way... the strength of our common institutions is really palpable during that pandemic.- institutions is really palpable during that pandemic. what i am lookin: at during that pandemic. what i am looking at is _
4:52 pm
during that pandemic. what i am looking at is an _ during that pandemic. what i am looking at is an election - during that pandemic. what i am looking at is an election that - during that pandemic. what i am looking at is an election that was held less — looking at is an election that was held less than _ looking at is an election that was held less than two _ looking at is an election that was held less than two months - looking at is an election that was held less than two months ago i looking at is an election that was i held less than two months ago and what was _ held less than two months ago and what was elected _ held less than two months ago and what was elected was _ held less than two months ago and what was elected was a _ held less than two months ago and what was elected was a majority i held less than two months ago and what was elected was a majority ofj what was elected was a majority of msps— what was elected was a majority of msps who — what was elected was a majority of msps who favour _ what was elected was a majority of msps who favour independence, . what was elected was a majority of i msps who favour independence, that would _ msps who favour independence, that would indicate — msps who favour independence, that would indicate to _ msps who favour independence, that would indicate to me _ msps who favour independence, that would indicate to me that _ msps who favour independence, that would indicate to me that there - msps who favour independence, that would indicate to me that there does| would indicate to me that there does not seem _ would indicate to me that there does not seem to — would indicate to me that there does not seem to be — would indicate to me that there does not seem to be such— would indicate to me that there does not seem to be such an _ would indicate to me that there does not seem to be such an appetite - would indicate to me that there does not seem to be such an appetite for| not seem to be such an appetite for strengthening — not seem to be such an appetite for strengthening the _ not seem to be such an appetite for strengthening the union. _ strengthening the union. strengthening _ strengthening the union. strengthening the - strengthening the union. | strengthening the union, strengthening the union. - strengthening the union, what is that supposed _ strengthening the union, what is that supposed to _ strengthening the union, what is that supposed to mean? - strengthening the union, what is that supposed to mean? just - strengthening the union, what isj that supposed to mean? just like strengthening the union, what is - that supposed to mean? just like you decided _ that supposed to mean? just like you decided that — that supposed to mean? just like you decided that scotland _ that supposed to mean? just like you decided that scotland would - that supposed to mean? just like you decided that scotland would be - that supposed to mean? just like you decided that scotland would be taken out of _ decided that scotland would be taken out of the _ decided that scotland would be taken out of the european _ decided that scotland would be taken out of the european union, _ decided that scotland would be taken out of the european union, even - out of the european union, even though— out of the european union, even though it — out of the european union, even though it was _ out of the european union, even though it was rejected _ out of the european union, even though it was rejected with - out of the european union, even though it was rejected with an i though it was rejected with an overall— though it was rejected with an overall majority— though it was rejected with an overall majority in _ though it was rejected with an overall majority in scotland. l though it was rejected with an i overall majority in scotland. how are you _ overall majority in scotland. how are you going _ overall majority in scotland. how are you going to _ overall majority in scotland. how are you going to approach - overall majority in scotland. how are you going to approach the . are you going to approach the scottish— are you going to approach the scottish government - are you going to approach the scottish government now? i are you going to approach the i scottish government now? no, are you going to approach the scottish government now? no, i don't think... i scottish government now? no, i don't think--- i don't — scottish government now? no, i don't think... i don't think— scottish government now? no, i don't think... | don't think it _ scottish government now? no, i don't think... i don't think it can _ scottish government now? no, i don't think... i don't think it can be - scottish government now? no, i don't think... i don't think it can be bad - think... i don't think it can be bad for all the constituent parts of the union to have... their trading relations strengthened, to have theirfriendships relations strengthened, to have their friendships strengthened, to have their means of easy
4:53 pm
communication strengthened, their roots from one part of the union to another strengthened... it seems to me to be a good thing and something thatis me to be a good thing and something that is pretty hagi to —— hard to argue against. that is pretty hagi to -- hard to argue against-— that is pretty hagi to -- hard to argue against. your former senior adviser said _ argue against. your former senior adviser said you _ argue against. your former senior adviser said you are _ argue against. your former senior adviser said you are an _ argue against. your former senior adviser said you are an unthinking unionist— adviser said you are an unthinking unionist who _ adviser said you are an unthinking unionist who think— adviser said you are an unthinking unionist who think devolution - adviser said you are an unthinking unionist who think devolution wasj adviser said you are an unthinking i unionist who think devolution was a disaster— unionist who think devolution was a disaster and — unionist who think devolution was a disaster and would _ unionist who think devolution was a disaster and would like _ unionist who think devolution was a disaster and would like to - unionist who think devolution was a disaster and would like to reverse l disaster and would like to reverse it. disaster and would like to reverse it that _ disaster and would like to reverse it that is — disaster and would like to reverse it. that is pretty _ disaster and would like to reverse it. that is pretty accurate, - disaster and would like to reverse it. that is pretty accurate, isn't i it. that is pretty accurate, isn't it? ., ., , ., , ., it? no, iwas... iwas... i mean... iwas it? no, iwas... iwas... i mean... lwasa— it? no, iwas... iwas... i mean... i was a massive — it? no, iwas... iwas... i mean... i was a massive beneficiary - it? no, iwas... iwas... i mean... i was a massive beneficiary of- i was a massive beneficiary of devolution... as i wasjust i was a massive beneficiary of devolution... as i was just saying, it was... the labour government's decision in the late 90s to follow the john decision in the late 90s to follow thejohn smith package and to devolve, it enabled me to become mayor of london and i think it was a
4:54 pm
great thing. what you did not find when i was mayor of london, you did not find me endlessly attacking central government and moaning about it and you didn't find me endlessly trying to shuffle off blame and responsibly... trying to shuffle off blame and responsibly. . .— trying to shuffle off blame and resonsibl , , responsibly... this disaster theme seems. . . responsibly... this disaster theme seems- - - lf _ responsibly... this disaster theme seems--- if i _ responsibly... this disaster theme seems... if i may— responsibly... this disaster theme seems... if i may say, _ responsibly... this disaster theme seems... if i may say, the - responsibly... this disaster theme | seems... ifi may say, the problem is not seems... ifi may say, the problem is rrot with — seems... ifi may say, the problem is not with devolution, _ seems... ifi may say, the problem is not with devolution, the - seems... ifi may say, the problemj is not with devolution, the problem is not with devolution, the problem is with the party in power... just on that, disaster _ is with the party in power... just on that, disaster seems to crop up quite _ on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a _ on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a bit — on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a bit the _ on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a bit. the one _ on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a bit. the one you _ on that, disaster seems to crop up quite a bit. the one you have - quite a bit. the one you have admitted _ quite a bit. the one you have admitted to— quite a bit. the one you have admitted to is— quite a bit. the one you have admitted to is when - quite a bit. the one you have admitted to is when you - quite a bit. the one you have admitted to is when you are. quite a bit. the one you have - admitted to is when you are speaking to northern _ admitted to is when you are speaking to northern tory— admitted to is when you are speaking to northern tory mps _ admitted to is when you are speaking to northern tory mps you _ admitted to is when you are speaking to northern tory mps you said - admitted to is when you are speaking to northern tory mps you said that i to northern tory mps you said that devolution — to northern tory mps you said that devolution was _ to northern tory mps you said that devolution was tony— to northern tory mps you said that devolution was tony blair's - to northern tory mps you said that| devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake _ devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and — devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and again _ devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and again you _ devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and again you refer- devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and again you refer to- devolution was tony blair's biggest mistake and again you refer to it i devolution was tony blair's biggest| mistake and again you refer to it as a disaster — mistake and again you refer to it as a disaster l— mistake and again you refer to it as a disaster. . ., , ~ mistake and again you refer to it as a disaster. . . , ,, ., a disaster. i certainly think that the... there _ a disaster. i certainly think that the... there are _ a disaster. i certainly think that the... there are disastrous - a disaster. i certainly think that - the... there are disastrous aspects of scottish government and scottish national... scottish national party's performance... scottish pa rty�*s performance... scottish national party's performance... scottish national party's performance in
4:55 pm
delivering education, in fighting crime, in tackling the scourge of drugs, i think there have been lamentable failures, yes, i do. the difficult thing for me as prime minister of the uk is how to... it is a difficult thing because... i love the whole uk and i want to succeed and it is very hard to say that something is going wrong in scotland... i don't want to do that. i want scotland to be brilliant but i want scotland to be brilliant but i think the snp is not delivering what it could... i think the snp is not delivering what it could. . .— i think the snp is not delivering what it could... you are now the minister for _ what it could... you are now the minister for the _ what it could... you are now the minister for the union. - what it could... you are now the minister for the union. can - what it could... you are now the minister for the union. can you | what it could... you are now the - minister for the union. can you name your top— minister for the union. can you name your top three — minister for the union. can you name your top three achievements - minister for the union. can you name your top three achievements in - minister for the union. can you name your top three achievements in that i your top three achievements in that position? _ your top three achievements in that position? i— your top three achievements in that osition? ~ ., ~ position? i think that... i think that it position? ithink that... ithink that it would _ position? ithink that... ithink that it would be _ position? ithink that... ithink that it would be invidious - position? ithink that... ithink that it would be invidious of i position? i think that. .. i think| that it would be invidious of me to... ,., ., that it would be invidious of me to- - -- you _ that it would be invidious of me to...- you are _ that it would be invidious of me to. . .- you are watching l that it would be invidious of me i to. . .- you are watching bbc to... go on! you are watching bbc news. if to... go on! you are watching bbc news- if you _ to... go on! you are watching bbc news. if you would _ to... go on! you are watching bbc news. if you would like _ to... go on! you are watching bbc news. if you would like to - to... go on! you are watching bbc| news. if you would like to continue watching the prime minister of the s evidence of the liaison committee in
4:56 pm
parliament, you can do so by turning over to our sister channel, bbc parliament. head over there if you would like to see the rest of that session. more questions for the prime minister and lots of talk about covid and more besides, of course. we are pulling away because it is quite an exciting evening and we have lots of other things to talk about. we will have much more from wembley and more besides from five o'clock but that is very much there on our sister channel. before we take a pause as well and look at the all—important weather prospects, i can bring you the latest coronavirus data that has come through, while we have been listing to the prime minister. let me bring you those latest figures, uk wide figures, uk reporting 33 deaths from covid within 28 days of a positive covid test and in terms of the number of cases now of coronavirus, the uk reporting 32,548
4:57 pm
cases on wednesday, that is on the previous figure, just over 26,000. those are the latest uk wide figures that have come through to us in the last little while. as i say, much more from five dm, talking about football and covid, but now we are talking about the weather. there is a little sunshine out there through the course of the afternoon. cloud has been thinning and breaking up through the day. we will continue to see sunshine and some showers. this was the picture a little earlier on. over the next two days, keeping this theme of spells of sunshine but scattered heavy downpours around and thatis scattered heavy downpours around and that is because we have an area of low pressure slow moving and it is going to be remaining close to the uk through the remainder of the week really. back to the rest of the afternoon and into the ceiling, the heaviest of the showers in
4:58 pm
south—west england, wales, the midlands and lincolnshire, even into eastern scotland as well. if you are lucky enough to be heading to wembley, most of those showers should fade away during the evening hours. we are expecting things to be largely dry and a similar story at wimbledon. most of the showers are expected to be further north. things drying out for many of us into the evening hours. heavy showers will keep going for a time in the midlands and north—east england. tending to fade away and for most of the uk, we have some clear spells, variable amounts of cloud, light winds and temperatures overnight between ten and 40 degrees. moving on into thursday, quite a bit of dry weather on the cards —— 14 degrees. further south, across england and wales, more sunshine than we have had today but during the afternoon, once again, these hit and miss scattered heavy showers and thunderstorms, similar to what we
4:59 pm
have got this afternoon. temperatures at best between 20 and 23 degrees. watch out for locally torrential downpours. heading on into friday and eventually an area of higher pressure starts to build in for a time. more fronts waiting in for a time. more fronts waiting in the atlantic. another day of sunny spells on friday. scattered showers bubbling up. maybe a little more rain in the south—west later in the day. sunny spells in between and temperatures between 16 and 22 degrees. still unsettled on friday and as we head into the weekend, mooring to come at times, especially on saturday. the hint of something a little drier further south on sunday and into next week.
5:00 pm
three hours to kick off. england's footballers on the brink of sporting history tonight here at wembley as they take on denmark in the semifinal of the european championship. victory for these players this evening would see england reach their first major tournament final in more than half a century. this time, things have been slightly different, you know? teams have missed a couple of key chances, like when muller was through, managed to get little breaks of the ball on occasions. and nothing has gone massively wrong, and if that continues, then it mightjust happen. and there will be 60,000 fans inside the stadium for the big game this
5:01 pm
evening.

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on