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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 7, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... can england reach theirfirst major final for over half a century? they're preparing right now to take on denmark in their euros semifinal tonight at wembley. 60,000 are expected at wembley. millions more of us will be at a friends�*, at home, in the pub. even the band of the coldstream guards have been showing their support, with their rendition of that song. if england win tonight, they'll face italy on sunday. there were celebrations in rome last night, after a penalty shoot—out in the semifinals against spain. if you're an england supporter,
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how are you feeling? let me know... please don't say it's coming home cos it's tempting fate. also today, british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—19. the dutch prime minister condemns the shooting of a prominent investigative journalist as an attack on press freedom. peter de vries is now in a critical condition. the gun crime crisis hitting new york state — the governor declares a disaster emergency after more than 50 deaths over the past weekend. the mum of two women who were stabbed to death last year, says she fears the man who took her daughters�* lives will become a killing machine in prison. it's the worst thing that has happened to you. you have the result, but you still don't have your daughters. and so, there is no peace.
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hello and welcome, if you re watching in the uk or around the world. england are hoping to make history tonight, when they play denmark in the semifinals of the euros, a victory would secure them their first final in a major tournament since 1966. italy claimed their place in sunday's final by beating spain on penalties last night. tonight's game will be watched by 60,000 supporters at wembley. sally is at wembley. as an england supporter, i do not
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wanted to go to penalties.- wanted to go to penalties. now, i don't think— wanted to go to penalties. now, i don't think anyone _ wanted to go to penalties. now, i don't think anyone does. - wanted to go to penalties. now, i don't think anyone does. last - wanted to go to penalties. now, i l don't think anyone does. last night did not disappoint. it went to penalties, as you say, but it is italy that went through to the final. 60,000 fans are here to watch. we know that wembley stadium is at 75% capacity. it will be the same on sunday. is at 7596 capacity. it will be the same on sunday.— is at 7596 capacity. it will be the same on sunday. denmark fans have not been able _ same on sunday. denmark fans have not been able to _ same on sunday. denmark fans have not been able to travel— same on sunday. denmark fans have not been able to travel from - same on sunday. denmark fans have| not been able to travel from denmark because of covid, although some members of the danish royalfamily are coming, and that has upset a few people. for england, it is home advantage, it is incredible. it is coin: advantage, it is incredible. it is auoin to advantage, it is incredible. it is going to be _ advantage, it is incredible. it is going to be very _ advantage, it is incredible. it 3 going to be very different to advantage, it is incredible. it 1 going to be very different to their last game in rome. we know that a lot of fans were not able to travel because of covid restrictions but this week will be very different. 60,000 fans. we know that 6000 tickets have been given to danish supporters living in the uk but the majority of fans tonight will be england fans and the atmosphere is going to be amazing.—
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going to be amazing. where are the encland going to be amazing. where are the england team _ going to be amazing. where are the england team now? _ going to be amazing. where are the england team now? we _ going to be amazing. where are the england team now? we followed i going to be amazing. where are the i england team now? we followed them esterda , england team now? we followed them yesterday, training _ england team now? we followed them yesterday, training at _ england team now? we followed them yesterday, training at saint _ england team now? we followed them yesterday, training at saint georges i yesterday, training at saint georges park. they then move down to watford where they are staying. i think in the past they have say that maida vale but i think they wanted a bit more space, which is why they moved to watford. we saw them yesterday as the coach arrived and they seemed to be in good spirits. not training today but they did train yesterday morning and gareth southgate has a full 26 man squad to pick from, which is pretty rare at this late stage in the tournament. they all seem happy and relaxed and they will be heading down to wembley with about two hours to go before the game. kick—off is at atm. —— 8pm. lucy williamson is in the danish capital copenhagen — she said there's great anticipation and national pride ahead of denmark's clash with england tonight. yes, quite a lot of disappointment about the fact most fans cannot get over to the uk mainly because of
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covid restrictions. 0ne paper said this morning it is the biggest different to denmark since the british navy attacked copenhagen in 1807, slightly to 90 —— ten in cheek but you get the idea. there is really national pride and a source of you can see the flags are out and you will be lucky to get a ticket for any of the big events in the cities. you can kind of understand it. this is a nation of 5 million people whose football team is playing england tonight in the semifinal and they have done it without their star player. lots of emotion, lots of sense that this is a really strong team and that denmark can do what he did in 92 and surprise the world and go all the way. after a night of great passion and drama, italians are waking up with their footballers one step closer to victory in the euro 2020 tournament. late on tuesday they beat spain in a gripping semifinal match that was finally settled with a penalty shootout. mark lobel reports on a night
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of dazzling football. cheering. it was italy's night. horns honking. the four—time world champions... cheering. ..now have a second euros crown firmly in their sights. we loved it! i'm so happy that we win. it's been 53 years now without the european cup. it's time! it's about time to win it. and we're gonna bring it home! spanish fans coming to terms with their side losing a semifinalfor the first time in their history. it was an intense start to a game of the highest quality, but a goalless first half. it took until the 60th minute, when chiesa curled one in on the counterattack. as you would expect from italy. but with just ten minutes to go, morata had stepped off the bench and coolly slotted in an equaliser to rerwrite the script for spain and rectify some of his
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misses this tournament. then, into extra time, with spain dictating play, dominating possession. italy, seemingly playing for penalties until berardi scored — but was caught offside. as penalties began, the drama did not stop. locatelli's efforts saved by simon. then 0lmo missed his. five well—taken penalties later, it was morata's turn, surely? but he fired towards donnarumma, who saved it. which meantjorginho could win it for italy. he strolled up, sending the keeper the wrong way. it was an enthralling end to an unforgettable encounter. translation: i have to say that we are very happy about all of this and i thank the players because they believed right from day one that we could produce something incredible.
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we haven't done everything we need to, yet, there's still another step to go, but now we have to rest. cheering. italy will go into the final at wembley with a record that even roman soldiers would be proud of. they came into this match unbeaten for 32 games — they saw 16 straight wins — can they now conquer europe? mark lobel, bbc news. mark lowen is in rome — earlier i asked him how the italian fans are feeling after last night's victory. they are feeling pretty ecstatic, i can tell you. this is looking fairly empty this morning, the fan zone, the fine village they call it in central rome, but i think it is because a lot of people are nursing their hangovers after last night and having a particularly strong espresso this morning let me give you a sense of what the papers are saying, this is one of the leading
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sport newspapers, saying is italian. and this one, you won't need a translation ford fiesta, celebration. there is a sense that after the ignominy of failing to qualify for the world cup in 2018 for the first time in 60 years, now roberto mancini, the former manchester city manager, who came in to manage the italian football team, has just completely rejuvenated the team and transform the image of it, transform the use of it, given italians back the love that they once had for their national team and they are sensing victory. they are hoping that they can lift the trophy on sunday night, the first time in a european championships since 1968. in terms of the nerves that must have been shredded across the country without penalty shoot—out, goodness! country without penalty shoot-out, noodness! ~ , ,., , country without penalty shoot-out, noodness! ~ , �* country without penalty shoot-out, noodness! ~ , ~ ,, , goodness! absolutely. and especially so because they _ goodness! absolutely. and especially so because they remember _ goodness! absolutely. and especially so because they remember the - goodness! absolutely. and especially so because they remember the dark. so because they remember the dark days of 2012 when they were thrashed
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in the euro 2012 final by spain, 4-0. in 2008, they in the euro 2012 final by spain, 4—0. in 2008, they lost to spain on penalties. these were two massive... they call it the mediterranean derby, the southern european identity came together to battle it out also bit was a thriller of a match and when italy scored on sickly minutes, they dared to dream and then spain equalised and it came down to that nail—biting shoot—out. what italy have managed to achieve is not only to really bring the team together but also to bring this country together under the leadership of roberto mancini. he is a very charismatic and loved figure. this is a country that is often where regional identities often supersede national ones. you might feel like you are sicilian or from northern italy. but actually 60 million italians have come together under the italian flag, it is not necessarily a flag—waving country, has echoes of flashes and echo —— etc, the italian flag, but you go around rome and the italian flag is
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waving and they feel pride and joy. i think it'll be england that they will play at wembley. we will have to see tonight what happens and who they will be taking on on sunday night. harriet, you may have to keep quiet when harry kane scores that hat—trick! 0k, when harry kane scores that hat—trick! ok, let's ask both of you individually, how are you feeling? i am feeling great. i think it is going to be a great match and i cannot wait to watch it. absolutely. i am a bit nervous _ cannot wait to watch it. absolutely. i am a bit nervous about _ cannot wait to watch it. absolutely. i am a bit nervous about sitting - i am a bit nervous about sitting with_ i am a bit nervous about sitting with the — i am a bit nervous about sitting with the danish fans. i am sure they will be _ with the danish fans. i am sure they will be friendly but i need to not be screaming at the wrong points in the match — be screaming at the wrong points in the match |— be screaming at the wrong points in the match. . , , be screaming at the wrong points in the match. ., , , , the match. i am sure they will be friendl .
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the match. i am sure they will be friendly. denmark _ the match. i am sure they will be friendly. denmark kind _ the match. i am sure they will be friendly. denmark kind of- the match. i am sure they will be friendly. denmark kind of feel . friendly. denmark kind of feel because of what happened with christian eriksen that this is going to be your wane, since 1992, this is going to happen for denmark. how do you feel about that narrative? i think we are less confident in denmark than we are —— that we are going to win. but there is no doubt of course that when you experience a trauma like they did in the first match, that does bring the team together and they do play as a collective and most danes have fairly high expectations in advance. it was a very sad state of affairs but i think it is a stronger team for it now. and we are all hoping that we will win of course. {131 that we will win of course. of course. that we will win of course. of course. kasper schmeichel was asked by an english member of the press, is football coming home for england,
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or something like that, and he said is it? have you ever won it? it is a fair point. it is it? have you ever won it? it is a fair point-— fair point. it is a very good point. i think fair point. it is a very good point. i think he — fair point. it is a very good point. i think he was _ fair point. it is a very good point. i think he was asked _ fair point. it is a very good point. i think he was asked if _ fair point. it is a very good point. i think he was asked if you - fair point. it is a very good point. i think he was asked if you ever l i think he was asked if you ever wonder... i don't actually know my did you ever win the european cup question mark it is a great dry sense of humour running through this conversation, which i love.— conversation, which i love. england are ranked — conversation, which i love. england are ranked fourth _ conversation, which i love. england are ranked fourth in _ conversation, which i love. england are ranked fourth in the _ conversation, which i love. england are ranked fourth in the world, - are ranked fourth in the world, denmark are tenth. the danes have lost two games already in this tournament but beat england at wembley on the 2020 nations league. for england, there is never going to be a better chance to get to a final now? ., ., ., , ., ., ., now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley _ now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley is _ now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley is going _ now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley is going to _ now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley is going to be - now? no, i mean home side advantage, i'm sure wembley is going to be on - i'm sure wembley is going to be on fire tonight — i'm sure wembley is going to be on fire tonight. and they have just had such great— fire tonight. and they have just had such great momentum in the last few games _ such great momentum in the last few games i_ such great momentum in the last few games i am — such great momentum in the last few games. lam hopeful that such great momentum in the last few games. i am hopeful that it is going to be _ games. i am hopeful that it is going to be an _ games. i am hopeful that it is going to be an interesting post match
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discussion between the two of us. but england is going to win. you will be all right _ but england is going to win. gm. will be all right afterwards, whatever happens, you are going to be disappointed but you will be happy for other half. absolutely. probabl . happy for other half. absolutely. probably- i _ happy for other half. absolutely. probably. i can _ happy for other half. absolutely. probably. i can see _ happy for other half. absolutely. probably. i can see you - happy for other half. absolutely. probably. i can see you raising . happy for other half. absolutely. i probably. i can see you raising your eyebrowe — probably. i can see you raising your eyebrowe how _ probably. i can see you raising your eyebrows. how did _ probably. i can see you raising your eyebrows. how did you _ probably. i can see you raising your eyebrows. how did you fall- probably. i can see you raising your eyebrows. how did you fall in i probably. i can see you raising yourj eyebrows. how did you fall in love? we were not bonding over football. absolutely not. we met ten years ago now. absolutely not. we met ten years ago now in _ absolutely not. we met ten years ago now. ., ., can absolutely not. we met ten years ago now-_ can you _ absolutely not. we met ten years ago now-_ can you tell- absolutely not. we met ten years ago now._ can you tell me i absolutely not. we met ten years ago now._ can you tell me any i now. in london. can you tell me any more? on — now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the _ now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the street, _ now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the street, in _ now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the street, in a _ now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the street, in a club, i now. in london. can you tell me any more? on the street, in a club, at l more? on the street, in a club, at work was two in a pub. what happened? we work was two in a pub. what happened?— work was two in a pub. what happened? work was two in a pub. what ha ened? ~ ., , , work was two in a pub. what hauened? ., , , happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and happened? we met in a pub, as you do. and the — happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and the rest _ happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and the rest is _ happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and the rest is history, - happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and the rest is history, as i happened? we met in a pub, as you do, and the rest is history, as you . do, and the rest is history, as you say. that is more or less ten years ago exactly. say. that is more or less ten years ago exactly-— say. that is more or less ten years ago exactly. and when now we have two little kids _ ago exactly. and when now we have two little kids and _ ago exactly. and when now we have two little kids and i _ ago exactly. and when now we have two little kids and i guess _ ago exactly. and when now we have two little kids and i guess they i two little kids and i guess they don't _ two little kids and i guess they don't quite understand football but my daughter, whichever team is
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dressed — my daughter, whichever team is dressed in — my daughter, whichever team is dressed in white is the team that she supports. that works in our favour~ — she supports. that works in our favour~ |— she supports. that works in our favour. ., . she supports. that works in our favour. ~ ., , favour. i think that is good. harriet. _ favour. i think that is good. harriet, do _ favour. i think that is good. harriet, do you _ favour. i think that is good. harriet, do you want - favour. i think that is good. harriet, do you want me i favour. i think that is good. harriet, do you want me -- favour. i think that is good. i harriet, do you want me -- to favour. i think that is good. - harriet, do you want me -- to give harriet, do you want me —— to give me any more details about what he said to you in that pub? i am quite intrigued he is still reluctant to share. 0bviously, intrigued he is still reluctant to share. obviously, don't say anything rude or swear. ida. share. obviously, don't say anything rude or swear-— rude or swear. no, he was definitely not rude. rude or swear. no, he was definitely not rude- the _ rude or swear. no, he was definitely not rude. the sarcasm _ rude or swear. no, he was definitely not rude. the sarcasm definitely i not rude. the sarcasm definitely came _ not rude. the sarcasm definitely came out, — not rude. the sarcasm definitely came out, for sure. and then he asked _ came out, for sure. and then he asked me — came out, for sure. and then he asked me a _ came out, for sure. and then he asked me a series of medical weird questions — asked me a series of medical weird questions. you had your heart incident — questions. you had your heart incident. the conversation was a bit strange _ incident. the conversation was a bit strange but— incident. the conversation was a bit strange. but somehow, i fell in love _ strange. but somehow, i fell in love how— strange. but somehow, i fell in love. how knows? strange. but somehow, ifell in love. how knows?— strange. but somehow, ifell in love. how knows? who said romance was dead? i — love. how knows? who said romance was dead? i never— love. how knows? who said romance was dead? i never said _ love. how knows? who said romance was dead? i never said that! - love. how knows? who said romance was dead? i never said that! enjoy i was dead? i never said that! en'oy this evening. fl was dead? i never said that! en'oy this evening. thanki was dead? i never said that! en'oy this evening. thank you i was dead? i never said that! en'oy this evening. thank you so i was dead? i never said that! enjoy this evening. thank you so much l was dead? i never said that! enjoy i this evening. thank you so much for talking to us and take care.
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if you want to get in touch... the headlines on bbc news... can england reach theirfirst major final for over half a century? they�*re preparing right now to take on denmark in their euros semifinal tonight at wembley, 60,000 are expected at wembley — millions more of us will be at a friends', at home, in the pub. british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—19. two of the world's biggest airlines are going to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport for passengers arriving in the uk who ve been fully—vaccinated. the scheme involving ba and virgin comes as the aviation industry calls for quarantine—free travel to the uk from lower—risk amber list countries.
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it's hoped the results will show the government that vaccine status checks can be completed quickly and easily. earlier i spoke to daniel pearce, the ceo of the travel trade gazette a weekly newspaper for the travel industry. he welcomed the trial. 0ne one of the biggest challenges now for the travel industry and the aviation industry as they open up will be rebuilding confidence among consumers that actually travel can still be a positive experience and this will be a big step towards that. ., ., ., ., ,, that. heathrow are taking the initiative because _ that. heathrow are taking the initiative because they - that. heathrow are taking the initiative because they are i that. heathrow are taking the i initiative because they are trying to put pressure on the government to change it, i suppose, to put pressure on the government to change it, isuppose, before to put pressure on the government to change it, i suppose, before the summer holidays so that brits can go abroad without having to quarantine on return. , , .,, ., on return. yes, people in the travel industry think— on return. yes, people in the travel industry think that _ on return. yes, people in the travel industry think that the _ on return. yes, people in the travel industry think that the wind - on return. yes, people in the travel industry think that the wind seems | industry think that the wind seems to be blowing in the right direction at the moment and we have seen the news just as we have all along with this, we have seen some news dribble
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out in the newspapers this week, an announcement is imminent about quarantine free travel being opened up quarantine free travel being opened up for the double jab and we do expect now an announcement probably tomorrow that countries on the amber list will be opened up to the double jab, which is good news. [30 list will be opened up to the double jab, which is good news.— list will be opened up to the double jab, which is good news. do you have an intel jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on — jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on what _ jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on what the _ jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on what the data _ jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on what the data will- jab, which is good news. do you have any intel on what the data will be i any intel on what the data will be when it will be lifted? brute any intel on what the data will be when it will be lifted?— when it will be lifted? we are heafina when it will be lifted? we are hearing that _ when it will be lifted? we are hearing that there _ when it will be lifted? we are hearing that there is - when it will be lifted? we are hearing that there is a - when it will be lifted? we are hearing that there is a real i hearing that there is a real willingness now in government for this to happen to coincide with the beginning of the school holidays and that could be as early asjuly the 19th, which is of course the date when so many other restrictions are being lifted but i do think that there is a real opportunity now, not only for football to be coming there is a real opportunity now, not only forfootball to be coming home today... only for football to be coming home toda ., ., ., ., ., ., today... you are not allowed to say that! literally _ today... you are not allowed to say that! literally not _ today... you are not allowed to say that! literally not allowed - today... you are not allowed to say that! literally not allowed to i today... you are not allowed to say that! literally not allowed to say i that! literally not allowed to say that. �* ., ., , ., ., , that. but for many more travellers to be coming _ that. but for many more travellers to be coming home. _ that. but for many more travellers to be coming home. you _ that. but for many more travellers to be coming home. you can i that. but for many more travellers to be coming home. you can say l that. but for many more travellers to be coming home. you can say it that. but for many more travellers i to be coming home. you can say it in relation to travellers _ to be coming home. you can say it in relation to travellers incoming i to be coming home. you can say it in relation to travellers incoming to i relation to travellers incoming to the why do you think people in the
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travel industry say that the government is slow when it comes to looking at travel, slow in imposing restrictions, slow and lifting them? it has been incredibly frustrating for this industry, both the travel and aviation industries, since the beginning of the crisis, often we have seen news and information dribbling out through other channels with little consultation with the travel industry. that has got a little bit better in recent months. we saw the announcement of the second local travel task force three orfour second local travel task force three or four months ago and that resulted in the announcement of the traffic light system but there is still plenty of evidence that consumers are confused by the traffic light system and the more that we can simplify things with these new rules, the betterfor an industry thatis rules, the betterfor an industry that is really on its knees at the moment. a well—known investigative journalist in the netherlands has been shot and seriously injured in an attack in amsterdam. payter r de vrees has covered numerous high—profile crime cases
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over the past twenty years. three people have been detained in connection with the shooting. tanya dendrinos reports. shocking and incomprehensible, the words used by the prime minister of the netherlands after prominent journalist payter r de vrees was shot on the street in amsterdam. translation: all we know i is that he is severely wounded and is fighting for his life. i cannot tell you more at this moment. 0ur heart and our sympathy go out to his family and his friends. de vrees falling victim to the type of crime he is renowned for covering. translation: payter r de vrees is a national hero. i an uncommonly brave journalist, tireless in his search forjustice, vocally independent and free of spirit. he stands for people in need, for the parents was child has been murdered or people who have been wrongly convicted. he keeps the investigation authorities on their toes. and with that, he keeps
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the rule of law on course. it is believed a 64—year—old was attacked just minutes after appearing on a tv chat show around 7:30pm local time. translation: we immediately started a large-scale investigation. _ bystanders and eyewitnesses gave us information about a possible getaway car. this getaway car has been stopped and two suspects have been arrested. we believe that one of them is possibly the shooter, a third suspect has been arrested at another location in amsterdam. we are still investigating his role. police are appealing for information, as a nation left rattled attempts to come to grips with this staggering crime. 0ur netherlands correspondent anna holligan is in amsterdam and has the latest.
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all morning, people have been coming to this spot where payter r de vrees was shot. local people heard at least four gunshots and people have been laying flowers. this is an indication of how popular and well—known payter r de vrees is in this country. he rose to prominence in the early 1980s, covering the kidnapping of the beer magnet freddy heineken. after that, kidnapping of the beer magnet freddy heineken. afterthat, he kidnapping of the beer magnet freddy heineken. after that, he received threats to his life on the kidnapper himself, one of the netherlands are possibly most notorious gangsters. he was found guilty of that. he really rose to prominence as somebody who investigated cold cases, especially child murders. he won an emmy for that work in fact. investigating the case of natalee holloway, an american student on the caribbean island of aruba. and most recently, he has been the adviser to
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a key prosecution witness in the case of a man accused of murders and drug—related offences. to give you an idea hasjust how drug—related offences. to give you an idea has just how well—known he is, the dutch prime minister had a meeting last night with thejustice minister, they talked about how important his work was as a journalist, how crucial it is to society. last night we heard from the mayor of amsterdam, she said that payter r de vrees was in hospital, fighting for his life and today, the king of the netherlands paid tribute to him and acknowledge the shock among the journalists here that this has happened to one of their colleagues. the shooting happened last night about 7:30pm local time, happened last night about 7:30pm localtime, he happened last night about 7:30pm local time, he had just come out of a television studio, appearing on a chat show. it was broad daylight, at least four shots fired, and police
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have arrested three people, two of them in a carney evie hague. they believe one of those people was the gunman and one other man in amsterdam. they are urging people not to share the footage so collating on social media but to get in touch with them. new york governor andrew cuomo has declared a �*disaster emergency�* following a surge in gun violence there. the move will enable the state to bolster law enforcement in cities where shootings are on the increase. the announcement comes as new york and many other parts of the united states see a big rise in gun violence. it�*s so bad that when you look at the recent numbers, more people are dying of gun violence than of covid. it is an emergency. and i want the people of the state to understand that. and i want them to respond to the emergency for the way it is. so today, first state in the nation is going to declare a disaster
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emergency on gun violence. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis, told us more about the decision by governor cuomo. what it basically does is it pinpoints the areas where crime is at its worst, and seeks to direct resources to those areas. now, governor andrew cuomo has proposed an office of gun violence prevention, and he is also going to create a department to track the illegal flow of firearms from other states into new york state, and he is also planning to boostjob creation programmes for young people in order to keep them off the streets. as for what�*s caused this, well, initially, the pandemic saw a reduction in crime as people were cooped up at home, if you like, but then we had problems with unemployment, a lot of people were laid off, of course, and that is thought
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to have contributed to the rise in gun crime here, along with, of course, a proliferation of firearms and such things as questions over the legitimacy of police forces here, if you like, in the wake of incidents such as that involving george floyd. so, it�*s a combination of factors, but we have certainly seen some very, very scary statistics from some cities in recent months. to singapore now where a 19—year—old man has been sentenced after pleading guilty to sending death threats to the english premier league footballer, neal maupay. derek ng who wrote the messages on social media after brighton beat arsenal last year is the first person outside britain to be convicted of the online harassment of a premier league player.
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matt himsworth is a lawyer specialising in media issues. he�*s been following the case. there have been a number of individuals prosecuted and convicted of hate lying —— hate crimes online but it is hugely symbolic of the international nature of it, the cooperation of authorities. they have relied on the hard work of the premier league liaising with the singaporean authorities. social media seems a wild west and many users hide behind anonymity and they think it is a safe haven for them to behave despicably. i think it is hugely symbolic. one of india�*s most accomplished and respected film stars, dilip kumar, has died at the age of 98. born as yusuf khan, he acted in more than 60 films. he was nicknamed �*the tragedy king�* and won the highest
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awards in the country. prime minister narenda modi said he will be remembered as a cinematic legend. he was blessed with unparalleled brilliance, due to which audiences across generations were enthralled. his passing away is a loss to our cultural world. tropical storm elsa has strengthened into a category1 hurricane, hours before it�*s expected to hit land in florida. many floridians have begun to hunker down as winds begin to pick up speed. forecasters say elsa will hit land along the north florida gulf coast in a few hours time. it comes days after elsa damaged infrastructure and killed three people in the caribbean. sophia tran—thomson has this report. elsa still hasn�*t touched us soil, but strong winds and rains slammed florida�*s key west on tuesday as the storm passed by offshore. the timing is a little scary it is early. because it�*s early — it�*sjust the beginning ofjuly. it�*s only one month
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into hurricane season. florida�*s governor said that the storm was expected to come ashore between 8am and 9am on wednesday. elsa is forecast to become a hurricane before making landfall, with landfall appearing most likely in the eastern big bend of florida nature coast north of tampa bay tomorrow morning. local residents have been preparing for a battering, and evacuation shelters are at the ready. this is going to be a water event. there is going to be flooding, there is going to be storm surge, and that�*s what is giving us the greatest concern. we learned our lesson from eta here last year. it was just a tropical storm, and just a tropical storm brought us about five inches of water inside the building, so we can�*t take it lately. after landfall, elsa is forecast to drop up to four inches of rain across the florida peninsula, with tornadoes possible across florida, georgia and south carolina. it also threatens the search
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and rescue effort at the side of the building collapse in miami, where at least 36 people have been confirmed dead, and over 100 are missing. the storm prompted officials to demolish a still—standing section of the tower on sunday, over worries the high wind could knock it down. for many floridians, extreme weather is a part of life. now, the only thing to do is to prepare that to weather the storm. sophia tran—thomson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... can england reach theirfirst major final for over half a century? they�*re preparing right now to take on denmark in their euros semifinal tonight at wembley. 60,000 fans are expected at wembley. millions more will be watching in fanzones and on tv. whoever wins tonight will face italy on sunday,
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after a dramatic penalty shoot—out in last night�*s other semi—final. also today — british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—19. the dutch prime minister condemns the shooting of a prominent investigative journalist in amsterdam as an attack on press freedom. the gun crime crisis hitting new york state — the governor declares a disaster emergency after more than 50 deaths over the past weekend. tonight, the england squad will be hoping to beat denmark and get to the final of a mjaor tournament since 1966. to the final of a major tournament since 1966. jayne mccubbin has been asking people where you�*re planning on watching the game my goodness, we have hit peak excitement here, haven�*t we? at woodhey high school. come on, england! we are here this morning because this young man came
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to this high school. his name is... do the introductions. kieran trippier. there you go. very proud of him, aren�*t you? very proud. the lads have prepared something for you this morning. are you ready? three, two, one, take it away. # we�*ve gotjackie, jackie grealish. # we�*ve got kane. # we�*ve gotjude, rice and foden. # we will reign. # we�*ve got stones and maguire. # the england are on fire. # mouty scores for england once again!# well done. we tried to bottle just an ounce of that excitement yesterday with our cameras. have a look at this. bell rings. the day has arrived. the big news of the day. england expects every man to do his duty.
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including the substitutes and, especially, the penalty takers. everyone is now officially a fan, everyone a pundit. ladies, are we excited? yes! come on, england. where will you watching, ladies? at home. with a glass of something, i hope. prosecco! we are going to win. because we are the best. you heard it here first. these are the experts. we are going to win, aren't we? we've got to win. a boost for the country. we need it. this will be a moment to savour — after 17 months of the pandemic, perhaps, in the pub, with a pint and your pals. hello, paddy. hello, how are you? or perhaps not.
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i don�*t want to make you feel bad oranything, but... ..you have been pinged, paddy. i know, pinged. i couldn�*t believe it. i was at work and i got a ping, actually. the first thing i thought of was, oh, no, i�*m not going to be able to go out to watch the football. there will be so many people like you across the country who have been pinged by track and trace? yes, loads, thousands, probably, i�*d imagine. at least you will be clear by what date? saturday. yes! just in time. if we make it. we will. it�*s coming home. there is a silver lining, though, isn�*t there? there most certainly is, because i get to watch it with my lovely 11—week—old baby aria. here she is. hey! aria, is football coming home, darling? yes! tonight, a new generation of football fans will be watching
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who have yet to have their heart broken by the beautiful game. meet dan and lindsay. they were babies back in 1996, when england last made it to the semis. today, their big day clashes with the big game. when you heard about the clash, what did you think, be honest? be honest. what am i going to do? wedding or football? no, daniel! i know he's football mad, so you just have to embrace it. just run with it. yeah, just let him have his football on. and hopefully they win. hopefully they win. what a downer it would be, though, if england lost on your wedding day. not for my dad. not your dad. my dad's scottish. so he's a scotland fan. so it�*ll make his night. come on, england, yeah. there will be split loyalties,
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no doubt about it. no more so than in the armstrong household. dad al is english, mum catherine is danish. fortunately, all of us are going to wembley to watch the game. unfortunately, from my point of view, is we are all in the danish end. so i am going to have to sit on my hands when harry kane knocks in the fourth goal. wait and see. let's wait and see. don't underestimate the vikings, yeah? i'd like to see you do that. but he might, he might, and a nation is ready to will them on with song. when england smashed germany, it was this song. # sweet caroline! # good times never seemed so good# _ can we do it again? we might, wejust might.
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if you are singing to that son at home, brace yourself, we have quite a treat coming up. best of all, another treat. are you ready to take it away? hit it. # we�*ve gotjackie, jackie grealish. # we�*ve got kane. # we�*ve gotjude, rice and foden. # we will reign. # we�*ve got stones and maguire. # the england are on fire. # mouty scores for england once again!# brilliant, how excited are we? very! this is the reason _ brilliant, how excited are we? very! this is the reason we _ brilliant, how excited are we? very! this is the reason we are _ brilliant, how excited are we? very! this is the reason we are here, i brilliant, how excited are we? 7�* this is the reason we are here, this young man. what is his name? kieran trippier. why is he special? because he came to your school. let�*s bring in the pe teacher. thank you for hosting us. fix. in the pe teacher. thank you for hosting us— hosting us. a bit giddy. very excited. we _ hosting us. a bit giddy. very excited. we had _ hosting us. a bit giddy. very excited. we had the - hosting us. a bit giddy. very| excited. we had the euphoria hosting us. a bit giddy. very i excited. we had the euphoria of hosting us. a bit giddy. very - excited. we had the euphoria of the world cup and it is amazing to think
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it is happening again so we are glad to be a part of it.— to be a part of it. kids, what you were you — to be a part of it. kids, what you were you born — to be a part of it. kids, what you were you born in? _ to be a part of it. kids, what you were you born in? you _ to be a part of it. kids, what you were you born in? you have i to be a part of it. kids, what you. were you born in? you have never known the heartbreak and disappointment that me and lee have gone through. they don�*t know it. b, gone through. they don't know it. bit disappointing when they lost to croatia in 2018 but i am confident we will do the business tonight. listen, let�*s have a little bit of a chat. i want to paint a picture tonight, where are you going to be? will you watch it with? with your mum and dad? that will you watch it with? with your mum and dad?— will you watch it with? with your| mum and dad?_ you will you watch it with? with your i mum and dad?_ you are mum and dad? at my house. you are havin: a mum and dad? at my house. you are having a party? _ mum and dad? at my house. you are having a party? i— mum and dad? at my house. you are having a party? i have _ mum and dad? at my house. you are having a party? i have to _ mum and dad? at my house. you are having a party? i have to introduce i having a party? i have to introduce josh here. let�*s have a flash. three lions on your shirt. what is the score going to be? i lions on your shirt. what is the score going to be?— score going to be? i think it is auoin to score going to be? i think it is going to be — score going to be? i think it is going to be 3- _ score going to be? i think it is going to be 3- 04 _ score going to be? i think it is going to be 3- 04 england. i score going to be? i think it is i going to be 3- 04 england. other chocolates _ going to be 3- 04 england. other chocolates are _ going to be 3- 04 england. other
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chocolates are available! - going to be 3- 04 england. other chocolates are available! i - going to be 3- 04 england. other chocolates are available! i want i going to be 3— 04 england. 0ther chocolates are available! i want you to name and shame anybody in your house who is going to be overexcited tonight and might wake up with a sore head. ~ tonight and might wake up with a sore head. me! your narked! you will be in school. we need to do some penalty shoot—out. when you pretend to be the danish goalkeeper, get in there. josh, do you want to take it away? here we are. come on, josh. i want you to channel england. are you ready? cheers. look at that. they are in fine spirits. we have something very special value. we neil diamond to
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come down and play for us today, the son of the summer. instead, we have got mike. he is a police officer by day. and by night, he is a tribute artist. are you ready? get your hands ready. # reaching out # reaching out # touching me, touching you. # touching me, touching you. # sweet caroline # sweet caroline # good times never seemed so good # good times never seemed so good # i�*ve been inclined to believe they never good would. and
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# there will be some mums with sore heads as well after tonight! thank you for your messages. av you are saying that england is a broad church so there are plenty of scotland people who are very fans in the nations. this from david, an e—mailfrom new zealand. there is huge interest in new zealand following the england team, the weight of support is behind harry kane, including rugby made kiwis. we will all be watching the game live on this side of the world. thank you for those. that was a good rendition
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of sweet caroline from the school. listen to this version of three lions. well, take a listen to this version by the band of the coldstream guards. they play three lions the prince of wales invited the band to clarence house, to play instrumental versions of the rousing euro 2020 anthems in support of the england squad. the soldiers played in full uniform in the garden of the royal household. ? three lions was originally written and performed by comedians frank skinner and david baddiel, and ian broudie of the band the lightning seeds. we�*ll hearfrom ian in a moment, but first, let�*s have a quick listen to their version. # it�*s coming home, it�*s coming home. # it�*s coming.
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# football�*s coming home. # everyone seems to know the score. # they�*ve seen it all before. # theyjust know, they�*re so sure. ian�*s band the lightning seeds have been experiencing something of a revival recently. 0ur reporter piers hopkirk caught up with him to talk about the song that�*s become a new national anthem. # it's coming home, it's coming home. # it's coming. # football's coming home. we all know the words by now, but what about the story behind england�*s football anthem ? in fact, it was the fa who came to ian broudie, asking, could he pen a song for euro �*96? football songs have a pretty chequered history, don�*t they? from the quite good
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to the truly terrible. how anxious were you about taking this on? i decided if i was going to do it, i wanted to do a very, very good one. and i suppose the only song that i really felt like it would great if i could get somewhere near would be you�*ll never walk alone. notjust because i am a liverpool fan, but i just think that song, it encapsulates a lot of feelings, really. # three lions on a shirt. # jules rimet still gleaming.# then it was the small matter of the lyrics. the hosts of tv�*s fantasy football david baddiel and frank skinner added the words. a combination that created a classic. as soon as i saw it, i realised they wrote an absolutely brilliant lyric. which i certainly wouldn�*t have been able to do. and itjust encapsulated everything that i hoped it would. it has since sold more than1 million copies
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and is the only song to have been number one four times. but ian admits he originally intended to turn down the fa�*s initial approach. at the time, i couldn�*t have anticipated, you know, what has happened, really. you know, i couldn�*t have anticipated 25 years on, to be talking to you about it. so obviously i am really pleased it all happened and it is a continuing story. and with the song reinvigorated yet again, well, there is only one question left. and, ian, you have asked this question enough times to yourself. so, come on, is it coming home? your guess is as good as mine, but we live in hope and dreams. fingers crossed. # three lions on a shirt. # jules rimet still gleaming. # 30 years of hurt...# that was piers hopkirk speaking to ian broudie from the lightning seeds. luxmy gopal is at england�*s only danish school this morning, meeting young denmark fans.
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this is one of the only places in england where you will hear the rousing cheers from schoolchildren in support of denmark. give us a blast! fantastic. these children, many of them are going to wembley. they are going to be among the 6000 danish fans going to wembley tonight. who is going to wembley? ok, let�*s speak to you first of all. how are you feeling? good. denmark will get 16—0. there is the optimism of youth for you there! who else is going? what do you think is going to happen? 2—1 to denmark. and i think simon kjaer is going to score _ very in—depth analysis. we are just good to speak briefly to the head teacher of the school. first of all, tell me a little bit
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about how the feeling has been among the children and among the staff about tonight�*s game. we live in england but some of us have roots from denmark, so all of this football has just brought us all together and we have been celebrating the whole competition and it has been so good to cheer for something again. absolutely. i know a lot of people really noticed denmark and their teamwork, their strong team vibes, when christian eriksen collapsed on the pitch and the team formed a protective barrier around him. how important is that teamwork? i think that is exactly why they have got so far and that is also what we like to do in school. it is what we teach the children. if things happen like that, we stand together and we get through it and i think that is exactly what denmark is doing now in the european championships. we stand together, that is a line from the danish version of the three lions songs, so let�*s hear
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it little bit of that. three, two, one. they sing. fantastic. good work, guys. what do the words to that mean? it just means that we are red and white, exactly like england, and we stand together side by side. some of the children have one english parent and one danish parent. where do the loyalties lie there? i don't know. you will have to ask them. you have got one danish parent and one english parent. what are you going to do? i am going to have to support denmark because i am going to wembley in the danish section. you have no choice! but if england still wins,
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i will still be cheering for them. excellent. for many of the kids, it is a win—win, they are going to be at to be at least at the moment supporting denmark but depending on the results, they might change allegiances. thank you very much. the united nations has warned that myanmar is heading towards a new "civil war at an unprecedented scale". some protesters have taken up arms in their fight to restore democracy. while the police have been used to suppress mass protests, many are now under intense pressure to decide which side they are on. the bbc was given rare access to the first group of police officers who defected and are now on the run ?0ur asia editor, officers who defected and are now on the run. rebecca henschke reports. these men are attacking myanmar�*s police 200km east of the capital naypyidaw. they are part of the local branch of the so—called people�*s defence force,
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civilians who have taken up arms to fight to restore democracy. they are attacking the police because of their role in suppressing mass uprisings against the military coup. translation: we were put- between the people in the military. they used us to protect themselves. john had only been an officer for four years when the military overthrew the elected government. that put him in a difficult position. translation: we are paid - by the people, the weapons we have are the people�*s weapons. it is totally wrong that we are using these weapons against the people. john was amongst the first group of 40 police officers to cross the line. when police killed the first pro—democracy protester, he decided he couldn�*t stay.
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translation: our tears are the people�*s, the people�*s tears are our tears. since then, john and the others have been on the run, hiding in the jungle. if caught, they could be executed or face long jail sentences. translation: the first 40 officers are top targets. i have heard from my friends that they really want to capture me. we can�*t stay in one place now, we have to move around to survive. over time, more police officers have joined them. there is now more than 70 in their group. news from the outside world and contact with love ones are very limited. translation: if | had - the opportunity now to speak to my family, i want to say i miss you a lot, mum,
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and love you so much. i am carrying on doing what i need to do now, i am trying to be a daughter that you are proud of. some of the offices injohn�*s group say they are now prepared to turn their weapons against their former colleagues. translation: | want - the police force to be loved and desired by the people. to achieve that, i will change my uniform if i have to. i will fight hand—in—hand with the people. the people�*s defence force continues to launch sporadic attacks. but this is a very uneven conflict. the myanmar military remains firmly in control. rebecca henschke, bbc news. the mum of two sisters who were stabbed to death last year has said she fears the man who murdered them will become a killing machine in prison. yesterday a 19—year—old man was found guilty of the murder of nicole smallman and bibaa henry. their mum nina smallman gave her response after the verdict.
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it�*s the worst thing that has happened to you. you have the result, but you still don�*t have your daughters. and so, there is no peace, really. so, do i feel a sense of relief orjoy or...? no, i don�*t. ifeeljustice has been done. but there is work... there�*s still work to be done. justice has been done after a long period, weeks, in which you sat through day after day, of harrowing evidence about what happened to nicole and bibaa. you say your faith gave you strength through that, but it must have taken so much out of you to have to hear all of those details. i can�*t tell you. i was really, really anxious about it.
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we had to hear that our daughter, ouryoungest, nicole, this animal had... i think she had 34 stab wounds and they could tell by the order and where they were that while she was dying on the picnic rug, she was kicking him away and the stab wounds to her legs were defence stab wounds. so we had to hear that horror. and to learn through the course of this process that he, at a younger age, when he was 15, had been referred to the counter extremism programme because he had been researching far—right ideology, how did that make you feel? you know, what we don�*t want to do is classify a young person as — they are never going to be right.
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the problem is, the people who are supposed to be assessing and taking responsibility, there is a gap from stage to stage, so they get lost in the system. the saddest thing, if this young man does have this tendency, when he goes into prison, he is going to be even more radicalised. he is going to be... he will be... he is a killer now, he will be a killing machine by the time he comes out. this man, this 19—year—old, took away two of the most precious people in your life. could you ever imagine forgiving him? i have. i already have. when we hold hatred for someone, it is not only them who are held captive, it is you. because your thoughts
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become consumed by revenge and what you would like to do to them. i refuse to give him that power. you�*re watching bbc news. do you remember the massive tanker that blocks their suez canal? there was a huge trafficjam. it is actually on the move for the first time in three months. it was moved enough so that traffic could go by, but there was potentially a dispute, something to do with insurance if i recall correctly, but it is finally on the move. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carole kirkwood. hello again. the forecast for the next few days
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is one of sunshine and showers, and some of those showers will be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. today we have got low pressure to the north—east, it is a weakening feature, and we have got another weather front pushing south—eastwards, enhancing the showers. after a fairly cloudy start, things starting to brighten up, triggering some showers in the sunshine, some of which will be heavy and thundery, some will be torrential. the rain across the north—east easing a little bit through the afternoon, but there will still be a fair bit of cloud around in the north—east with one or two showers left. and top temperatures 15 to 21 degrees. the heaviest showers today across wales, the midlands and into northern england. now, for wimbledon, there will be fewer showers than there were yesterday, but we could still see some interruptions to play. and for the football, well, early showers should tend to fade, so we could have a dry match altogether. as we go through the evening and overnight period once again, we will start with those showers and then you can see how they fade
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as we go through the evening, leaving some clear skies, and in the clear skies, we can see some mist and fog patches forming. at the same time, there will be more cloud moving in across western scotland and northern ireland thick enough for some drizzle, but it is not going to be a cold night — our overnight lows between about 11 and 14. tomorrow, we will still have all this cloud and some drizzle across the north in the west, some breaks in that cloud, but for many it will be a cloudy day. for england, for wales, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, the same for eastern scotland. fewer showers, but they will be slow—moving, so if you catch one, it could be torrential and it could also be thundery. now, as we move from thursday into friday, a ridge of high pressure starts to build across us. we have got this weather front showing its hand coming into the west later on in the day, which means a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine first thing, away from the north—east corner, where we will have the cloud and a few showers, we could see a few showers develop across some eastern areas and here comes our weatherfront, moving
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in from the south—west, bringing some showery outbreaks of rain. these are our temperatures — between 15 and about 22. then as we head into the weekend, well, a weather front will cross us, so on saturday morning, there will be some rain, then we are looking at some sunshine and showers, but it is looking a bit wetter on sunday.
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this is bbc news, i�*m annita mcveigh. the headlines: can england go all the way and make history? they take on denmark in their euros semi—final tonight at wembley. england last reached a majorfinal in 1966. gareth southgate�*s team are hoping to take another step towards erasing those 55 years of hurt. 60,000 fans will be at wembley and millions more will be watching at home, in fanzones, or in the pub. even the band of the coldstream guards have been showing their support with their version of that song. if england win tonight, they�*ll face italy on sunday after they won a dramatic penalty shoot—out in last night�*s other semi—final.
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iamat i am at wembley where the first fans are beginning to gather. just nine hours to go until kick—off. also today, british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—19. the mum of two women who were stabbed to death last year, says she fears the man who took her daughters�* lives will become a killing machine in prison. it's the worst thing that could happen— it's the worst thing that could happen to you. you have the result but you _ happen to you. you have the result but you still— happen to you. you have the result but you still don't have your daughters. and so there is no peace.
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england are hoping to make history tonight, when they play denmark in the semi—finals of the euros. if they win, they�*ll face italy in their first major final since 1966. olly foster looks ahead to the big match. this england team don�*t like to dwell on the past. the history hurts. but they can afford to look back at the last three weeks as a job very well done. commentator: then plays it into sterling! _ the rise of raheem sterling, his first goals at a major tournament took them to the top of their group. in comes the captain! harry kane joined the party quite late, but what an entrance that was against germany. pickford who saves it. what a good hand. they haven�*t conceded a goal yet. mason mount with the corner. there�*s another one. and then that game in rome against ukraine.
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four goals to send them hurtling into the home straight on a wave of belief for their return to wembley tonight in front of 60,000 fans. we are very excited about the game, that's for sure. and we know that we are going to have tremendous support throughout the country, so that's a great feeling for us. i think we are ready for the game. i think the players are ready. they have tremendous experience now themselves, having been in this situation before. england reached the world cup semifinals three years ago in russia. they seem much better equipped and stronger as a squad going into this one, although denmark will be tough opponents. what an emotional, inspirational tournament they�*ve had. their star player, christian eriksen, collapsed on the pitch with a cardiac arrest during their first match. from fearing the worst, they are now playing every game for him as he recovers at home. good hit, good goal. we try to fight the best we have
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learnt through these emotions. we have played fantastic football. we have shown who we are. i am very proud of these boys. i am very proud of the people of denmark, the support and love and compassion we've been given. england are also feeding off theirfans. the thousands in wembley, the millions watching and listening. and they want to give something back. they have been exceptionally solid. they have got better as the tournament�*s progressed. beating germany, i think, was big mental block to overcome, perhaps. and then an almost perfect performance in the quarterfinals against ukraine. the prize is so close and, of course, england have fallen at this hurdle before. but this team is all about rewriting, not repeating, history. olly foster, bbc news, wembley. our sports correspondent
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eleanor roper is at wembley. good morning. just nine hours to go but fans already arriving. clearly wanting to absolutely soak up every bit of atmosphere today. give us a sense of what it�*s like to. bit of atmosphere today. give us a sense of what it's like to.- sense of what it's like to. plenty of en . lish sense of what it's like to. plenty of english people _ sense of what it's like to. plenty of english people here - sense of what it's like to. plenty of english people here this i sense of what it's like to. plenty . of english people here this morning and it's going to be a pretty busy day. 57,000 fans were here last night to see italy against spain. wembley stadium is at 75% capacity this week for both semifinals and full sun because my final so 60,000 fans back here tonight for england against denmark. 6000 tickets have been given to danish fans living in the uk but the majority of the support is obviously going to be english fans. it's going to have a very different feel to the last game in rome. many fans couldn't travel very up but they will be making up for it today. i very up but they will be making up for it today-— for it today. i imagine they are auoin to for it today. i imagine they are going to be — for it today. i imagine they are going to be in _ for it today. i imagine they are going to be in fine _ for it today. i imagine they are going to be in fine voice. -
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for it today. i imagine they are going to be in fine voice. any i for it today. i imagine they are i going to be in fine voice. any idea yet who gareth southgate will have in his starting line—up for tonight? we are not sure yet. the team trained yesterday morning and then travelled down to watford where we saw them arrive at the hotel. first gareth southgate and harry kane followed by the rest of the team. they are having a rest day today before travelling down to wembley. gareth southgate has a full 26 man squad to pick from, they are all fit. we will find out later this afternoon. fit. we will find out later this afternoon-— fit. we will find out later this afternoon. ~ . ., ., , , afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game — afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game but _ afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game but for— afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game but for now _ afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game but for now thank - afternoon. much more on the build-up to the game but for now thank you - to the game but for now thank you very much. lucy williamson is in the danish capital copenhagen. she says there's great anticipation and national pride ahead of denmark's clash with england tonight. there has been quite a lot of disappointment about the fact fans can't get over to the uk mainly because of covert restrictions. one paper said this morning it's the
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biggest different to denmark since the british navy attacked copenhagen in 1807. slightly tongue in cheek but you get the idea. there is real national pride. you can see the flags are out and the fan zones are ready. you will be lucky to get a ticket for any of the big events in the city, some of them sold out in 15 minutes. this is a nation of 5 million people whose football team is playing england tonight in the semifinal and they have done it without their star player. so lots of emotion, lots of sense that this is a strong team and that denmark can do what it did in 92 and surprise the world and go all the way. whoever wins tonight they will take on italy on sunday at wembley after they beat spain last night on penalties. our correspondent mark lowen has been in rome this morning. they are feeling pretty ecstatic, i can tell you. this is looking fairly empty this morning, the fan zone, the fine village they call it
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in central rome, but i think it is because a lot of people are nursing their hangovers after last night and having a particularly strong espresso this morning let me give you a sense of what the papers are saying, this is one of the leading sport newspapers, saying is italian. and this one, you won't need a translation for fiesta, celebration. there is a sense that after the ignominy of failing to qualify for the world cup in 2018 for the first time in 60 years, now roberto mancini, the former manchester city manager, who came in to manage the italian football team, has just completely rejuvenated the team and transform the image of it, transform the use of it, given italians back the love that they once had for their national team and they are sensing victory. they are hoping that they can lift the trophy on sunday night, the first time in a european championships since 1968.
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tonight there are going to be many households with split loyalties. let's speak to one of them. joining me are rob and julie smith and their two sons, sebastian and marcus. rob moved to denmark 20 years ago and will be supporting england. julie will be supporting the danes and as for sebastian and marcus, they are undecided! rob, you had a feeling this meet up between england and denmark could be on the cards when you look at the groups up at the beginning of the tournament. we groups up at the beginning of the tournament-— tournament. we saw it coming actuall . tournament. we saw it coming aetually- we — tournament. we saw it coming actually. we were _ tournament. we saw it coming actually. we were worried. - tournament. we saw it coming - actually. we were worried. denmark didn't do too well in the first two games and we thought it might not happen but they did a good job of turning it around. england have been really good the whole tournament. much rivalry in the house in the build—up to all of this then. yes. much rivalry in the house in the build-up to all of this then. yes. i really believe _ build-up to all of this then. yes. i really believe in _ build-up to all of this then. yes. i really believe in denmark. - build-up to all of this then. yes. i really believe in denmark. we - build-up to all of this then. yes. i l really believe in denmark. we have build-up to all of this then. yes. i i really believe in denmark. we have a lot of— really believe in denmark. we have a lot of passion and team spirit, especially of the christian eriksen
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and that— especially of the christian eriksen and that incident. i think that will carry— and that incident. i think that will carry us_ and that incident. i think that will carry us cash carriers very far. do ou feel carry us cash carriers very far. you feel what carry us cash carriers very far. dr? you feel what happened to christian eriksen, that that has given the team an extra spark and has created more passion in the team. definitely. denmark and the fans have come together as a big family. we don't _ have come together as a big family. we don't have many people in denmark but we _ we don't have many people in denmark but we are _ we don't have many people in denmark but we are very passionate about our countrx _ but we are very passionate about our countrx i_ but we are very passionate about our country. i believe we will go far in this tournament.— this tournament. sebastien and marcus, hello. _ this tournament. sebastien and marcus, hello. who _ this tournament. sebastien and marcus, hello. who are - this tournament. sebastien and marcus, hello. who are you - marcus, hello. who are you supporting? i marcus, hello. who are you summing?— marcus, hello. who are you suuuortin? . . , . supporting? i am a bit conflicted because i feel _ supporting? i am a bit conflicted because i feel a _ supporting? i am a bit conflicted because i feel a strong - supporting? i am a bit conflicted i because i feel a strong relationship to both _ because i feel a strong relationship to both england _ because i feel a strong relationship to both england and _ because i feel a strong relationship to both england and denmark. - because i feel a strong relationship to both england and denmark. i- because i feel a strong relationship l to both england and denmark. i have a huge _ to both england and denmark. i have a huge family— to both england and denmark. i have a huge family in_ to both england and denmark. i have a huge family in england _ to both england and denmark. i have a huge family in england and - a huge family in england and denmark _ a huge family in england and denmark i_ a huge family in england and denmark. ithink— a huge family in england and denmark. i think i— a huge family in england and denmark. i think i will-
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a huge family in england and denmark. i think i will keepl a huge family in england and - denmark. i think i will keep with my mother_ denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country— denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country for— denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country for a _ denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country for a while - denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country for a while but - denmark. i think i will keep with my mother country for a while but i- mother country for a while but i will also — mother country for a while but i will also he _ mother country for a while but i will also be supporting - mother country for a while but i will also be supporting to- mother country for a while but i will also be supporting to —— . will also be supporting to —— england~ _ will also be supporting to —— england~ se _ will also be supporting to -- england-— will also be supporting to -- encland. ., ., . , england. so your allegiances might chance england. so your allegiances might change depending _ england. so your allegiances might change depending on _ england. so your allegiances might change depending on how - england. so your allegiances might change depending on how it's - england. so your allegiances might | change depending on how it's going, is that if fair comment? yes. marcus. _ is that if fair comment? yes. marcus, what _ is that if fair comment? yes. marcus, what about - is that if fair comment? yes. marcus, what about you? - is that if fair comment? yes. | marcus, what about you? are is that if fair comment? yes. - marcus, what about you? are you supporting one team or the other or are you keeping a foot in both camps? i are you keeping a foot in both cam s? , are you keeping a foot in both cams? , .,, are you keeping a foot in both cams? , camps? i will try to support both teams and _ camps? i will try to support both teams and may _ camps? i will try to support both teams and may the _ camps? i will try to support both teams and may the best - camps? i will try to support both teams and may the best team i camps? i will try to support both l teams and may the best team win. camps? i will try to support both - teams and may the best team win. you have a future — teams and may the best team win. have a future as teams and may the best team win. urn. have a future as a diplomat! you will win boys either way. yes. have a future as a diplomat! you will win boys either way.- will win boys either way. yes. it reall is will win boys either way. yes. it really is a _ will win boys either way. yes. it really is a win _ will win boys either way. yes. it really is a win win _ will win boys either way. yes. it really is a win win because - will win boys either way. yes. it really is a win win because of. really is a win win because of england when we will be happy for me and that would be great but we will be jubilant for and that would be great but we will bejubilant for denmark and that would be great but we will be jubilant for denmark to carry on going to the final. it be jubilant for denmark to carry on going to the final.— going to the final. it won't 'ust be our going to the final. it won't 'ust be your immediate * going to the final. it won't 'ust be your immediate family _ going to the final. it won'tjust be your immediate family tonight . your immediate family tonight because you are hosting a barbecue
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tonight. it's going to be quite the get—together of english people and danish people isn't it? yes. get-together of english people and danish people isn't it?— danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six — danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six close _ danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six close friends _ danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six close friends so - danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six close friends so we - danish people isn't it? yes. i have five or six close friends so we are | five or six close friends so we are having danish families and english families and 15 or 16 people will be wearing different colours. it’s a wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but _ wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but what _ wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but what will - wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but what will be - wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but what will be on i wearing different colours. it's a barbecue but what will be on the menu? will you have some traditional danish dishes long within this food? i think we will do some traditional danish salads but then a typical bring your own meat and beers barbecue and cook your own food. we look forward to seeing everyone, that's for sure. d0 look forward to seeing everyone, that's for sure.— that's for sure. do you think the rivalry will _ that's for sure. do you think the rivalry will stay _ that's for sure. do you think the rivalry will stay pretty _ that's for sure. do you think the rivalry will stay pretty friendly? | rivalry will stay pretty friendly? yes, i do believe that. the english people _ yes, i do believe that. the english people are — yes, i do believe that. the english people are quite nice after all. everyone — people are quite nice after all. everyone i have been talking to about the football throughout this tournament, i have asked for a
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prediction so let's get a prediction from each of you for the final score tonight. i from each of you for the final score toniaht. . , ., ,, tonight. i believe denmark will win. we won against _ tonight. i believe denmark will win. we won against germany _ tonight. i believe denmark will win. we won against germany in - tonight. i believe denmark will win. we won against germany in 1992. i we won against germany in 1992. england _ we won against germany in 1992. england has a strong country but we can heat _ england has a strong country but we can beat them with our passion. it�*s can beat them with our passion. it's auoin to can beat them with our passion. going to be can beat them with our passion. it�*s going to be 2—0 and the jordan going to be 2—0 and thejordan pickford will keep a clean sheet. it will finish in normal time. i pickford will keep a clean sheet. it will finish in normaltime.- will finish in normaltime. i hope so because _ will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i— will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i have _ will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i have to _ will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i have to be - will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i have to be up- will finish in normaltime. i hope so because i have to be up early| will finish in normaltime. i hope i so because i have to be up early for work tomorrow!— work tomorrow! marcus? i think it will be very _ work tomorrow! marcus? i think it will be very close. _ work tomorrow! marcus? i think it will be very close. i _ work tomorrow! marcus? i think it will be very close. i don't - work tomorrow! marcus? i think it will be very close. i don't know. i will be very close. i don't know. denmark— will be very close. i don't know. denmark and _ will be very close. i don't know. denmark and england _ will be very close. i don't know. denmark and england have - will be very close. i don't know. i denmark and england have played well. denmark and england have played well its— denmark and england have played well it's a — denmark and england have played well. it's a difficult _ denmark and england have played well. it's a difficult question. - well. it's a difficult question. sebastien? _ well. it's a difficult question. sebastien? [— well. it's a difficult question. sebastien?— well. it's a difficult question. sebastien? ~' , ., ., sebastien? i think it will be a low scorin: sebastien? i think it will be a low scoring game _ sebastien? i think it will be a low scoring game so _ sebastien? i think it will be a low scoring game so maybe - sebastien? i think it will be a low scoring game so maybe 2-1- sebastien? i think it will be a low scoring game so maybe 2-1 to i sebastien? i think it will be a low| scoring game so maybe 2-1 to one sebastien? i think it will be a low-
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scoring game so maybe 2-1 to one or scoring game so maybe 2—1 to one or the other— scoring game so maybe 2—1 to one or the other team. scoring game so maybe 2-1 to one or the other team.— the other team. whatever happens toni . ht, the other team. whatever happens tonight. have _ the other team. whatever happens tonight, have lots _ the other team. whatever happens tonight, have lots of _ the other team. whatever happens tonight, have lots of fun _ the other team. whatever happens tonight, have lots of fun and - the other team. whatever happens tonight, have lots of fun and thank| tonight, have lots of fun and thank you for talking to us. you are watching bbc news. so split loyalties in the smith household. but our next guest will be supporting denmark, the danish ambassador to the uk. ijust wonder how you are feeling today. you are going to be at wembley tonight. it's probably difficult to think about anything else today. i am probably difficult to think about anything else today.— anything else today. i am not thinkina anything else today. i am not thinking about _ anything else today. i am not thinking about anything - anything else today. i am not thinking about anything else | anything else today. i am not i thinking about anything else but anything else today. i am not - thinking about anything else but i have to _ thinking about anything else but i have to go to the airport and i have to pick— have to go to the airport and i have to pick up— have to go to the airport and i have to pick up some members of the royal family— to pick up some members of the royal family so _ to pick up some members of the royal family so that will keep me busy until the — family so that will keep me busy until the match tonight. so some
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diloma until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and — until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and all— until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and all in _ until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and all in a _ until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and all in a days - until the match tonight. so some diplomacy and all in a days work| until the match tonight. so some i diplomacy and all in a days work for an ambassador. yes diplomacy and all in a days work for an ambassador.— an ambassador. yes but this is a very special— an ambassador. yes but this is a very special day- _ an ambassador. yes but this is a very special day. it's _ an ambassador. yes but this is a very special day. it's all - an ambassador. yes but this is a very special day. it's all about i very special day. it's all about football _ very special day. it's all about football. �* . very special day. it's all about football. �* , ., ., football. because of travel restrictions, _ football. because of travel restrictions, danish - football. because of travel restrictions, danish fans i football. because of travel i restrictions, danish fans will football. because of travel - restrictions, danish fans will be outnumbered by england fans, around 6000 or so danish fans at the game tonight. are you worried at all by that home advantage for the english? not really. the fans back in denmark are very— not really. the fans back in denmark are very disappointed that they cannot— are very disappointed that they cannotjoin the team are very disappointed that they cannot join the team tonight at wembley but we got some additional tickets— wembley but we got some additional tickets yesterday so we have 8000 tickets _ tickets yesterday so we have 8000 tickets in _ tickets yesterday so we have 8000 tickets in total and they are all for teens — tickets in total and they are all for teens living in the uk. these are a _ for teens living in the uk. these are a thousand tickets were sold out in no _ are a thousand tickets were sold out in no time _ are a thousand tickets were sold out in no time at — are a thousand tickets were sold out in no time at all. we are all located _ in no time at all. we are all located in— in no time at all. we are all located in the same area so you will notice _ located in the same area so you will notice there — located in the same area so you will
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notice there are danish people in the stadium. | notice there are danish people in the stadium-— notice there are danish people in the stadium. i noticed your tweet from a few _ the stadium. i noticed your tweet from a few days _ the stadium. i noticed your tweet from a few days ago _ the stadium. i noticed your tweet from a few days ago saying - the stadium. i noticed your tweet from a few days ago saying the i from a few days ago saying the vikings are coming back! i think i can show some footage from 1992 when denmark won the european championship. i am sure you remember that occasion. that is something i am sure the team will be holding onto and trying to repeat that performance. that was described as a shock at the time. but they have made great strides in this tournament. in 1992 they were a last—minute replacement when another team couldn't compete and they went on to win the tournament. this time around, they are playing for national pride and playing for christian eriksen. how much of a factor has that been in the success so far and how much will it mean tonight? it so far and how much will it mean toniaht? . . so far and how much will it mean toniaht? .,, . so far and how much will it mean toniaht? ., ., ., so far and how much will it mean toniaht? ., . ., .
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tonight? it has had a huge impact. it was a terrible _ tonight? it has had a huge impact. it was a terrible incident _ tonight? it has had a huge impact. it was a terrible incident for - tonight? it has had a huge impact. it was a terrible incident for all - it was a terrible incident for all of us — it was a terrible incident for all of us an— it was a terrible incident for all of us. an emotional roller—coaster. eirst _ of us. an emotional roller—coaster. first we _ of us. an emotional roller—coaster. first we were — of us. an emotional roller—coaster. first we were crying and praying for him and _ first we were crying and praying for him and when we realised he had recovered — him and when we realised he had recovered we would crying tears of 'oy. recovered we would crying tears of joy. footballand recovered we would crying tears of joy. football and sport is not important any longer after what we have been— important any longer after what we have been through but then he recovered very quickly and he left hospital— recovered very quickly and he left hospital after two days. he got together— hospital after two days. he got together with his team—mates and he made _ together with his team—mates and he made it— together with his team—mates and he made it clear to everybody that he wanted _ made it clear to everybody that he wanted us — made it clear to everybody that he wanted us to go on and play the tournament as normal. since then, it has been _ tournament as normal. since then, it has been a _ tournament as normal. since then, it has been a huge success and the whole _ has been a huge success and the whole country has been united behind the team _ whole country has been united behind the team. ~ . . whole country has been united behind the team. ~ . , i. , ., the team. what is your message for the team. what is your message for the danish team? _ the team. what is your message for the danish team? do _ the team. what is your message for the danish team? do your— the team. what is your message for the danish team? do your best. - the team. what is your message for| the danish team? do your best. you are a great —
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the danish team? do your best. you are a great team. _ the danish team? do your best. you are a great team. you _ the danish team? do your best. you are a great team. you are _ the danish team? do your best. you are a great team. you are a - the danish team? do your best. you are a great team. you are a bunch i the danish team? do your best. you| are a great team. you are a bunch of individuals— are a great team. you are a bunch of individuals but the strength is you are playing as a team. find individuals but the strength is you are playing as a team.— are playing as a team. and any prediction _ are playing as a team. and any prediction for _ are playing as a team. and any prediction for the _ are playing as a team. and any prediction for the score - are playing as a team. and any. prediction for the score tonight? are playing as a team. and any - prediction for the score tonight? do you think it will be done in 90 minutes or will it go to extra time and penalties? i minutes or will it go to extra time and penalties?— and penalties? i think we have a aood and penalties? i think we have a good chance- — and penalties? i think we have a good chance. i _ and penalties? i think we have a good chance. i don't _ and penalties? i think we have a good chance. i don't agree - and penalties? i think we have a good chance. i don't agree with | and penalties? i think we have a i good chance. i don't agree with the bookmakers. according to the bookmakers. according to the bookmakers we are the underdogs. i think this _ bookmakers we are the underdogs. i think this team has a great record and they— think this team has a great record and they have improved a lot during the last— and they have improved a lot during the last matches so we definitely have a _ the last matches so we definitely have a good chance. i have no idea if we _ have a good chance. i have no idea if we can _ have a good chance. i have no idea if we can beat england in 90 minutes or we _ if we can beat england in 90 minutes or we need _ if we can beat england in 90 minutes or we need some additional time and penalties _ or we need some additional time and penalties but i am quite confident we have _ penalties but i am quite confident we have a — penalties but i am quite confident we have a fair chance tonight. lovely— we have a fair chance tonight. lovely to _ we have a fair chance tonight. lovely to talk to you. thank you very much for your time.
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raheem sterling has been one of england s stand—out performers this tournament, scoring the joint most goals alongside harry kane. let's speak to one of his old coaches, paul lawrence. great to have you with us. tell us a little bit about your association with raheem sterling. i little bit about your association with raheem sterling.- little bit about your association with raheem sterling. i first saw him when he _ with raheem sterling. i first saw him when he was _ with raheem sterling. i first saw him when he was eight - with raheem sterling. i first saw him when he was eight years i with raheem sterling. i first saw him when he was eight years old j with raheem sterling. i first saw i him when he was eight years old and his sister— him when he was eight years old and his sister kept — him when he was eight years old and his sister kept saying _ him when he was eight years old and his sister kept saying to _ him when he was eight years old and his sister kept saying to me - him when he was eight years old and his sister kept saying to me how- his sister kept saying to me how good _ his sister kept saying to me how good her— his sister kept saying to me how good her brother— his sister kept saying to me how good her brother was _ his sister kept saying to me how good her brother was so - his sister kept saying to me how good her brother was so i - his sister kept saying to me how good her brother was so i asked| his sister kept saying to me how- good her brother was so i asked her to bring _ good her brother was so i asked her to bring him — good her brother was so i asked her to bring him in _ good her brother was so i asked her to bring him in i_ good her brother was so i asked her to bring him in. i had _ good her brother was so i asked her to bring him in. i had him _ good her brother was so i asked her to bring him in. i had him play- to bring him in. i had him play against — to bring him in. i had him play against him _ to bring him in. i had him play against him of— to bring him in. i had him play against him of my— to bring him in. i had him play against him of my year- to bring him in. i had him play against him of my year sevenl to bring him in. i had him play. against him of my year seven and eight— against him of my year seven and eight players _ against him of my year seven and eight players with _ against him of my year seven and eight players with three - against him of my year seven and eight players with three or- against him of my year seven and eight players with three or four i eight players with three or four years— eight players with three or four years older _ eight players with three or four years older. he _ eight players with three or four years older. he was _ eight players with three or four years older. he was very- eight players with three or four years older. he was very smallj eight players with three or four i years older. he was very small and slight _ years older. he was very small and slight and — years older. he was very small and slight and he — years older. he was very small and slight and he ran— years older. he was very small and slight and he ran rings— years older. he was very small and slight and he ran rings around i years older. he was very small and i slight and he ran rings around them. you was _ slight and he ran rings around them. you was scoring _ slight and he ran rings around them. you was scoring goals _ slight and he ran rings around them. you was scoring goals for _ slight and he ran rings around them. you was scoring goals for fun - slight and he ran rings around them. you was scoring goals for fun and i you was scoring goals for fun and making _ you was scoring goals for fun and making loads _ you was scoring goals for fun and making loads of _ you was scoring goals for fun and making loads of chances. - you was scoring goals for fun and making loads of chances. from i you was scoring goals for fun and i making loads of chances. from that day on _ making loads of chances. from that day on i _ making loads of chances. from that day on i knew— making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he _ making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he was _ making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he was going - making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he was going to- making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he was going to be i making loads of chances. from that day on i knew he was going to be a| day on i knew he was going to be a very good — day on i knew he was going to be a very good professional— day on i knew he was going to be a very good professional footballer. i very good professional footballer. he saw _ very good professional footballer. he saw that — very good professional footballer. he saw that star— very good professional footballer. he saw that star quality— he saw that star quality straightaway? he saw that star quality straiahtawa ? ,, . ., straightaway? straightaway. the way he assed straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the _ straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the ball _ straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the ball and _ straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the ball and the _ straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the ball and the way i straightaway? straightaway. the way he passed the ball and the way he i he passed the ball and the way he dribbled _ he passed the ball and the way he dribbled and — he passed the ball and the way he dribbled and ran— he passed the ball and the way he dribbled and ran with _ he passed the ball and the way he dribbled and ran with the - he passed the ball and the way he dribbled and ran with the ball. i he passed the ball and the way he | dribbled and ran with the ball. the way he _ dribbled and ran with the ball. the way he would _ dribbled and ran with the ball. the way he would write _ dribbled and ran with the ball. the way he would write for— dribbled and ran with the ball. the way he would write for tackles i way he would write for tackles against — way he would write for tackles against guys _ way he would write for tackles against guys who _ way he would write for tackles against guys who were - way he would write for tackles against guys who were biggerl way he would write for tackles i against guys who were bigger and stronger— against guys who were bigger and stronger than— against guys who were bigger and stronger than him. _ against guys who were bigger and stronger than him. he _
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against guys who were bigger and stronger than him. he kept- against guys who were bigger and stronger than him. he kept his i stronger than him. he kept his balance — stronger than him. he kept his balance and _ stronger than him. he kept his balance and kept _ stronger than him. he kept his balance and kept scoring - stronger than him. he kept his balance and kept scoring goalsj stronger than him. he kept his i balance and kept scoring goals or created _ balance and kept scoring goals or created chances. _ balance and kept scoring goals or created chances. it's _ balance and kept scoring goals or created chances.— created chances. it's been interesting _ created chances. it's been interesting to _ created chances. it's been interesting to hear- created chances. it's been interesting to hear gareth | created chances. it's been _ interesting to hear gareth southgate talk about the team not thinking about history and everything that's gone before. but raheem sterling has a really strong link to wembley. he grew up in the shadow of the stadium and has got the wembley tattoo on his arm. what do you think it's going to mean to him tonight in terms of passion and pride and the fact he is part of this team in the semifinal of the euros?— semifinal of the euros? raheem sterlin: semifinal of the euros? raheem sterling used — semifinal of the euros? raheem sterling used to _ semifinal of the euros? raheem sterling used to walk _ semifinal of the euros? raheem sterling used to walk past - semifinal of the euros? raheem| sterling used to walk past school every _ sterling used to walk past school every day — sterling used to walk past school every day -- _ sterling used to walk past school every day —— looked _ sterling used to walk past school every day —— looked at _ sterling used to walk past school every day —— looked at wembley| every day —— looked at wembley stadium — every day —— looked at wembley stadium on _ every day —— looked at wembley stadium on his— every day —— looked at wembley stadium on his way— every day —— looked at wembley stadium on his way and - every day —— looked at wembley stadium on his way and we - every day —— looked at wembley stadium on his way and we hope every day —— looked at wembley. stadium on his way and we hope to school _ stadium on his way and we hope to school he — stadium on his way and we hope to school he has _ stadium on his way and we hope to school. he has grown _ stadium on his way and we hope to school. he has grown up _ stadium on his way and we hope to school. he has grown up having i school. he has grown up having dreams — school. he has grown up having dreams of— school. he has grown up having dreams of playing _ school. he has grown up having dreams of playing at _ school. he has grown up having dreams of playing at wembley. dreams of playing at wembley stadium _ dreams of playing at wembley stadium he _ dreams of playing at wembley stadium. he has— dreams of playing at wembley stadium. he has played - dreams of playing at wembley stadium. he has played for. dreams of playing at wembley- stadium. he has played for england for nine _ stadium. he has played for england for nine years — stadium. he has played for england for nine years and _ stadium. he has played for england for nine years and has _ stadium. he has played for england for nine years and has been- stadium. he has played for england for nine years and has been playingj for nine years and has been playing really— for nine years and has been playing really well— for nine years and has been playing really well stop _ for nine years and has been playing really well stop he _ for nine years and has been playing really well stop he feels _ for nine years and has been playing really well stop he feels confident i really well stop he feels confident and comfortable _ really well stop he feels confident and comfortable playing - really well stop he feels confident and comfortable playing at - really well stop he feels confident i and comfortable playing at wembley whether— and comfortable playing at wembley whether it's — and comfortable playing at wembley whether it's for _ and comfortable playing at wembley
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whether it's for manchester - and comfortable playing at wembley whether it's for manchester city i whether it's for manchester city over _ whether it's for manchester city over england _ whether it's for manchester city over england. he _ whether it's for manchester city over england. he always - whether it's for manchester city over england. he always seemsj whether it's for manchester city i over england. he always seems to perform _ over england. he always seems to perform really _ over england. he always seems to perform really well. _ over england. he always seems to perform really well. the _ over england. he always seems to perform really well.— perform really well. the fact that it's the semifinal _ perform really well. the fact that it's the semifinal of _ perform really well. the fact that it's the semifinal of the - perform really well. the fact thatj it's the semifinal of the european championship, it's a huge competition. gareth southgate has been doing his best to keep the pressure off the players and keep them level—headed. do you think raheem sterling responds well to that pressure? i raheem sterling responds well to that pressure?— that pressure? i think so. the ma'ori that pressure? i think so. the majority of — that pressure? i think so. the majority of the _ that pressure? i think so. the majority of the england - that pressure? i think so. the majority of the england squad that pressure? i think so. the i majority of the england squad will see it _ majority of the england squad will see it as— majority of the england squad will see it as one _ majority of the england squad will see it as one more _ majority of the england squad will see it as one more game. - majority of the england squad will see it as one more game. it's- majority of the england squad will see it as one more game. it'sjust one more — see it as one more game. it'sjust one more game _ see it as one more game. it'sjust one more game to _ see it as one more game. it'sjust one more game to win— see it as one more game. it'sjust one more game to win and - see it as one more game. it'sjust one more game to win and after. see it as one more game. it'sjust i one more game to win and after that you think— one more game to win and after that you think about — one more game to win and after that you think about what _ one more game to win and after that you think about what happens - one more game to win and after that you think about what happens after. you think about what happens after that. you think about what happens after that full— you think about what happens after that. full concentration _ you think about what happens after that. full concentration and - you think about what happens after that. full concentration and focus i that. full concentration and focus on this— that. full concentration and focus on this one — that. full concentration and focus on this one game. _ that. full concentration and focus on this one game.— that. full concentration and focus on this one game. where will you be watchin: on this one game. where will you be watching the — on this one game. where will you be watching the game _ on this one game. where will you be watching the game tonight? - on this one game. where will you be watching the game tonight? i - on this one game. where will you be watching the game tonight? i will i on this one game. where will you be watching the game tonight? i will be watchin: watching the game tonight? i will be watching the — watching the game tonight? i will be watching the game _ watching the game tonight? i will be watching the game at _ watching the game tonight? i will be watching the game at home - watching the game tonight? i will be watching the game at home becausej watching the game tonight? i will be l watching the game at home because i tend to _ watching the game at home because i tend to get _ watching the game at home because i tend to get quite _ watching the game at home because i tend to get quite emotional— watching the game at home because i tend to get quite emotional when- tend to get quite emotional when england _ tend to get quite emotional when england are — tend to get quite emotional when england are playing _ tend to get quite emotional when england are playing and - tend to get quite emotional wheni england are playing and especially when _ england are playing and especially when raheem _ england are playing and especially when raheem sterling _ england are playing and especially when raheem sterling scores- england are playing and especially. when raheem sterling scores goals england are playing and especially- when raheem sterling scores goals or creates _ when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists — when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists. i— when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists. i tend _ when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists. i tend to _ when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists. ! tend to either- when raheem sterling scores goals or creates assists. i tend to either be i creates assists. i tend to either be on creates assists. ! tend to either be on my— creates assists. i tend to either be on my home — creates assists. i tend to either be on my home at _ creates assists. i tend to either be on my home at home _ creates assists. ! tend to either be on my home at home or— creates assists. ! tend to either be on my home at home or with- creates assists. i tend to either be| on my home at home or with some personal— on my home at home or with some
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personal friends— on my home at home or with some personal friends that _ on my home at home or with some personal friends that i _ on my home at home or with some personal friends that i played - personal friends that i played football — personal friends that i played football with _ personal friends that i played football with for _ personal friends that i played football with for over - personal friends that i played football with for over 45 i personal friends that i played. football with for over 45 years. personal friends that i played - football with for over 45 years. you sound quite — football with for over 45 years. sound quite emotional talking football with for over 45 yearsm sound quite emotional talking about it now. it's going to be an emotional night and you must be so proud of him. i emotional night and you must be so proud of him-— proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are _ proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are all _ proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are all of _ proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are all of his _ proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are all of his family - proud of him. i am extremely proud of him as are all of his family and i of him as are all of his family and friends _ of him as are all of his family and friends. , ,., j , of him as are all of his family and friends. , ,., j, , friends. everybody's wishing him well. friends. everybody's wishing him well- enjoy _ friends. everybody's wishing him well- enjoy the _ friends. everybody's wishing him well. enjoy the game _ friends. everybody's wishing him well. enjoy the game tonight i friends. everybody's wishing him| well. enjoy the game tonight and thank you forjoining us. the £20—a—week increase to universal credit will be "phased out" in the autumn, the government has said. work and pensions secretary therese coffey told mps the boost — introduced in april last year to help deal with the economic effects of covid — would face an "adjustment". let's get more on this from our political correspondent damian grammaticas. tell us more about the announcement and any reaction. tell us more about the announcement and any reaction-— and any reaction. what they mean is and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the _ and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the £20 _ and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the £20 a _ and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the £20 a week _ and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the £20 a week extra i and any reaction. what they mean is an end to the £20 a week extra that| an end to the £20 a week extra that had been added as you point out
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early in the pandemic. that was put on the universal credit payments which has meant thousand pounds a yearfor which has meant thousand pounds a year for some of the neediest families in the country and some estimates say up to 6 million households have benefited from it. but what the government is saying is that this will now come to an end from the end of september, that is when it has been extended up to and the treasury are saying it's right that uplift goes. it had been extended for another six months earlier this year and they are saying that as the restrictions are wound down this provides an extra three months of payments but at that point it seems it will stop. their decision was made within government to make sure that £20 was
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extended _ government to make sure that £20 was extended for the six months and that is extended for the six months and that is being _ extended for the six months and that is being honoured but a collective decision— is being honoured but a collective decision was made that as we see the economy— decision was made that as we see the economy open up we shift the focus strongly— economy open up we shift the focus strongly on— economy open up we shift the focus strongly on the getting people into work and _ strongly on the getting people into work and jobs. in strongly on the getting people into work and jobs-— strongly on the getting people into work and jobs. work and 'obs. in terms of reaction to this work and jobs. in terms of reaction to this announcement, _ work and jobs. in terms of reaction to this announcement, really i work and jobs. in terms of reaction to this announcement, really the i to this announcement, really the government is saying it can't provide additional support for an extended period but they will be many who argue that actually the people who this is aimed at will need that additional support to continue for a time yet. yes need that additional support to continue for a time yet. yes and i think we have _ continue for a time yet. yes and i think we have already _ continue for a time yet. yes and i think we have already had - continue for a time yet. yes and i think we have already had just i continue for a time yet. yes and i think we have already had just a . think we have already had just a couple of days ago a letter from a number of former conservative work and pensions secretary is. they were six of them from iain duncan smith who had helped oversee bringing in universal credit and all of his successes, so there was damian greene, stephen crabb, david gauke, estimate the end all of them had
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penned this letter urging the government not to do this. their argument is that this conflicts with the government's own agenda which is about levelling up and helping those who have been worst hit. what they say is that this uplift should stay permanently because they said a failure to act would mean damaging living standards and health an opportunity to some of the families who need our help most as we emerge from the pandemic. charities to have also made the same point. so what we will have to watch as the political response to this and how much criticism and how many objections arise and whether they are able to make any changes in the plans to remove that £20 uplift. two of the world's biggest airlines are going to trial
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fast—track lanes at heathrow airport for passengers arriving in the uk who ve been fully—vaccinated. the scheme involving ba and virgin comes as the aviation industry calls for quarantine—free travel to the uk from lower—risk amber list countries. it's hoped the results will show the government that vaccine status the mother of two women who were stabbed to death last year has said she fears the man who killed her daughters will become a killing machine in prison. yesterday 19 year old danyal hussein was found guilty of the murder of nicole smallman and bibaa henry — they had been celebrating ms henry's birthday when they were attacked in a north london park. the sisters mother, mina, sat down with the bbc�*s mishal husain after the verdict. some viewer's might find this interview upsetting. it's the worst thing that has happened to you. you have the result, but you still don't have your daughters. and so, there is no peace really.
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so, do i feel a sense of relief orjoy or... no, i don't. ifeeljustice has been done. but there is work... there's still work to be done. justice has been done after a long period, weeks, in which you sat through day after day, of harrowing evidence about what happened to nicole and bibaa. you say your faith gave you strength through that, but it must have taken so much out of you to have to hear all of those details. i can't tell you... i was really, really anxious about it. we had to hear that our daughter, ouryoungest, nicole, this animal had... i think she had 3a stab wounds and they could tell by the order and where they were that
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while she was dying on the picnic rug, she was kicking him away and the stab wounds to her legs were defence stab wounds. so we have to hear that horror. and to learn through the course of this process that he, at a younger age, when he was 15, had been referred to the counter extremism programme because he had been researching far right ideology, how did that make you feel? you know, what we don't want to do is classify a young person as — they are never going to be right. the problem is, the people who are supposed to be assessing and taking responsibility, there is a gap from stage to stage, so they get lost in the system.
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the saddest thing, if this young man does have this tendency, when he goes into prison, he is going to be even more radicalised. he is going to be... he will be... he is a killer now, he will be a killing machine by the time he comes out. this man, this 19—year—old, took away two of the most precious people in your life. could you ever imagine forgiving him? i have. i already have. when we hold hatred for someone, it is not only them who are held captive, it is you. because your thoughts become consumed by revenge and what you would like to do to them. i refuse to give him that power.
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the president of haiti has been assassinated at his residence. the interim prime minister has said that he was assassinated at his home by a commando. so this newsjust he was assassinated at his home by a commando. so this news just coming in, the president of haiti assassinated at his home by a commando. that statement coming from the person who is now interim prime minister. any more details on that, we will bring them to you. hello again. as we go through the next few days, the forecast once again is one of sunshine and showers and some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. today, we have got a fair bit
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of cloud across the north east, producing some showers. today's heaviest showers will be in northern england, wales, the midlands and in and around lincolnshire. but they are showers, not all of us will catch one, but they could be torrential and have some rumbles of thunder mixed in with them. now, this evening and overnight, many of those showers will tend to fade, we will see some clear skies develop with some mist and fog patches and thicker cloud moving in across western scotland and northern ireland, and here, that will be thick enough for some drizzle. but it is not going to be cold, most of us staying in double figures. tomorrow, we start off with all this cloud in the north and the west, still producing some drizzle here and there. but there will be quite a bit of sunshine around tomorrow with fewer showers. they'll be well scattered, but if you catch one, it could be torrential, slow—moving and thundery, with highs of 23. hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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can england go all the way and make history? they take on denmark in their euros semi—final tonight at wembley, 60,000 fans will be at wembley — millions more will be watching at home, in fanzones, or in the pub. also today — british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—19. the mum of two women who were stabbed to death last year, says she fears the man who took her daughters' lives will become a killing machine in prison. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. good morning.
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your prediction is correct because we start with england. your prediction is correct because we start with england. the nation is confident, the players and the manager are too, but will england manage to reach their first majorfinal since 1966? not long now to find out. they play denmark tonight at wembley in the semi finals of the euros. all 26 squad members trained at st georges park yesterday before heading south — and there seems to be a real unity amongst them throughout their campaign. on the pitch england haven't lost a match or conceeded a goal yet in the tournament, so optimism is in abundance amongst the squad. we've got a fantastic squad. notjust the team that play, everyone who's in the fold, everyone who has been with us throughout the journey. and, obviously, we've had great clean sheets in this tournament. our aim is to try to get another one. obviously, there is a lot of talk going into the semifinal and there is a chance for us, obviously, to go one step further than what we did in russia in 2018. so it's a great opportunity for us to go and achieve that.
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sixty thousand fans will be at wembley to watch the semi—final, where we canjoin eleanor roper.1 — presumably the england england might not want penalties? yes, the first semifinal definitely did not disappoint. they would have been watching last night and obviously hoping tonight does not go to penalties but tens of thousands of italian fans here last night celebrating. they will be looking forward to sunday. 57,000 people here last night and another 60,000 fans will be watching england and denmark tonight. bind fans will be watching england and denmark tonight. fans will be watching england and denmark toniaht. . , , ., , , denmark tonight. and presumably the ma'ori of denmark tonight. and presumably the majority of the — denmark tonight. and presumably the majority of the crowd _ denmark tonight. and presumably the majority of the crowd will _ denmark tonight. and presumably the majority of the crowd will be _ majority of the crowd will be english so how much of an advantage for that be for them? yes. english so how much of an advantage for that be for them?— for that be for them? yes, most of difference to _ for that be for them? yes, most of difference to the _ for that be for them? yes, most of difference to the last _ for that be for them? yes, most of difference to the last game - for that be for them? yes, most of difference to the last game in i for that be for them? yes, most ofl difference to the last game in rome and we know that covid restrictions meant that many fans were unable to travel said there is going to be
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enormous support for them tonight. we know that 6000 tickets have been given to danish fans who get live here in the uk but of the stadium is going to be packed with england fans so it will be an amazing atmosphere. what are the movements of the squad been today? we what are the movements of the squad been toda ? ~ . been today? we went and saw them esterda . been today? we went and saw them yesterday- they _ been today? we went and saw them yesterday. they travelled _ been today? we went and saw them yesterday. they travelled down, - been today? we went and saw them | yesterday. they travelled down, they trained at st george's park yesterday morning and travel to watford where they were staying. they have been staying in central london but we understand they moved to watford and they will be making their way down to wembley later this afternoon. a, ~' , monkey. —— thank you. whoever makes it through later will face italy in the final, after they beat spain at wembley last night. it was the hardest the italians have had to work all tournament — and it took an hour for federico chiesa to put them ahead. but alvaro morata came off the bench and equalised 10 minutes from the end of normal time. extra time didn't settle it, so it went to penalties and, after spain missed two,
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chelsea'sjorginho strolled up to send italy through. world number one novak djokovic is among those in action at wimbledon this afternoon in the men's quarter—finals — he takes on hungary's marton fucsovics, who knocked out the fifth seed andrey rublev. and the eight—time champion roger federer will face hubert hurkacz, who completed a five—set victory over daniil medvedev yesteday, after a rain interruption. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's stay with the big match tonight, wembley stadium will be 75% full with 60,000 fans , the rest of us will be
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glued to the television — in our living rooms and in pubs across the country. this morning jayne mccubbin has been visiting a school where of one of the england players attended. we have hit peak excitement here. we are here because this young man came to this high school. very proud of him, iventure?— to this high school. very proud of him, i venture?_ the | to this high school. very proud of i him, i venture?_ the lad him, i venture? very proud. the lad to prepare — him, i venture? very proud. the lad to prepare something _ him, i venture? very proud. the lad to prepare something for _ him, i venture? very proud. the lad to prepare something for you - him, i venture? very proud. the lad to prepare something for you this i to prepare something for you this morning. take it away. they sing
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the day has arrived. the big news of the day. england expects every man to do his duty. including the substitutes and, especially, the penalty takers. everyone is now officially a fan, everyone a pundit. ladies, are we excited? yes! come on, england. where will you watching, ladies? at home. with a glass of something, i hope. we are going to win. because we are the best. you heard it here first.
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these are the experts. we are going to win, aren't we? we've got to win. a boost for the country. we need it. this will be a moment to savour — after 17 months of the pandemic, perhaps, in the pub, with a pint and your pals. hello, paddy. hello, how are you? or perhaps not. i don't want to make you feel bad oranything, but... you have been pinged, paddy. i know, pinged. i couldn't believe it. i was at work and i got a ping, actually. the first thing i thought of was, oh, no, i'm not going to be able to go out to watch the football. there will be so many people like you across the country who have been pinged by track and trace? yes, loads, thousands, probably, i'd imagine. at least he will be clear by what date? saturday. yes! just in time. if we make it. we will. it's coming home. there is a silver lining, though, isn't there?
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there most certainly is, because i get to watch it with my lovely ii—week—old baby aria. here she is. hey! aria, is football coming home, darling? yes! tonight, a new generation of football fans will be watching who have yet to have their heart broken by the beautiful game. meet dan and lindsay. they were babies back in 1996, when england last made it to the semis. today, their big day clashes with the big game. when you heard about the clash, what did you think, be honest? be honest. what am i going to do? wedding or football? no, daniel! i know he's football mad, so you just have to embrace it. just run with it. yeah, just let him have his football on. and hopefully they win.
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hopefully they win. what a downer it would be, though, if england lost on your wedding day. not for my dad. not your dad. my dad's scottish. so he's a scotland fan. so it'll make his night. come on, england, yeah. there will be split loyalties, no doubt about it. no more so than in the armstrong household. dad al is english, mum catherine is danish. fortunately, all of us are going to wembley to watch the game. unfortunately, from my point of view, is we are all in the danish end. so i am going to have to sit on my hands when harry kane knocks in the fourth goal. wait and see. let's wait and see. don't underestimate the vikings, yeah? i'd like to see you do that. but he might, he might, and a nation is ready to will them on with song. when england smashed
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germany, it was this song. # sweet caroline! # good times never seemed so good# _ can we do it again? we might, wejust might. luxmy gopal is at england's only danish school this morning, meeting young denmark fans. this is probably one of the only places in england where you will hear the rousing cheers from schoolchildren in support of denmark. give us a blast, guys. fantastic. these children, many of them aren't going to wembley. they will be among the 6000 danish fans going to wembley tonight. he was going to wembley tonight. he was going to wembley tonight. he was going to wembley? 0k, going to wembley tonight. he was going to wembley? ok, let's speak to you, that of all. how are you
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feeling? you, that of all. how are you feelin: ? ~ ., ., you, that of all. how are you feelina? ~ ., ., you, that of all. how are you feeling?— you, that of all. how are you feelina? ~ ., ., ~ , ., feeling? what do you think is going to ha en? feeling? what do you think is going to happen? denmark— feeling? what do you think is going to happen? denmark will— feeling? what do you think is going to happen? denmark will get - feeling? what do you think is going to happen? denmark will get 16 - feeling? what do you think is going| to happen? denmark will get 16 nil. there is the optimism of youth for you there. who else is going to wembley? what do you think will happen? 24 wembley? what do you think will ha--en? ' , .,~ wembley? what do you think will hauen? ' , ., ~ ., ~ wembley? what do you think will ha en? ' , ., ~' ., 4' ., happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one articular happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one particular player _ happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one particular player will _ happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one particular player will score. _ happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one particular player will score. i - happen? 2-1 denmark and i think one particular player will score. i will - particular player will score. i will seak particular player will score. i will speak briefly _ particular player will score. i will speak briefly to _ particular player will score. i will speak briefly to be _ particular player will score. i will speak briefly to be had - particular player will score. i ll speak briefly to be had feature of this scandinavia school here. christina, tell me a little bit about, you know, how the feeling has been among the children and among the staff about tonight's game. we live in england but some from denmark— live in england but some from denmark so_ live in england but some from denmark so all— live in england but some from denmark so all advise, - live in england but some from. denmark so all advise, football live in england but some from - denmark so all advise, football has brought— denmark so all advise, football has brought us— denmark so all advise, football has brought us all— denmark so all advise, football has brought us all together— denmark so all advise, football has brought us all together and - denmark so all advise, football has brought us all together and we - denmark so all advise, football has brought us all together and we had | brought us all together and we had been celebrating _ brought us all together and we had been celebrating the _ brought us all together and we had been celebrating the whole - been celebrating the whole competitiou_ been celebrating the whole competition and _ been celebrating the whole competition and it - been celebrating the whole competition and it has - been celebrating the wholel competition and it has been been celebrating the whole - competition and it has been so good to cheer_ competition and it has been so good to cheer for— competition and it has been so good to cheer for something _ competition and it has been so good to cheer for something again. - to cheer for something again. absolutely _ to cheer for something again. absolutely i_ to cheer for something again. absolutely. i know— to cheer for something again. absolutely. i know a - to cheer for something again. absolutely. i know a lot - to cheer for something again. absolutely. i know a lot of. to cheer for something again. - absolutely. i know a lot of people notice denmark and their teamwork
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and their strong team vibes when ericsson collapsed in the team formed a protective barrier around him. how important is that teamwork? that is why they have gotten so far and that _ that is why they have gotten so far and that is— that is why they have gotten so far and that is what _ that is why they have gotten so far and that is what we _ that is why they have gotten so far and that is what we like _ that is why they have gotten so far and that is what we like to - that is why they have gotten so far and that is what we like to do - that is why they have gotten so far and that is what we like to do in i and that is what we like to do in school, — and that is what we like to do in school, you _ and that is what we like to do in school, you know. _ and that is what we like to do in school, you know. it— and that is what we like to do in school, you know. it is- and that is what we like to do in school, you know. it is what- and that is what we like to do in school, you know. it is what we| school, you know. it is what we teach _ school, you know. it is what we teach the — school, you know. it is what we teach the children. _ school, you know. it is what we teach the children. you - school, you know. it is what we teach the children. you know. i school, you know. it is what we| teach the children. you know. if things— teach the children. you know. if things happen _ teach the children. you know. if things happen like _ teach the children. you know. if things happen like that- teach the children. you know. if things happen like that we i teach the children. you know. if| things happen like that we stand together— things happen like that we stand together and _ things happen like that we stand together and we _ things happen like that we stand together and we get _ things happen like that we stand together and we get through i things happen like that we stand together and we get through it. i things happen like that we stand i together and we get through it. and that is_ together and we get through it. and that is exactly— together and we get through it. and that is exactly what _ together and we get through it. and that is exactly what denmark - together and we get through it. and that is exactly what denmark is i that is exactly what denmark is doihg _ that is exactly what denmark is doihg how~ _ that is exactly what denmark is doing nova— that is exactly what denmark is doinu now. ., , ., ., doing now. you say we stand together and that is a — doing now. you say we stand together and that is a line _ doing now. you say we stand together and that is a line from _ doing now. you say we stand together and that is a line from the _ doing now. you say we stand together and that is a line from the danish i and that is a line from the danish version of the three lions of that now. let's hear a little bit. they sing fantastic, good work, guys. what did the words to that mean? it just
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the words to that mean? it 'ust means that �* the words to that mean? it 'ust means that we i the words to that mean? it 'ust means that we are i the words to that mean? it 'ust means that we are read i the words to that mean? itjust means that we are read and i the words to that mean? itjust means that we are read and we the words to that mean? itjust i means that we are read and we are right exactly like england. and we stand together side by side. that is it. �* ,., ., . ., it. and some of the children have one english _ it. and some of the children have one english parent _ it. and some of the children have one english parent and _ it. and some of the children have one english parent and one i it. and some of the children have | one english parent and one danish cabin so why did the loyalties lie there? i cabin so why did the loyalties lie there? ., �* ~' ., cabin so why did the loyalties lie there? ., �* ~ ., ., ~ there? i don't know. i mean i think ou have there? i don't know. i mean i think you have to — there? i don't know. i mean i think you have to ask — there? i don't know. i mean i think you have to ask them. _ there? i don't know. i mean i think you have to ask them. what - there? i don't know. i mean i think you have to ask them. what are i there? i don't know. i mean i think| you have to ask them. what are you auoin to you have to ask them. what are you going to do? _ you have to ask them. what are you going to do? who — you have to ask them. what are you going to do? who are _ you have to ask them. what are you going to do? who are you _ you have to ask them. what are you i going to do? who are you supporting? i will have to support to denmark because — i will have to support to denmark because i'm going to go to wembley to the _ because i'm going to go to wembley to the danish section. you because i'm going to go to wembley to the danish section.— to the danish section. you have no choice, to the danish section. you have no choice. then- _ to the danish section. you have no choice, then. but _ to the danish section. you have no choice, then. but if _ to the danish section. you have no choice, then. but if england i to the danish section. you have no choice, then. but if england win i i choice, then. but if england win i will be cheering _ choice, then. but if england win i will be cheering for _ choice, then. but if england win i will be cheering for them. - choice, then. but if england win i will be cheering for them. for i choice, then. but if england win i i will be cheering for them. for many ofthe will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet _ will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet it _ will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet it is _ will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet it is a _ will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet it is a win _ will be cheering for them. for many of the kids yet it is a win win. i of the kids yet it is a win win. they are going to be at least at the moment supporting denmark but depending the results, you know, they might change allegiances. indeed.
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the prince of wales invited the band clarence house, to play instrumental versions of the rousing euro 2020 anthems in support of the england squad. the soldiers played in full uniform in the garden of the royal household. ? three lions was originally written and performed by comedians frank skinner and david baddiel, and ian broudie of the band the lightning seeds. we'll hearfrom ian in a moment — but first, let's have a quick listen to their version. # it's coming home, it's coming home. # it's coming. # football's coming home. # everyone seems to know the score. # they've seen it all before. # theyjust know, they're so sure. # that england's gonna...
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ian broudie with frank skinner and david baddiel there. ian's band the lightning seeds have been experiencing something of a revival recently. our reporter piers hopkirk caught up with him to talk about the song that's become a new national anthem. # it's coming home, it's coming home. # it's coming. # football's coming home. we all know the words by now, but what about the story behind england's football anthem ? in fact, it was the fa who came to ian broudie, asking, could he pen a song for euro '96? football songs have a pretty chequered history, don't they? from the quite good to the truly terrible. how anxious were you about taking this on? i decided if i was going to do it, i wanted to do a very, very good one. and i suppose the only song that i really felt like it would great if i could get somewhere near would be you'll never walk alone. notjust because i am a liverpool fan, but i just think that song, it encapsulates a lot
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of feelings, really. # three lions on a shirt. # jules rimet still gleaming.# then it was the small matter of the lyrics. the hosts of tv�*s fantasy football david baddiel and frank skinner added the words. a combination that created a classic. as soon as i saw it, i realised they wrote an absolutely brilliant lyric. which i certainly wouldn't have been able to do. and itjust encapsulated everything that i hoped it would. it has since sold more than! million copies and is the only song to have been number one four times. but ian admits he originally intended to turn down the fa's initial approach. at the time, i couldn't have anticipated, you know, what has happened, really. you know, i couldn't have anticipated 25 years on, to be talking to you about it. so obviously i am really
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pleased it all happened and it is a continuing story. and with the song reinvigorated yet again, well, there is only one question left. and, ian, you have asked this question enough times to yourself. so, come on, is it coming home? your guess is as good as mine, but we live in hope and dreams. fingers crossed. # three lions on a shirt. # jules rimet still gleaming. # 30 years of hurt...# ian broudie from the lightning seeds. an update on travel restrictions from the scottish government. the last remaining restriction on nonessential travel between scotland and the north west of england is to be lifted. journeys between scotland and blackburn will be permitted for any reason from tomorrow. the headlines on bbc news...
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can england go all the way and make history? they take on denmark in their euros semi—final tonight at wembley, also today — british airways and virgin are to trial fast—track lanes at heathrow airport, for passengers who are fully vaccinated against covid—i9. the mum of two women who were stabbed to death last year, says she fears the man who took her daughters' lives will become a killing machine in prison. a high—profilejournalist in the netherlands has been shot and seriously injured in an attack in amsterdam. payter r. de vrees has covered multiple crime cases over the past 20 years. three people have been detained in connection with the shooting. tanya dendrinos reports. shocking and incomprehensible, the words used by the prime minister of the netherlands after prominent journalist payter r de vrees was shot on the street in amsterdam. translation: all we know i is that he is severely wounded and is fighting for his life.
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i cannot tell you more at this moment. our heart and our sympathy go out to his family and his friends. de vrees falling victim to the type of crime he is renowned for covering. translation: payter r de vrees is a national hero. i an uncommonly brave journalist, tireless in his search forjustice, very independent and free of spirit. he stands for people in need, for the parents was child has been murdered or people who have been wrongly convicted. he keeps the investigation authorities on their toes. and with that, he keeps the rule of law on course. it is believed a 64—year—old was attacked just minutes after appearing on a tv chat show around 7:30pm local time. translation: we immediately started a large-scale investigation. _ bystanders and eyewitnesses gave us information about a possible getaway car. this getaway car has been stopped
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and two suspects have been arrested. we believe that one of them is possibly the shooter, a third suspect has been arrested at another location in amsterdam. we are still investigating his role. police are appealing for information, as a nation left rattled attempts to come to grips with this staggering crime. it usually takes around 10 years to develop a vaccine — but the team at oxford university managed it injust 10 months. the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine has been crucial in protecting millions of people across the world from covid—i9, but it hasn't all been plain—sailing. tim muffett looks back at the story so far. when covid first changed our world last year, it became clear that a vaccine offered the only realistic route back to normality. first of all, i think we've got
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to get a vaccine and that isn't two days away, it's not two months away. making a vaccine is a difficult, complicated process. it normally takes years or decades to produce a vaccine. they harmlessly show viruses or bacteria to the immune system. the body's defences recognise them as an invader and learn how to fight them. researchers at oxford university put small sections of the genetic code of the coronavirus into a harmless virus that infects chimpanzees. they hoped they had developed a safe virus that looked enough like the coronavirus to produce an immune response. we have used this vaccine technology before. we have seen it perform very well, so we think it's the best thing to use and that is why we are making the vaccine the way we are doing. we think it gives us the best chance. all we have to do, though, is test it. the first volunteer to be
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injected was elisa granato. i'm a scientist, so of course i want to try to support the scientific process whenever i can _ thousands of other volunteers then took part to test the oxford astrazeneca vaccine's safety and effectiveness. then, on december the 2nd, another key development. in the past few minutes, we have heard the first coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. that was a vaccine developed by pfizer and biontech. on december the 30th, the oxford astrazeneca jab was also approved. there have been concerns about a possible link between the oxford astrazeneca jab and very rare incidents of blood clots. france, germany and the netherlands say only people aged over 55 or 60 should get the jab. denmark has stopped using it. but regulators in europe and the uk say benefits outweigh any risk. crowds at wimbledon gave scientist sarah gilbert a round of applause last week. the normality we could only dream of 16 months ago seems closer than ever. tim muffett, bbc news.
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and coming up at midday — we'll bring you prime minister's questions. let's speak to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. he has got a busy day. here starmer wanting to talk to him about the announcement earlier this week and the easing of restrictions on the 19th ofjuly. the easing of restrictions on the 19th ofjuly— the easing of restrictions on the 19th ofjul . , , , ., .,, 19th ofjuly. yes, it seems almost certain that _ 19th ofjuly. yes, it seems almost certain that is _ 19th ofjuly. yes, it seems almost certain that is what _ 19th ofjuly. yes, it seems almost certain that is what the _ 19th ofjuly. yes, it seems almost certain that is what the labour i certain that is what the labour leader is likely to press the prime minister on. that big announcement we havejust had minister on. that big announcement we have just had about the plan for lifting or remaining or all remaining restrictions from the 19th ofjuly. and the reason for that is
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circular starmer has already said he thinks it is reckless to do it in that way. while we have that backdrop of rapidly rising coronavirus cases driven by the new variant. and the fact that he may well seek to press the prime minister on these projections which we saw actually on the scientific briefings as the prime minister was laying out the plans. which suggest that up to 100,000 cases a day could be happening pretty soon. and i think the question that then arises from that is a couple of things. one is keir starmer may want to press the prime minister on the scientific basis. but at the scientists been saying about the numbers? what does that mean about hospitalisations? where might those go and how high might those go. it also, the sort of
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longer—term impact. so long that covid cases. we know that from the number of covid infections you may not get hospitalisations being so high at the minute because of the protection that vaccines give but many people will still be left with long term lingering health effects. so should there then also be the lifting of all requirements to wear masks make that guidance not legal? many different points of pressure there that the labour leader could seek to exploit. share there that the labour leader could seek to exploit.— there that the labour leader could seek to exploit. are those sorts of ruestions seek to exploit. are those sorts of questions that _ seek to exploit. are those sorts of questions that the _ seek to exploit. are those sorts of questions that the prime - seek to exploit. are those sorts of questions that the prime minister| seek to exploit. are those sorts of. questions that the prime minister is going to be asked in front of the liaison committee later? yes. going to be asked in front of the liaison committee later?- liaison committee later? yes, i susect liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so- _ liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so. and _ liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so. and that _ liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so. and that is - liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so. and that is a i liaison committee later? yes, i suspect so. and that is a much | suspect so. and that is a much longer session, suspect so. and that is a much longersession, of suspect so. and that is a much longer session, of course. where he a sort of regular grilling from mps. so very likely going broadly on that but also questions around travel and double vaccination on the fact that those who are double vaccinated will not have to do home quarantine if
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they come into contact with someone who is positive for covid. but that is only coming into effect later in august, it seems. so there may well be questions about why that delay, again questions the other way, too. is it right to be lifting the measures while we have this growing number of cases going on in the background. number of cases going on in the background-— number of cases going on in the back round. ., ~ ,, , . and before we go , waterslides are a staple of summer. and it turns out, even baby elephants in china like tojoin in the fun. look at this from a rescue center in china's yunnan province. this playful elephant, yee—shwang , enjoyed herself on a muddy hill slide. the ground was wet and slippery after rainfall, and she knelt down — and slid all the way down.// the internet noticed, and the footage went around the world.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. the forecast for the next few days is one of sunshine and showers, and some of those showers will be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. today we have got low pressure to the north—east, it is a weakening feature, and we have got another weather but they are showers, not all of us will catch one, but they could be torrential and have some rumbles of thunder mixed in with them. now, this evening and overnight, many of those showers will tend to fade, we will see some clear skies develop with some mist and fog patches and thicker cloud moving in across western scotland and northern ireland, and here, that will be thick enough for some drizzle. but it is not going to be cold, most of us staying in double figures. tomorrow, we start off with all this cloud in the north and the west, still producing some drizzle here and there. but there will be quite a bit of sunshine around tomorrow with fewer showers. they'll be well scattered, but if you catch one,
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it could be torrential, slow—moving and thundery, with highs of 23. this is bbc news. the headlines: can england go all the way and make history? they take on denmark in their euros semi—final tonight at wembley. england last reached a majorfinal in 1966. gareth southgate's team are hoping to take another step towards erasing those 55 years of hurt. 60,000 fans will be at wembley and millions more will be watching at home, in fanzones, or in the pub. even the band of the coldstream guards have been showing their support with their version of that song. if england win tonight, they'll face italy on sunday after they won a dramatic penalty shoot—out in last night's other semi—final.
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let's cross live to the house of commons for prime minister's questions. she was the uk's first black female police officer. i am sure colleagues will also want tojoin police officer. i am sure colleagues will also want to join me in wishing the england football team the best of luck tonight in the semifinal against denmark. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i will have further such meetings dated today. we hear about the rule of law and injustice. can the prime minister tell me what he's going to do about the injustice that my constituents in falkirk and families up and down the uk are facing every day because of loan sharks. the hounding by
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hmrc, accountable to no one, and now according to the head of hmrc the retrospect of loan charge seems to be that any legal cases or justification so therefore will the prime minister accept this matter needs further investigation? i am acutely aware _ needs further investigation? i am acutely aware of _ needs further investigation? i am acutely aware of the _ needs further investigation? i am acutely aware of the pain suffered by those in loan charge schemes. they were misguided to do so. but i think the line taken by the treasury is right on this. john think the line taken by the treasury is right on this.— is right on this. john stevenson. there is more _ is right on this. john stevenson. there is more that _ is right on this. john stevenson. there is more that unites i is right on this. john stevenson. there is more that unites us i is right on this. john stevenson. l there is more that unites us than divides—
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there is more that unites us than divides us— there is more that unites us than divides us in— there is more that unites us than divides us in the _ there is more that unites us than divides us in the uk, _ there is more that unites us than divides us in the uk, however- divides us in the uk, however improved _ divides us in the uk, however improved connectivity- divides us in the uk, however improved connectivity is i divides us in the uk, however improved connectivity is vital| divides us in the uk, however. improved connectivity is vital to ensuring — improved connectivity is vital to ensuring we _ improved connectivity is vital to ensuring we remain _ improved connectivity is vital to ensuring we remain united. i improved connectivity is vital toj ensuring we remain united. the government's— ensuring we remain united. the government's recent _ ensuring we remain united. the. government's recent connectivity review _ government's recent connectivity review has— government's recent connectivity review has suggested _ government's recent connectivity review has suggested some i review has suggested some improvements _ review has suggested some improvements. if— review has suggested some improvements. if this i review has suggested some improvements. if this is i review has suggested some i improvements. if this is really going — improvements. if this is really going to — improvements. if this is really going to happen— improvements. if this is really going to happen then - improvements. if this is really- going to happen then improvements must be _ going to happen then improvements must be made — going to happen then improvements must be made to— going to happen then improvements must be made to the _ going to happen then improvements must be made to the 875, _ going to happen then improvements must be made to the 875, the - going to happen then improvements must be made to the 875, the 869. going to happen then improvements i must be made to the 875, the 869 and the ektension— must be made to the 875, the 869 and the extension of— must be made to the 875, the 869 and the extension of the _ must be made to the 875, the 869 and the extension of the boat _ must be made to the 875, the 869 and the extension of the boat as _ the extension of the boat as railway _ the extension of the boat as railway. does _ the extension of the boat as railway. does the _ the extension of the boat as railway. does the prime i the extension of the boat as i railway. does the prime minister support— railway. does the prime minister support such _ railway. does the prime minister support such investment - railway. does the prime minister support such investment and i railway. does the prime minister. support such investment and what railway. does the prime minister- support such investment and what is the timescale — support such investment and what is the timescale for— support such investment and what is the timescale for such _ support such investment and what is the timescale for such investment? i support such investment and what is| the timescale for such investment? i the timescale for such investment? [ think the timescale for such investment? think he should not have too long the timescale for such investment?” think he should not have too long to wait for the final recommendations about the a75 and other great of union connectivity which this government hopes to support but we will agree a 5 million from the uk and scottish governments to support the extension of the edinburgh body's railway to carlisle. leader ofthe body's railway to carlisle. leader of the opposition, _ body's railway to carlisle. leader of the opposition, sir _ body's railway to carlisle. leader of the opposition, sir keir- body's railway to carlisle. leader i
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of the opposition, sir keir starmer. can i_ of the opposition, sir keir starmer. can livin— of the opposition, sir keir starmer. can ijoin the prime minister in his remarks about the 77 anniversary. i remember where i was on that day and will neverforget remember where i was on that day and will never forget it. we will never forget all those affected, especially the family and friends of all those who died. can ijoin the prime minister in his comments about football and wish the very best of luck to the england football team this evening. i am sure the whole country with the possible exception of the mp for ashfield will be watching this evening and cheering england on. can i also extend a special welcome to the new member for batley and spen. will members opposite forgive me if ijust turn around to look at the new member as she sits there on these benches beneath the plaque tojo cox, his sister. it's an emotional moment for
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all of us and i think for everybody across this house. it takes incredible courage and bravery to stand in that constituency and to sit on these benches beneath that plaque. we all want our economy to open and get back to normal but the question is whether we do it in a controlled way or a chaotic way. the health secretary told the house yesterday that under the government's plan infections could government's plan infections could go as high as 100,000 a day. a number of key questions. that. first, if infections reach io0,000 first, if infections reach 100,000 per day what does the prime minister expect the number of hospitalisations, deaths and the number of people with long covid will be in that eventuality? there are a number—
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will be in that eventuality? there are a number of— will be in that eventuality? there are a number of projections - will be in that eventuality? there are a number of projections and l will be in that eventuality? there are a number of projections and they are a number of projections and they are available from the graphs but it's true that we are seeing a wave of cases because of the delta variant, but scientists are also absolutely clear that we have severed the link between infection and serious disease and death. currently there are only 30 of the deaths that we were seeing at an equivalent position in previous waves of this pandemic. that has been made possible thanks to the vaccine roll—out, the fastest of any european country. what people would like to hear from the party opposite because it wasn't clear from their opening question, is whether they support the progress this country is intending to make onjuly the 19th 00. he says it is reckless to go ahead but does that mean he is opposing it? we ahead but does that mean he is opposing it?— ahead but does that mean he is o- osina it? ~ ~ ., . ~ opposing it? we know that the link
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between infection _ opposing it? we know that the link between infection rates _ opposing it? we know that the link between infection rates and - opposing it? we know that the linki between infection rates and deaths have been weakened but it hasn't been broken and the prime minister should know the answer to the question i asked him. that he won't answer it in —— hardly inspires confidence in his plan. let's be clear why infection rates are so high, because the prime minister let the delta variant into the country. and let's be clear why the number of cases will surge so quickly because he is taking all protection off in one go. that is reckless. the sage papers yesterday make clear that with high infection rates there is a greater chance of new variants emerging, greater pressure on the nhs, more people will get long covid and test entries will be less effective. knowing all that, is the prime minister really comfortable with a plan that means 100,000 people catching this virus every day
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and everything that entails. i people catching this virus every day and everything that entails.- and everything that entails. i think we need to — and everything that entails. i think we need to hear— and everything that entails. i think we need to hear from _ and everything that entails. i think we need to hear from him - and everything that entails. i think we need to hear from him what. and everything that entails. i think we need to hear from him what hei we need to hear from him what he actually supports. we will continue with a reasonable approach. i have given the reasons. we have the fastest roll—out of the vaccination programme in europe, the vaccine provides more than 90% protection against hospitalisation. both of them by the 19th ofjuly we will have vaccinated every adult. everybody over a0 will have been offered to vaccinations. that is an extraordinary achievement and it's allowing us to go ahead. last week, he seemed to support opening up and getting rid of the one metre rule. he seemed to support getting back into nightclubs and pubs without masks. but if he doesn't support it,
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maybe he could clear it up now. irate maybe he could clear it up now. we should maybe he could clear it up now. - should open up in a controlled way. keeping basic protections such as masks on public transport, improving ventilation, making sure the track and trace system remains effective. the prime minister cannotjust wish away the practical problems that 100,000 infections a day are going to cause. the next obvious one is the huge number of people who will be asked to isolate. if there are 100,000 infections a day that means hundreds of thousands perhaps millions of are going to be told to isolate. the financial times estimates this morning that could be around 2 million people per week. the mail says 3.5 million people a week. eitherway the mail says 3.5 million people a week. either way it's a massive number. it means huge disruption to families and businesses just as the
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summer holidays begin. we know what the ft thinks, we know what the mail thinks, can the prime minister tell us how many people does he expect will be asked to isolate if infection rates continue to rise at this rate? i infection rates continue to rise at this rate? . ., . ~ , , this rate? i want to thank everybody who self isolates. _ this rate? i want to thank everybody who self isolates. they _ this rate? i want to thank everybody who self isolates. they are - this rate? i want to thank everybody who self isolates. they are doing . who self isolates. they are doing the right thing. they are a vital part of the protection against the disease. what we will be doing is moving away from self isolation towards testing in the course of the next few weeks and that is the prudent approach because we will have vaccinated even more people. what he can't explain, he says it's reckless to open up and yet he attacks self isolation which is one of the key protections this country has. let me ask him again, on monday he seemed to say he was in favour of
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opening up onjuly the 19th but now he is saying it's reckless. which is it? , ., , a it? just to remind us, it's prime minister's _ it? just to remind us, it's prime minister's questions. _ it? just to remind us, it's prime minister's questions. if - it? just to remind us, it's prime minister's questions. if we - it? just to remind us, it's prime i minister's questions. if we wanted to ileat— minister's questions. if we wanted to beat the opposition is questions we would — to beat the opposition is questions we would have to change the standing orden _ we would have to change the standing orden the _ we would have to change the standing order. , ., , ., . , order. the question is how many --eole order. the question is how many people will _ order. the question is how many people will have _ order. the question is how many people will have to _ order. the question is how many people will have to self-isolate l order. the question is how many| people will have to self-isolate if people will have to self—isolate if we have 100,000 infections a day? we know why he won't answer it. he ignored the problems in schools, that was 700,000 children of the week because you ignored it. now he is ignoring the next big problem that's heading down the track and going to affect millions of people who have to self—isolate. it won't feel like freedom day for those who have to isolate. when they're having to cancel the holidays, when they can't go the pub or even to their kids a sports day. and it won't feel like freedom day to the businesses
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who are already warning of carnage because of the loss of staff and customers. it must be obvious with case rates that high his plan risks undermining the track and trace system he spent billions of pounds on. there are already too many stories of people deleting the nhs app and they are doing it because they can see what is coming down the track. of course we don't support that but under his plan it's entirely predictable. what is the prime minister going to do to stop people deleting the nhs app because they can see what he can see which is millions of them are going to be told this summit itself isolated. {lit told this summit itself isolated. of course we will continue with the programme of self isolation for as long as it's necessary. but of course what we are also doing is
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moving to a system of testing rather than self isolation and we can do that because of the massive roll—out of the vaccine. for the fourth or fifth time, it's still not clear whether he is in favour of this country moving forward on the basis of the vaccine. this is unlike the law where you can attack from lots of different positions at once, to oppose you must have a credible and clear alternative. oppose you must have a credible and clearalternative. i oppose you must have a credible and clear alternative. i simply do not hear, is he in favour of us moving forward, yes or no? it's impossible to tell. 5ir forward, yes or no? it's impossible to tell. ,, ,, . if forward, yes or no? it's impossible to tell-_ if he - forward, yes or no? it's impossible to tell._ if he had l to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens, to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens. he _ to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens, he would _ to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens, he would have _ to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens, he would have heard - to tell. sir keir starmer. if he had listens, he would have heard thati listens, he would have heard that the answer the first time. we want to open in a controlled way and keep
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in line protections that can keep done infections like mandatory facemasks on public transport. we know that will protect people, reduce the speed of the virus and the spread of the virus and it won't harm the economy. it's common sense. why can't the premise to see that? of course we can see it's common sense for people in confined spaces to wear a facemask out of respect and courtesy to others such as on the tube. but what we are doing is cautiously moving from legal ticked at two allowing people to take personal responsibility. that is the right way forward and i must say if thatis right way forward and i must say if that is the only difference between this, if he supports absolutely everything else so opening pubs, nightclubs, getting rid of the one
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metre rule, getting people back to work and it's all about whether the difference between making facemasks mandatory or advisory on the tube, if that is the only difference between us then that is good news. it's common sense because it protects the public but it does he want to make it mandatory. it's ridiculous. it's clear what this is all about. ridiculous. it's clear what this is allabout. he ridiculous. it's clear what this is all about. he has lost a health secretary, he has lost a by—election and he is getting flak from secretary, he has lost a by—election and he is getting flakfrom his secretary, he has lost a by—election and he is getting flak from his mps so is doing what he always does. crashing over to the other side of the aisle, chasing headlines and coming up with a plan that has not been thought through. we all want restrictions lifted, we want our economy open, we want to get back to normal, but we've been here too many times before. isn't it the case that once again instead of a carefully controlled approach, we are heading
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for the summer of chaos and confusion. for the summer of chaos and confusion-— for the summer of chaos and confusion. ., , . , ., . confusion. no is the answer to that. these are difficult _ confusion. no is the answer to that. these are difficult decisions - confusion. no is the answer to that. these are difficult decisions and - these are difficult decisions and they need to be taken in a balanced way and that is what we are doing. throughout the pandemic, to do all these things frankly takes a lot of drive and leadership to get things done. if we had followed his advice we would still be in the european medicines agency and we would never have rolled out the vaccines is fast. if we followed his advice we would never have got schools open again with all the damage to kids education and frankly if we had listens to him we would not now be proceeding cautiously and sensibly to reopen our society and our economy and give people back the
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chance to enjoy the freedoms they love. we are getting on with taking the tough decisions to take this country forward, we vaccinate, we inoculate while they invertebrate. last week i visited a primary school in warringlon — last week i visited a primary school in warringlon to _ last week i visited a primary school in warrington to talk— last week i visited a primary school in warrington to talk to _ last week i visited a primary school in warrington to talk to year - last week i visited a primary school in warrington to talk to year six - in warrington to talk to year six children— in warrington to talk to year six children about _ in warrington to talk to year six children about how— in warrington to talk to year six children about how we - in warrington to talk to year six children about how we can - in warrington to talk to year six - children about how we can generate clean _ children about how we can generate clean energy— children about how we can generate clean energy in— children about how we can generate clean energy in the _ children about how we can generate clean energy in the future. - children about how we can generate clean energy in the future. as - children about how we can generate clean energy in the future. as well. clean energy in the future. as well as backing — clean energy in the future. as well as backing electric— clean energy in the future. as well as backing electric vehicle - as backing electric vehicle production— as backing electric vehicle production in— as backing electric vehicle production in the - as backing electric vehicle production in the north i as backing electric vehicle i production in the north west as backing electric vehicle - production in the north west there is a great _ production in the north west there is a great opportunity _ production in the north west there is a great opportunity to _ production in the north west there is a great opportunity to shift i is a great opportunity to shift towards _ is a great opportunity to shift towards low— is a great opportunity to shift towards low carbon _ is a great opportunity to shift towards low carbon hydrogen is a great opportunity to shift i towards low carbon hydrogen by providing — towards low carbon hydrogen by providing support— towards low carbon hydrogen by providing support for— towards low carbon hydrogen by providing support for projects i towards low carbon hydrogen by i providing support for projects such as~~~ _ providing support for projects such as~~~ it _ providing support for projects such as~~~ it will— providing support for projects such as~~~ it will cut— providing support for projects such as... it will cut emissions - providing support for projects such as... it will cut emissions to - providing support for projects such as... it will cut emissions to the i as... it will cut emissions to the same _ as... it will cut emissions to the same levels _ as... it will cut emissions to the same levels as _ as... it will cut emissions to the same levels as taking _ as... it will cut emissions to the same levels as taking a - as... it will cut emissions to the same levels as taking a millioni same levels as taking a million because — same levels as taking a million because off— same levels as taking a million because off the _ same levels as taking a million because off the road. - same levels as taking a million because off the road. i- same levels as taking a million because off the road.— same levels as taking a million because off the road. i believe the north west _ because off the road. i believe the north west and _ because off the road. i believe the north west and the _ because off the road. i believe the north west and the rest _ because off the road. i believe the north west and the rest of - because off the road. i believe the north west and the rest of this i north west and the rest of this country can be a world leader in
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hydrogen technology and the high net project is an excellent example. we have already put a5 million into supporting the high net project, kick—starting a hydrogen storage and i thank him for his support. the leader of the _ i thank him for his support. the leader of the snp. can - i thank him for his support. the leader of the snp. can i - i thank him for his support. the leader of the snp. can i wish i leader of the snp. can i wish encland leader of the snp. can i wish england all— leader of the snp. can i wish england all the _ leader of the snp. can i wish england all the best - leader of the snp. can i wish england all the best for i leader of the snp. can i wish england all the best for the l leader of the snp. can i wish i england all the best for the match tonight— england all the best for the match tonight against denmark and i associate myself with the remarks of the prime _ associate myself with the remarks of the prime minister on the tragedy of the prime minister on the tragedy of the bombing of 77 that we will remember. and also yesterday was the 33rd anniversary of the piper alpha disaster— 33rd anniversary of the piper alpha disaster where 167 people cruelly lost their— disaster where 167 people cruelly lost their lives and our thoughts are very— lost their lives and our thoughts are very much with the friends and family— are very much with the friends and family there are still grieving over the terrors— family there are still grieving over the terrors of that event. and finally — the terrors of that event. and finally before they move on, it's mernorial— finally before they move on, it's memorial weekend we should be remembering those who have suffered genocide _ remembering those who have suffered genocide whether that be in bosnia, in the _ genocide whether that be in bosnia, in the holocaust and other places.
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mavhe _ in the holocaust and other places. maybe the — in the holocaust and other places. maybe the premise will meet with me. this week, _ maybe the premise will meet with me. this week, the tory government introduced its so—called electoral integrity— introduced its so—called electoral integrity bill. in reality, the bill is designed to do anything but increase — is designed to do anything but increase the integrity of our elections. it is a solution in desperate search of a problem that simply— desperate search of a problem that simply does not exist. what the bill will do _ simply does not exist. what the bill will do is _ simply does not exist. what the bill will do is to— simply does not exist. what the bill will do is to impose for the first time _ will do is to impose for the first time champion voter id laws on the uk. time champion voter id laws on the uk the _ time champion voter id laws on the uk. the electoral reform society says it _ uk. the electoral reform society says it could lead to voter disenfranchisement on an industrial scale~ _ disenfranchisement on an industrial scale this — disenfranchisement on an industrial scale. this entrancing people from working _ scale. this entrancing people from working class communities, bme communities and others already marginalised in society. creating barriers — marginalised in society. creating barriers to— marginalised in society. creating barriers to vote. why is this tory government is trying to rob people of their— government is trying to rob people of their democratic right to vote?
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what _ of their democratic right to vote? what we — of their democratic right to vote? what we are trying to protect is their democratic right of people to have a one person one vote system. i am afraid i have personal experience, rememberwhat am afraid i have personal experience, remember what is to go on in tower hamlets and i think it is important that we move to some sort of voter id and plenty of other countries have it. it is sensible and i think people will be reassured that their votes matter and that is what this bill is about.— what this bill is about. come on, they were _ what this bill is about. come on, they were 34 _ what this bill is about. come on, they were 34 allegations - what this bill is about. come on, they were 34 allegations of i they were 34 allegations of impersonation in 2019. this is a problem — impersonation in 2019. this is a problem that does not exist. it is a british— problem that does not exist. it is a british prime minister seeking to make _ british prime minister seeking to make it — british prime minister seeking to make it harder to vote because it's easier— make it harder to vote because it's easier to— make it harder to vote because it's easier to get re—elected if the government can choose the voters rather _ government can choose the voters rather than — government can choose the voters rather than letting the voters choose — rather than letting the voters choose their government. three and a half million _ choose their government. three and a
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half million people in the united kingdom do not have a form of photo id. kingdom do not have a form of photo id~ ii _ kingdom do not have a form of photo id~ ii million — kingdom do not have a form of photo id. 11 million people do not have a passport— id. 11 million people do not have a passport or— id. 11 million people do not have a passport or drivers licence. these millions— passport or drivers licence. these millions of— passport or drivers licence. these millions of people will be directly impacted by seeing their right to vote curtailed. members of the prime minister's _ vote curtailed. members of the prime minister's own party have called his plans— minister's own party have called his plans and _ minister's own party have called his plans and illogical and illiberal solution — plans and illogical and illiberal solution to a nonexistent problem. will the _ solution to a nonexistent problem. will the prime minister withdrawal these _ will the prime minister withdrawal these vote rigging proposals immediately or he will continue down the path _ immediately or he will continue down the path of— immediately or he will continue down the path of being a tinpot dictator. ithink— the path of being a tinpot dictator. i think he's— the path of being a tinpot dictator. i think he's making a mountain out of a mole hill. councils will be under an obligation to provide free photo id to anybody who wants it and i do think it reasonable to protect the public in our elections from the idea of voter fraud. the public in our elections from the idea of voterfraud. nobody the public in our elections from the idea of voter fraud. nobody wants to say. i don't think elections in this
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country should be in any way clouded or contaminated by the suspicion of voterfraud and or contaminated by the suspicion of voter fraud and that is what we are trying to stop. i voter fraud and that is what we are trying to stop— voter fraud and that is what we are trying to stop. i was pleased to see m riaht trying to stop. i was pleased to see my right honourable _ trying to stop. i was pleased to see my right honourable friend - trying to stop. i was pleased to see my right honourable friend in i my right honourable friend in cornwall for a very successful g7 summit. whilst i know he did manage to get south—east cornwall i can assure him that lou is a beautiful town but it floods regularly —— regularly. will my right honourable friend speak to government departments to get this sorted. can i thank again the people of cornwall. it was a wonderful hospitality that the g7 had. i can assure her i am aware of the problem of the flooding and i can tell her that the environment secretary has met cornwall council to discuss the
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matter and we will do everything we can sort it out. i matter and we will do everything we can sort it out-— can sort it out. i would like to add m voice can sort it out. i would like to add my voice to _ can sort it out. i would like to add my voice to the _ can sort it out. i would like to add my voice to the comments - can sort it out. i would like to add my voice to the comments aboutl can sort it out. i would like to add i my voice to the comments about 77. on that— my voice to the comments about 77. on that morning i was in a meeting as the _ on that morning i was in a meeting as the information started coming through— as the information started coming through and i want to pay tribute to every— through and i want to pay tribute to every single one of those front line staff that _ every single one of those front line staff that i — every single one of those front line staff that i worked alongside on that day — staff that i worked alongside on that day. it was a long shift and it was a _ that day. it was a long shift and it was a long — that day. it was a long shift and it was a long walk home that evening. the prime _ was a long walk home that evening. the prime minister talks about vaccines, — the prime minister talks about vaccines, accurate surveillances is really _ vaccines, accurate surveillances is really important as well. equally as important — really important as well. equally as important. on the 15th of march the department of health and social care said only— department of health and social care said only the logic were in line for 2 million — said only the logic were in line for 2 million lateral flow device order today— 2 million lateral flow device order today by— 2 million lateral flow device order today by the end of may. it promised 'obs today by the end of may. it promised jobs and _ today by the end of may. it promised jobs and security. so can the prime minister— jobs and security. so can the prime minister explain why his government is undermining the superior tests
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while _ is undermining the superior tests while propping up discredited chinese — while propping up discredited chinese imports to the tune of £3 billion? _ chinese imports to the tune of £3 billion? |— chinese imports to the tune of £3 billion? ., �* ~' chinese imports to the tune of £3 billion? ., �* ~ . �* , chinese imports to the tune of £3 billion? ., �* ~ . �*, . . billion? i don't think that's a fair characterisation _ billion? i don't think that's a fair characterisation of _ billion? i don't think that's a fair characterisation of what - billion? i don't think that's a fair characterisation of what the i characterisation of what the government is doing. we work night and day to build up our domestic lateralflow and day to build up our domestic lateral flow capacity and continue to do so. . , ~ lateral flow capacity and continue to do so. ,, ., , to do so. last week any -- the chinese president _ to do so. last week any -- the chinese president said - to do so. last week any -- the chinese president said that i to do so. last week any -- the i chinese president said that at... will the — chinese president said that at... wau the prime — chinese president said that at... will the prime minister- chinese president said that at... | will the prime minister therefore support— will the prime minister therefore support our— will the prime minister therefore support our motion _ will the prime minister therefore support our motion to _ will the prime minister therefore support our motion to be - will the prime minister thereforel support our motion to be debated will the prime minister therefore i support our motion to be debated in this house _ support our motion to be debated in this house next _ support our motion to be debated in this house next thursday— support our motion to be debated in this house next thursday calling i support our motion to be debated in this house next thursday calling for| this house next thursday calling for a diplomatic— this house next thursday calling for a diplomatic boycott _ this house next thursday calling for a diplomatic boycott of— this house next thursday calling for a diplomatic boycott of the - this house next thursday calling for a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 i a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter _ a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter olympics, _ a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter olympics, incredibly- a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 i winter olympics, incredibly awarded to beijing _ winter olympics, incredibly awarded to beijing until— winter olympics, incredibly awarded to beijing until and _ winter olympics, incredibly awarded to beijing until and unless _ winter olympics, incredibly awarded to beijing until and unless this- to beijing until and unless this dangerous— to beijing until and unless this dangerous regime _ to beijing until and unless this dangerous regime abides i to beijing until and unless this dangerous regime abides by. to beijing until and unless this. dangerous regime abides by basic international— dangerous regime abides by basic international standards _ dangerous regime abides by basic international standards of - dangerous regime abides by basic.
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international standards of decency. this country— international standards of decency. this country has _ international standards of decency. this country has led _ international standards of decency. this country has led the _ international standards of decency. this country has led the world i international standards of decency. this country has led the world in i this country has led the world in condemning human rights abuses and inputting sanctions on those responsible and holding companies to account that import goods made with forced labour. iwill certainly consider the proposal debated but i must say i am instinctively against sporting boycotts. mar; must say i am instinctively against sporting boycotts-— sporting boycotts. may i associate m self sporting boycotts. may i associate myself with _ sporting boycotts. may i associate myself with the _ sporting boycotts. may i associate myself with the views _ sporting boycotts. may i associate myself with the views on - sporting boycotts. may i associate myself with the views on the i myself with the views on the anniversaries today. it's two years since the government committed to reforming a cruel aspect of the way for which says ill people have to prove they have six months or less to live before they are granted faxed access to benefits. the motor neurone disease association estimates in that time 7000 people have died waiting for a decision. with the pandemic and the nhs managing that in the backlog of diseases the situation will all know
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—— only become more acute. when with the government published its review and scrap the six month rule as it has committed to do so? i am and scrap the six month rule as it has committed to do so? i am aware ofthe has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue — has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue she _ has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue she has _ has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue she has raised _ has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue she has raised and i has committed to do so? i am aware of the issue she has raised and we . of the issue she has raised and we are making the change but i will write to her as soon as i have that information. write to her as soon as i have that information-— write to her as soon as i have that information. ~ , , ., ., information. whilst the extension or race information. whilst the extension or grace period — information. whilst the extension or grace period for— information. whilst the extension or grace period for the _ information. whilst the extension or grace period for the supply - information. whilst the extension or grace period for the supply of i grace period for the supply of chilled — grace period for the supply of chilled meat from great britain to northern— chilled meat from great britain to northern ireland is welcome, lord foster's_ northern ireland is welcome, lord foster's is— northern ireland is welcome, lord foster's is right to say that it amounts _ foster's is right to say that it amounts and truth no more than a temporary— amounts and truth no more than a temporary sticking plaster. can my right _ temporary sticking plaster. can my right honourable friend confirmed that unless the european union adopts — that unless the european union adopts a — that unless the european union adopts a more proportionate approach to the _ adopts a more proportionate approach to the application of the northern ireland _ to the application of the northern ireland protocol this country will do whatever it is necessary to fix the problem permanently. my right honourable friend _ the problem permanently. my right honourable friend is _ the problem permanently. my right honourable friend is completely i honourable friend is completely right in his analysis. there remain
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serious problems in the misapplication of that deal. and what we are hoping for is in progress from the european commission, some repairs i think they should make to the way this is working. but to echo what he has said, we certainly rule nothing out in our approach. fsine said, we certainly rule nothing out in our approach.— in our approach. one in four pregnancies _ in our approach. one in four pregnancies end _ in our approach. one in four pregnancies end in - in our approach. one in four. pregnancies end in miscarriage in our approach. one in four- pregnancies end in miscarriage and therefore _ pregnancies end in miscarriage and therefore does _ pregnancies end in miscarriage and therefore does the _ pregnancies end in miscarriage and therefore does the prime _ pregnancies end in miscarriage and therefore does the prime ministeri therefore does the prime minister agree _ therefore does the prime minister agree that — therefore does the prime minister agree that parents _ therefore does the prime minister agree that parents grief _ therefore does the prime minister agree that parents grief is - therefore does the prime minister agree that parents grief is not i therefore does the prime minister agree that parents grief is not ani agree that parents grief is not an illness, _ agree that parents grief is not an illness, therefore _ agree that parents grief is not an illness, therefore parents- agree that parents grief is not an illness, therefore parents should receive _ illness, therefore parents should receive formal— illness, therefore parents should receive formal miscarriage - illness, therefore parents should receive formal miscarriage leave| receive formal miscarriage leave rather _ receive formal miscarriage leave rather than _ receive formal miscarriage leave rather than resort _ receive formal miscarriage leave rather than resort to _ receive formal miscarriage leave rather than resort to sick - receive formal miscarriage leave rather than resort to sick pay i receive formal miscarriage leave rather than resort to sick pay or| rather than resort to sick pay or unpaid — rather than resort to sick pay or unpaid leave _ rather than resort to sick pay or unpaid leave if— rather than resort to sick pay or unpaid leave if the _ rather than resort to sick pay or unpaid leave if the pregnancy. unpaid leave if the pregnancy miscarriage _ unpaid leave if the pregnancy miscarriage occurs _ unpaid leave if the pregnancy miscarriage occurs before i unpaid leave if the pregnancy miscarriage occurs before za| unpaid leave if the pregnancy- miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the _ miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the prime — miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the prime minister— miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the prime minister is _ miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the prime minister is about- miscarriage occurs before 24 weeks. will the prime minister is about myi will the prime minister is about my private _ will the prime minister is about my private members _ will the prime minister is about my private members bill— will the prime minister is about my private members bill and _ will the prime minister is about my private members bill and introduce| private members bill and introduce paid miscarriage _ private members bill and introduce paid miscarriage leave _ private members bill and introduce paid miscarriage leave for- private members bill and introduce| paid miscarriage leave for parents?
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i paid miscarriage leave for parents? i sympathise — paid miscarriage leave for parents? i sympathise deeply— paid miscarriage leave for parents? i sympathise deeply with _ paid miscarriage leave for parents? i sympathise deeply with anybody. paid miscarriage leave for parents? i i sympathise deeply with anybody who has suffered the loss of a baby by miscarriage. what i can tell her is that we did introduce in 2020 paid parental bereavement leave, but that entitles those who lose a child after 2a weeks of pregnancy to some payment. but nothing i can say and no payment we can make would be any consolation to those who experience miscarriage in that way. the consolation to those who experience miscarriage in that way.— miscarriage in that way. the serious fraud office — miscarriage in that way. the serious fraud office achieved _ miscarriage in that way. the serious fraud office achieved as _ miscarriage in that way. the serious fraud office achieved as a _ miscarriage in that way. the serious fraud office achieved as a success l fraud office achieved as a success in april with the successful prosecution of special projects which resulted in £28 million of penalties for corruption. the key whistle—blower in the case was my
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constituency in foxley, without whom the prosecution would never have happened. yet he has been hung out to dry by the serious fraud office despite ten years of financial devastation. does my right honourable friend agree that unless we compensate whistle—blowers they simply will not come forward and would he consider making a payment out of the £28 million received by the treasury to compensate him for his losses? i the treasury to compensate him for his losses? . ~ the treasury to compensate him for his losses? . ,, ., the treasury to compensate him for his losses?— his losses? i thank him for his question- _ his losses? i thank him for his question- i — his losses? i thank him for his question. i want _ his losses? i thank him for his question. i want to _ his losses? i thank him for his question. i want to thank- his losses? i thank him for his question. i want to thank mr l his losses? i thank him for his i question. i want to thank mr foxley for his whistle—blowing because he has seen justice done. the trouble is we don't usually compensate whistle—blowers in the way that he recommends but i know my right honourable friend the solicitor general has offered to meet my right honourable friend to discuss the matter for —— further. fin honourable friend to discuss the matter for -- further. on monday we celebrated the _ matter for -- further. on monday we celebrated the 73rd _ matter for -- further. on monday we celebrated the 73rd birthday - matter for -- further. on monday we celebrated the 73rd birthday of - matter for -- further. on monday we celebrated the 73rd birthday of the l celebrated the 73rd birthday of the nhs. many of us on the side of the
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house remain committed to protecting the fundamental right of universal health care free at the point of delivery. this government remains a constant threat to our public health service. no staff pay rise, 25% cut in the number of mental health beds and the widespread sell—off of gp practices. and also the health and care bill which will only open the doors for privatisation. why is the prime minister continuing and not listening to thousands of essential workers who demonstrated on saturday to end nhs privatisation, and chronic underfunding and in the starting and keep the nhs public? with great respect to the member opposite i do not think i have ever
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heard a question more inversely related to reality. this is a government that, from the beginning, invested the biggest amount in the nhs for a generation than in the last year we put another £92 billion into front line care. we have increased nurses pay by 12.8% over the last three years and above all, we are building 48 more hospitals but another 59,000 people working in the nhs this year than there were this time —— but at a government thatis this time —— but at a government that is putting our nhs first. this time -- but at a government that is putting our nhs first. thank ou, mr that is putting our nhs first. thank you. mr speaker- _ that is putting our nhs first. thank you, mr speaker. i— that is putting our nhs first. thank you, mr speaker. i am _ that is putting our nhs first. thank you, mr speaker. i am sure - that is putting our nhs first. thank you, mr speaker. i am sure the - that is putting our nhs first. t�*ué�*ua; you, mr speaker. i am sure the whole house welcomes the fantastic news of nissan's investment and a factory in sunderland but does the prime minister agree with me that this is only part of the solution in pursuit of net zero by 2050 and that zero
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carbon hydrogen combustion engines such as those recently developed by jcb have an important role to play in decarbonisation? my jcb have an important role to play in decarbonisation? my honourable friend is completely _ in decarbonisation? my honourable friend is completely right _ in decarbonisation? my honourable friend is completely right because l friend is completely right because the investments that we are seeing just the last week or so, the sunderland investment by nissan, the diggerfactory and what sunderland investment by nissan, the digger factory and what is happening elsewhere are tremendously exciting for battery—powered vehicles but we must not forget hydrogen. as i said, in an earlier answer, we want this country to be a world leader in hydrogen technology as well. thank ou, mr hydrogen technology as well. thank you. mr speaker- — hydrogen technology as well. thank you, mr speaker. i— hydrogen technology as well. thank you, mr speaker. i know _ hydrogen technology as well. thank you, mr speaker. i know the - hydrogen technology as well. t�*ua�*ué you, mr speaker. i know the prime minister is aware of serious accidents that have taken place in my constituency. could a premise to advise the house and me on what more the government is doing to improve road safety not just the government is doing to improve road safety notjust in the case of
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fatal accidents but also when there are serious accidents on your mrs because this is an issue that is a growing concern to many in my constituency, and many across the country. i constituency, and many across the count . ~ , constituency, and many across the count . ~' , ., ., country. i think my honourable friend. country. i think my honourable friend- he _ country. i think my honourable friend. he is _ country. i think my honourable friend. he is right _ country. i think my honourable friend. he is right and - country. i think my honourable friend. he is right and those i friend. he is right and those seriously injured on the roads it has been coming down over a long period of time and it is vital we invest in this and they also draw to us attention think campaign which can play a huge role in reducing deaths and serious injuries on our roads. deaths and serious in'uries on our roads. , , , deaths and serious in'uries on our roads. , roads. despite their assurances durin: roads. despite their assurances during the _ roads. despite their assurances during the fire _ roads. despite their assurances during the fire safety _ roads. despite their assurances during the fire safety but - roads. despite their assurances during the fire safety but that l roads. despite their assurancesj during the fire safety but that it will do so that bill published monday does little to help the hundreds of thousands of leaseholders who, right now, faced financial ruin as a result of this crisis. my question to be premised
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as a simple one. why is his government seemingly intent on failing to honour the commitments given to those leaseholders and members of this house by refusing to legislate and fully protect all the blameless victims of this scandal. that is not accurate. we are continuing to support all those who have to remediate their buildings and a 5 billion that we have provided us five times, mr speaker, what labour offered to support in the last manifesto. and we will make sure that all the leaseholders, people who have suffered from the consequences of that grand falcons are great and to get the advice and support that they need. my are great and to get the advice and support that they need.— support that they need. my right honourable _ support that they need. my right honourable friend _ support that they need. my right honourable friend will _ support that they need. my right honourable friend will recognise | support that they need. my right. honourable friend will recognise the huge service done by independent hospices to those at the end of their lives, to their families and to the nhs because these people would likely otherwise be in hospital. he will also understand
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the huge impacts that the covid pandemic has had on the fundraising capacity of these hospice charities. so can i ask him to consider, carefully and personally, the case be made by independent hospices for greater government support for clinical costs. cost that if they were no longer there would be borne by the taxpayer? i were no longer there would be borne by the unpaved— were no longer there would be borne by the tamer?— by the taxpayer? i think my right honourable _ by the taxpayer? i think my right honourable friend. _ by the taxpayer? i think my right honourable friend. and _ by the taxpayer? i think my right honourable friend. and he - is right to... is right to draw attention to the difficulties they have had in fundraising and that is this year over the pandemic and that is why they have received an additional £257 million. the prime minister promised _ additional £257 million. the prime minister promised me _ additional £257 million. the prime minister promised me that - additional £257 million. the prime minister promised me that he - additional £257 million. the prime l minister promised me that he would
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listen to the cause of those that the government had excluded to protect theirjobs, businesses and incomes during the coronavirus pandemic yet all of the last six months many of my constituents are still telling me that they have been shook off and ignored and millions across the country continue to be excluded. so i have to ask the prime minister why did he give those who have been excluded. hope instead of the support they desperately needed? mr speaker, i think the honourable gentleman and of course i know how tough it is been for millions of people up and down the country and how tough it has been by business but that is why, this government has put in an extraordinary £407 billion to supportjobs and livelihoods across the country through the pandemic and the single most important thing we can now for the individuals and families that he represents and he is rightly talking about today is to help our country to get back on its feet by
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cautiously opening up in the way that we are onjuly i9. cautiously opening up in the way that we are onjuly 19. if we can take that step, which i very much hope that we will and i hope it may command the support if not the leader of the opposition then at least of him. the leader of the opposition then at least of him.— leader of the opposition then at least of him. the river tess is one ofthe least of him. the river tess is one of the finest _ least of him. the river tess is one of the finest chalk _ least of him. the river tess is one of the finest chalk streams - least of him. the river tess is one of the finest chalk streams in - least of him. the river tess is one of the finest chalk streams in the | of the finest chalk streams in the world but since may diesel has been spilling into the river. what matters most is that the flow has stopped and there is an effective clean—up and there are many agencies involved which has made a coordinated response challenging. please can you make sure that all involved can solve this environmental catastrophe together? i think my right honourable friend. all those bodies are involved but the lead agency is the environment agency. i must say i think i have very high regard for them and their work. —— i must sayi very high regard for them and their work. —— i must say i do have. i’m work. -- i must say i do have. i'm
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not sure — work. -- i must say i do have. i'm not sure there _ work. -- i must say i do have. i'm not sure there prime _ work. —— i must say i do have. my not sure there prime minister welcomed the new member. they say where there is a will there is a way and the public were clearly welcome the government's move to introduce emergency legislation for pubs and bars tomorrow to be able to stay open on sundays later. however, the public will wonder why, tomorrow, one member will be allowed to return to this house and not subject to ever call despite a serious case of sexual harassment and the public doesn't understand why they should be one rule for conservative mps and another for the rest of us. so therefore, will the prime minister, with the prime minister allow time tomorrow for a motion to close this loophole and make him subject of a recall? loophole and make him sub'ect of a recall? �* ~ ,,, ., ~ recall? all, mr speaker, the
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gentleman _ recall? all, mr speaker, the gentleman in _ recall? all, mr speaker, the gentleman in question, - recall? all, mr speaker, the gentleman in question, this| recall? all, mr speaker, the - gentleman in question, this action has come to an end and secondly, he is and ever. the gentleman opposite is and ever. the gentleman opposite is and ever. the gentleman opposite is an error. he is not a conservative mp.- is an error. he is not a conservative mp. , , ., ., , conservative mp. this year thousands of children will _ conservative mp. this year thousands of children will die _ conservative mp. this year thousands of children will die because _ conservative mp. this year thousands of children will die because of- conservative mp. this year thousands of children will die because of the - of children will die because of the government's dramatic cuts in international aid. top lawyers in the country advise is that this policy is unlawful and it has never been presented to this house for approval. and it was previously asked he suggested that the one vote would be the appropriate vote but that does not allow us to increase spending on this sol that does not allow us to increase spending on this so i asked the prime minister again, when are we going to get a binding vote? i am going to get a binding vote? i am assured that _ going to get a binding vote? i am assured that the _ going to get a binding vote? i am assured that the house was given a chance to vote on the estimates. mr; chance to vote on the estimates. m grandmother, who chance to vote on the estimates. m1:
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grandmother, who i love dearly, chance to vote on the estimates. m1 grandmother, who i love dearly, was lying in a deathbed and none of us were allowed to be there to comfort her in herfinal moments and i had to watch alone online the funeral of my uncle and we were not there to comfort loved ones during their final moments because we followed government guidance and imagine our collective disgust when in order to curry favour with the primers to's chief adviser we see hypocritical government ministers are lining up to defend the indefensible and saying it is time to move on. with some having the gall to tell us that they too went for a long drive when they too went for a long drive when they need to get their eyesight tested. what a disgrace and they should be thoroughly ashamed of themselves so when is the prime
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minister finally going to apologise to the nation for not mustering up some courage and integrity, for doing the honourable thing and sacking chief adviser who so shamelessly flouted his own government guidance that he could have gained public trust and confidence and could have demonstrated there is not one rule for him and his chums and then anotherfor for him and his chums and then another for the for him and his chums and then anotherfor the rest of for him and his chums and then another for the rest of us plebs? well said. it another for the rest of us plebs? well said. , ,., another for the rest of us plebs? well said._ the - another for the rest of us plebs? l well said._ the best well said. it is well said. the best thin i well said. it is well said. the best thing i can — well said. it is well said. the best thing i can say. — well said. it is well said. the best thing i can say, mr— well said. it is well said. the best thing i can say, mr speaker, - well said. it is well said. the best thing i can say, mr speaker, is . well said. it is well said. the best thing i can say, mr speaker, is i l thing i can say, mr speaker, is i deeply think, i and the government and everybody sympathises with those who and no one can, who has not can imagine what it feels like to be deprived of the ability to mourn properly and hold the hands of a loved one in their last moments. i know how much sympathy there will be with him. and i take his criticisms
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most sincerely of the government and everything that we have done and all i can say is we have tried throughout this pandemic to minimise human suffering and to minimise as i have said before when he asked me to apologise, i do. have said before when he asked me to apologise, ido. i have said before when he asked me to apologise, i do. iapologise have said before when he asked me to apologise, i do. i apologise for the suffering that the people of this country have enjoyed and all i can say is that nothing i can say or do can take back the lost lives and the lost time spent with loved ones that he describes and i am deeply, deeply sorry for that. prime minister's questions coming to an end. at times unemotional and ill
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tempered session. keir starmer put a number of key questions to the prime minister and said if infections reach 100,000 a day in the summer thatis reach 100,000 a day in the summer that is something the health secretary suggested, what is the prime minister expect the number of hospitalisations, deaths and long covid cases to be? borisjohnson referred to a number of predictions but do not give any detail. keir starmer also is the premise to how many people does he expect to have to isolate if cases continue rising. and the speaker on a number of occasions reminded the prime minister that he is expected to answer questions. the prime minister talked about the link, he focused on the success of the vaccine programme and talked about the link between the virus and hospitalisations and deaths being severed. of course i'm to say it has not been severed, rather it has been weakened. so that was prime minister's questions. and
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stay with the government because the £20 a week increase to universal credit will be phased out in the autumn. the government has said. the work and pensions secretary told mps the boost introduced in april to help deal with the economic effects of covid would face an adjustment. let's get reaction now from the direction director of policy and impact at the trussell trust. give us a sense, first of all, of how many people this extra £20 a week has been helping, claimants of universal credit.— has been helping, claimants of universal credit. around 5 million heled b universal credit. around 5 million helped by universal _ universal credit. around 5 million helped by universal credit - universal credit. around 5 million helped by universal credit in - universal credit. around 5 million helped by universal credit in the| universal credit. around 5 million i helped by universal credit in the uk and this cut would be a devastating blow for those who are already struggling to make ends meet and it would clearly be wrong for the government to take £20 a week from precarious incomes from these households. we are concerned about food banks. we'll see a lot more people coming through doors of our
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services. we have millions potentially who are already on low incomes who will be left unable to afford the essentials. if the government is going to take this lifeline away. i've been speaking to lots of food banks across the uk, lots of food banks across the uk, lots of food banks across the uk, lots of volunteers and staff and without exception they are deeply worried about this proposed and what it is going to do to the most vulnerable households in their communities.— vulnerable households in their communities. , . ., communities. give evidence that even thouh communities. give evidence that even though these — communities. give evidence that even though these most _ communities. give evidence that even though these most vulnerable - though these most vulnerable households, as you say, been receiving this additional £20 a week, that it has necessitated them coming and using the services offered banks.— coming and using the services offered banks. ., ., , , , offered banks. unfortunately, yes. it is absolutely _ offered banks. unfortunately, yes. it is absolutely the _ offered banks. unfortunately, yes. it is absolutely the right _ offered banks. unfortunately, yes. it is absolutely the right move - offered banks. unfortunately, yes. it is absolutely the right move for| it is absolutely the right move for the government to give this increase and there was a recognition that rates of universal credits as they were not enough people to make ends meet. before the pandemic, the trussell trust alone sort food banks
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distributing 1.9 million emergency food parcels and this increase would have made things less bad for people on the lowest incomes but we still saw a record year of need and over 2.3 million emergency food parcels in 2021. so it is not a silver bullet but it really is unconscionable that think will take this away especially as failover is being taken away and it comes at a very difficult time. sin. being taken away and it comes at a very difficult time.— very difficult time. six former work and pensions _ very difficult time. six former work and pensions secretaries _ very difficult time. six former work and pensions secretaries have - very difficult time. six former work. and pensions secretaries have urged the government to keep this additional £20 a week as part of the payment. let me quote sir iain duncan smith. one of the signatories to a letter saying the failure to act with me not grasping this opportunity to invest in a future with more work and were damaged living standards, health and opportunities for some of the families that opportunities for some of the need our support most as we emerge from the pandemic. do you think the
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government is being short—sighted on this when it talks about levelling out. is it being short—sighted to remove this additional payment and what you say the people who argue that additional supports like furlough in this £20 a week cannot be in place indefinitely. i absolutely agree with the succession of previous work and pensions secretaries. and with the words of iain duncan smith there. and i think that what we have seen through this pandemic is that people are keen to look after themselves but also to look after themselves but also to look after themselves but also to look after their communities. we've all been through enormous sacrifices in order to protect one another. there is a desire to want to change how things work. after going through all of this pain with the pandemic and i think a really crucial and important first step that a lot of
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people cross parties agree with is let's not take £20 a week from millions of the lowest income households across the uk. we are looking at the prime minister now to make the right call here and keep this lifeline because it really is it has saved so much pain and misery and to take awayjust as we are trying to rebuild would be short—sighted because poverty and its peoples opportunities. i think we can all agree that we want children to grow up in a safe, warm place where they can get on with their lives, rebuild their lives. that is what i have social security system should do and it is what we expect from our nhs and health care services and we should expect from a well. allow people to step back, take stock. let's move forwards and support people so they can rebuild their lives properly rather than needing emergency charity food and
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one of the richest countries in the world. thank you very much. we have been speaking to one player. be done is make you communicate on the pitch and communicate off it sometimes, you might not be the best player, but through sheer force and your values in the way you are on the way you behave consistently that can make a good captain, a good player, can make you a good and he has got that. you know, he's got good support and i think the wider picture here is the support staff
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and there is a synergy between everyone. it is very value get it. i was fortunate enough to have when i was fortunate enough to have when i was manager in my first year and everyone has values that are aligned. it is notjust one person. as someone is having a down day, it is not always the manager picks it up, it might be someone else and gareth has fostered that from the start. very open as well. and that is where you see the difference for me. he has learned that over the years. he isa he is a thoughtful person, gareth, and he understands we have all got
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different roles and different backgrounds and how we have got to hear, no one has done it the same way, culturally he understands that even though we are all english that are totally different to each other but we are together. here for one thing, we are representing the country and i think he recognises that, yes, there has been, you know, issues over the years and there still are, issues over the years and there stillare, not issues over the years and there still are, not going to stand here and say there is in. there still are but, you know, he understands. he wants to learn and that is always said to me consistently, i have never experienced some of the things you have so i need to know. i need to learn. did you have so i need to know. i need to learn. , ,, .«r ., ., to learn. did you speak to him about that? yes- — to learn. did you speak to him about that? yes- he _ to learn. did you speak to him about that? yes. he called _ to learn. did you speak to him about that? yes. he called me _ to learn. did you speak to him about that? yes. he called me before - that? yes. he called me before bularia that? yes. he called me before bulgaria and — that? yes. he called me before bulgaria and an _ that? yes. he called me before bulgaria and an hour _ that? yes. he called me before bulgaria and an hour on - that? yes. he called me before bulgaria and an hour on the - that? yes. he called me before i bulgaria and an hour on the phone and we had a meeting with the senior
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players before the start of this tournament and he wanted it from my point of view. that i have been through it but equally, how would the young players feel. and she will ask them but, i have asked them and, you know, we have tried to go the best way that we can for each individual but, we recognise it is still going to be ongoing issues and we know that. but i think we also know that we have got to do something about it. we are in a good position to do that. as i have always said, this is my country. regardless of my background, i am very proud of that. but i am from england. you know, iam a black very proud of that. but i am from england. you know, i am a black man in england. that is it. i am part of the england team and it should not really matter about your colour but i know it will do certain people. but it is my country. it always will
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be. so i am representing my country the best way i can and i think what is good is representing and working for england and that is it. let’s for england and that is it. let's hear from _ for england and that is it. let's hear from another _ for england and that is it. let's hear from another england - for england and that is it. let's hear from another england fan. your memories of england in's performance at euro 96 helped inspire a play. lovely to see you again. we spoke ahead of the germany game. it was interesting listening to chris powell because this ties in with the themes you are exploring in that play and i wonder what your reflections are now comparing to what extent the england football team embodies those values of inclusivity and respect.- inclusivity and respect. yes. pickinu inclusivity and respect. yes. picking up — inclusivity and respect. yes. picking up on _ inclusivity and respect. yes. picking up on that _ inclusivity and respect. yes. picking up on that amazing l inclusivity and respect. ia; picking up on that amazing interview with chris there and huge identification with everything he was saying there was that this team, for me particularly, i have always questioned my right to wear shirt
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which is ridiculous considering i was born here. my mum is of south asian heritage but i think this england team really does embody those values that it is your decision to decide what being english means. i'm really proud of myself and my asian heritage and i feel incredibly proud to be english and this team is making me feel very bad to be english. the way they represent different groups of people. the weight rash that is speaking off the pitch and i saw on twitter his comment to a young tennis player yesterday as well. i think there have such great values, respect, unity, they're promoting a positive image of the men senior game and ifeel positive image of the men senior game and i feel really proud to have them representing me. bud game and i feel really proud to have them representing me.— game and i feel really proud to have them representing me. and it is more ou think them representing me. and it is more you think they're _ them representing me. and it is more you think they're just _ them representing me. and it is more you think they're just talking - them representing me. and it is more you think they're just talking the - you think they're just talking the talk this time. you think they're 'ust talking the talk this time.— you think they're 'ust talking the talk this time. yes, i think it is a lot more than _ talk this time. yes, i think it is a lot more than talking _ talk this time. yes, i think it is a lot more than talking the - talk this time. yes, i think it is a lot more than talking the talk. . talk this time. yes, i think it is a lot more than talking the talk. i | lot more than talking the talk. i think we're seeing a team that is not making a fuss things. we have not making a fuss things. we have not seen any of the pitch incidents
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and i know one with soward because of contact with covid. when i was watching that game against ukraine you can see it in their performance, there is no panicking. they are holding the ball up. they may be a little defensive at times but you just feel confident that they know what they're doing.— just feel confident that they know what they're doing. you're hoping for a really _ what they're doing. you're hoping for a really positive _ what they're doing. you're hoping for a really positive legacy - what they're doing. you're hoping for a really positive legacy from i for a really positive legacy from all of this, and r. most of the a little bit to tonight's game. what are your thoughts about tonight. obviously very, very excited. yes. obviously very, very excited. yes, excited, anticipation _ obviously very, very excited. yes, excited, anticipation put _ obviously very, very excited. ia: excited, anticipation put up i mean, i am sure nobody is underestimating the danish team. some of their players play in the premier league and they know the english game. i think it is going to be a tough game but they do have every confidence in gareth southgate picking the right team to face that the danish team and i am hoping for a positive result. i do think that they are going to win the game and go all the way to the final.—
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way to the final. lovely to talk very much _ way to the final. lovely to talk very much for— way to the final. lovely to talk very much for your _ way to the final. lovely to talk very much for your time. - in a moment the bbc news at one with ben brown at wembley and jane hill who's here — but first it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello again. the forecast for the next few days is one of sunshine and showers, hello again. as we go through the next few days, the forecast once again is one of sunshine and showers and some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. we are going to keep this theme of some sunshine and scattered heavy downpours around, to matters because we have got an area of low pressure which is quite slow moving and remaining close to the uk for the remainder of the week. but back to the west of the afternoon into the evening the heaviest of shower readily parts of south—west england, wales, through the midlands and east riding into eastern scotland as well. a few are lucky enough to be heading to wembley later on today, most of those shower should fade
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away during evening hours by around eight o'clock. we expect these to be largely dry and it is a similar story at wimbledon, too. we are expecting most of their showers to be further north. things drying out for many of us into this evening hours. we will keep some of the heavy showers going through this evening and night for a time. particularly through the midlands and north—east england, tending to fade away for most of the uk and we have got clear spells and variable amounts of cloud. light winds and temperatures overnight between 10-14 . temperatures overnight between 10—14. moving on into thursday, quite a bit of dry weather on the clouds. a little bit cloudy for parts of north—west scotland, northern ireland, too. further south across england and wales more sunshine then we have had today but during the afternoon we will see these hit and mist scattered heavy showers and thunderstorms pretty dissimilar to what we have got out there is afternoon, best 20—23 . do watch out for locally torrential downpours a few do catch one of those showers. heading on into friday and eventually area of higher
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pressure starts to build in a lease for a time. we have got more fronts waiting in the atlantic button on the day of sunny spells on friday. again, some scattered showers bubbling up. most likely the parts of eastern scotland and eastern england as well. perhaps rain to the south—west later in the day but sunny spells in between. temperature somewhere between 16 and 22 degrees. still unsettled on friday and as we head into the weekend, more rain to come at times especially on saturday. a hint of something a little further south on sunday into next week. goodbye.
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england s footballers on the brink of sporting history tonight here at wembley as they take on denmark in the semi final of the european championship. victory for these players this evening would see england reach their first major tournament final in more than half a century this time, things have been slightly different. teams have missed a couple of key chances, like when muller was through and managed to get little breaks of the ball on occasions, and nothing has gone massively wrong, and if that continues, then it mightjust happen.

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