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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 7, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: the gun crime crisis hitting new york state. new york's state governor declares a �*disaster emergency�* following a sharp rise in gun violence. it is so bad that when you look at the recent numbers, more people are dying of gun violence than of covid. gunfire as nato withdraws, afghan security forces insist their soldiers have not defected to the taliban as it captures districts across the country. by no means has anyone defected to the taliban. they may have abandoned their
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posts, because they were no longer able to fight, but they have come back. cheering and wild celebrations in rome as italy fans see their team reach the final of the euros, beating spain in a penalty shootout. hello, and thank you for joining us. well, 51 shootings over a single weekend in new york state alone have prompted the governor andrew cuomo to declare a �*disaster emergency�*. new york is the first state to take that step, which allows for extra funding to bolster police presence in the worst hit cities, and to establish a variety of other programmes in poorer parts of the state. there has been a surge in gun violence across the us in the last year.
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the governor, andrew cuomo, explained his decision at a news conference, where he spelled out the scale of the problem they�*re facing. it is so bad, that when you look at the recent numbers, more people are dying of gun violence than of covid. it is an emergency. and i want the people of the state to understand that! and i want them to respond to the emergency for the way it is. so, today, i the first in the nation is going to declare a disaster emergency on gun violence. the announcement comes as gun violence surges in new york and many other parts of the united states. governor cuomo said more than 50 people had died in shooting incidents in new york over the fourth ofjuly weekend alone. statistics from the gun
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violence archive found at least 150 people across the us were killed by guns in more than 400 incidents, prompting fears that 2021 is now on a trajectory to be worse than last year, itself the worst in many decades. karol mason is president ofjohn jay college of criminaljustice, where governor cuomo made his announcement. she gave me her reaction. what i like about governor cuomo�*s approaches he is looking at a local level and communities, where the violence is occurring. it is occurring primarily in communities of colour. but i think one of the things they think is contributing to it is all of the anti—violence work that we had got suspended during covid, and we have a lot of people who were displaced without things to do, no jobs, not able to go to school, no safe spaces for them to gather, and i think
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all of these things paid tribute to an increase in violence. and we were starting from historic lows. obviously an important point. how significant is the funding for extra resources and what sort of things are going to be provided now that have not been? well, i think based on what i heard in the press conference and i think i had the same things you did, he is going to be investing in our young people, investing in our communities and investing in breaking the cycle of violence. he�*s going to be investing injobs, because there needs to be safe spaces for young people and things for them to do. and he also talked about breaking the cycle by hospital interventions and there�*s great research on this. by going to the hospital where someone has been a shooting victim, whether — you don�*t need to wait until someone dies from a gunshot for you to intervene.
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you go to the hospital and you work with the person who is the victim and you stop that cycle of violence. there is great research on these violence interrupters are going to the community and engage with the community in stopping the violence. but wasn�*t able to happen during covid. people were shut in. better, presumably, you have other people to do this job than the police over? exactly. right. so, in that case, where would you sit on the scale of this problem? we�*re talking about 51 fatal shootings in new york state over the matter of a long weekend. which soundsjust extraordinary, to me. how big is the problem? how many people are involved? again, based on the numbers and the data we have today, it is not a large number of people that are responsible for the violence, and i think that people need to remember it is not everywhere. that is the challenge. not having this narrative. people thinking it is unsafe to
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be in new york. there are communities at risk and we need to go in and break that cycle. but it is not happening everywhere, i think that is the challenge. look at where it is happening, why it�*s happening and deal with those people and breaking them out of the cycle of violence. karol mason. the taliban is continuing its advance across swathes of afghanistan, claiming to have captured another 10 districts over the past 2a hours. the militants have made rapid advances as nato troops withdraw, and now control about a third of the country. afghanistan�*s military insisted today it will retake all districts that have fallen. our correspondent, secunder kermani, reports. the taliban advance rapidly across afghanistan. gunfire in some areas, under—resourced government forces have fled.
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and in others, the insurgents have faced stiff resistance. the group now controls around a third of all districts, but afghan officials have vowed to launch a counteroffensive. the afghan security forces, the afghan air force has reorganised itself. so, they may have abandoned their posts because they ran out of ammunition or they run out of supplies, but by no means has anyone defected. bagram was america�*s largest base in afghanistan and was home to high—value prisoners. it was handed over to afghan forces as nearly all international troops have been withdrawn from the country. officials here claim they weren�*t even warned when exactly the americans were leaving. us air strikes had been a key weapon in holding the taliban back — now they�*re largely stopping. afghan officials are still trying to sound positive. this is war.
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in a combat, everything is possible and nothing is stable. but the point, the men — the people, or the government goal is mentally, they don�*t want taliban, physically they do not want taliban. from the villages, they do not want the taliban. under pressure last night, neighbouring tajikistan ordered thousands more troops to the border after hundreds of afghan soldiers fled across it in recent days. many fear come september — and the formal deadline for the withdrawal of remaining foreign forces — the taliban�*s military offensive will only grow even stronger. secunder kermani, bbc news. let�*s get some of the day�*s other news. a well—known investigative journalist in the netherlands, peter r de
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vries, has been shot and seriously injured in an attack on a street in amsterdam. police said he�*s been taken to hospital in critical condition. de vries has covered numerous high—profile crime cases over the past 20 years. three people have been detained in connection with the shooting. a former challenger for the presidency in belarus, viktor babariko, has been sentenced to 14 years in jail. the banker was found guilty of taking bribes and money laundering — charges he says were fabricated to prevent him challenging alexander lukashenko in last year�*s election. just over two weeks to go before the start of the tokyo olympics, and japanese media is reporting that the partial state of emergency for the tokyo area is likely to be extended over coronavirus concerns. some olympic events, such as the opening ceremony and the marathon, may also be held without spectators.
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the anti—of spectators at wembley, that is for sure. —— there was plenty. it went to a penalty shootout — but italy have beaten spain at wembley to reach the final of the euro 2020 football tournament. the azzurri took the lead with a lovely curling shot from federico chiesa, before alvaro morata equalised for spain with ten minutes to go here�*s mark lobel. it was italy�*s night. the four time world champions now have a second euros crown firmly in their sights.— their sights. we're happy to win. it their sights. we're happy to win- it has _ their sights. we're happy to win. it has been _ their sights. we're happy to win. it has been 53 - their sights. we're happy to win. it has been 53 years i their sights. we're happy to i win. it has been 53 years now without — win. it has been 53 years now without the european cup. it's time! — without the european cup. it's time! its— without the european cup. it's time! it's about time to win it. time! it's about time to win it we — time! it's about time to win it. we have got to bring it home! _ it. we have got to bring it home! ,, , ., , it. we have got to bring it home! , ., , ., home! spanish fans coming to terms with _ home! spanish fans coming to terms with their _ home! spanish fans coming to terms with their side - home! spanish fans coming to terms with their side losing i home! spanish fans coming to terms with their side losing a l terms with their side losing a semifinalfor terms with their side losing a semifinal for the terms with their side losing a semifinalfor the first time terms with their side losing a semifinal for the first time in their history. it was an intense start to a game of the highest quality, but a goalless first half. it took until the
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60th minute, when he asked the girl dwelling on the counter attack. as you would expect from italy. but withjust attack. as you would expect from italy. but with just ten minutes to go, more outer had stepped off the fish and coolly slotted in and equaliser to rectify the script for spain. in extra time, with spain dictating play, dominating possession. italy, seemingly playing for penalties until the variety scored but was caught offside. as penalties began, the drama did not stop. lauga tele�*s efforts saved by simon. five penalties later, it was morata�*s turn, surely? but he fired towards the keeper who saved it. that met eugenio could win it for italy. he
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strolled up ——jorginho, strolled up —— jorginho, sending strolled up ——jorginho, sending the keeper the wrong way. and enthralling and do an unforgettable encounter. translation: i unforgettable encounter. translation:— unforgettable encounter. translation: i have to say we're very — translation: i have to say we're very happy _ translation: i have to say we're very happy about - translation: i have to say we're very happy about all l translation: l have to say| we're very happy about all of we�*re very happy about all of this and i thank the players because they right from day one that we could produce something incredible. we haven�*t done everything we need to, yet, there is still another step to 90, there is still another step to go, but now we have two rest. italy will go into the final at wembley with a record that even roman soldiers would be proud of. they came into this match unbeaten for 32 games, they saw 14 unbeaten for 32 games, they saw ia street wins. can they now conquer europe? mark lobel, bbc news. as an englishman, i hope not, but best of luck to them. many parts of south—east asia coped well when covid first hit, in spite of limited resources.
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more than a year and half into the pandemic, and a number of lockdowns later, goodwill among the people is wearing thin. certainly in some countries where vaccination programmes have stalled and several countries are struggling to cope. in indonesia, the government has appealed for international help to secure supplies of oxygen, a day after recording its highest numbers of daily covid infections and deaths. our south—east asia correspondent, jonathan head, reports. as other businesses flounder, it�*s a sign of the dismal times we live in that this one is thriving. this jakartan coffin—maker says he�*s making three times as many these days after the new outbreak of the delta covid variant. indonesians may have thought last year was bad enough. this year, though, is much worse — covid deaths running at more than 500 a day.
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oxygen is in critically short supply. people have to fill up their own cylinders to ensure that hospitalised family members get it. anwar says his best efforts were not enough. his sister died at this hospital on monday morning. here in thailand, these shuttered bars tell the story of how far the government was willing to sacrifice the all—important tourist industry to keep covid out — which, last year, it did very successfully. this year, though, despite all of this economic pain, infections have surged so fast, they�*ve overwhelmed the hospitals and completely outstripped the government�*s faltering vaccination programme. this hotel cleaner, now out of a job, was forced to camp on the street after testing positive for covid, but unable to self—isolate in her cramped home. an ngo helping thai covid victims heard of her plight and eventually found a hospital
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that could take her. there is growing public anger here over the government�*s failure to order vaccines early enough and in sufficient quantities. after a well—publicized launch last month, vaccines have run out in many areas. ministers are also accused of failing to prioritise the elderly, of giving over optimistic predictions, and of not imposing tougher measures quickly enough to curb the new outbreaks. but after a year and a half, many businesses here just can�*t survive more lockdowns. this restaurant owner is in despair after the government banned on—site dining last month with no warning. translation: the voice - of little people like me never gets heard at the top.
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but if we close down, then what will i do? will i have to give up everything i�*ve built and lay off all my staff? malaysia is well ahead of both of its neighbours in vaccinating its population. the government believes it can inoculate 80% of them by the end of the year. yet even here in a much wealthier society, that�*s a long stretch of continued lockdowns and travel restrictions to endure. without access to more vaccines, governments across this region have run out of answers to give their increasingly frustrated people. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. stay with us on bbc world news, still to come: why planting extra trees across europe could combat climate change — and at the same time appease the rain gods.
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central london has been rocked by a series of terrorist attacks. police say there have been many casualties, and there is growing speculation that al-qaeda was responsible. germany will be the hosts of the 2006 football world cup. they pipped the favourite, south africa, by a single vote. in south africa, the possibility of losing hadn't even been contemplated. celebration parties were cancelled. a man entered the palace i through a downstairs window and made his way to the queen's private bedroom, then _ he asked her for a cigarette and, on the pretext - for arranging for some to be . bought, summoned a footman on duty who took the man away. cheering and applause. one child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. education is the only solution.
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this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: new york�*s state governor declares a disaster emergency, following a sharp rise in gun violence. after nato withdraws, afghan security forces insist their soldiers have not defected to the taliban — as it captures districts across the country. plant a tree and save the planet — it�*s one of those mantras we have become used to hearing in the battle to reduce carbon emissions and slow down global warming. but more trees doesn�*t just mean less carbon in the atmosphere. a new study shows that it also leads to significantly more rainfall. researchers estimated that a 20 per cent increase in forests
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across europe would lead to 7.6% rise in rain in the summer months. i�*m joined now by frances seymour — distinguished senior fellow at the world resources institute, and a leading figure in the field of deforestation and reforestation. all things forestation, really. but first things first, when i think about the amazon rainforest i suppose we should not be too surprised that these findings. are you surprised that all about the scaling of rainfall there in this forecast? ! rainfall there in this forecast?— rainfall there in this forecast? ., , , ., forecast? i was interested to see these — forecast? i was interested to see these findings _ forecast? i was interested to see these findings but - forecast? i was interested to see these findings but not i see these findings but not surprised that the impact of land cover change could have impacts on the climate other than just through the carbon cycle. we are familiar, as you say, with the need to stop the forestation and recover a lot of our lost forest in order to
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keep carbon out of the atmosphere. but increasingly we are appreciating that greenhouse gas emissions are not the only way that forests interact with the atmosphere and, in fact, these other non— greenhouse impacts on forestation or on local temperature are also quite importantand, in temperature are also quite important and, in fact, can be more significant at the local scale in terms of the physically lived climate experience, in particular places than the impacts of global climate change. fin places than the impacts of global climate change. on the face of it it — global climate change. on the face of it it looks _ global climate change. on the face of it it looks like - global climate change. on the face of it it looks like an - face of it it looks like an added bonus, in a way that there is more water to come down but, of course, we have flooding just as we have drought. i suppose that is part of the challenge, knowing where you might want to put more forestry. ! you might want to put more forest . ~ ., , forestry. i think that is riuht. forestry. i think that is right. and _ forestry. i think that is right. and one - forestry. i think that is right. and one of - forestry. i think that is right. and one of the l forestry. i think that is - right. and one of the exciting things about the new research thatis things about the new research that is coming out based on our increasing ability to do geospatial monitoring with the
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improved modelling with improved modelling with improved data and compute in power, we are actually getting better at being able to nut out these different effects and see how they are distributed. but i would hasten to say that one of the things that came out of the article was, in fact, building on this unique role of protecting forest and forest restoration as a climate action because it is simon tony eastley a mitigation action as well as an adaptation action in that, you know, forests store carbon and have a mitigating effect that simultaneously can moderate the severity of local extreme weather events, that is important for adaptation. extreme weather events, that is important foradaptation. it important for adaptation. it has become one of those things, hasn�*t it? everyone knows that you can plant a tree and perhaps even take away a little of your own carbon footprint in doing so. it feels like a good thing. there is a programme in wales for planting sequoia
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trees which, obviously, we are more familiar with seeing those in north america, for example. there must be some risk, isn�*t there, of trying to plant different trees in different places and expecting to get the same result. it}! places and expecting to get the same result.— same result. of course. we alwa s same result. of course. we always have _ same result. of course. we always have to _ same result. of course. we always have to plant - same result. of course. we always have to plant the . same result. of course. we l always have to plant the right tree in the right place at the right time and there have been some unfortunate negative experiences of forests being areas that will not —— were not previously forested that can have unintended consequences on local biodiversity or hydrology. ourfirst local biodiversity or hydrology. our first messages to protect the natural ecosystem that we still have in the second is to restore them with native species and restore native ecosystem function and be careful about the forest in areas that have not been forested before because that is where the things tend to go wrong. where the things tend to go wronu. �* ., ., wrong. beware of unintended consequences. _ wrong. beware of unintended consequences. thank - wrong. beware of unintended consequences. thank you - wrong. beware of unintended | consequences. thank you very
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much. tropical storm elsa has strengthened into a category! hurricane — hours before it�*s expected to hit land on florida�*s northern gulf coast, the us national hurricane center said. many floridians have begun to hunker down and protect their homes as elsa picks up speed. florida governor ron desantis said elsa will make landfall probably between 8 and 9 local time on wednesday morning and that florida�*s emergency operations center has moved into 2a—hour operation mode allowing them to be ready to assist highly impacted areas as needed. earlier today the national hurricane centre issued a hurricane centre issued a hurricane warning for a portion of the west coast of florida to reflect the increased strength. elsa is forecast to become a hurricane before making landfall. landfall appearing most likely in the eastern big bend of florida or nature coast north of tampa bay tomorrow
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morning. there are about 1500 customers across florida experiencing power outages but we have got, between the various utilities, more than 7000 restoration personnel prepared to respond to these outages. an anxious time therefore florida and we will keep across that story for you. the line up for the women�*s semi—finals at the wimbledon tennis championships has been completed. angelique kerber, champion in 2018, is the only former winner to make it this far. rounding up all of tuesday�*s action from the all england club, here�*s chetan pathak. she will face ashleigh barty who enters her first wimbledon semi—final as she won over her fellow australian. roger federer will be on centre court on wednesday. canada has appointed an inuit leader, mary simon,
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to serve as governor—general — the representative of the head of state, queen elizabeth. it�*s the first time an indigenous person has held the largely ceremonial role. prime ministerjustin trudeau confirmed that the queen had accepted mary simon�*s appointment. in her acceptance speech, ms simon referred to the recent discovery of unmarked graves at former indigenous residential schools. during my time as governor general i will work every day towards promoting healing and wellness across canadian society. to me that means stopping to fully recognise memorialise and come to terms with the atrocities of our collective past that we are learning more about each day. it means we must thoughtfully work hard towards the promise of a better tomorrow. that was mary simon — of a better tomorrow. that was mary simon the _ of a better tomorrow. that was mary simon the newly - of a better tomorrow. that was | mary simon the newly appointed governor general of canada. more on that appointment on our
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website, of course. take a look at all the stories we have been covering in this bulletin. if you want to get in touch i can be found on twitter. hello there. we�*ve seen yet more rain across many parts of the country in the past 2a hours. and the reason it�*s been so wet, really, for so long is because of the position of the jet stream, that�*s the upper level winds. and as it�*s diving to the south of the uk, with that sort of pattern, you end up with low pressure sitting close to the uk. and it�*s around that low pressure that we see these areas of cloud rotating, keeping some wet weather going into the night and into wednesday, as well. if we look at the story over the next few days, we find some sunshine, yes, but there�*s still the threat of some showers which may be heavy, as well. and certainly on tuesday, there was lots of rain at wimbledon. it looks a lot drier though for wednesday — can�*t rule out 1—2 showers, mind you, and temperatures will be 20—21 celsius. we start the day pretty cloudy, actually, there may well be some further rain around. as it brightens up, we get some sunshine which triggers more
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showers, particularly across england and wales, and some of those could be heavy and thundery. may see a few showers breaking out across parts of scotland and northern ireland. a warmer day, though, than it was on tuesday for eastern scotland and the northeast of england. and for many parts of the country, temperatures are a little bit higher on wednesday. a few showers in the london area, those will tend to fade away during the evening, and it�*ll probably be dry at wembley for kick—off with ideal temperatures for playing football. as we move into thursday, many places starting dry, some sunshine breaking through. again, we�*ll see some showers developing too. these will be a little more hit and miss, but it brightens up in eastern scotland, we could get some heavy showers here. the rest of scotland and northern ireland looks more cloudy and not as warm, perhaps, but with the sunshine in england and wales, it should feel a bit warmer with light winds on thursday. we�*ve got slightly higher pressure to end the week — the fly in the ointment is this little weather front here that
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keeps more cloud across northern ireland, eventually increasing the cloud across wales and the southwest, bringing some rain later on in the day. ahead of it, some sunshine coming through, still the chance of some showers. these are most likely in eastern scotland and across the eastern side of england. but many places on friday will have a dry day. and those temperatures sitting at 22—23 celsius. now i don�*t think those numbers will change a great deal into the weekend. there will still be some sunshine around, but we still have this threat of some showers and the greater risk of showers is likely to be on sunday.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: new york state�*s governor, andrew cuomo has declared a disaster emergency following a surge in gun violence over the ath ofjuly, holiday weekend. the move will enable the state to bolster its law enforcement presence in cities where shootings are on the increase. afghanistan�*s national security advisor has denied claims by the taliban that government soldiers have defected to the militant group. following the departure of nato troops, the afghan army has come under pressure, with many worried about whether it can hold off the taliban, as it continues to capture more territory. (00v)there were wild celebrations in rome as italy�*s
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—— there were wild celebrations in rome as italy�*s footballers reached the final of the euros — after beating spain. the game had to go to penalties — having finished one—one after extra time. italy will now play either denmark or england in sunday�*s final. now on bbc news, panorama. the government says there will be bumps along the road to brexit success. every single box needs to be opened, so every single product needs to be labelled. so what are those bumps like for people in the most affected industries? so we're seeing lots _ of administration fees, extra costs being added onto invoices. we�*ve been following uk businesses at the sharp end of brexit. paperwork. that's three hours' work every morning that we export to the eu. through six months of upheaval... we could end up with an english
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driver, with an irish driving

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