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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 6, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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the headlines: the uk government has signalled a further easing of coronavirus restrictions in england. the health secretary, sajid javid, said people who've had two vaccines will no longer have to self—isolate if they come into contact with a positive case. president biden has again appealed for americans to get the covid jab. it comes after his administration felljust short of its target of 70% of us adults receiving at least one dose by the july 4th holiday. the united states has confirmed that its military withdrawal from afghanistan is now more than 90% complete. the taliban, meanwhile, says it has captured another ten districts from the government. we still don't know the first finalist at euro 2020. italy and spain has finished i—i finalist at euro 2020. italy and spain has finished 1—1 after extra time.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are rachel cunliffe, deputy online editor of the new statesman, and ali miraj, a columnist for the article website. but would come to you both, thank you so much for being with us —— welcome to you both. let's start with the financial times. it says that businesses fear weeks of staffing �*carnage�* if the government delays the lifting of self—isolation rules and the introduction of a lighter testing system for double—jabbed to august 16th. the telegraph leads on the same story. it says that the government faces a backlash from the hospitality and arts sector, with warnings that venues risk shutdown when a single member of staff and crew test positive. the metro leads with the headline �*beer we go', as hospitality bosses estimate that more than 30 million pints will be sunk by fans watching the england v
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denmark euro 2020 semifinal. the guardian carries a front page of the sisters. it shows the women in the sisters. it shows the women in the wembley park, when they were stabbed to death injune 2020 by daniel hussein. according to the times, fully vaccinated travellers arriving from amber list countries are set to avoid quarantine as early asjuly are set to avoid quarantine as early as july the are set to avoid quarantine as early asjuly the 19th. the let's start off. ali, why don't you kick us off with the guardian? fears io ali, why don't you kick us off with the guardian? fears 10 million may fate isolation. that really is a growing concern about the sheer numbers you might have to self—isolate as cases rise. numbers you might have to self-isolate as cases rise. that's riuht. i self-isolate as cases rise. that's right- i think— self-isolate as cases rise. that's right. i think the judgment - self-isolate as cases rise. that's right. i think the judgment call. right. i think the judgment call that the government made here is
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that the government made here is that the government made here is that the economic damage to the economy is so large, they want to get people back to work, open up things as quickly as they can, but the corona re of doing that is the infection rate is already raising rapidly. we've already had a 50% increase in just one week, and rapidly. we've already had a 50% increase injust one week, and sajid javid said by the summer, the daily infection rate could rise to 100,000. what that means is that people who have not had their second jack map are increasingly likely to have to self—isolate —— second jab. what we're now hearing from sajid javid today was about the whole policy of the double jabbed are going to be allowed to not have to self—isolate any more. which is good for them, self—isolate any more. which is good forthem, but self—isolate any more. which is good for them, but this will also cause a lot of problems until that point with people having to self—isolate who come into contact with people
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who come into contact with people who got the covid symptoms of. rachel, the guardian story quotes sajid javid as the guardian story quotes sajid javid as saying england is entering uncharted territory and scrapping lockdown rules from the 19th ofjuly. scrapping lockdown rules from the 19th ofjul . ~ scrapping lockdown rules from the 19th ofjuly-— scrapping lockdown rules from the 19th ofjul . ~ �* ., j~ ~ ., 19th ofjuly. well, we've got 8696 of the adult population _ 19th ofjuly. well, we've got 8696 of the adult population which - 19th ofjuly. well, we've got 8696 of the adult population which has had| the adult population which has had one ghost, which is fantastic. if you told — one ghost, which is fantastic. if you told us_ one ghost, which is fantastic. if you told us injanuary that's one ghost, which is fantastic. if you told us in january that's where we'd _ you told us in january that's where we'd be, _ you told us in january that's where we'd be, i'm — you told us in january that's where we'd be, i'm not sure anyone would believe _ we'd be, i'm not sure anyone would believe you —— one dose. two thirds of the _ believe you —— one dose. two thirds of the population, including the most _ of the population, including the most honourable, which are fully vaccinated. what we don't know is the extent — vaccinated. what we don't know is the extent to which somebody who has been vaccinated can still transmit the virus — been vaccinated can still transmit the virus -- — been vaccinated can still transmit the virus —— most vulnerable. what we will_ the virus —— most vulnerable. what we will have — the virus —— most vulnerable. what we will have is this very strange four week— we will have is this very strange four week period where everything is opening _ four week period where everything is opening up, all of the social distancing rules are being relaxed. but if_ distancing rules are being relaxed. but ifyou — distancing rules are being relaxed. but if you promise that with someone who is_ but if you promise that with someone who is positive, you have to isolate
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eveh _ who is positive, you have to isolate even with _ who is positive, you have to isolate even with both jabs. who is positive, you have to isolate even with bothjabs. it's going to increase — even with bothjabs. it's going to increase the number of people who come _ increase the number of people who come into— increase the number of people who come into contact with somebody who test positive. it's estimated 2 million — test positive. it's estimated 2 million people catch covid in that summer— million people catch covid in that summer period and 10 million people will have _ summer period and 10 million people will have to _ summer period and 10 million people will have to isolate as a result. so where _ will have to isolate as a result. so where the, — will have to isolate as a result. so where the, everything is going to be opening _ where the, everything is going to be opening up. — where the, everything is going to be opening up, yet your chance of having — opening up, yet your chance of having to — opening up, yet your chance of having to self—isolate because you come _ having to self—isolate because you come into — having to self—isolate because you come into contact with somebody who test positive is much higher. that's a weird _ test positive is much higher. that's a weird state we're in now. we're looking _ a weird state we're in now. we're looking at — a weird state we're in now. we're looking at a — a weird state we're in now. we're looking at a situation with more cases. — looking at a situation with more cases, more self—isolation but fewer rules, _ cases, more self—isolation but fewer rules, and _ cases, more self—isolation but fewer rules, and it — cases, more self—isolation but fewer rules, and it is an experiment. it is uncharted _ rules, and it is an experiment. it is uncharted territory. we don't know _ is uncharted territory. we don't know yet — is uncharted territory. we don't know yet what effect that's going to have on _ know yet what effect that's going to have on hospitalisations and deaths. fantastically high vaccination rates, — fantastically high vaccination rates, but what will that do for the general— rates, but what will that do for the general trend? will be faced a third wave of— general trend? will be faced a third wave of death in the same way as last year? — wave of death in the same way as last year? we don't know yet. it�*s a last year? we don't know yet. it's a similar story _ in the financial times. business
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fears snapping carnage. they're talking about 2 million people a week at risk of contracting covid —— staffing carnage. how difficult that is going to be for any company trying to get back on its feet. yes, the head of uk hospitality is quoted on the front of the ft talking about how 60% of workers in the hospitality industry are under the hospitality industry are under the age of sa, so a lot will not have had a second jab back. the fact that this delay in changing the rules that sajid javid amounts to about isolation are only good to be changed on august the 16th. the call here is for that to have been brought forward. they're saying this delay is actually going to lead to carnage because a lot of people will end up getting pinged by test and trace and isolate at home, which is going to have a really significant impact. it also is going to
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potentially impact the nhs because again, a lot of workers may be affected by it, so the head of nhs providers also said this could create shortages, and we already know as a result of the lockdown over the last 16 months, there is a backlog of 5 million operations to conduct in the nhs. as well as all the other issues sajid javid has on his plate. so, a lot to deal with. rachel, the telegraph are sort of —— they're sort of angle on the same story is there is a backlash. government accused of delaying freedom day, says the telegraph, after this closing fully vaccinated people will still have to follow self—isolation rules until august the 16th. really suggesting all this should have been done at the same
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time onjuly the 19th. it’s time on july the 19th. it's interesting. _ time on july the 19th. it's interesting. the - time onjuly the 19th. it's interesting. the government was so determined to have freedom day on july 19— determined to have freedom day on july 19 having delayed it by four weeks — july 19 having delayed it by four weeks already. all of the government messaging _ weeks already. all of the government messaging is that all the restrictions will end on that day, that is— restrictions will end on that day, that is freedom day and it's irreversible. except for the self—isolation rules. what's interesting about that is you can't really _ interesting about that is you can't really have — interesting about that is you can't really have widespread reopening of the economy if you still have those self—isolation rules. partly because people _ self—isolation rules. partly because people will behave differently. they're — people will behave differently. they're less likely to go to a crowded _ they're less likely to go to a crowded pub if they know they might -et crowded pub if they know they might get pinged and have to self—isolate for ten _ get pinged and have to self—isolate for ten days. but it's also causing chaos— for ten days. but it's also causing chaos for— for ten days. but it's also causing chaos for businesses. 60% of workers in hospitality are under 34, so they're — in hospitality are under 34, so they're not— in hospitality are under 34, so they're not likely to get double jabbed, — they're not likely to get double jabbed, even by august the 16th. if you continue with this system where everything _ you continue with this system where everything is open but a business may everything is open but a business n1ay be _ everything is open but a business may be forced to shutdown if a
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single _ may be forced to shutdown if a single staff member, crewmember, a waiter— single staff member, crewmember, a waiter if— single staff member, crewmember, a waiter if you're talking about a restaurant, the entire business has to close _ restaurant, the entire business has to close. that can't go hand—in—hand with the _ to close. that can't go hand—in—hand with the grand reopening of the economy— with the grand reopening of the economy the government '5 been trying _ economy the government '5 been trying to— economy the government '5 been trying to present to us. it's really interesting. it's kind of a way of moving — interesting. it's kind of a way of moving freedom day back four weeks. it's moving freedom day back four weeks. it's all— moving freedom day back four weeks. it's all getting very complicated. moving freedom day by stealth. let's look at another story in the telegraph, which is about heathrow fast tracking the double jab. fully vaccinated holiday—makers to get fasttrack claims that he sorrow, which are under plans to open —— heathrow. the whole travel scenario is all part of this as well. i is all part of this as well. i thought a double jab was something mohammed all he did to his opponents, but it seems to be the
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path to true freedom —— mohammed ali. this is being pushed by airports which have been affected. that have seen passenger numbers plummet sometimes up to 95%. also, a lot of people are keen to, they've been cooped up for months, to enjoy a holiday somewhere. this could be a game changer which would allow people who return from amber list countries to avoid the need to self—isolate for ten days. they would come back if they've been double jabbed, have a test and then be released, which would really free of things. i think there's good to be some special treatment that there. between the jab at mac and the jab back knots. i'm not sure there's any solution because it's
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better to do we can to get the travel industry up and running as much as possible, even if it's a little bit unfair to for those who haven't had the second jab back yet. if it is a game changer, it's a game changer the travel industry definitely needs.— changer the travel industry definitely needs. changer the travel industry definitel needs. �* ., , definitely needs. we've all seen the footaae of definitely needs. we've all seen the footage of cues _ definitely needs. we've all seen the footage of cues last _ definitely needs. we've all seen the footage of cues last thinking - definitely needs. we've all seen the footage of cues last thinking for - footage of cues last thinking for hours _ footage of cues last thinking for hours -- — footage of cues last thinking for hours —— queues lasting for hours. i think— hours —— queues lasting for hours. i think what— hours —— queues lasting for hours. i think what we — hours —— queues lasting for hours. i think what we will see is a more integrated — think what we will see is a more integrated approach by different countries with the covid restrictions they require. it will probably— restrictions they require. it will probably be digital. we're going to see a _ probably be digital. we're going to see a collection of countries working _ see a collection of countries working together because at the moment, — working together because at the moment, it really is prayer chaos. something — moment, it really is prayer chaos. something else that is pure chaos is the school bubbles idea and hundreds
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of thousands of people having to stay—at—home because of these self—isolation rules. the yorkshire post features that story. was it a necessary evil to have these bubbles in the first place? that we have to have them?— in the first place? that we have to have them? ~ �* , ., , have them? well, it's an interesting oint. the have them? well, it's an interesting point. the opinion _ have them? well, it's an interesting point. the opinion is _ have them? well, it's an interesting point. the opinion is divided. - have them? well, it's an interesting point. the opinion is divided. the i point. the opinion is divided. the government would argue they were needed because whilst children are not as affected by the virus as adults, they clearly do live at home with parents who can spread it in the course of their daily life and work. that was the theory behind it, but it has been extremely disruptive. we understand that up to 640,000 children in the last week have been off school. that's an increase from 370,000 a week before. you've got about one in eight children at the moment self—isolating at home because
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they're part of this bubble policy. iain duncan smith is quoted there. he's been writing quite openly about the negative effects to learning, where you have an increase of 55% of children who have actually missed half of their schooling in the past year, which is huge. he's talking about the associated affects that could lead to criminalisty, to anti—social behaviour and also made anti—social behaviour and also made a point that if you don't sort these things out and it leads to those effects, you could, the taxpayer could be looking up to £400,000 per people that suffers as a result of this. because they haven't been attending school. it's a serious problem and i'm glad that it's actually been undressed today by gavin williamson. let's move away from covid, and the guardian focuses on the story about the horrific murders of nicole smallman and beaver henry and daniel
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hussein, who's been convicted of those two murder. a beautiful picture, which is a still taken from footage found. this is an incredibly _ still taken from footage found. this is an incredibly tragic story. there isn't _ is an incredibly tragic story. there isn't a _ is an incredibly tragic story. there isn't a huge — is an incredibly tragic story. there isn't a huge amount to say other than _ isn't a huge amount to say other than it— isn't a huge amount to say other than it is— isn't a huge amount to say other than it is very sad and very disturbing. he has been convicted, he is _ disturbing. he has been convicted, he is only— disturbing. he has been convicted, he is only 19, disturbing. he has been convicted, he is only19, one disturbing. he has been convicted, he is only 19, one of the sisters was _ he is only 19, one of the sisters was only— he is only 19, one of the sisters was only 27 _ he is only 19, one of the sisters was only 27 when she was tragically murdered — was only 27 when she was tragically murdered. there was evidence that at suggest _ murdered. there was evidence that at suggest he _ murdered. there was evidence that at suggest he was radicalised on the dark web, — suggest he was radicalised on the dark web, and had he not been taught with these _ dark web, and had he not been taught with these murders, he would've gone on to hurt— with these murders, he would've gone on to hurt and murder other women. an incredibly— on to hurt and murder other women. an incredibly tragic case. some form ofjustice _ an incredibly tragic case. some form ofjustice and revolution for the family— ofjustice and revolution for the family that he has been convicted now _ family that he has been convicted now. �* , ., ., family that he has been convicted now. �*, ., ., now. let's go to the football because it's _ now. let's go to the football because it's a _ now. let's go to the football because it's a big _ now. let's go to the football because it's a big game - now. let's go to the football- because it's a big game tomorrow, as we know. let's look at the metro.
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beer we go. italy have just gone through in their semifinal against spain on penalties, so if england can beat their market, its an england — italy final. house excited are you? england - italy final. house excited are ou? ., , ., , i think we're all very excited but we have to remember denmark is not ukraine. tomorrow will be a very tough match. i think you can see denmark was in a very fine form at the weekend in their match against the weekend in their match against the czech republic. i think england just need to focus on the game in front of them tomorrow, not worry about the weekend. i think we've got some very good players who have showed that their ability, both on and off the pitch, and with the need to continue to work as a union. that was good at the ukraine dane.

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