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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with christian fraser. good news for people in england who are fully vaccinated — they won't have to self—isolate after a close covid contact. that there are concerns that anti—factors are putting that at risk. the rate of vaccination in the us has stalled. joe biden says we are at a vulnerable stage. us has stalled. joe biden says we are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans are _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans are still _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions| of americans are still unvaccinated and unprotected. because of that, that communities are best, their friends are at rest, the people they care about are at risk. we will speak to andy, the former white house covid adviser. it is getting more expensive to develop at the pump as oil prices hit a
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six—year high today. so why is there so much uncertainty over supply? rescue workers and miami are working against the clock at the sight of the collapsed building in surfside as florida braces for the arrival of tropical storm alsop. —— alsop. there is, around the world, an unacceptable disparity in the distribution of covid vaccines. but that is not true within the united states, britain, or most countries in europe. we have the vaccines, they are available to all adults, yet still we have case numbers rising. and a large part of that is because the uptake of the vaccine has slowed. in the united states in april there were more than three million shots administered daily that is now down to a one million. those who wanted it — have had it. the target of vaccinating 70% of
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americans byjuly fourth was missed. and in the last hour president biden has appealed again for people to protect one another. ourfight against our fight against this virus is not over. right now, as i speak to you, millions of americans are still unvaccinated and unprotected. because of that, their communities are at risk. their friends are at rest, the people they care about are at risk. this is an even bigger concern because of the delta variants. in today's breathing, we discussed how the delta variant has already been responsible for half of all cases in many parts of this country. a story of two americas is emerging in states like idaho, wyoming, louisiana and mississippi fewer than 40% of people have had theirfirstjab. in stark contrast to a state like vermont, where more than 70% have received at least one dose. and in those states where vaccinations are low, 99.2 % of those in hospital —
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or those who have died — are the unvaccinated. i'm joined by andy slavitt, the former senior adviser for covid response, in the biden white house. he has got a new book out preventable: "the inside story of how leadership failures, politics, and selfishness, doomed the us coronavirus response" it isa it is a suitable title in mind we are at the moment. i dare say that where it is selfishness you used in mind of some of the politics over the last year, but i wonder if you think that there is a selfishness among those who are refusing to get vaccinated now.— among those who are refusing to get vaccinated now. well, good evening, aood to be vaccinated now. well, good evening, good to be with _ vaccinated now. well, good evening, good to be with you. _ vaccinated now. well, good evening, good to be with you. you _ vaccinated now. well, good evening, good to be with you. you know, - vaccinated now. well, good evening, good to be with you. you know, i - good to be with you. you know, i think that sometimes we forget that so many people are dependent upon us in order to survive in this world, you know, in the us, we certainly price our individual liberties and
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our ability to do what we want, but, you know, to not wear a mask, for example, if we were risking spreading the virus is really a small sacrifice of stopping outcome of the thing about vaccination is it's a bit different, i think people have been selfish when it comes to their own bodies, they should make their own bodies, they should make the decisions that are right that i'm committee are going to anyway, so i think that we should acknowledge it is an individual decision, i hope people are motivated by the fact that keeping society running and keeping society safe depends on all of us doing our part. at safe depends on all of us doing our art. �* ., safe depends on all of us doing our art, �* ., ., safe depends on all of us doing our art. �* ., ., , ., part. a lot of people out there whose businesses _ part. a lot of people out there whose businesses have - part. a lot of people out there whose businesses have nearly| part. a lot of people out there - whose businesses have nearly gone to the wall over the last year or who have lived in isolation and have been lonely and have suffered with depression and getting out and resuming a normal life would say that science is there, we know that this vaccine works. why wouldn't you go out there and protect her neighbour, yourfriend, yourfamily, neighbour, your friend, your family, the neighbour, yourfriend, yourfamily, the other members of your family who are at risk from this new variance? well, i hope that appeal works, but
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i would also assure people that these vaccines are highly effective. they protect us very well, and if people have been vaccinated you know, they can and should begin to resume their normal life to the extent that they are comfortable. it is safe to be around other people, evenif is safe to be around other people, even if those other people are not vaccinated if you have been protected. these are well tolerated and very effective vaccines. so i hope people do that and i hope that people who have questions about taking the vaccine or who needs a motivation can get that motivation from others, from talking to their doctors, their gps, and people in their communities. i think it is an important decision to make but no one can be forced into it. hopefully people will get there on their own who haven't done it.— who haven't done it. let's talk a little bit about _ who haven't done it. let's talk a little bit about the _ who haven't done it. let's talk a little bit about the science. - who haven't done it. let's talk a little bit about the science. the | little bit about the science. the delta variance, there are cases of it appearing among those who have been vaccinated. they don't fall as ale as they would have done if they
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happen to have the vaccines, but is there evidence that the vaccine, or do you think it is the immunity that is on the wane?— is on the wane? well, love, i think 99.296 of is on the wane? well, love, i think 992% of peeple. _ is on the wane? well, love, i think 99.296 of people, as _ is on the wane? well, love, i think 99.296 of people, as he _ is on the wane? well, love, i think 99.296 of people, as he said, - is on the wane? well, love, i think 99.296 of people, as he said, that| 99.2% of people, as he said, that are dying from coven and the us now are dying from coven and the us now are dying from coven and the us now are dying because they haven't been vaccinated, of course, there are going to be breakthrough cases, we saw that in the lab, and we saw that health—wise. it was more people in the real world being vaccinated, we will be more about those cases, but remember, if you have a mild case and you have been vaccinated, that very likely could have been a very severe case. we should be watching throughout the date and throughout the world for things like immunity raining. it will happen first when it happens likely to start and all their populations, probably in places like israel would be the places like israel would be the places we will see them, i don't know if that's what we are seeing just yet, but i think the israeli
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health ministry is meeting and discussing this, but if that is the case, i think we let we will have a better sense of our schedule when we need to be boosted. the answer will not be fewer vaccines committee answer will be more vaccines. just so i'm clear. _ answer will be more vaccines. just so i'm clear. it— answer will be more vaccines. just so i'm clear, it is _ answer will be more vaccines. just so i'm clear, it is waning among those who have had the vaccine first, or it is waning among older people? first, or it is waning among older --eole? ~ u, first, or it is waning among older neale? . ., first, or it is waning among older n-eole? . ., ., ., people? welcome it will rain among older people — people? welcome it will rain among older people first. _ people? welcome it will rain among older people first. not _ people? welcome it will rain among older people first. not because - older people first. not because the 're older people first. not because they're old. — older people first. not because they're old, but _ older people first. not because they're old, but because - older people first. not because they're old, but because they l older people first. not because i they're old, but because they had they're old, but because they had the vaccine first?— the vaccine first? both. we have seen data _ the vaccine first? both. we have seen data which _ the vaccine first? both. we have seen data which shows - the vaccine first? both. we have seen data which shows that - the vaccine first? both. we have seen data which shows that for l seen data which shows that for people who are all there, it's not clear where the precise break—out point is, but there immunity goes first. as it so happens in both the uk in the us, they were also the people that were vaccinated first. so i thank you can imagine that when it comes time to consider boosts for both of those reasons, it will be seniors that are going to be the first ones to get their booster jabs.
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first ones to get their booster 'abs. ., , ., , jabs. he mentioned israel, they met toda and jabs. he mentioned israel, they met today and israel _ jabs. he mentioned israel, they met today and israel to _ jabs. he mentioned israel, they met today and israel to discuss _ jabs. he mentioned israel, they met today and israel to discuss whether. today and israel to discuss whether today and israel to discuss whether to bring forward the booster programme. do you think there is an argument in the uk and in the united states now for bringing that booster programme forward to the summer? well, i think we will have to wait and see what comes out of israel. i think the data has been very preliminary so far, and so i for one know that the scientists in the us government are eager to see what it says when we see the full set of data. so i think it's too early to say that. i wouldn't be surprised if in the fall, or certainly defer the printer, we do decide that it's time to start boosting folks again, but we are still shy of being able to make that determination. again, i would say, for people who are older, they are probably going to be the first ones that we are going to recommend that for a. you first ones that we are going to recommend that for a. you speak a lot to people _ recommend that for a. you speak a lot to people in _ recommend that for a. you speak a lot to people in the _ recommend that for a. you speak a lot to people in the white - recommend that for a. you speak a lot to people in the white house. l recommend that for a. you speak a l lot to people in the white house. do you think the spread of the delta variant is forcing them to rethink the recommendations for masking?
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well, interestingly enough, it is not the white house that made us recommendation for minard at the white house change those recommendations if they wear. it's the centers for disease control. something that the president has gone to great pains to make sure is free from political process. so the cdc, and i talked michelle berlinski during last weekend i was speaking with her again this afternoon, you know, theirjob is to study the data. and i think, you know, i don't think that's anything we have seen in the data that would tell us differently than what recommendation they made before. and dramatic reductions and continued reductions in cases, and of course, hospitalisations and deaths. but they should watch things, and if things change, local conditions change, particularly in vaccinated communities, the reasons for concerns, i expect the cdc to speak up concerns, i expect the cdc to speak up and i expect the white house will allow them to do thatjust by saying
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follow the science and not the politics. follow the science and not the olitics. . ., , . follow the science and not the olitics. . . , . ., , politics. the mandate is much easier here, politics. the mandate is much easier here. politically. _ politics. the mandate is much easier here, politically, it— politics. the mandate is much easier here, politically, it is— politics. the mandate is much easier here, politically, it is much - here, politically, it is much easier, because you are not having to mandate across states as you are there in the united states. so i just wonder, you will be aware of the debate here. we were told yesterday that caseloads could be up around 50,009 days' time, it could double to the peak of the third wave to around 100,000 with a large part of that, of course, is that delta variant. if you are here, would you be advising the government to keep the mask restrictions in place? well, look, iwould be advising individuals to make sure that they were doing what they were comfortable with with the delta variant. if you are vaccinated, you know, we have very good evidence that you are going to be protected against severe disease, and you make it something mild, but, you now can i expect that we are going to see an outbreak in cases from the delta variant both in the uk and in the us. i don't think it will necessarily follow that like last year, they will not fill up hospital
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beds, but we have all been there a great deal. there is plenty of uncertainty. it makes sense to take precautions both as individuals and as local governments as things evolve, but, you know, we have to pay attention, but i think not allow ourselves to get wracked with fear every time we see a new data point or read something about a new variant because we have very good vaccines and we just really should focus on making sure that those who haven't taken advantage of that time of the vaccination process, they actually do the. it’s of the vaccination process, they actually do the.— of the vaccination process, they actually do the. it's always good to net our actually do the. it's always good to get your thoughts. _ actually do the. it's always good to get your thoughts. thank - actually do the. it's always good to get your thoughts. thank you - actually do the. it's always good to get your thoughts. thank you so i actually do the. it's always good to . get your thoughts. thank you so much for coming in the programme. thank ou. here in the uk the government says it is determined to lift the restrictions in spite of the modelling that shows a third peak could lead to 100,000 infections a day. health secretary sajid javid said the link between hospitalisations and deaths has been significantly weakened by the vaccines, and there are currently seven million people he said who have not come forward with other health problems during the pandemic. they must now be, he said, a priority. more than 640,000 children
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in england were absent from school last week due to covid. in a statement to parliament, the education secretary, gavin williamson, said that from the 19july grouping pupils into protective bubbles within schools will end. keeping children in consistent groups was essential to control the spread of the virus when our population was less vaccinated. we recognise that the system of bubbles and isolation is causing disruption to many children's education. that's why we will be ending bubbles and transferring contract tracing to the nhs test and trace system for early year settings, schools and colleges. let's ta ke let's take a look at the days other news.
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a former challenger for the presidency in belarus, viktor babaryko has been sentenced to 1a years in jail. the banker was found guilty of taking bribes and money—laundering — charges he says were made up, to prevent him challenging alexander lukashenko in last year's election. britney spears' long—time manager has announced he's stepping down and says he thinks she intends to retire. larry rudolph�*s announcement comes two weeks after the pop star told a judge in la that she had been forced to perform against her will. spears is trying to end a court appointed conservatorship that has governed her life and finances for over a decade. and mark cavendish has sprinted to his 33rd stage victory at the tour de france to move within one win of the belgian legend eddy merckx�*s all—time record. the 36—year—old had not won a stage on the the tour for five years before this years race. mark cavendish rolling back the years. this time last night, we were keeping an eye on the teenage british tennnis player emma raducanu who was bidding for a place in the wimbledon quarter finals but sadly had to retire with breathing problems.
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well today, i am pleased to say she looks a lot better, recovered, and she has been speaking to the bbc. i think that it was a combination of, you know, everything that has gone on behind the scenes in the last week and accumulation of the excitement, the buzz, and, you know, i think it's a great learning experience for me going forwards. it's a great step forward and now next time hopefully i will be better prepared. it's been the best week of my life, honestly. good to see her looking so well. stay with us here on bbc news. still to come... tropical storm is closing in on florida. we will be live from a county right in its path.
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—— after celebrating a birthday. the jury —— after celebrating a birthday. the jury heard that 19—year—old stabbed them at random after planning to sacrifice when in. the murdered women's mother spoke to reporters after the verdict. this women's mother spoke to reporters after the verdict.— after the verdict. this is the kind of lace after the verdict. this is the kind of place first _ after the verdict. this is the kind of place first that _ after the verdict. this is the kind of place first that i _ after the verdict. this is the kind of place first that i believe - after the verdict. this is the kind of place first that i believe in - after the verdict. this is the kind | of place first that i believe in and we need to work storied so that we have justice and so that families are treated with respect. can i think all of my family and all my church family for holding us all up in prayer. this is an unbelievable day for us, but it is the first and there are two more battles to go, but today, we remember our girls as the wonderful strong women they were, and we hope that some good will come out of this horrible story. thank you.
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world oil prices have been on a tier in recent weeks, earlier today they hit their highest level since 2014. although there was a bit of a sell of later in the day. why is it so volatile. well, because there is still a lot of uncertainty out there about supply. and how the big oil producers will respond to growing demand as the world economy recovers. lets speak to samira hussein who is in new york for us. they just keep theyjust keep going up, these oil prices, and i say, you do feel it at that time, particularly there in america. ~ , ., ., america. absolutely. the automobile association here _ america. absolutely. the automobile association here in _ america. absolutely. the automobile association here in the _ america. absolutely. the automobile association here in the united - association here in the united states has estimated that by the month of august, we could see gasoline prices jump another 10—20%. to be perfectly honest, i took my own little road trip over the weekend with my kids and i was surprised at how much it cost to fail my very mum —like car. there is of the reasons for that. there is just a lot of pent—up demand. so
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much more travelling that's happening as the infection rates have really slowed down in america, so people are taking this opportunity to go on road trips, to get on planes, and that all requires petrol. 0n the other side of it, you see the organisation of oil—producing countries, they have been engaged in meetings for the last several days and they haven't been able to come up with a solution, whether or not they should boost oil production. and that has a lot of people worried about the fact that we are probably not going to see the prices is leaving anytime soon at the pumps as a result of that. �* , ., _ . soon at the pumps as a result of that. , my that. am i being a cynic by saying that. am i being a cynic by saying that this might _ that. am i being a cynic by saying that this might be _ that. am i being a cynic by saying that this might be a _ that. am i being a cynic by saying | that this might be a manufactured row? 0bviously that this might be a manufactured row? obviously the oil prices been hired as pay for the bells that might not have been paid during the pandemic. i might not have been paid during the andemic. , . i. might not have been paid during the andemic. , . ,, . might not have been paid during the andemic. , . , ., ., ., might not have been paid during the andemic. , . i. ., ., , pandemic. i cynic you are! that is ossible! pandemic. i cynic you are! that is possible! look, _ pandemic. i cynic you are! that is possible! look, i— pandemic. i cynic you are! that is possible! look, ithink— pandemic. i cynic you are! that is possible! look, i think that - pandemic. i cynic you are! that is possible! look, i think that is - possible! look, i think that is certainly a possibility, because if we look at this time last year, we saw that the oil prices were very
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depressed because no one was travelling, but also in terms of manufacturing, that was all down. nothing was really happening globally, and so these kinds of countries took a bit of a hit. if you look at specifically the countries that are looking to boost production, it's a place like the united arab emirates that spent a lot of money and capital to try to boost its oil production, so you are seeing that they are really pushing to try to increase production. 0n the flip side can he say that saudi arabia doesn't want to increase the production because for a variety of reasons, but, of course, the mean one you pointed out is that it's a opportunity at the moment. meanwhile, on the markets today, a rough day for the chinese app, i know there was huge interest from investors last may, then we had the bank holiday, and during that period, the chinese regulators have moved in, with a double whammy. yes. moved in, with a double whammy. yes, absolutel . moved in, with a double whammy. yes, absolutely- so — moved in, with a double whammy. yes, absolutely. so over _ moved in, with a double whammy. ye: absolutely. so over the weekend, we heard two things from chinese regulators, first, they said they are not going to allow any new
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downloads of the std act, this ridesharing app. and it's going to boot it off any app stores. then we also heard that it is going to start investigating the company with regards to its cyber security dealings. and that was really a big blow, that both of those two things were a blow to investors. investors in the united states had to wait a few days before they can actually react to that because of the holiday. as a result you saw that share price has dropped more than 20% lower than how it started training —— trading on the new york stock exchange plastic. does training -- trading on the new york stock exchange plastic.— stock exchange plastic. does that affect how a _ stock exchange plastic. does that affect how a chinese _ stock exchange plastic. does that affect how a chinese tax? - affect how a chinese tax? absolutely, because there is certainly a theme that is emerging that you are seeing an increased crackdown by beijing on some of its home—grown technology companies. because they want to have, they are exerting a lot more of their control. so we even saw an impact on
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other technology stocks that are chinese companies that are traded in new york, those stock prices also went down because i think that it's a bit of skittishness amongst investors in the united states about what kind of reach beijing is going to happen what kind of impact that will have on those technology companies happening here. thank you for that, get — companies happening here. thank you for that, get to _ companies happening here. thank you for that, get to see _ companies happening here. thank you for that, get to see you. _ spare a thought for the rescue teams in miami, who for nearly two weeks have been working around the clock, clawing through the rubble, in a desperate seach for those buried in the collapsed apartment block. not only have they worked with the threat of the remaining structure that loomed above them but they have also had to battle the elements. what remained of the champlain south tower was demolished over the weekend, opening up a significant new area to search, butjust as they make one step forward, along comes, tropical storm elsa, which is due to hit florida tomorrow morning. it is missing miami but still, bringing plenty of wind and rain. here's the mayor of miami—dade county with an update. we continue to urge all of the
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families who are missing loved ones to please reach out and connect with us so that our detectives can file a missing person reports with the police, and they want to confirm every single account. every single life that has been lost as a beloved family friend, a best friend, someone's child, or parent, or knees, or cousin or grandparents, and we know that waiting for news is unbearable. regarding the impacts of tropical storm, we do continue to expect occasional gusts and strong showers today, and we are closely monitoring the weather, and we now have our weather service embedded within our search and rescue teams to work closely to track for any changes that could impact the work to ensure the safety of our first responders. fist to ensure the safety of our first responders-_ responders. at last count, 113 eo - le responders. at last count, 113 people still missing, - responders. at last count, 113 people still missing, still- people still missing, still unaccounted.
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elsa is blowing close to hurricane strength —according to the the us national hurricane centre. these are some of the latest pictures from the florida keys, which gives you an idea of how bad it is getting. florida governor ron desantis has warned the storm's effects could be widepsread — and he's declared a state of emergency across a number of counties. lets bring meteorologist megan borowski who is with the florida public radio emergency network. she is in gainesville, florida which is in alachua county — it was added to the state of emergency list last night. nagging, lovely to see you. what are you anticipating?— you anticipating? rights, so we are trackin: you anticipating? rights, so we are tracking the — you anticipating? rights, so we are tracking the centre _ you anticipating? rights, so we are tracking the centre of _ you anticipating? rights, so we are tracking the centre of the _ you anticipating? rights, so we are tracking the centre of the storm - tracking the centre of the storm which is west of naples, down in the southwestern start of the florida peninsula. we are expecting that's trying to track parallel to the gulf coast overnight and it actually should just briefly read straight into hurricane status, so we are expecting about 75 per mile per hour winds right along the core of the storm come up that will be over the gulf of mexico. as for storm tracks
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northward, we are expecting heavy rainfall across the florida peninsula, flooding, rains, especially right along the gulf coast. tropical storm force wind gusts, so the rain and the winds will likely combine to down numerous trees and power lines. we are expecting some power outages especially along the gulf coast. the storm should make landfall. rainouts expected to make landfall as a category gory when hurricane along the nature coast, that is the coastline of north florida on the west side just before dawn tomorrow morning, and it will track in lined up morning, and it will track in lined up with heavy rain fell over us here in gainesville, it will then move up towards jacksonville and parallel to the atlantic coast and accelerate up the atlantic coast and accelerate up the us coastline. we the atlantic coast and accelerate up the us coastline.— the us coastline. we were 'ust talkin: the us coastline. we were 'ust talking about i the us coastline. we were 'ust talking about those * the us coastline. we were 'ust talking about those poor h the us coastline. we were just| talking about those poor rescue workers in miami, what can they expect? they seem to be plugging on, and the bulk of that is missing
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them, but do they still get quite bad weather?— them, but do they still get quite bad weather? ~ , them, but do they still get quite bad weather? ~ ., ., , , bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is — bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is on _ bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is on the _ bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is on the east _ bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is on the east coast, - bad weather? well, the good news is that miami is on the east coast, so . that miami is on the east coast, so it isn't getting directly hit by that rain shield, but they can still expect at least two this evening in the first part of the overnight some of those outer bands wrapping some thunderstorms in the area. they will stop the worry about heavy rain falls and strong costs. i think the biggest threat of the search and rescue efforts in miami are going to be lightning strikes nearby because if it's within a certain radius, they have got to suspend outer operation. {lit they have got to suspend outer operation-— they have got to suspend outer o eration. .. , _, ., operation. of grace they cannot get those cranes _ operation. of grace they cannot get those cranes working _ operation. of grace they cannot get those cranes working which - operation. of grace they cannot get those cranes working which is - operation. of grace they cannot get those cranes working which is a - operation. of grace they cannot get| those cranes working which is a real blow. tell me where you are, what sort of preparations are going on because my rhonda santos has said he has declared a state of emergency across a number of counties, what are you seeing? the across a number of counties, what are you seeing?— are you seeing? the state of emergency _ are you seeing? the state of emergency pretty _ are you seeing? the state of emergency pretty much - are you seeing? the state of l emergency pretty much allows are you seeing? the state of - emergency pretty much allows funds and resources to become available to local governments to prepare for the
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storm. where i am on the university of florida campus, it is pretty inland, pretty far in land. so further west down toward tampa, there are road closures, sandbags being distributed and local government offices are being closed to date tonight and tomorrow. thank ou ou to date tonight and tomorrow. thank you you very — to date tonight and tomorrow. thank you you very much — to date tonight and tomorrow. thank you you very much for— to date tonight and tomorrow. thank you you very much for that _ to date tonight and tomorrow. thank you you very much for that update. thank you. now, we never tire of elephant stories on this programme, as you well know, so here's one from a rescue centre. this is the best video of an elephant strike —— flying down to hell. she is two years old, and like every two—year—old, she likes sliding around in the mud. i think we can rename her after this. all the way to the hell, which does give you some money knees, so it's a good job there is a man there with a hose. —— mighty knees. coming up, do stay
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with us. well, i think the weather's going to be a little bit better tomorrow. certainly quite a few showers around today, and earlier on some really quite heavy rain with strong winds in southern areas of the uk. tomorrow, we'll see more blue sky. but at the moment, we're still in the wake of this low pressure which swept across the country earlier on. you can see a big dip in the jet stream here. and within this dip, we've got that showery weather that's in place over us right now. so through the course of this evening and overnight, still scattered showers across the country. you can see the low pressure centred just to the east of scotland there, so for a time, in some areas here, there will be more persistent rain. but plenty of clear spells in places, too. temperatures of around 1a in liverpool. we'll match that in cardiff as well, so it's not a cold night. and then tomorrow, the low pressure's actually quite slow moving.
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that means that it's not taking its weather with it. there is high pressure trying to build here from the south, but we're still really under the influence of that low. i know it's quite far away, it's closer to norway than it is to us, but it's still overall driving the weather pattern across the uk. so scattered showers, but blue sky in between too. the winds are going to be lighter. all of that combined means that the temperatures will be around 21 in london, 21 in glasgow. it is going to feel a little bit warmer. still a shower chance, though, i think, in wimbledon, and the same goes for the football. the following day might actually be a little bit drier. in fact, thursday right across the country is looking better. we're still expecting showers dotted around almost anywhere, but i think plenty of sunny spells as well. the winds will be relatively light, so temperatures again getting into the low 20s across many southern and central areas of the uk. now, through the weekend, friday into saturday, we'll see i think a little weather
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front moving across the south of the country, so that means we are expecting perhaps a few spits and spots of rain. but before that happens, you can see showers building across some parts of the uk on friday. but again, plenty of sunny spells in between, temperatures in the sunshine getting to around 20 or 23 celsius. so here's the outlook for the next few days. a little bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go — maybe only around 17 in aberdeen, but in the south, no higher than 22. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. new freedoms for people who were double vaccinated, no longer will they have the south isolate after a close covid—19 contact. the afghan security forces insist — they will retake all the areas that have fallen to the taliban — and they tell the bbc — soldiers have not defected to the militants. the stars are back for the cannes film festival — and about to return to the red carpet after an enforced break due to the pandemic and the first semifinal of euro 2020 is under way, italy are playing spain in front of crowd of 60 thousand we'll get the latest from wembley.
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the us has announced more than 90% of its military presence in afghanistan has been withdrawn, at the same time as the taliban say they've captured more than ten districts over the past 2a hours. they now control about a third of the country. this map shows the areas of taliban control in dark grey, contested areas in red, areas controlled by the afghan government in light grey. afghanistan's military has insisted today — they will retake all districts that have fallen — and the country's national security advisor told
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the bbc — afghan soldiers had not been defecting to the taliban. they may have abandon their posts because they ran out of ammunition, they ran out of supplies, but by no means has anyone defected to the tele band. they may have abandoned their posts because there were no longer able to fight. but they have come back and arejoining us. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul the tele band advancing rapidly and it's a bit? about the training of the afghan forces and other money thatis the afghan forces and other money that is been poured into it and whether or not there up to the job. it is the trillion dollar question. that people, american servicemen and women, british members of the forces that have spent so much time in
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afghanistan, training them, travelling with so many of the generals across afghanistan visited so many bases and i think you have to wait and see what happens with the macro to make their assault as we expect them to on the provincial capitals because that is where the best trained, the best resourced soldiers and police, specialforces of the afghanistan will be. some 40,000 with the elite forces that we have seen an action, police and army, they're supposed to be at the cutting—edge of the response to the tele band attacks and they are often sent across the country and their exhausted already because there's not enough of them because the taliban are striking so many areas. so i think the biggest test of security forces is still to come. in this thing that you did back in may, the top us official overseeing
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things in afghanistan, this is what he said about the capabilities of the afghan forces.— the afghan forces. risks to the future of afghanistan, - the afghan forces. risks to the future of afghanistan, we - the afghan forces. risks to the future of afghanistan, we are l future of afghanistan, we are watching _ future of afghanistan, we are watching what the taliban are doing, they will— watching what the taliban are doing, they will pick up violence in the near— they will pick up violence in the near term _ they will pick up violence in the near term-— they will pick up violence in the near term. but we see that they still need you — near term. but we see that they still need you in _ near term. but we see that they still need you in one _ near term. but we see that they still need you in one battle - near term. but we see that theyj still need you in one battle after another. �* . still need you in one battle after another. ~ ., ., . , ., another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and _ another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and we _ another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and we are _ another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and we are still - another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and we are still in - another. the afghan forces of the capabilities and we are still in a l capabilities and we are still in a position— capabilities and we are still in a position even in the midst of a retrograde, were able to support afghan— retrograde, were able to support afghan security forces. | retrograde, were able to support afghan security forces.— afghan security forces. i want if ou afghan security forces. i want if you would _ afghan security forces. i want if you would say _ afghan security forces. i want if you would say that _ afghan security forces. i want if you would say that today - afghan security forces. i want if| you would say that today looking across the picture. there to support the afghan forces, what sort of support is there? is there any air cover that would help them? i think ofto cover that would help them? i think of to bear in — cover that would help them? i think of to bear in mind _ cover that would help them? i think of to bear in mind with _ cover that would help them? i think of to bear in mind with general- of to bear in mind with general miller did. he's been serving as the top commander of the nato resolute support missions since 2018 and i've travelled with him a few times
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across the past six months. he sits down with the commanders in the area and since right, tell me what you want, what are your weaknesses. you have to work together with this. these are the problems in this or how you go to address this. they contacted him and sometime their messages on send air support, we are under attack, what can we do. these are very strong professional personal relationships between the senior american commander in the senior american commander in the senior afghan commanders who he has now passed all the responsibilities to. general mothers on responsibility has been to frank mckenzie was the central command and general miller is not travelling around the region and brussels meeting the nato secretary general and he still is here to oversee the transition but there is no aircraft and afghanistan that he can call in any more and he doesn't have resources any more. he does not special forces any more in the way that he could in the past. fin a
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that he could in the past. on a liuhter that he could in the past. on a lighter note. _ that he could in the past. on a lighter note, which _ that he could in the past. on a lighter note, which is - that he could in the past. on a lighter note, which is picked . that he could in the past. on a lighter note, which is picked up today, it is a man in kabul who has filled his shop with all the things that were looted from the air base. it is such a store this, look at what he scott, it's completely mesmerising, the sort of american bike helmets, basketball there, some fans and the keyboard. no wonder he's so exhausted. a serious aspect of that is that it was a bit of a free—for—all and if you look at what has happened since the weekend and the pictures of background airbase, it really is a picture of abandonment.- it really is a picture of abandonment. , ., , ., abandonment. yes, that is a snapshot of life on america's _ abandonment. yes, that is a snapshot of life on america's biggest _ of life on america's biggest military base on the last 20 years. there are thousands of americans and of their forces were in and out of
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that base, it became their home. as a city within a city, it is named after american states and you think you are in middle america and there's is basketball, there is the film, the electronic goods, the helmets. it is what life is like in that base. that was not all looted, i don't know where he got his. there is a steady business going on that the americans would give out their scrap, if you like some of the things they were getting rid of. they would either it away and so, when we visited that place recently, they really were worrying about the americans leaving. probably because of security and partly because many of security and partly because many of them became very wealthy on the proceeds. this was their livelihood and now, even we visited last october, their revenues were hitting 0ctober, their revenues were hitting rock bottom and now, the golden goose is now flown away. aha,
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rock bottom and now, the golden goose is now flown away.- goose is now flown away. a very different situation _ goose is now flown away. a very different situation now. - goose is now flown away. a very different situation now. thank. goose is now flown away. a very l different situation now. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you very much for being with us. and just let me pick up with what they're talking about and background airbase. the electricity was turned off, the looters went off without even telling the commander they were going. it is an odd way to leave a country that you've been in for 20 years. country that you've been in for 20 ears. , ., , ,., , country that you've been in for 20 ears. , i, ., years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take _ years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take a _ years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take a look— years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take a look at _ years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take a look at this - years. yes, it absolutely is. you have to take a look at this and l years. yes, it absolutely is. you i have to take a look at this and may be in the larger context and i don't have any unique insights into what happened but my guess, my up my assumption is the top priority for the americans as they were wrapping this up was to make sure that as they were departing that they had absolute security of the departing us forces. that is such a dangerous
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time it's on my guess is that there was a very high level of secrecy, notjust among the american forces there were leaving were probably also with the highest commands at the afghanistan government as well. there was probably a high level of coordination and an understanding that it was necessary for a very secretive departure just to make sure that the us forces were not put additional risks.— additional risks. overwhelming merel , additional risks. overwhelming merely, americans _ additional risks. overwhelming merely, americans supported l additional risks. overwhelming i merely, americans supported the decision —— overwhelmingly. americans supported the decision but in their view, the military campaign that was supposed to fight extremism and defeat terrorism had failed. and ijust wonder what your and defeat terrorism had failed. and i just wonder what your veterans think about that. all the tears, the injuries, the depths, that there have been over the last 20 years, are they bound to ask what was it all for? i are they bound to ask what was it all for? ~ , ., are they bound to ask what was it all for? ~ ,., ., ., ., all for? i think some are going to ask that but _ all for? i think some are going to ask that but the _ all for? i think some are going to ask that but the bigger _ all for? i think some are going to ask that but the bigger picture i all for? i think some are going to| ask that but the bigger picture is, i don't think amy has put a lot of
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stock and the statements along that. we went there which was on a mission to keep afghanistan from being used as a staging ground for attacks, terrorist attacks on the us and other coalition forces. that mission has been achieved. there's been a tremendous amount of mission creep over the last few years, but i don't think it's a question of what is it worth it, it's more how much did that mission creep and what was the reality of what us forces having a presence in afghanistan going to continue to accomplish at this point. continue to accomplish at this oint. , ., ., , , ., point. there is no appetite for auoin point. there is no appetite for going back — point. there is no appetite for going back end _ point. there is no appetite for going back end of— point. there is no appetite for going back end of the - point. there is no appetite for going back end of the united | going back end of the united states is going to stop this from being a staging ground for terrorism in the future, then there has to be collecting of intelligence, there has to be support of the afghan military and would be muses me is the story of the weekend that the white house is yet to agree with the
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rules of engagement will be. what will the rules of engagement be for the cia, for the department of defence, when can trends be used, is not the sort of thing that you before you leave the country? that chances before you leave the country? that changes on — before you leave the country? that changes on a _ before you leave the country? that changes on a regular _ before you leave the country? trust changes on a regular basis, the number that the rules of engagement change of the last 20 years is very, very high. and this is a unique situation we have done this in a long time i'm not sure if there's any other comparison to this other than vietnam, and so, i think there's a lot of times where we are learning things as we go and i think there's also had a very good understanding of what the number is that the us is going to have on the ground to come up with uniform, diplomatic and intelligence forces and things like that and so until there a number things worked out, i think there's going to be a very fluid situation, if you will to coin the term with how the us dictates to
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its personnel what rules and engagements are and things of that sort. ~ . , engagements are and things of that sort. ~ ., ., engagements are and things of that sort. ~ ._ ., i. engagements are and things of that sort. way to get your perspective, thank ou sort. way to get your perspective, thank you for— sort. way to get your perspective, thank you for coming. _ in our north american correspondent and what does that mean, a state of emergency? how will this work? he: basically sees it now as a public health crisis and such is the epidemic of gun violence in new york state and i might add that that is also the case for many other american cities. and so, what he is doing is funnelling state resources through to job creation programmes, to the creation of an office of gun
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violence prevention, department to track the illegal flow of weapons into new york from other states where there lacks are laws and there's a million—dollar initiative that they will hope that this will help cure the epidemic of gun violence. 50 help cure the epidemic of gun violence. ., ., , violence. so often on this programme. _ violence. so often on this programme, we - violence. so often on this programme, we talk - violence. so often on thisl programme, we talk about violence. so often on this - programme, we talk about gun violence and the persistence there is on the right to doing anything about it. how will new yorkers react to this? i about it. how will new yorkers react to this? ., ~' about it. how will new yorkers react to this? ., ~ . ., , about it. how will new yorkers react to this? ., ,, . ., , to this? i would think certainly as ou sa , to this? i would think certainly as you say. a _ to this? i would think certainly as you say. a lot _ to this? i would think certainly as you say. a lot of— to this? i would think certainly as you say, a lot of them _ to this? i would think certainly as you say, a lot of them will - to this? i would think certainly as you say, a lot of them will react l you say, a lot of them will react quite favourably and there are attempts from presidentjoe biden to crack down on gun violence by introducing tougher background checks, bans on assault weapons and so on. those measures, which the
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president proposed got to the house of representatives, but they have stalled in the senate. you're obviously aware that there's much appetite on the right, particularly in this country for any tighter gun control laws across this country and of course, the national rifle association remains one of the most potent lobbying groups and well resourced lobbying groups in this country. resourced lobbying groups in this count . ,, ., resourced lobbying groups in this count _ ,, ., ~ resourced lobbying groups in this count . ,, . ., country. still to come. we are live with the film _ country. still to come. we are live with the film festival _ country. still to come. we are live with the film festival is _ country. still to come. we are live with the film festival is back - country. still to come. we are live with the film festival is back on i with the film festival is back on after an enforced break due to the pandemic. draft legislation intended to tackle what ministers describe as a "broken asylum system" is being introduced to parliament. the home office says the bill will help prevent people who've passed through a safe country claiming asylum in the uk. refugee campaigners warn
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that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. our home editor mark easton has more. press must stand out parts of it or to try to keep those traffickers out of business. there is a plan to perhaps deport more easily asylum seek is who arrived here, particularly if they've come in from an illegal, by an illegal route, there will be a criminal offence of arriving in the uk without permission and they'll also want to try and send people back, as you say, to a safe country. burn asylum—seekers may have come through and perhaps maybe deport them to another country if the team that they don't have the right to come to they don't have the right to come to the uk. but the problem with all of this, and it really has been the problem since the beginning of the
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year is that you need essentially an agreement from another country to make the most of that happened. and at the moment, the home office has not gotten those agreements. lots of negotiations going on behind the scenes and there are lots of hopes that they will be able to do some kind of deals. and important asylum—seekers, setting up asylum systems and stories about putting them on a island, and its props, cooperation and the paradox of brexit that taking control of the borders is going to require greater international cooperation and not less.
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one of the biggest events in cinema — the cannes film festival is back. it was cancelled last year because of the pandemic, which played havoc with all manner of productions that are halted, releases postponed. so one imagines there will be greater cause for celebration this year. and with a sense of normality returning, we are also keen to know what we can look forward to later this year. 0ur entertainment correspondent tom brook has been travelling to cannes for two decades — he is with us. psychologically, this is a very big moment for the film industry. thea;r moment for the film industry. they like to say that _ moment for the film industry. they like to say that it _ moment for the film industry. they like to say that it is _ moment for the film industry. they like to say that it is the _ moment for the film industry. tie: like to say that it is the mother of all film festivals and as you know it was cancelled last year because of covid—19. but the fact that cannes is coming back is very good psychologically. for the film industry and over the next 12 days here, all sorts of wondrous films will be actually showcased here and go out to the rest of the world. so, psychologically yes, it is a big boost for the film industry and fingers are crossed that it's going to proceed in a good way. obviously,
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ou aet to proceed in a good way. obviously, ou net to to proceed in a good way. obviously, you get to some _ to proceed in a good way. obviously, you get to some screenings, - to proceed in a good way. obviously, you get to some screenings, what i you get to some screenings, what about the films that you have seen. any standouts? 50 about the films that you have seen. any standouts?— any standouts? so far, i've only seen one _ any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, _ any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, i _ any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, i got _ any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, i got up - any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, i got up at i any standouts? so far, i've only seen one film, i got up at the i seen one film, i got up at the crack of dawn today and it was a net, the opening night film. it is a very ambitious film. it is an operatic music and it starts and it is put together by a french director who really is influenced by the french new wave and i'm thinking of people likejean—luc godard who defined the 1960s, it ticked all the right boxes. ifound it defined the 1960s, it ticked all the right boxes. i found it very moving to be back at cannes and to see people singing on screen, adam driver singing perhaps not so well but the other quite nicely. and to
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embrace cinema, ifeel but the other quite nicely. and to embrace cinema, i feel very privileged, actually. i embrace cinema, i feel very privileged, actually.- embrace cinema, i feel very privileged, actually. i am adding that went to the _ privileged, actually. i am adding that went to the list. _ privileged, actually. i am adding that went to the list. the - privileged, actually. i am adding that went to the list. the films l that went to the list. the films that went to the list. the films that you have seen recently, do you find that the experience of the last year, the lock down, working remotely, the isolation that everyone has felt, everyone in the film industry, has that affected the films we are seeing? as a translating into what we see on screen? it is changing the types of stories that they are telling and actually, i think it may be film makers using interesting new techniques. there is an anthology of several films put together by esteemed film—makers and it's called the year of the everlasting storm and we have to produce films under conditions of lockdown i'm very intrigued to see
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that because it does test their film—making skills and they're going to have to use subtlety and metaphorical things like that to try to tell compelling stories and covid—19 has had an impact on everyone and of course, the film industry is no exception. i understand that cannes is the place were stars mixed with producers and directors were people pitch ideas. what he think the industry is right now? are they sitting on a pile of cash looking for the great ideas? are people looking to invest in film? i are people looking to invest in film? ~' are people looking to invest in film? ~ �* , ., are people looking to invest in film? ~ �*, ., , film? i think it's a very uncertain time. i think— film? i think it's a very uncertain time. i think what _ film? i think it's a very uncertain time. i think what is _ film? i think it's a very uncertain time. i think what is happening i time. i think what is happening right now is people are waiting to see what is happening in this spat between the studio system putting things up to theatres. it does put the film festival in a precarious
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position because all films being shown here are destined for cinemas and the general man in charge of cannes has no love at all for the likes of netflix. and so, it is a difficult time and a transitional time and hopefully the outcome will be good and we hope will get a greater richness of experience in terms of moving pictures and storytelling. i a moving terms of moving pictures and storytelling. ia moving picture because where else is going to be. i'm very invested personally going to the cinema and obviously, i want that to thrive. that's why it's very nice to be in a place like cannes break and screen these films and see it in the full—blown artistry. it is ten to 11. d0 it in the full-blown artistry. it is ten to 11. ,, ., it in the full-blown artistry. it is ten to 11. i. ., ., ten to 11. do you get a late screening? _
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ten to 11. do you get a late screening? if _ ten to 11. do you get a late screening? if i _ ten to 11. do you get a late screening? if i was - ten to 11. do you get a late screening? if i was really l screening? if i was really enthusiastic, _ screening? if i was really enthusiastic, i— screening? if i was really enthusiastic, i could i screening? if i was really i enthusiastic, i could probably screening? if i was really - enthusiastic, i could probably find one but i'll probablyjust get a drink and may be, i'm addicted, i probably get a croissant on the way home. ., , ., , ., _, home. lovely to see when are coming on. dozens of oil paintings of cherry blossom by the british artist damien hirst are going on public view for the first time this week, in paris. the new exhibition, at the fondation cartier, delayed twice because of covid restrictions, brings together around a third of the 100 canvases painted by hirst, during the lockdown, without his team of assistants. lucy williamson reports. as shocking as a dead animal or a diamond studded skull in the eyes of the artist. as much about life and death. damien hirst has been painting cherry trees, dozens upon dozens of them, all the way through the pandemic. much of it alone, without his team of assistants, thanks to covid restrictions.
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itjust became a really solitary thing, making art, which i've never really got it to that point except when i was very young. so it was quite nice to do that, and then trying to find some positivity in all the negativity and all the anxiety that everybody is feeling. in the beginning i was really anxious, but it's funny that in that anxiety, i made these paintings that are really positive. the canvases got larger in lockdown, he says. leaves appeared and shifts in perspective gave more gravity to the trees. after brexit and covid—19, there were extra obstacles to negotiate. post—brexit red tape as a barrier for smaller galleries than small established ones like this. the covid—19 restrictions mean fewer british visitors. here in france, the gallery director told me that he
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is both well—known and also unknown. there are a lot of people who think they know him. everyone has an opinion on him but what they think of him is not the point. what is important is that they see his work. the french appreciate painting and colour. it is the country of painting. colour. it is the country of painting-— colour. it is the country of nuaintin. , ., ., ~ �* painting. his earlier work hasn't often been _ painting. his earlier work hasn't often been compared _ painting. his earlier work hasn't often been compared to - painting. his earlier work hasn'tj often been compared to vincent painting. his earlier work hasn't i often been compared to vincent van gogh and others, but when you've made a living from provocation, perhaps nature paintings are the only surprise left. before we go, time to tell you about the next big event. the festival of football. spain have been taking on italy in the first of the semi—finals in the euro 2020 tournament — why are they looking so quiet, because spain equalised elite in the game and they are heading into extra
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time. tense times in rome and madrid. we will bring you the end result on bbc news. thank you and we'll see you tomorrow. hello. thank you for tuning into our weatherfor hello. thank you for tuning into our weather for the week ahead. it leaves a lot to be as desired. it's not particularly spectacular at the moment due to the strong jet stream which is been generating low pressure giving us bouts of heavy rain and some strong winds earlier on as well. and here's the picture from the last 24 hours
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or so, a big the picture from the last 24 hours orso, a big dip in thejet the picture from the last 24 hours or so, a big dip in thejet stream developed with low pressure across the country giving some strong winds, heavy rain and i we were in some big dip year in the cooler area stretching from the north, giving us the showery weather and here is a schematic of the jet stream circling the north year. it has a rich and it is with in these areas to receive low pressures forming for as long as thatis low pressures forming for as long as that is over us, the weather is not going to change dramatically. in fact, another one will be headed our way as we head towards the weekend and into early next week. here's the short term for the next few days. sure was on the cards for wednesday and that's going to affect wimbledon, the football as well and i think it will bring more sunshine and so as a result, it's going to feeljust and so as a result, it's going to feel just a little and so as a result, it's going to feeljust a little bit warmer as well. on wednesday night, and the early hours of thursday, it actually turns largely clear across the country with just a few showers in the north and then on thursday, we
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will see further showers developing but we are not going to see too many of them said then on the whole, yes is going to be a relatively unsettled picture as we are not seeing a vast amount of sunshine but a decent date nonetheless. 0n a decent date nonetheless. on thursday into friday, we will see under the low pressure heading our way bringing us over the front that he can see us approaching here, but ahead of it is a good deal of fine weather but within that fine weather with the sunshine and the strength of the sunshine was the clouds building, showers and even the possibility of thunderstorms and we cannot guarantee try weather on friday we certainly can't guarantee tray the course of the weekend and in fact, a little low pressure with the weather front will be zipped across the southern part of the uk and bring a little low pressure with the weather front will be zipped across the southern part of the uk and bring us some outbreaks of rain in the thinking is this will come early in the morning and then saturday afternoon will be a little bit brighter and in the south, eventually turning relatively sunny across most of the uk and with
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temperatures of around 21 celsius. let's have a look at saturday and into sunday and actually we are in between weather systems on sunday, not too bad with one beat weather front they are moving across the island and bringing in some cloud and ran through irish seacoast senior but the best of the weather on sunday will probably be further east you are some places like hall in norwich with sunshine here at around 22 celsius. not a wash—out, but certainly not completely dry. next week, early next week we're still having a jet stream close to us and still a bit of a dip but look at this year, more of a rich building this way and that means high pressure and better, warmer column or whether it's trying to build in a can see this high pressure trying to build in and settle in but that is not going to happen until around about wednesday and when it does, it should drop some warmth in this direction and that means people will be recovering to the mid—20s split until then, it
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is looking a little unsettled. thanks for watching.
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i'm laura trevelyan in washington dc, and this is bbc world news america. afghan security forces claim they'll retake all the areas that have fallen to the taliban, as we learn more about the dramatic withdrawal of us troops, now 90% complete. authorities in nigeria close more than a dozen schools after a series of kidnappings. distraught parents are angry and scared. the uk health minister says daily covid cases could rise to 100 thousand this summer, even as restrictions in britain are lifted. "100,000. plus, how one of the world's most daring artists used lockdown to change course. damien hirst tells the bbc why he's moved from sharks in tanks to cherry blossoms. my mum used to say to me, "there's enough horror in the world.

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