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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 6, 2021 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the us military says its pull—out from afghanistan is more than 90% complete. that is more than two months earlier than expected. the taliban meanwhile has taken another ten districts, pushing afghan forces into retreat. by pushing afghan forces into retreat. by no means has anyone defected to the taliban. they may have abandoned their posts because they were no longer able to fight. in their posts because they were no longer able to fight.— longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria. _ longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria. cs — longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria, cs was _ longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria, cs was up _ longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria, cs was up in - longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria, cs was up in order- longer able to fight. in one state of nigeria, cs was up in order to | of nigeria, cs was up in order to close after the 11th mass kidnapping of students in under six months. more than 140 students were taken in the latest raid, and parents are
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furious. ~ , ., ., furious. we stand in one voice, we condemn what _ furious. we stand in one voice, we condemn what has _ furious. we stand in one voice, we condemn what has happened, - furious. we stand in one voice, we condemn what has happened, and | furious. we stand in one voice, we i condemn what has happened, and we protest, we continue to protest. it protest, we continue to protest. it is under an protest, we continue to protest. it is underan hour protest, we continue to protest. it is under an hour now until the first semifinal of the euros kicks off. it is easily against spain. here are pictures showing the fans arriving at wembley for the game. 60,000 of them, biggest crowd at wembley so far. we will be live there in a few minutes. the united states says its military withdrawal from afghanistan is now 90% complete — well ahead of the september 11th deadline set by president biden. here's a statement from us central command in florida, saying...
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that involved 984 loads being carried out of the country on these c—17 cargo planes. this is for both troops and equipment. the us started the year with 2,500 troops in afghanistan. many were at bagram airbase — which is north of kabul and has been its key base. at the peak of us involvement over a decade ago, more than 100,000 us and nato troops passed through bagram. but now they've gone. the last us troops withdrew from bagram in the middle of the night — without notifying the afghans. that huge compound is now deserted and under the control of afghan forces. the military commander there says those forces expect to have to defend the base against a taliban assault. and of course they'd have to do that without the americans. if we compare ourselves with the americans, it's a big difference. we cannot say we will continue...that much powerful that the us army was before on that base. we are trying to do the best and,
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as much as possible, secure and serve all the people. lyse doucet is in kabul. lyse, thank for joining lyse, thank forjoining us on 0utside source. if 90% of the withdrawal is done, tells about the 10%. remains for america to do? it is very interesting that in this last update from centcom, and even updated the percentages now for many months, they say it is at 90%, we will not be updating it any more because of our security concerns. in other words they know the taliban are watching this, a countdown right to the last us and nato soldier in afghanistan, the last bit of the retrograde, so it is hard to say exactly what it involves. we went to bagram when the retrograde was just starting. huge hangers, extraordinary amounts of military
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assets, toilet paper, chilli beans, electronic equipment, gps devices, armoured vehicles, the whole gamut of things that the united states and soldiers used during its years of operations here, but it is telling us that it is in days now. find operations here, but it is telling us that it is in days now. and we have art had _ us that it is in days now. and we have art had a _ us that it is in days now. and we have art had a briefing _ us that it is in days now. and we have art had a briefing from - us that it is in days now. and we have art had a briefing from the | have art had a briefing from the american dummett americans to say they intend to leave some troops to protect the us embassy, for example. talking about them — are they a separate deponent we should see differently? separate deponent we should see differentl ? ., , ., , differently? that should definitely be seen differently. _ differently? that should definitely be seen differently. what - differently? that should definitely be seen differently. what the - differently? that should definitely i be seen differently. what the united states is saying is, "we use troops notjust in afghanistan, we use american missions around the world as marines guarding the us embassy in berlin, so this is a normal diplomatic procedure to use your armed forces, to protect your diff
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—— to phonetic staff." the difficulty now, and it is a big one, is that the taliban are counting that as what they say they negotiated with the united states. bay city trainers, the civilians, the advisers, all of that have to 90, the advisers, all of that have to go, and that tension between who or what has to go under the terms of the deal is at the heart of discussions over how to secure kabul international airport, the entry and exit point notjust for the diplomats who are still here, and not just the diplomats who are still here, and notjust the us mission, but also for afghans. notjust the us mission, but also forafghans. it notjust the us mission, but also for afghans. it is also seen as, in the worst—case scenario, it may not happen, as an evacuation route. without a functioning airport, but some kind of protection, the embassies will not stay here and many afghans will find it very nerve—racking too. many afghans will find it very nerve-racking too.— many afghans will find it very nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with us. i 'ust nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with us- i just want _ nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with
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us. i just want to _ nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with us. i just want to run _ nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with us. i just want to run back - nerve-racking too. lyse, stay with us. i just want to run back through some of the most recent of elements and come back to you. —— most recent details. the taliban say they've captured another ten districts in the past day. and afghanistan's national security adviser says his national defence forces became overstretched when the us withdrew its troops. some of our resources were not enough, particularair some of our resources were not enough, particular air force, some of our resources were not enough, particularair force, and there were bases far else that were hard to supply and needed air support to do so. this is war. and there will be times when we are under pressure, but it is capable to defend most of the territory of afghanistan. it is working to enhance his capabilities further. in the provice of takhar, 15 out of 16 districts fell to the taliban. but in the provincial capital, afghan forces held firm. they successfully defended taloqan against an attack, although the city is now surrounded on all sides.
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this is a spokesman for the local governor. translation: the taliban tried to break through _ translation: the taliban tried to break through the _ translation: the taliban tried to break through the city's _ translation: the taliban tried to break through the city's defence i break through the city's defence line until midnight, but they faced strong resistance from our defence and security forces. our forces were able to defend the westgate varsity, with high morale and patriotism. —— western data varsity. the focus is now on holding onto the provincial capitals. in the next door province of badakhshan, at least 25 of the 28 districts have fallen. the afghan journalist bilal sarwary shared this video, saying, "four taliban in a vehicle show up in one of the most remote districts on the border with tajikistan and china. it fell to the taliban without a fight." the afghan government doesn't see
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every district lost as a defeat. on the contrary, one afghan government official has said "we pulled out intentionally" from districts that were "smaller" and "not strategically significant". he says the government moved its troops to protect larger towns instead. one freelance journalist in afghanistan tweeted about "the role of rumours". a local elected official said forces abandoned districts because they thought "handing over the rural areas to the taliban was part of the us—taliban plan." which, of course, it is not. there were also reports some afghan government forces abandoned their posts and defected to the enemy. but afghanistan's national security adviser says that's not true. they may have abandoned their posts because they ran out of ammunition, they ran out of supplies, but by no means has anyone defected to the taliban. they may have abandoned their posts because they were no longer able to fight. a fortnight ago, the washington post reported an assessment by us intelligence that the "afghan government could fall within six months of a us military withdrawal". the events of recent days have made that assessment seem plausible — though we should emphasise
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that outcome is some way off. lyse, if we can bring you back and lie from kabul, how do we assess the progress the taliban is making in terms of a genuine threat to the government —— live from kabul? i think we just have to be very cautious. you've been listening, the districts which have been tumbling across the country. as you say some of them are not as surgically as important, some of them are falling without a fight because, technically, these afghan secure the forces decide they're not worth protecting, they pull back to protecting, they pull back to protect more important installations, and this map that we are seeing with greater clarity, the military map of afghanistan, and it is also a map of human suffering, because we have heard in case after case that what happens, you will have a small post in the middle of nowhere and they are begging their commanders, send us food, sent us
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water, send us ammunition for we heard one report of a unit which asked 70 times and was always told, it is coming, it is coming. we are seeing that the supply chains are not working properly, and so this criticism, did national criticism, did the afghan national secured fe=== ' " f ' f criticism, did the afghan national secured fe=== ' 'set * ' f criticism, did the afghan national secured fe=== ' 'set up ' f criticism, did the afghan national secured fe=== ' ' set up their own secured forces not set up their own system? that system seems to be falling apart, which seems to be one of the reasons white in so many areas some of the posts are falling so quickly. so if that continues to be the case, of course it means the taliban keep advancing, but it will be much different pain of battle. it is expected once the provincial capitals come under attack. that is where you have the better trained, better resourced forces and the most best trained of all, some 40,000 best trained of all, some 40,000 best of the best trained by the biggest armies in the world, 40,000 pleas and army who are trained, and they are supposed to be the elite who will keep the country safe. they will soon be challenged.—
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will soon be challenged. lyse, we alwa s will soon be challenged. lyse, we always appreciate _ will soon be challenged. lyse, we always appreciate your _ will soon be challenged. lyse, we always appreciate your help - will soon be challenged. lyse, we always appreciate your help in - always appreciate your help in telling this story. thank you for joining us from kabul. nigeria's kidnapping crisis is deepening. kaduna state has now closed all schools it considers vulnerable. more students are missing. this is how the issue has escalated. this week, there have been two attacks in kaduna, one at a hospital — eight people were taken — one at a school hours later. around 150 students were taken. and once again, parents in nigeria are facing their worst fears. we stand in one voice. we condemn whatever happened and we protest, we continue to protest until her children are brought back. —— our children. sadly, this is nothing new. on the contrary, the mass kidnapping of children is becoming a regular event. there have been 11 mass kidnappings of students in these five states since december. over 1,000 students have been taken.
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9 have been killed. 300 are still missing. this latest round of kidnappings started in kankara state in december — 344 schoolboys were taken from their dormitories. a week later, they were released. a day later after that, 84 students were captured and were released after a gun battle. there were two attacks in february. 27 boys and their teachers were taken in niger state. later that month, 279 schoolgirls were kidnapped in zamfara state. most were freed days later. unfortunately, there are many other examples i could show you. and they all bring back of memories of the chibok girls — the 276 schoolgirls who were kidnapped by the islamist group boko haram in 2014. 100 are still missing. those girls were taken by boko haram, but this already complex issue is complicated further by the fact that militant islam does not fully explain
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what is happening this year. farfrom far from it. the analyst bulama bukarti has described an "epidemic of insecurity" and argues... and it's not only students who are being targeted. there are kidnappings across the country that happen every day, people travelling to a native town, people travelling to a native town, people visiting relatives. even people visiting relatives. even people in their homes. and this is happening to particular in outlook as the nigerian economy is suffering so much. other agree that these broader issues have to be considered. it is like a competition process. why— it is like a competition process. why not— it is like a competition process. why not look at the social economic issues _ why not look at the social economic issues in _ why not look at the social economic issues in the country broadly and address— issues in the country broadly and address it? — and it includes everybody. no doubt this is more — and it includes everybody. no doubt this is more than _ and it includes everybody. no doubt this is more than militant _ and it includes everybody. no doubt this is more than militant islam. - this is more than militant islam. this is about a reduction in poverty, needing a better performing economy, but that cannot be
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delivered overnight, and covid is making those things harder. but we can see in the response of some local politicians that they see this as an economic issue. injuly last year, the governor of zamfara state promised bandits two cows and guns for every... underthe promised bandits two cows and guns for every... under the people did promise to disarm. here is the analyst again arguing we cannot ignore the fact that school specifically are being targeted. i would not be surprised if these people _ i would not be surprised if these peorrie are — i would not be surprised if these peorrie are doing _ i would not be surprised if these people are doing it _ i would not be surprised if these people are doing it for— i would not be surprised if these people are doing it for some - people are doing it for some ideological— people are doing it for some ideological reasons - people are doing it for some ideological reasons or- people are doing it for some ideological reasons or at - people are doing it for some i ideological reasons or at least people are doing it for some - ideological reasons or at least this indicated — ideological reasons or at least this indicated to — ideological reasons or at least this indicated to us _ ideological reasons or at least this indicated to us that _ ideological reasons or at least this indicated to us that the _ indicated to us that the pathological _ indicated to us that the pathological hatred - indicated to us that the l pathological hatred they indicated to us that the - pathological hatred they have for schools. — pathological hatred they have for schools, partially _ pathological hatred they have for schools, partially because - pathological hatred they have for schools, partially because they l pathological hatred they have for. schools, partially because they did not have _ schools, partially because they did not have an — schools, partially because they did not have an opportunity _ schools, partially because they did not have an opportunity of - schools, partially because they didj not have an opportunity of sending any. as you can see, it is hard to describe what is happening. a journalist wrote in the spectator...
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and certainly what they are doing is lucrative, something that matters whether you are in a table group or a local —— terror group or local group. the... this analysis from the washington post syncs with that point. it says... and it says... there is another story playing out too... and this ever evolving threat and its multifaceted routes and associative nature make it very difficult to respond to. back in february, the president urged governors to stop paying criminals. he said... he went
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on... and we know that security initiatives have started around nigerian schools, increase police checks close to schools, better fences around schools, even communities bringing in their own vigilantes, but evidently at the moment, it is not enough. we have not put mechanisms in place to actually protect the victims, protect the schools and, yes, you're going to say, we are narco to negotiate for so in essence, what you're telling those parents is your children aren't going to have to be scapegoats. the a nswer answer is wanting to stop people from kidnapping children in the first place, and that is easier said than done in nigeria right now, as he lives lost and the lives changed continue and they show no sign of
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stopping. translation: went i heard about the abductions at — translation: went i heard about the abductions at the _ translation: went i heard about the abductions at the school, _ translation: went i heard about the abductions at the school, i _ translation: went i heard about the abductions at the school, i could - abductions at the school, i could not sleep at night. i do not want the children to go through and i went through. even now, i still get scared when i hear gunshots stop you saw the bbc mayemi jone at the end of that. saw the bbc mayemi jone at the end of that. . , saw the bbc mayemi jone at the end of that. ., , ., . ., of that. thanks returns once more. is there a national _ of that. thanks returns once more. is there a national strategy - of that. thanks returns once more. is there a national strategy to - of that. thanks returns once more. is there a national strategy to take | is there a national strategy to take on this problem. —— this problem? not one that has been committed to very clearly, although since this latest round of kidnappings, the president has made a comment, he is describe the mass kidnappings of students as despicable, disturbing and cowardly, and he is also called on intelligence agencies to ensure the safe and early release of those
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taken. still, these words ring hollow for many nigerians who feel that the central government, the federal government, has done very little to tackle this crisis and that it has been allowed to go on for far too long. that it has been allowed to go on forfar too long. bud that it has been allowed to go on for far too long.— that it has been allowed to go on for far too long. and can you help us exolore _ for far too long. and can you help us explore further _ for far too long. and can you help us explore further the _ for far too long. and can you help us explore further the point - for far too long. and can you help us explore further the point i - for far too long. and can you help us explore further the point i was j us explore further the point i was making about the distinction between islamist militants and then local criminals and some times local criminals and some times local criminals who may be pretending to be islamist militants?— be islamist militants? yeah, it is uuite be islamist militants? yeah, it is quite difficult _ be islamist militants? yeah, it is quite difficult because _ be islamist militants? yeah, it is quite difficult because i - be islamist militants? yeah, it is quite difficult because i think - quite difficult because i think we're most people think of kidnappings of students in nigeria, they obviously remember the chibok girls. they made global headlines in 2014 and there was a global campaign to ensure they release. this latest wave of kidnappings is a lot more economically motivated, but as you explained there, the chibok girls did serve as an inspiration. a large
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ransom was reported he paid for the girls who were released, and in 2018 we saw 100 schoolgirls taken in northeastern nigeria. that was carried out by boko haram, and again there were rumours of ransoms being paid for stub this latest wave of attacks served to happening late last year in december, it seemed the criminals had seen those first two mass kidnappings of students, particular girls, how emotive it was, how much pressure is applied on the government, and decided they wanted to make money quick. this may be a tactic they want to adopt. i’m be a tactic they want to adopt. i'm interested. _ be a tactic they want to adopt. i'm interested, clearly these mass kidnapping is a good enough a lot of coverage around the world. here i am sitting in london talking about it, and you don't have to look far to see coverage of it in other countries too. is it a major story in nigeria? is it dominating the news there?— in nigeria? is it dominating the newsthere? , . , , ., news there? insecurity is front page of most nigerian _ news there? insecurity is front page of most nigerian papers _ news there? insecurity is front page of most nigerian papers on - news there? insecurity is front page of most nigerian papers on most. of most nigerian papers on most days, and i think the sheer scale
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and volume of insecurity in nigeria can often make people here feel quite immune to it — not immune but maybe a little bit isaiah about it, simply because there is just such a volume of incidents that in other countries would immediately make headlines —— a little blase about it. perhaps here it is not at the forefront of people's mines, but kidnapping is something that affects absolutely everybody. even if it is not a mass kidnapping of a school, you could be taken driving a car to another town, you could be taken at any point, even from your home, and so many nigerians are secured concerned about it —— are concerned about it. to see them take it with such frequency and no real action taken to stop, to stem the flow of kidnappings, i think is very discretion distressing —— very distressing for many nigerians.
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distressing -- very distressing for many nigerians.— distressing -- very distressing for many nigerians. mayemi, thank you very much- — we started the programme in kabul, then legos. ash make then lagos. now miami. there's a major storm approaching, but work continues at the site of the collapsed apartment block. these are the latest pictures we have. 32 people are confirmed to have died and over 100 remain missing. and you can see the search and rescue teams are battling high winds. that's because tropical storm elsa is now approaching florida. the mayor of miami—dade county has given this update. we continue to urge all of the families who are missing loved ones to please reach out and connect with us so that our detectives can file missing persons reports with the police and we want to confirm every single account. every single life that has been lost is a beloved family friend, a best friend, someone's child or parent or niece or cousin or grandparent, and we know that waiting for news is unbearable. or gardy the impacts of tropical storm elsa, we do continue
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to affect occasional gusts and strong showers today and we are closely monitoring the weather and we now have our weather service embedded within our search and rescue teams —— regarding the impacts. to work closely to track for any changes that could impact the work, to ensure the safety of our first responders. these images are of storm elsa battering cuba. it's now turned towards florida, where it's expected to make landfall. president biden has already declared a state of emergency there. let's talk to david willis. david, help me understand what that means, declaring a state of emergency full double kind of assistance to president biden want to offer florida? —— what kind of assistance? to offer florida? -- what kind of assistance?— to offer florida? -- what kind of assistance? , _, . ., assistance? there is concern about elsa, for assistance? there is concern about elsa. for a — assistance? there is concern about elsa, for a number _ assistance? there is concern about elsa, for a number of _ assistance? there is concern about elsa, for a number of reasons, - assistance? there is concern about elsa, for a number of reasons, and j elsa, for a number of reasons, and that's why officials brought for the demolition of parts of that building, that stricken building in miami which collapsed last week, and
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as you mentioned, four more bodies were recovered there overnight, bringing the total to 32, with 113 people missing. as for elsa itself, it is skirted the southern coast of cuba, having left about three people deadin cuba, having left about three people dead in the caribbean, added to said to be potentially raising the possibility of tornadoes and flash floods when it gets here probably early tomorrow morning for some that is wednesday morning here. it is expected to impact the west coast of florida and largely leave the search area in miami alone, although they already experiencing some high winds in that search area which had been blamed on elsa, lightning strikes as well which forced the postponement of the search for a couple of hours this morning was some also heavy winds making it difficult for cranes to operate in that rescue site and clear debris. to operate in that rescue site and clear debris-— to operate in that rescue site and
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clear debris. �* , , ., , , clear debris. and, david, presumably florida, miami _ clear debris. and, david, presumably florida, miami in _ clear debris. and, david, presumably florida, miami in particular, - clear debris. and, david, presumably florida, miami in particular, is- florida, miami in particular, is well prepared for storms. the deal with hurricanes all the time, so while tropical storm elsa is serious, presumably this is state well coped to prepare for its arrival? , , ., , , well coped to prepare for its arrival? , , . , , ., arrival? yes, they are very used to it, but this — arrival? yes, they are very used to it, but this was _ arrival? yes, they are very used to it, but this was at _ arrival? yes, they are very used to it, but this was at one _ arrival? yes, they are very used to it, but this was at one stage - it, but this was at one stage looking like it might be the first hurricane of the season, and it has since been downgraded to a tropical storm. there is the danger it could be raised in status to that of a hurricane before it reaches landfall in florida. but certainly around the tampa area, already we are seeing pictures of people evacuating, bars, restaurants and someone closing down early there, a lot of concern about tropical storm elsa.— tropical storm elsa. david, thank ou ve tropical storm elsa. david, thank you very much — tropical storm elsa. david, thank you very much for _ tropical storm elsa. david, thank you very much for the _ tropical storm elsa. david, thank you very much for the update. . tropical storm elsa. david, thank. you very much for the update. that is david leifer in washington, dc. —— live for us.
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let me show you some pictures coming in from wembley in northwest london, because it is beginning ready to host the first of the two euros semifinals, as you are no doubt aware, there is a big game tomorrow, england against denmark, but first of all it began in its own right, spin against italy. they are going to be kicking off in, where are we, 35 minutes. i think it is fair to state italy are going to be the slight favourites. spain have dominated world football for a long while, but not so much in the last three, four years, and italy of coming to the tournaments showing some incredible form, with roberto mancini their manager very much saying he is notjust looking to put down a marker of this term it but he wants to go on and win the world cup as well. at first things first, he has had to get through this game with spain. it ticks off, as i say, in afton hours' time, and if you want to follow that online, you can do that through the bbc sport website. you can get that at... or downloaded onto your phone. and i
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will see you in a couple of minutes' time. well, i think the weather's going to be a little bit better tomorrow. certainly quite a few showers around today, and earlier on some really quite heavy rain with strong winds in southern areas of the uk. tomorrow, we'll see more blue sky. but at the moment, we're still in the wake of this low pressure which swept across the country earlier on. you can see a big dip in the jet stream here. and within this dip, we've got that showery weather that's in place right now. so through the course of this evening and overnight, still scattered showers across the country. you can see the low pressure centred just to the east of scotland there, so for a time, in some areas here, there will be more persistent rain. but plenty of clear spells in places, too. temperatures of around 14 in liverpool. we'll match that in cardiff as well, so it's not a cold night.
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and then tomorrow, the low pressure's actually quite slow moving. that means that it's not taking its weather with it. there is high pressure trying to build here from the south, but we're still really under the influence of that low. i know it's quite far away, it's closer to norway than it is to us, but it's still overall driving the weather pattern across the uk. so scattered showers, but blue sky in between too. the winds are going to be lighter. all of that combined means that the temperatures will be around 21 in london, 21 in glasgow. it is going to feel a little bit warmer. still a shower chance, though, i think, in wimbledon, and the same goes for the football. the following day might actually be a little bit drier. in fact, thursday right across the country is looking better. we're still expecting showers dotted around almost anywhere, but i think plenty of sunny spells as well. the winds will be relatively light, so temperatures again getting into the low 20s across many southern and central areas of the uk. now, through the weekend, friday into saturday,
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we'll see i think a little weather front moving across the south of the country, so that means we are expecting perhaps a few spits and spots of rain. before that happens, you can see showers building across some parts of the uk on friday. but again, plenty of sunny spells in between, temperatures in the sunshine getting to around 20 or 23 celsius. so here's the outlook for the next few days. a little bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go — maybe only around 17 in aberdeen, but in the south, no higher than 22. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the us military is saying it's out from afghanistan is more than 90% complete. that's more than two months earlier than we were expecting. the taliban is taking another ten districts and placing some afghan forces into retreat. br; some afghan forces into retreat. el: no means has anyone effect to the taliban. they may have abandoned their posts because they were no longer able to fight. the their posts because they were no longer able to fight.— longer able to fight. the uk government _ longer able to fight. the uk government set _ longer able to fight. the uk government set out - longer able to fight. the uk government set out more i longer able to fight. the uk - government set out more details on how it plans to fully unlock despite a new search of coronavirus. the difference _ a new search of coronavirus. the difference is _ a new search of coronavirus. the difference is that _ a new search of coronavirus. tie: difference is that this a new search of coronavirus. tte: difference is that this vaccine a new search of coronavirus. t'te: difference is that this vaccine rule of defence is working on the link
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between cases and hospitalisations is severely weakened. th between cases and hospitalisations is severely weakened.— is severely weakened. in half an hour, is severely weakened. in half an hour. and _ is severely weakened. in half an hour. and to _ is severely weakened. in half an hour, and to be _ is severely weakened. in half an hour, and to be an _ is severely weakened. in half an hour, and to be an spain - is severely weakened. in half an | hour, and to be an spain kick-off hour, and to be an spain kick—off for the first semifinal i think urologist. these are pictures from wembley after the last of the fans arrived and they crowd tonight, 60,000 will be in there. the new health secretary says and then now entering uncharted territory as it moves to lift all legal restrictions for covid—19. here he is speaking to the bbc. trio here he is speaking to the bbc. no one here he is speaking to the bbc. th? one is pretending the pandemic is gone. the pandemic is still very much there. we estimate pandemic, case numbers are high and they are going to get higher. so one of the things i said yesterday currently we are seeing case around 25,000 today and i suspect they will be as high
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as 50,000 a day by the time this evening happens. the difference is it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. the decision to lift restrictions comes at a time when cases are rising sharply in england because of the delta variant. that could lead to as many as 100,000 new infections a day this summer. the difference now though is we vaccines are proving effective at reducing seriosu illness. the latest weekly figures show those jabs driving excess deaths — shown here in red — back to the level we'd expect in a normal year without covid. and the scientist whose advice led to the first lockdown expects hospital admissions and deaths to stay far lower than early in the pandemic. this is an experiment at the moment. i think it is justifiable and i am optimistic that the policy will have
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to remain flexible. if we end up in something close to the worst case scenario we and other groups are looking at which i think it's unlikely but cannot be ruled out and yes, there may be some kind of course correction later. others are worried that legal restrictions are being lifted too quickly. the opposition labour party says it wants to open up the economy but the wearing of masks in shops and on public transport should continue. here's the shadow health secretary. we wa nt we want people to have their freedoms back. but we do not want a high—risk free—for—all. rememberthe high—risk free—for—all. remember the context high—risk free—for—all. rememberthe context that we are in. infection rates sadly are rising again steeply. hospitalisations are rising again. more people will die. but let's be clear — no country in the world has attempted to lift restrictions in the middle of a new surge, as england plans to. so let's compare what's happening in the uk with elsewhere. in the uk, 63% of people in the uk are fully vaccinated — but more than 27,000 cases were reported on monday. france fears a fourth wave of the virus, because of delta —
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it's accounting for around a third all new infections at the moment. and it's delayed the lifting of some of its restrictions because of a new surge. in the us, anthony fauci has warned there will soon be surges in cases of the delta variant in areas where vaccination rates are low. almost 60% of americans are fully vaccinated, but the rate varies sharply by region. and some areas — like la county — have gone back to recommending that vaccinated people wear masks. and in asia, many countries are battling a surge related to delta. indonesia imposed a partial lockdown on saturday, reporting almost 30,000 cases in one day on monday. here's the bbc�*s naomi grimley on why the strategy in england is out of sync with how some others countries. there is no no doubt it is a massive gamble, because if you think about it hitherto, when you've had rising infections, you've had more restrictions put on a population like the uk, not have them taken away. so that's where the gamble is. i guess what the government is thinking is that if there is going to be what's termed an exit wave, as the population releases
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and as vaccines do theirjob, then it's better to have that in summer rather than delay it to september, when kids go back to school and when the weather starts turning and people huddle indoors again, so that's really the gamble. the problem is, if infections keep rising, what if the wall of immunity 64% of the adult population in the uk has been double jabbed.
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the uk government announced restrictions on the school will come to an end. up to now children have been put into bubbles. when one tests positive the others must isolate. it's caused a lot of disruption. over the past week more than 640,000 children missed school because of this. only 10% actually tested positive. as of the 19th july they will remove these bubbles and children will only have to isolate if they test positive. there will no longer be a requirement to wear a mask. and social distancing will no longer be necessary. professor adam finn is a specialist in children's health and a member of the uk's vaccination board. he explains his view
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on these new restrictions. i think a great deal of the suffering and damage that this pandemic has inflicted has been on children whose education and social development has been massively impacted from the very start and so we really do need to prioritise our children now and ensure that their lives can go back to normal and as a paediatrician i feel that's a much more important priority than giving freedoms to adults to do the things that they like to do. but schools will have to mass test before the start of the new year in autumn. here's a head teacher with the problems that brings. the problem for us is that to establish testing stations we need to develop significant area of of a school which impacts our teaching and learning for our school and it would be for sports hall once again
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and that impacts on activities retaining have been even further impacted throughout this time and the concerns about students not getting physical exercise that needs to be a priority for us when students return to school. we would also potentially struggle to recruit the same body of volunteers to be enjoyed from the local community because of course we now that many people have gone back to work and the work for community has increased against the people may not have the capacity to devote the time they so generously gave the last time when we had to attest that on our community. here is our education correspondent reporting from a school in the north of england. this reporting from a school in the north of encland. , , reporting from a school in the north of england-— of england. this is the high school in bolton. of england. this is the high school in bolton- an _ of england. this is the high school in bolton. an area _ of england. this is the high school in bolton. an area which - of england. this is the high school in bolton. an area which has - of england. this is the high school in bolton. an area which has had i in bolton. an area which has had some of the highest rates of covid—19 in the country. over the past few months, the school has been
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part of the clinical trial. instead of bubbles being sent to him to isolate, children are sent here for daily tasks will stop during the october at the christmas period to sent home masses of students, 76, seven times in isolation and we are keen to avoid that situation again selling the clinical trial came along to allow us to keep the student and school with the daily contact testing, we volunteered. 50. contact testing, we volunteered. so, with that we — contact testing, we volunteered. so, with that we have managed to keep it well over_ with that we have managed to keep it well over 500 students in the building — well over 500 students in the building that would have been sent home _ building that would have been sent home. ., ., home. today, the government announced _ home. today, the government announced many _ home. today, the government announced many restrictions l home. today, the government i announced many restrictions such as facemasks where they use social distancing and staggered starts will be listed. bubbles will also be scrapped. taste be listed. bubbles will also be scra ed. ~ , , be listed. bubbles will also be scraued.~ , , scrapped. we recognise this system of bubbles in _ scrapped. we recognise this system of bubbles in isolation _ scrapped. we recognise this system of bubbles in isolation is _ scrapped. we recognise this system of bubbles in isolation is causing i of bubbles in isolation is causing disruption to many children's education. that is why we would be ending bubbles and transferring contract —— contact tracing for the nhs test and trace system for earlier settings, schools, and
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colleges. there are also plans to move back to the exam system last year but these apples save the disruption caused has put them at a disadvantage. we have missed months of education and places very heavily populated uc we are sleeping more often so out we are missing out much my education. last often so out we are missing out much my education-— my education. last time in school had a major _ my education. last time in school had a major impact _ my education. last time in school had a major impact on _ my education. last time in school had a major impact on learning i my education. last time in school. had a major impact on learning and well—being. neighboursaid it had a major impact on learning and well—being. neighbour said it is that the bubble system is ending but said there is a risk that today's announcement of the tribe of infections in schools. at this primary school there are safety concerns for teachers, pupils and parents. t concerns for teachers, pupils and arents. ., �* , . concerns for teachers, pupils and arents. ~ �*, ., , parents. i think it's a complicated issue in terms _ parents. i think it's a complicated issue in terms of— parents. i think it's a complicated issue in terms of baselining i parents. i think it's a complicated issue in terms of baselining and l issue in terms of baselining and health, i thoroughly welcome it. the children will still be in school, but when it comes to the anxieties of parents and teachers, of potentially having a child in school at the vilest domains, and the impact on their health, that would be very challenging to manage.
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changes to the covid—19 willis are under review. with wheels due to announce their national plans shortly. in northern ireland secondary pupils will continue to be offered lateral flow tests. the government hopes in september, schools in england will return to normality as we learn to live with covid—19. but the dilemma of keeping schools safe while minimising disruption means there are no easy answers. now, let's take a look at how this compares internationally: in the netherlands. pupils don't need to socially distance from each other and whole classes can attend in person lessons at the same time. but pupils must stay 1.5 metres away from staff. in the us the cdc recommend social distancing, mask wearing and quarantining for close contacts of positive cases. except when double vaccinated in italy schools are now on their summer break, but when they return in september its expected the rules
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will include masks for all over 6, quarantine for classes with positive cases and staggered entrance and exit times. to india now — where an alarming number of doctors have found themselves the targets of attacks by family members of patients who say their loved ones haven t received sufficient medical care. the indian medical association is now calling for a new law to protect healthcare workers. divya arya has more from delhi, and a warning that her report contains disturbing scenes at the very start. they used whatever they could lay their hands on.
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a metal bedpan, a stick orjust theirfists. shocked by the death of their loved one from covid—19, these relatives took out their anger on doctors. on just his second day of work after graduating from medical school. one month later, the memory of the attack was still fresh. i was very scared and it felt like i would not survive the attack. they were hitting my head, my nose was constantly bleeding. i begged them to stop but they didn't. 36 people have now been charged. a shocking case but not by a long way india's first during the pandemic. in some cases, doctors have taken to the streets complaining about the ongoing attacks that have occured throughout the pandemic. they started throwing items.
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nobody was arrested over the attack which has left the doctor suffering flashbacks. and at the peak of the second wave of infection, angry relatives damaged property at the hospital. the most common factor is the lack of infrastructure in hospitals and the scarcity of doctors. because of these hospitals get overcrowded and as a result, thejunior doctors often become the target of violence by relatives. last month, doctors across india held demonstrations calling for legal protection for health care staff saying there has been a sharp increase in attacks during the pandemic. many indian states have laws against attacking health workers. the indian medical association said it's not always enforce or publicise.
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they believe only a new law passed by the central government can help stop the violence. india has very few doctors for its billion plus people and struggling to keep them safe. inafew in a few minutes he will turn back to football. as the last of the fans heading to the stadium, they better get a move on because it is kick off in 15 minutes.
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the white specks on the screen are a group of iraqi men illegally crossing from belarus into lithuania. in the past few weeks more and more have reached european union in this way. a near migrant roots that cut that tiny country completely by surprise. on average, lithuania welcomes around 70 migrants in a year. in the past month alone, they have received more than 1200 people. that government says it is not coincidence.— government says it is not coincidence. ., ., ., , coincidence. today, lithuania is exoeriencing — coincidence. today, lithuania is experiencing an _ coincidence. today, lithuania is experiencing an unprecedented | experiencing an unprecedented migrate every pressure. we witnessed how the regime of that it was as a tool of manipulation.— tool of manipulation. authorities believe that _ tool of manipulation. authorities believe that a _ tool of manipulation. authorities believe that a -- _ tool of manipulation. authorities
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believe that a -- belarus - tool of manipulation. authorities believe that a -- belarus airline | believe that a —— belarus airline ace flying migrants from baghdad and is then billeted the belarusian capital. from there, people can easily make their way to bed lithuania border. it easily make their way to bed lithuania border.— lithuania border. it is not difficult to _ lithuania border. it is not difficult to understand i lithuania border. it is not i difficult to understand certain links between the sanctions the eu has applied on belarus and the actions that lukashenko is taking across the border. the actions that lukashenko is taking across the border.— actions that lukashenko is taking across the border. the eu imposed sanctions on _ across the border. the eu imposed sanctions on that _ across the border. the eu imposed sanctions on that after— across the border. the eu imposed sanctions on that after ryan - across the border. the eu imposed sanctions on that after ryan air- sanctions on that after ryan air flight was forced to land that authorities could arrest that journalist. they long—time belarusian leader said his border guards would no longer stop migrants from crossing into the eu.
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this is outside source. our lead story comes from afghanistan. the taliban claimed that taking control of territories as nato withdrawal nearest completion. a draught legislation is about to be published in britain they should make it a criminal offence to enter the country without permission. the home secretary says she aims to repair a broken assignment 15 and campaigners are condemning the plans as pained —— shameful. until the pandemic struck last year, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk had doubled since 2010. if you look back over the last two decades, the number of applicants was still less than half what it was 20 years ago. and the figure, including dependents, is significantly lower than the numbers in germany, france, spain and greece. the pandemic also triggered a change in how people try to get to britain. the number crossing the channel in small boats rose sharply. it was 8,500 last year. it's heading for an even
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greater number this year. the home secretary, priti patel, says she wants to create a fair but firm system that will break the business model of the people—smuggling gangs. the nationality and borders bill will allow the uk government to return people to a safe country if they've passed through it on the way to britain. campaigners say this will result in thousands of valid claims being deemed inadmissible, and call it a shameful dereliction of duty. the bill will also allow asylum claims to be processed outside the uk, potentially paving the way for controversial offshore centres for processing applications. daniel sandford, bbc news. let's turn now to the euros. the first semi final will kick off in a few minutes. italy and spain will play each other for their place in the final. the spanish team can be seen here a little earlier getting on the bus on the way to the stadium. these are the fans arriving
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at wembley stadium in london. there will be 60.000 of them altogether. let's hear from some of them. so excited. i hope it's going to be a good match. we hope we are going to win, the italian team obviously, but we are here to enjoy the match. looking forward to it. hopefully it should _ looking forward to it. hopefully it should be — looking forward to it. hopefully it should be a massive game with two massive _ should be a massive game with two massive teams so i'm thinking we should _ massive teams so i'm thinking we should see — massive teams so i'm thinking we should see a really good performance but definitely wants spain to win. of course, — but definitely wants spain to win. of course, travel to the game is more complicated because of covid—19. i want to bring you these pictures of fans from rome who are getting ready. it looks like the weather is better there than it is in london at the moment. people are gathering and getting ready for take—off. tomorrow, there is another
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semifinal, it is england against denmark. here is the danish team training after they arrived in the uk a bit earlier. we will speak with holly foster live with us us from wembley. let us start with the one that is about to kick off. it is rare i don't think spain are the favourites but in this case would that be right?- the favourites but in this case would that be right? they have done it the hard way- _ would that be right? they have done it the hard way. extra _ would that be right? they have done it the hard way. extra time _ would that be right? they have done it the hard way. extra time against i it the hard way. extra time against croatia in the last 16 penalties against this lease and they made three changes to their line—up. morata has been dropped. the winning penalty has been pushed up into a more forward position. just one change for italy. they had a fantastic tournament so far. he is out and enjoyed it emerson who comes into the starting line—up. the last few stragglers walking up but you are expecting between 55 and 60,000.
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that government ups the capacity for these two semi finals and then the final of 60,000 again on sunday. talk to me about the italian manager. he has had quite an impact as he has taken over. that manager. he has had quite an impact as he has taken over.— as he has taken over. that michael dou~las as he has taken over. that michael douglas look-alike _ as he has taken over. that michael douglas look-alike with _ as he has taken over. that michael douglas look-alike with his - as he has taken over. that michael douglas look-alike with his chart i douglas look—alike with his chart pursuits, he has been unbeaten in three years after failing to get to the russian world cup. unbeaten in three years. the only team in austin the 29th that have won each of their games. a bit of a special history with wembley. in the last 16 may be austria here in front ofjust 40,000. it went the extra time but it's a very exciting italian team and they are toward something special and it has been a special run and just as the spanish team has got a fresh look as well i think
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what we are looking at is where the two next generations matchup and which are possibly going to be the next dominant force in world football. the first time these two teams have met at year—round knockout matches. i was at the finer mtf when spain absolutely tory it to be and we are talking about the tactics that he and played that night. they have been very successful for other managers as well down the years. those are the two themes with plenty of momentum going into their game. taste two themes with plenty of momentum going into their game.— going into their game. we have but to teams tomorrow _ going into their game. we have but to teams tomorrow with _ going into their game. we have but to teams tomorrow with plenty i going into their game. we have but to teams tomorrow with plenty of l to teams tomorrow with plenty of momentum as well. it’s to teams tomorrow with plenty of momentum as well.— to teams tomorrow with plenty of momentum as well. it's a slow start but then they _ momentum as well. it's a slow start but then they exploded _ momentum as well. it's a slow start but then they exploded in _ momentum as well. it's a slow start but then they exploded in the i momentum as well. it's a slow start but then they exploded in the last i but then they exploded in the last 15 minutes and the last 16 against germany. and they played with a bandanna in rome in the quarterfinal against ukraine. for unanswered
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goals yet to concede a goal. they games have such an emotionaljourney after their star player collapsed with cardiac arrest on the ph in the first game but as he recovers at home they have gone out and played every match for him. and it's an incredible fairy tale for denmark to get this far. they will be incredibly motivated but england are the favourites for these 20 minutes. is that just according the favourites for these 20 minutes. is thatjust according to british bookmakers are all bookmakers i wonder? a _ wonder? across the board. possibly lookin: at wonder? across the board. possibly looking at english _ wonder? across the board. possibly looking at english bookies - wonder? across the board. possibly looking at english bookies but i wonder? across the board. possibly looking at english bookies but they| looking at english bookies but they know they don't part with their money that easily. the way england are playing it's the clean sheets, notjust are playing it's the clean sheets, not just the attacking are playing it's the clean sheets, notjust the attacking talents and the fact that harry got into the goals and scored three and raheem sterling as well but it's a solid base that has served them so well. yet to concede the goal. it's
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unheard of and be our 45th as well. five games into the tournament going into the semifinal is unheard—of as well. d0 into the semifinal is unheard-of as well. , ., ~ , ., into the semifinal is unheard-of as well. ~ . ., . well. do you think there is a chance he miaht well. do you think there is a chance he might bring _ well. do you think there is a chance he might bring in _ well. do you think there is a chance he might bring in the _ well. do you think there is a chance he might bring in the playmaker? i well. do you think there is a chance l he might bring in the playmaker? he he might bring in the playmaker? the: has had one start so far but he has made more of an impact coming off the bench as he did against germany. really providing the spark. i think the ending theme is becoming settled. i was down in training this morning trying to work out how they will play. possibly playing through the back and looking to bomb on a game. he's provided three assists from left back. when you look at the forward line, sterry 19, from left back. when you look at the forward line, sterry19, they will start. it's one other piece next to them. we need to be coming back into them. we need to be coming back into the reckoning? you have got to 89 check release as well and marcus rush fred still trying to get a
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look. so many selection issues for garrett southgate. taste look. so many selection issues for garrett southgate.— look. so many selection issues for garrett southgate. we would have to wait until tomorrow. _ garrett southgate. we would have to wait until tomorrow. thank _ garrett southgate. we would have to wait until tomorrow. thank you. i'll. wait until tomorrow. thank you. i'll see you later. goodbye. well, i think the weather's going to be a little bit better tomorrow. certainly quite a few showers around today, and earlier on some really quite heavy rain with strong winds in southern areas of the uk. tomorrow, we'll see more blue sky. but at the moment, we're still in the wake of this low pressure which swept across the country earlier on. you can see a big dip in the jet stream here. and within this dip, we've got that showery weather that's in place over us right now. so through the course of this evening and overnight, still scattered showers across the country. you can see the low pressure centred just to the east of scotland there,
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so for a time, in some areas here, there will be more persistent rain. but plenty of clear spells in places, too. temperatures of around 14 in liverpool. we'll match that in cardiff as well, so it's not a cold night. and then tomorrow, the low pressure's actually quite slow moving. that means that it's not taking its weather with it. there is high pressure trying to build here from the south, but we're still really under the influence of that low. i know it's quite far away, it's closer to norway than it is to us, but it's still overall driving the weather pattern across the uk. so scattered showers, but blue sky in between too. the winds are going to be lighter. all of that combined means that the temperatures will be around 21 in london, 21 in glasgow. it is going to feel a little bit warmer. still a shower chance, though, i think, in wimbledon, and the same goes for the football. the following day might actually be a little bit drier. in fact, thursday right across the country is looking better. we're still expecting showers dotted around almost anywhere, but i think plenty of sunny spells as well. the winds will be relatively light, so temperatures again getting
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into the low 20s across many southern and central areas of the uk. now, through the weekend, friday into saturday, we'll see i think a little weather front moving across the south of the country, so that means we are expecting perhaps a few spits and spots of rain. but before that happens, you can see showers building across some parts of the uk on friday. but again, plenty of sunny spells in between, temperatures in the sunshine getting to around 20 or 23 celsius. so here's the outlook for the next few days. a little bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go — maybe only around 17 in aberdeen, but in the south, no higher than 22. bye— bye.
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hello, good evening. this is bbc news. our headlines... new guidance for people for double jabs from the 16th as they continue to relax restrictions in england. step—by—step we are replacing the temporary protection of what the long—term protection of the vaccine. yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now. _ yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now. fix— yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now, fix six pay and let's unlock— for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in— for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in a _ for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six _ unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six pay — unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six pay-— -- six pay. the end of term will mean the _ -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end _ -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end of— -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end of school- -- six pay. the end of term will| mean the end of school bubbles -- six pay. the end of term will. mean the end of school bubbles for england. you both only help isolate if they test positive. amanda spent guilty of murdering sisters who

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