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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at 5pm: new guidance for the double—jabbed from the 16th of august, as the government continues to relax covid restrictions in england. anyone who is a close contact of a positive case will no longer have to self—isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. he's releasing controls on transmission at a time when infections are rising and then hospitalisations will rise as well. the end of self—isolation for pupils who come into contact with positive cases in english schools. the education secretary also says the bubble system causes too much disruption and will go. that is why we'll be ending bubbles
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and transferring contact tracing to the nhs test and trace system for early years settings, schools and colleges. a man is found guilty of the murder of sisters nicole smallman and bibaa henry in a north london park injune last year. teenager danyal hussein repeatedly stabbed the sisters. police found a note in which he wrote about wanting to "sacrifice" women in exchange for winning the lottery. today, we remember our girls as the wonderful, strong women they were. and we hope that some good will come out of this horrible story. vauxhall announces a £100 million investment in electric vehicles, securing more than 1,000 jobs at ellesmere port. and emma raducanu thanks her supporters and says she is feeling much better after pulling out of wimbledon yesterday.
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this whole week has just been absolutely incredible. i've neverfelt support like it. i'm just so, so grateful for every single person who cheered me on during the matches and all of the messages that i received, you know, via social media. hello, a very good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. the health secretary, sajid javid, has announced that people who've had both doses of a covid vaccine in england will no longer have to self—isolate if they come into contact with a positive case of the virus. the change, which will come into force on the 16th of august, will also apply to people under
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the age of 18 — who are currently not eligible for vaccination. also this afternoon, the education secretary, gavin williamson, has announced an end to the bubble system in english schools. we'll have more on that. our first report this hour is from our health correspondent, jim reed. over 7 million people in england have had a call or notification like this, telling them to self—isolate after being in contact with someone who tests positive for covid. speaking in the house of commons, the health secretary said that is changing from the middle of next month. from the 16th of august, when even more people will have the protection of both doses and when modelling suggests the risk from the virus will be even lower, anyone who is a close contact of a positive case will no longer have to self—isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. it's just one of the major changes to life in england.
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in 13 days' time, social distancing rules will be scrapped, as will the guidance to work from home if possible. masks in shops like this will become voluntary. i don't like wearing masks. i like to see faces. half of the face is covered. not a way to live life, i'm afraid. let's give it a bit longer. yes, i'm bored with lockdown, but, hey, i'm still here. the decision to lift restrictions comes at a time when cases are rising sharply, driven by the faster spreading delta variant. the government says that could lead to as many as 100,000 infections a day this summer. the difference now, though, is that we have vaccines that work well. the latest weekly figures show those jabs driving excess deaths, here shown in red, back to the level we would expect in a normal year without covid. and the scientist whose advice led to the first lockdown expects the hospital admissions
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and deaths to stay far lower than in previous waves. it's a slight gamble, it's a slight experiment at the moment. i think it's justifiable and i'm reasonably optimistic, but policy will have to remain flexible. if we end up in something close to the worst case scenario, we and other groups are looking at, which i think is unlikely but cannot be ruled out, then, yes, there may need to be some sort of course correction later. others are worried legal restrictions are being lifted too quickly. labour is saying they want to open up the economy but some rules like mask wearing should continue in shops and on public transport. we want people to have their freedoms back, but we don't want a high—risk free—for—all. remember the context that we are in. infection rates, sadly, are rising again steeply. hospitalisations are rising again. more people will die, sadly. the government is expected to confirm the lifting of england's restrictions next week before going ahead onjuly 19. governments in wales, scotland and northern ireland are also due to review the rules later this month.
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jim reed, bbc news. as we say, the education secretary, gavin williamson, has set out plans to scrap bubbles in england's schools. children will only have to isolate if they test positive. let's hear some of what mr williamson had to say to mps earlier this afternoon. though keeping children in consistent groups was essential to control the spread of the virus when our population was less vaccinated, we recognise that the system of bubbles and isolation is causing disruption to many children's education. that is why we will be ending bubbles and transferring contact tracing to the nhs test and trace system for early years settings, schools and colleges. where there are outbreaks, schools and colleges may be contacted by nhs test and trace and they will also work with local health teams
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as they currently do now. we are also setting out new rules that mean that from the 16th of august, children will only need to isolate if they have tested positive for covid—19. i am also pleased to be able to say that there will be no restrictions on in—person teaching and learning in universities unless students are advised to isolate or are impacted by local outbreaks. gavin williamson there addressing the commons. we are going to be talking to a head teacher later this hour, seeing what he thinks of those changes. let's bring you the latest uk coronavirus data in the latest 2a hours. a total of 28,773 new cases of coronavirus were confirmed. and the deaths of 37 further
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people were reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test. vaccinations now. almost 45.5 million people have received their first dose of the vaccine, and over 33.8 million people are now fully vaccinated. that is adults. let's discuss all those various announcements today. i'm nowjoined by professor adam finn, who is the head of the academic unit of child health at bristol university — he also sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. good afternoon, professor. good afternoon. _ good afternoon, professor. good afternoon, jane. _ good afternoon, professor. good afternoon, jane. how— good afternoon, professor. good afternoon, jane. how are - good afternoon, professor. good afternoon, jane. how are you? . good afternoon, professor. good afternoon, jane. how are you? ll good afternoon, professor. good i afternoon, jane. how are you? i am very well. _ afternoon, jane. how are you? i am very well. and — afternoon, jane. how are you? i am very well, and i'm _ afternoon, jane. how are you? i am very well, and i'm interested to know what you think. let's start with education, the ending of bubbles as far as english was a concern. is that the right approach, do you feel?—
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do you feel? yes, i do. i think a ureat do you feel? yes, i do. i think a great deal _ do you feel? yes, i do. i think a great deal of — do you feel? yes, i do. i think a great deal of the _ do you feel? yes, i do. i think a great deal of the suffering - do you feel? yes, i do. i think a great deal of the suffering and i great deal of the suffering and damage that this pandemic has inflicted, excuse me, has been on children, whose education and social develop and has been massively impacted right from the very start, and so we really do need to prioritise our children now and to ensure that their lives can go back to normal. and as a paediatrician, of course i show that is much more important than giving freedoms to adults to do the things they like to do. , ., . , ., adults to do the things they like to do. , .,. adults to do the things they like to do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile, do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile. but _ do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile, but we _ do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile, but we have _ do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile, but we have had - do. yes, i notice you say that with a smile, but we have had figures i a smile, but we have had figures today that, enormous number of children who of this education because of this rule, so are you confident that that comes inappropriately and that the possibility is there, that if we were to see a spike or perhaps even just a spike in one particular part of the country, that route can be adjusted as we go?— adjusted as we go? yes, but to continue the _ adjusted as we go? yes, but to
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continue the event _ adjusted as we go? yes, but to continue the event of _ adjusted as we go? yes, but to continue the event of my - adjusted as we go? yes, but to continue the event of my first | continue the event of my first answer, i think those rules adjustments need to be applied to adults not children. although we have been very cautious throughout, because actually other respiratory viruses are efficiently transmitted by children, that turns out not to be the case with this particular virus. children of course can get the infection, they are generally not very ill with it and they can transmit it, but they are not nearly as infectious as adults, so if it does prove to be the case their outbreaks on the line, we need to take action to deal with it, but not by restricting education in children in my opinion. qm. by restricting education in children in my opinion-— by restricting education in children in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in terms as well _ in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in terms as well as _ in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in terms as well as what _ in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in terms as well as what the _ in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in terms as well as what the new - in my opinion. ok, i am with you. in | terms as well as what the new health secretary had to say, he is talking about people who have received both doses of a vaccine and that removing the need to self—isolate if you come into contact with someone who test positive. again, from your perspective, is that a sign of the
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success of the vaccination programme? is that the right way forward? it programme? is that the right way forward? . , ., . programme? is that the right way forward? . , ., forward? it reflects the fact that those people — forward? it reflects the fact that those people who _ forward? it reflects the fact that those people who are _ forward? it reflects the fact that those people who are fully - forward? it reflects the fact that - those people who are fully immunised are substantially lower risk of getting seriously ill themselves, and a really quite substantial risk of infecting other people —— substantially lower risk. you note the announcement has been postdated to mid august, and i think that is for good reason, because it is not really reasonable to alleviate pressure on people like this if they have not even been offered the opportunity to be vaccinated, and by mid august, the vast majority of people will have been able to be vaccinated with two doses, so i think that is a sensible postdate, and it does provide an incentive of sorts to people to get immunised as well, which may help things. fiend well, which may help things. and --eole well, which may help things. and people who _ well, which may help things. and people who perhaps have concerns
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about some of the easing of when they are at the same time hearing ministers talk about perhaps as much as 100,000 cases a day, and —— as summer progresses, —— as summer progresses, people looking at this and picking, i do not know if these things added up, i would be interested in your take on that. , , ., would be interested in your take on that. , _, ., ,, would be interested in your take on that. , ., that. this is a massive copulated risk, which _ that. this is a massive copulated risk, which is _ that. this is a massive copulated risk, which is a _ that. this is a massive copulated risk, which is a nice _ that. this is a massive copulated risk, which is a nice word - that. this is a massive copulated risk, which is a nice word for - risk, which is a nice word for gambling. i mean, we have heard neil ferguson and other mathematical modelers have made predictions as to what will happen, we have heard chris whitty, saying, if we have got to have a way, we have to have it sooner rather than later, but all of those things are predicated on high levels of uncertainty, and so things could go wrong, and i think everyone should realise that. it is not like the story is all over, we still going to have to things very carefully, and if things do not go as expected, we may find ourselves in trouble, because these numbers of
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cases in this doubling rate are very substantial, and i would advise people, particular order people, to be quite cautious about exposing himself to the virus in the shorter—term. himself to the virus in the shorter-term.— himself to the virus in the shorter-term. that's really interesting. _ shorter-term. that's really interesting. thank - shorter-term. that's really interesting. thank you - shorter-term. that's really interesting. thank you so l shorter-term. that's really - interesting. thank you so much for your thoughts. always good to talk to you. we will speak again, i'm quite sure. thanks for now. professor adam finn, thank you. and at 5.30pm, we'll be putting your questions to our health correspondent and a virologist on what the proposed changes in england might mean for you. any questions you have, perhaps you are a teacher, perhaps you're a parent, whatever questions you have, you can send them through. use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. and there is an e—mail address as
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well. coming up at 5:30pm. the day's other main news. a 19—year—old man has been found guilty of murdering two sisters in a park in north london last summer. danyal hussein repeatedly stabbed 46—year—old bibaa henry and 27—year—old nicole smallman, as they were out celebrating bibaa's birthday. hussein's victims were chosen at random as he roamed the park in the early hours of the morning on the 6th ofjune. the old bailey heard that hussein wanted to kill more women, in a deal he thought he'd done with a demon to win the lottery. he'll be sentenced in september, after psychiatric reports. june kelly has the background to the case. bibaa henry on the left and nicole smallman out together during the first lockdown. on a summer evening with friends, they were celebrating bibaa's birthday in the park. in the darkness, the sisters filmed themselves dancing with fairy lights.
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by now, all theirfriends had left. but as bibaa gave a sign of peace, there was a sinister presence close by. danyal hussein was lying in wait, watching them. he was armed with a knife because, in his words, his intention was to sacrifice women. he is believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to his sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. we were destroyed, really. as mum, i am as broken... i am broken beyond words. you're under arrest. after danyal hussein was arrested, police discovered a satanic plan in a note in his bedroom. it was a deal with a demon from hell.
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and it was signed in his own blood. he wrote that he was prepared to "perform a minimum of six sacrifices" every six months and "sacrifice only women." and he was clear what he wanted in return — a lottery win. under the heading, "for me," he wrote, "win the mega millions superjackpot." 2a hours after he killed the sisters, he began buying lottery tickets. danyal hussein is a very, very dangerous and evil person. i strongly believe that had he not cut his hand in such a bad way when he attacked nicole and bibaa, that he would have gone on to kill more women. so, he would have become a serial killer? essentially, yes. officers went to the site of the birthday picnic in north london after a call from the sisters' friends, who had reported them missing. frustrated by the initial police response, they began their own search.
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it was nicole's boyfriend who found the sisters' bodies intertwined in the undergrowth. danyal hussein was arrested after his dna was found on both bodies and his blood was discovered all over the murder scene. arrogant throughout, he denied any involvement. in life, bibaa henry and nicole smallman shared that special sister's bond. their family and all those who loved them are now forced to live their lives contemplating everything that has been lost. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. a little earlier, we heard statements outside the old bailey from nicola and bibaa's mother and from the detective who led the investigation. 0k, first and foremost, i want to pay tribute to the family of nicole and bibaa.
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they have all acted with the utmost dignity throughout this entire investigation and trial, and i hope personally, and my team do, that today's verdict gives them some sort ofjustice, to be able to move on with their lives. this investigation has touched all of us so deeply, and we are glad that the jury saw through danyal hussein's ridiculous denials of the overwhelming evidence in front of him. i've made no bones about my complaints with the met police office, but today i have to say i can only commend them. this team moved heaven and earth to ensure that we felt that we were being supported. this is the kind of police force that i believe in and we need to work towards, so that we have justice and families are treated with respect. can i thank all my family
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and all my church family for holding us all up in prayer? this is an unbelievable day for us, but it's the first, and there are two more battles to go. but today, we remember our girls as the wonderful, strong women they were. and we hope that some good will come out of this horrible story. thank you. mina smallman speaking outside the old bailey this afternoon. she lost two daughters after danyal
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hussein... he will be sentenced in september. it is coming up to 5:20 p:m.. draft legislation intended to tackle what ministers describe as a "broken asylum system" is being introduced to parliament. the home office says the bill will help prevent people who've passed through a safe country claiming asylum in the uk. refugee campaigners warn that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. let's find out more about the proposals. we can speak to our home editor, mark easton. explain more about what is on the table here, mark. this explain more about what is on the table here, mark.— table here, mark. this i think reall is table here, mark. this i think really is a _ table here, mark. this i think really is a response _ table here, mark. this i think really is a response to - table here, mark. this i think really is a response to some l table here, mark. this i think- really is a response to some deep political frustration in the really is a response to some deep politicalfrustration in the home office. priti patel of course has committed herself to taking back control of britain's borders after brexit, but almost daily, we are seeing those dinghies pulling up into talk haven in dover, and that each day, each migrant that walks up the ramp is in a sense a political
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humiliation for the home secretary and there is a real determination to do something to take on the people smugglers who are bringing over their desperate human cargo —— tug haven. and the nationality and borders bill really perhaps the most standup parts of it are designed to try and put those traffickers out of business. there is a plan to perhaps support more easily asylum—seekers who arrive here, particular if they have come in from an illegal route. they will be a new terminal offence of arriving in the uk without permission. there also —— they also want to try and send people back to a safe country. or perhaps deport them to another country if it is deemed that they do not have a right to come to the uk. and also, there
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are plans, with the migrant boats, to turn them around in foreign waters, or push them back into foreign waters, potentially into foreign waters, potentially into foreign ports. the problem with all of this, and it really has been the problem since the beginning of the year, is that you need an agreement from another country to make most of that happened, and at the moment, the home office has not got those agreements. there is lots of negotiation going on behind the scenes, there are lots of hopes we might be able to do some kind of deal, but when it comes to deporting asylum—seekers, when it comes to off shoring, as they called it, actually setting up asylum systems... we have been hearing source opening them on a central island and someone for some in the end, all those require cooperation, and it is perhaps the paradox of brexit in a way, that
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actually taking control of the borders is going to require greater international cooperation, not less. interesting. thank you very much for now, mark. mark easton, our home editor, there on the bill. it is 5:23pm. it is time, clearly, to get new glasses! we are going to talk more about education and covid. we have been reflecting on that announcement from gavin williamson, school bubbles are to be scrapped from the 19th ofjuly and that peoples would allegra have to isolate if they have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive. i promised we were going to talk to a head teacher, so let's. tom coen is the headteacher at stjohn payne catholic school in chelmsford in essex. hejoins me now. a very good afternoon. good afternoon- — a very good afternoon. good afternoon. what _ a very good afternoon. good afternoon. what do - a very good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you - a very good afternoon. good | afternoon. what do you make a very good afternoon. good - afternoon. what do you make of it? is it the right _
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afternoon. what do you make of it? is it the right announcement - afternoon. what do you make of it? is it the right announcement from i is it the right announcement from gavin williamson? i is it the right announcement from gavin williamson?— gavin williamson? i believe it is. we are really _ gavin williamson? i believe it is. we are really please. _ gavin williamson? i believe it is. we are really please. i _ gavin williamson? i believe it is. we are really please. i think- gavin williamson? i believe it is. we are really please. i think it i gavin williamson? i believe it is. i we are really please. i think it was before collects nationally that we are delighted at the prospect of no longer having to manage what has been to disruptive academic years —— i think i speakfor been to disruptive academic years —— i think i speak for collects nationally. with teachers being able to support students in the way to which we are custom, being able to move about the classroom, offer close personal individual support, advice and guidance, and in the case of cases of covid, to no longer have to place significant disruption on large numbers of students, having to self—isolate. i would say, yes, it is the right decision at this time and we look forward to be able to begin a new academic year without disruption, which is why if i'm able to say i'm slightly concerned about the proposals, following the secretary of state's and is meant,
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that schools will be required to mass test once again there who student body within three to five days upon return. the sizing of an implications for the start of the academic year, when the efforts of school leaders and staff need to be considered unwelcoming students back to school, particularly students whose education has been significantly disrupted. if we begin the testing is a understand we are allowed to do so earlier than the start of the school term, that has an implication of subjecting school leaders and staff to again a truncated school holiday period when their school holidays have been disrupted and interrupted. school leaders will be heavily immersed in what promises to be quite a convoluted process following the 4th of august, with the results of the gcse and a level exam results. while i'm delighted in the main look
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forward to return of greater neurology, i do have considerable concerns and reservations about that proposal. {lila concerns and reservations about that ro osal. ., concerns and reservations about that ro osal. . , concerns and reservations about that ro osal. ., , ., . proposal. 0k, and 'ust on that, ve , proposal. 0k, and 'ust on that, very. very h proposal. 0k, and 'ust on that, very. very quick_ proposal. 0k, and just on that, very, very quick thought, - proposal. 0k, and just on that, very, very quick thought, is - proposal. 0k, and just on that, l very, very quick thought, is your concern essentiallyjulis tickle —— essentially logistical? it is a big effort, is quite time—consuming? is that your point? and i am curious what you think your alternative would be? parents do it at home and you taken on trust they will not send a positive end if they have a positive test?— send a positive end if they have a positive test? yes, absolutely, and i'm glad- -- — positive test? yes, absolutely, and i'm glad--- the _ positive test? yes, absolutely, and i'm glad... the responsibility - positive test? yes, absolutely, and i'm glad... the responsibility of. i'm glad... the responsibility of the parents and carers and the student body. the most significant factor in us being able to remain operational the last 18 months has been the responsibility and maturity of our students, and i'm sure i speakfor school leaders of our students, and i'm sure i speak for school leaders nationally. young people have an absolute fantastic, their maturity, every measure, every step we had to make,
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they've are spotted with great maturity, so i am confident if we were to call upon families, they would responses to it would test at home, they would follow the guidance, they would hear to all the expectations —— adhere to. testing and reporting tests. the problem for us is that to establish the testing stations, we need to devote a significant every of our school, which impacts on teaching and learning for our school. i am sure there will be true of many for the impacts on pe activities, which i know have been even further impacted throughout this type, and the concerns around students not getting physical exercise. that needs to be a priority for us. we would also potentially struggle to recruit the same body of volunteers we enjoyed from the community because we know
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that, in the main, people have gone back to work. people may not have the capacity to devote the time that they so generously gave the last time in march we had to mass test. testing 1200 students twice within three to five days is a huge significant undertaking for any school immunity, and at the start of the new academic year, it diverts our attentions away from teaching and learning and the way we are bringing our committees back to school. ., ~' , ., , bringing our committees back to school. ., ,, , ., , . | bringing our committees back to school. ., ~ , ., , . iwould school. thank you very much. i would far rather see — school. thank you very much. i would far rather see testing _ school. thank you very much. i would far rather see testing allocated - school. thank you very much. i would far rather see testing allocated to - far rather see testing allocated to community testing centres, in large centres we know exist. we would like to see the government given the authority to organise that testing away from schools to allow us to concern on our core purpose, teaching and learning.- concern on our core purpose, teaching and learning. thank you very much _ teaching and learning. thank you very much indeed. _ teaching and learning. thank you very much indeed. we _ teaching and learning. thank you very much indeed. we must - teaching and learning. thank you | very much indeed. we must leave teaching and learning. thank you i very much indeed. we must leave it there for all the best. that is tom
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coen who is a head teacher in chelmsford and essex. let's have a look at the weather. here is tomasz schafernaker. well, it certainly feels like summer is on hold. further showers expected through the rest of today and into tomorrow and the reason for it is this low pressure, which swept across the country earlier on today. it brought some really quite heavy rain and some strong winds to southern areas. in the second half of the day, the more persistent rain is around eastern scotland and the north—east of england. elsewhere, it is a mixture of areas of cloud and the showers come and go as well. that will continue into the evening hours and overnight. it is not going to be a cold night, temperatures in the south around 13 or 1a degrees, not far off that in scotland as well. so, tomorrow, we will call it a day of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers could be heavy almost anywhere. there could be some cracks of thunder, but i think most of the time, most of the day,
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the weather should be dry. more sunshine tomorrow, so feeling a little bit warmer too. hello this is bbc news with jane hill. the headlines: there is new guidance for their vaccine from the 16th of august at the government continues to relax covid—19 restrictions in england. the end of self isolation for people who come into contact with positive cases in english schools. education secretary says the bible 15 causes too much disruption and will go. and that has been found guilty of the murder of sister is nicole small man and henry in a park in north london injune last year. teenager daniel hussein repeatedly stabbed the sisters. police laterfound hussein repeatedly stabbed the sisters. police later found a note in which he had written about wanting to sacrifice one in in exchange for winning the lottery.
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vauxhall announces a £100 million investment in electric vehicles securing more than a thousand jobs at the ports plants. we hope that your questions answered coming up shortly but right now it is time for the latest sports news. hello gabbing. how are you? very good thank you. emma raducanu says the whole experience caught up with her, after speaking today, following her mid—match retirement in the last 16. the british teenager was the surprise package this year, but missed out on the quarterfinals, which have taken place today. let's cross to live to wimbledon now and join chetan pathak, who is there for us. good to see you as always. after some attention this week it's good to see her. yes. i think lots of positives _ good to see her. yes. i think lots of positives for _ good to see her. yes. i think lots of positives for emma _ good to see her. yes. i think lots of positives for emma to - good to see her. yes. i think lots of positives for emma to take i good to see her. yes. i think lots| of positives for emma to take and it's good to see the setting and really optimistic about the future
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and in proud of what she actually that these championships because it's really upsetting last time for her and the british fans watching to see her go out having to walk off the pitch and walk off the court 3—0 down having lost the first set and and we know she had breathing difficulties and was advised by mentor experts not to continue and so unusual scenes played out on she had to retire in a few hours ago she was speaking to sue barker and here is what you have to say about what happened last time. i do is what you have to say about what happened last time.— happened last time. i do not know what caused _ happened last time. i do not know what caused it. _ happened last time. i do not know what caused it. i _ happened last time. i do not know what caused it. i think— happened last time. i do not know what caused it. i think it _ happened last time. i do not know what caused it. i think it was i happened last time. i do not know what caused it. i think it was a i what caused it. i think it was a combination that everything has gone on behind _ combination that everything has gone on behind the scenes in the last weekend — on behind the scenes in the last weekend and the accumulation of the excitement on the bus and i think it's a _ excitement on the bus and i think it's a great— excitement on the bus and i think it's a great learning experience for me going — it's a great learning experience for me going forward. and it's a great step forward and help you next time
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i'll be _ step forward and help you next time i'll be better prepared. she step forward and help you next time i'll be better prepared.— i'll be better prepared. she is callin: it i'll be better prepared. she is calling it the _ i'll be better prepared. she is calling it the biggest - i'll be better prepared. she is calling it the biggest week i i'll be better prepared. she is calling it the biggest week of| i'll be better prepared. she is i calling it the biggest week of her life. she has predicted that england will beat denmark tomorrow night if they are sending the report for her and having to retire to the australian who set up an all australian who set up an all australian quantified and on centre court against ash bar at the end we can change what is happening on the centre court in total control of this one. she won the first steps and in this is the best limo then she has seen from about bike with you who won the french open before and this is the furthest she's got at least championships and she is looking really good to reach the semi finals where she will face the 2018 champion angelique scarborough who has re—found herform. there was speculation earlier this year that she was thinking of retiring.
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angelique kerber has turned her career around. angelique kerber has turned her careeraround. going into angelique kerber has turned her career around. going into the semifinals. outstanding against carrying out. excitement two, 6—3. looking for replacing the semifinals. she is probably the favourite go on and when they championships. with a breakthrough moment at the grand slam the iconic shot, the drop shots, did not really work earlier today. winning that 16-4, 6-3. and will work earlier today. winning that 16—4, 6—3. and will play the czech republic all exciting mds winnings quarterfinals. thank you very much.
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the anticipation is building ahead of euro 2020 semi—finals — england in action tomorrow evening against denmark. and it all gets going later, when spain face italy — a match with so much history. let's speak tojohn watson now, who's at wembley for us, where both matches take place. it's a breathtaking turn around. it's a breathtaking turn around. it's astonishing when you think they did not qualify for the well cut backin did not qualify for the well cut back in 2018 for the first time in 60 years but at a maximum point to the group stage and they weren't given that wobble in the last against austria needing extra time but for a baby belgianjamming the gradient match last time out of the quarterfinals. the great gold to put them 2—0 up. of course if any doing what they need to do to get out of the nine. i think life out of the game and the closing stages. it's going to be set up beautifully
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tomorrow it's back to say is that it is tonight. after four hours mark cavendish has won again at the tour de france, taking stage ten in valence. afterfour hours riding his deceuninck quickstep, team—mates guided him perfectly to the finish. he's nowjust one stage win from equalling eddy merckx's record we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. next up, it's your questions answered. ona on a day with lots of announcements about coronavirus and restrictions that does get through your covid—19 questions. i would health correspondent is with me to go through your questions. and i'm alsojoined by dr sarah pitt, a virologist at the university of brighton. welcome to both of you. i will start in no particular order because questions of every shape and variety given what we have heard announced today. i will start with you. our
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opening question is from margaret who says i have a cottage holiday booked from a family of four households from the 16th ofjuly but of course that they too are all talking about and focused on his the 19th ofjuly, are we allowed to go? i think you are ready. 19th ofjuly, are we allowed to go? i think you are ready.— i think you are ready. things might chance a i think you are ready. things might change a bit _ i think you are ready. things might change a bit but _ i think you are ready. things might change a bit but as _ i think you are ready. things might change a bit but as far _ i think you are ready. things might change a bit but as far as - i think you are ready. things might change a bit but as far as this i i think you are ready. things might change a bit but as far as this is i change a bit but as far as this is concerned you currently are right cell on step three which is the current guidance that exists, domestic overnight stays are permitted provided no greater than six people or two households of any size. that will change on the 19th so you can have more than six people but as margaret is a family of four she should be ok anyway. there is one slight complicating factor which is she is in greater manchester and there have been extra restrictions in that area because of high cases of the delta variant and the current guidance is to minimise travel into and out of the affected areas. it does not mean you cannot leave the
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area of fire holiday. it'sjust guidance. if you go get extra tests at the moment and two extra tests a week it might be wise to take on extra pcr test for the family before you go. extra pcr test for the family before ou ro. ., ._ , extra pcr test for the family before ou ro. ., , , you go. from the way this is written it's not 100“i _ you go. from the way this is written it's not 100% clear _ you go. from the way this is written it's not 100% clear which _ you go. from the way this is written it's not 10096 clear which is - you go. from the way this is written it's not 10096 clear which is a - it's not 100% clear which is a household of four people or four households. if it is four households you are seeing to our allowed? that would depend _ you are seeing to our allowed? that would depend on _ you are seeing to our allowed? trisgii would depend on how big your households are. it could be six people. if it's more than six people and it's people. if it's more than six people and its four households, then currently you are not allowed to do that. untilthe currently you are not allowed to do that. until the 19th. that would change. thank you very much. shy, change. thank you very much. a question from jeff who says my wife a 78 and classed as critically vulnerable. the relaxing of rules makes me think we need to go back to shielding. what advice is there for the thousands of people in this
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situation? if the thousands of people in this situation? , ., ., , ., , ., situation? if you have been able to have the vaccine _ situation? if you have been able to have the vaccine and _ situation? if you have been able to have the vaccine and the _ situation? if you have been able to have the vaccine and the people i have the vaccine and the people around you with had the vaccine and should have had two doses that will give you a good protection against serious illness yourself and so i would advise people to plan and to go out what plan your outing very carefully and try to go into an environment where you can keep social distancing so if you are going to meet —— meet up with other people try and do that outdoors. i know the weather is not marvellous and we are at the time of year when it should be possible to meet out twice. and if you are having people come to visit you just ask them to be careful and make sure you have got the ventilation in your house while they are visiting and, for example, if i can go visit my mother who is over 80 and also clinically vulnerable and she had doses of the
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vaccine, what i would try to do is make sure i fear my cards with petrol of the day before i go to visit her and if i'm getting shopping i do that before i go so that i get out of my house in clean clothes and then drive to her house so i have not been in contact with anyone else or potentially any viruses on the way to the house. so it would be a question of being careful in remembering the virus is still out there and asking people around you to have some consideration for you but i would not necessarily say that you have to go back to shielding per se because it should be possible. the other thing is when people are asked to shield in march of 2020, narrow caf s, no shops, no environments were set up to be covid—19 secure. people were not prepared for this kind of measures we have in place to stop the spread of the virus which
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they are in places he would go to now so it would be proceed with caution. , , ., caution. yes, proceed with caution. thank ou caution. yes, proceed with caution. thank you and _ caution. yes, proceed with caution. thank you and good _ caution. yes, proceed with caution. thank you and good advice. - caution. yes, proceed with caution. thank you and good advice. there l caution. yes, proceed with caution. | thank you and good advice. there is a question from steven. ifeel we are trying to turn you into a travel correspondent but this is the question that people have been sending in. will restrictions be listed on the traffic light system for travel for anyone that has been fully vaccinated? i for travel for anyone that has been fully vaccinated?— fully vaccinated? i suspect he will have a lot of _ fully vaccinated? i suspect he will have a lot of questions _ fully vaccinated? i suspect he will have a lot of questions on - fully vaccinated? i suspect he will have a lot of questions on travel. | have a lot of questions on travel. we don't know the answer for this yet because the government said later on this week they will update about how those rules are changing. so a quick reminder at the moment for england you have got red, green, embrace countries. it is the amber list which is of particular interest at the moment. it includes big holiday destinations. france, if any, spain, greece, at the moment you still have to quarantine for ten days when you get back home to the uk and have three different tests for each member of the family which
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can obviously be incredibly pricey. the government is currently advising not to travel on holiday to those destinations but it's not against the law. the transport minister has said that intention is to scrap the rules for amber list countries by the summer holidays for double vaccinated people and children but they have not confirmed yet and they're expecting and announcements may be on thursday this week to clear that one up.— may be on thursday this week to clear that one up. there is more to come as you _ clear that one up. there is more to come as you suggest. _ clear that one up. there is more to come as you suggest. a _ clear that one up. there is more to come as you suggest. a question l clear that one up. there is more to come as you suggest. a question if the coronavirus that there are rates continues to rise, will there be another lockdown? that's an interesting thought, what is your take on that?— interesting thought, what is your take on that? , , , ., take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of — take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of how— take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of how well— take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of how well the _ take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of how well the virus - take on that? yes. the r number is a measure of how well the virus is i measure of how well the virus is under control and what we really should be aiming for with the vaccination programme and all the other measures is to bring that number well below one and once we
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see that it is .5, .6, then we now that the transmission of the virus is under control because the r number is a measure of the average number is a measure of the average number of people that someone with covid—19 can in fact so we needed to be less than one. we know that if anything else. at the moment across the uk it is well above one in all areas of the uk and in some places it's up to 1.6. but in other places it's up to 1.6. but in other places it's more closer to the number one so what we need to do is keep an eye on that. if it keeps going up and up, that will be a sign that the measures that we are taking are not working which means the spread of the virus is not under control and therefore there is a possibility that he would be segmenting a number
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of new cases is getting higher and higher and it would be time to go into another lockdown and self a question and being r number should start to come down over the summer. that is what i should be looking out for but if it does not keep going down and if it starts going up again then he may well be moving into another lockdown.— then he may well be moving into another lockdown. time will tell and that is decision _ another lockdown. time will tell and that is decision for _ another lockdown. time will tell and that is decision for the _ another lockdown. time will tell and that is decision for the government. | that is decision for the government. i am going to put your question about masks because we have had a lengthy question from linda about masks. i will paraphrase it but she is essentially making the point that at the moment you have to wear a mask or if you are in a shop. she said why is all of that being taken away and there is no risk to the user and it offers some protection. why is that being changed? that is
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currently being changed and that is the plan in england. in currently being changed and that is the plan in england.— the plan in england. in wales and northern ireland _ the plan in england. in wales and northern ireland we _ the plan in england. in wales and northern ireland we have - the plan in england. in wales and northern ireland we have not i the plan in england. in wales and l northern ireland we have not heard the plans and in scotland it's very likely nicola sturgeon and the looming into august and perhaps on —— longer. what borisjohnson said yesterday is that there is a switch for it is a switch for this law that says you have to wear masks in places like shops and making that voluntary rather than mandatory as to what difference that will make thatis to what difference that will make that is really hard to answer because from the beginning of that pandemic the data on mask wearing has been really hard to pin down and normally when you do a scientific trial on something you give people an appeal or in this case you get them to wear a mask or you get at different group though mask to wear and you get the differences. in a pandemic that is very difficult to deal because you cannot tell a group of people to put themselves in
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danger. there has not been this body of evidence about masks. the best i can tell you is that the world health organization in december said there is only limited and inconsistent scientific evidence to support mask use and reducing infection but they still recommend people delete. it's really interesting research from imperial couege interesting research from imperial college and oxford university recently that put the marginal gains but the reduction that sarah was talking about about 12% of wearing a mask. the same as closing restaurants and schools is fairly significant but not the only thing. some critics are going to say there is no downside in wearing masks in the same way they raise in closing the same way they raise in closing the restaurant which will hurt someone's business so why not continue. the government had said they made his decision to make it a personal choice because there is this move back towards nomadic in this move back towards nomadic in this country and to be honest with you there is no right answer to that question. but, people are going to have different views on what is
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acceptable and what is not. it’s have different views on what is acceptable and what is not. it's an interesting — acceptable and what is not. it's an interesting topic _ acceptable and what is not. it's an interesting topic of _ acceptable and what is not. it's an interesting topic of debate - acceptable and what is not. it's an | interesting topic of debate because he mentioned that number ten briefing and you saw chris and patrick standing next to the prime minister. very specifically saying, if they were in an enclosed indoor space they would still wear a mask. sell, that is quite interesting and thatis sell, that is quite interesting and that is for people to take a leap from what they will. but that is their opinion. it was interesting to hear that. their opinion. it was interesting to hearthat. doctor sarah, their opinion. it was interesting to hear that. doctor sarah, a question about vaccines for children. tyra wants to know when you get a vaccine brought out starts the children of high school age? we brought out starts the children of high school age?— high school age? we are still waitin: high school age? we are still waiting on — high school age? we are still waiting on the _ high school age? we are still waiting on the guidance i high school age? we are still waiting on the guidance from high school age? we are still- waiting on the guidance from the joint committee vaccination about this. there are vaccines that have been approved for use in 12 to 15—year—olds and in other european countries and the usa they cited
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vaccinating children in the area still waiting to be for the final decision on that one. so they raise the risk from one of the main reasons why we would be vaccinating children is to help with the stuff of the spread of the virus between children and then therefore the belts in the school and the adults they come in contact with outside of school rather than necessarily to protect the children themselves but we know that children can get fit and they can get area and there is the risk of lung covid—19 which would be the reason why you would vaccinate the children if the virus is under control in this country by
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then, then it might be too late for a little while longer and one of the reasons for doing that would be because there is a shortage of this vaccine supply in the morning. and there are health care workers in some countries that have not had one dose. the uk government has committed to give some doses of the vaccine and the actual vaccination programme. so, it may be that we would decide to contribute to the world vaccination programme before vaccinating children and their are good reasons to vaccinate children for their own health and safety and trying to control the pandemic in this country but there are also good arguments to say if there is a shortage of vaccines health care
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workers and vulnerable adults in other countries should get it because it's a global effort to bring their pandemic under control. i am sorry to cut you off. thank you very much. we have so many questions and we cannot get through them all. the owner of vauxhall has announced plans saving more than a thousand jobs. the plant in cheshire will make a new fleet of electric cars and vans, as our business correspondent theo leggett reports. for years, dark clouds have been hanging over the vauxhall plant at ellesmere port. but now, alas, the workforce has a reason be cheerful. parent company says it plans to invest £100 million preparing the factory to build a new range of electric vans as well
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as passenger versions of the same models. we are offering at ellesmere port plant vauxhall and the british automotive industry a new era of all electric vehicle manufacturing and a sustainable future. the new investment is badly needed, the factory currently makes an old version of the vauxhall astra but it is outdated and because of the government �*s plan to outlaw the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, its replacement will be built elsewhere. so why vans? the increase in home deliveries which has only grown during the pandemic, means things like this are selling very well at the moment but on top of that, increasing emissions regulations in towns and cities across europe means demand for this kind of vehicle is only going to grow
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and still in disbelief that is good business. but this investment comes at a price. bosses made it clear uk production would need support from the uk government. that support is thought to be worth tens of millions of pounds. every country in the world that has advanced manufacturing, all their governments are having the kinds of conversations we are having, it is a competitive situation and we are absolutely prepared to help investment in the uk or britishjobs and for our economy. the news today follows last week �*s announcement by nissan of a much larger investment in electric car production at its plant in sunderland. but experts say much more is needed if the uk industry is to remain competitive. the hard fact is whilst this is a really great start, we need much more investment like this in the uk car
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industry, if it to survive. and batteries and gig factories or what it is all about, the car industry will ultimately move to where the batteries are made. nevertheless, with uncertainty over trading conditions after brexit now out of the way, automotive manufacturers are clearly happier to invest in the uk. and the outlook for the industry here it seems brighter than it has for several years. theo leggett, bbc news. the artist damien hirst, famous for his bisected cow, shark in formaldehyde and diamond studded skull, has changed tack. his new exhibition is of oil paintings of cherry blossom. the show, in paris has been delayed twice because of covid, but has finally opened today, showcasing canvases painted during long periods working alone during lockdown. our paris correspondent lucy williamson was given a preview. as shocking as a dead animal or a diamond studded skull in the eyes of the artist. as much about life and death.
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damien hirst has been painting cherry trees, dozens upon dozens of them, all the way through the pandemic. much of it alone, without his team of assistants, thanks to covid restrictions. itjust became a really solitary thing, making art, which i've never really got it to that point except when i was very young. so it was quite nice to do that, and then trying to find some positivity in all the negativity and all the anxiety that everybody is feeling. in the beginning i was really anxious, but it's funny that in that anxiety, i made these paintings that are really positive. the canvases got larger in lockdown, he says. leaves appeared and shifts in perspective gave more gravity to the trees. i rememberjohn lennon once said, somebody said to him, why did he cut his hair in the 70s? and he said, "well, what else would you do after you have grown it?" it kind of feels something
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like that, i always just try to keep reinventing myself. yeah. my mum used to say to me, "there's enough horror in the world, can't you just paint flowers?" maybe she got to me eventually. flowers that are in his words garish, messy, almost tacky. "someone who saw them the other day asked me if i was in love," hirst told me, "but i hope they're more psychotic than that". lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. that is it from me for today. we will be back with the bbc news at six. here is the weather. it would be a little bit better tomorrow. early on they will be heavy rain with strong wind ines and southern areas of the uk. tomorrow we will see more blue skies. at the moment we are still in the wake of this low pressure which seeps across the country earlier on. you can see a dip in thejet stream and reading this that we have copy whether in place over us right now. so, through the course of this evening or
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overnight still scattered showers across the country. we will see the low pressure just to the east of scotland. fora low pressure just to the east of scotland. for a time, low pressure just to the east of scotland. fora time, in low pressure just to the east of scotland. for a time, in some areas they will be more persistent rain. plenty of clear spells in places as well. temperature is around 16 and it will match so it's not a cold night. tomorrow the low pressure is slow—moving and it is not taking the weather with apes. there is high pressure is build from the south. we are still really under the influence of the know it's far away. it's the overall driving the weather pattern across the uk. scattered showers and blue skies in between i'm doing will be lighter and of that means i read that temperatures will be around 21 in london. a bit warmer still a shallow chance and in limbo then and the same goes for following day will be dry. and if he is looking better.
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he asked expecting showers around almost anywhere but i think plenty of sunshine as well and the wind will be like so temperature is getting into the low 20s across southern and central areas of the uk. into the weekend, friday and saturday we will see a weather fronts moving across the south of the country so that means you are expecting a few spots of rain but before that happens you can see the show is building across some parts of the uk on friday but plenty of sunshine in between and temperatures 20, or23 sunshine in between and temperatures 20, or 23 celsius. a bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go. only around 7pm in aberdeen. in the south no higher than 22. goodbye.
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people in england who've been fully vaccinated won't have to self—isolate after a close covid contact from august 16th. daily cases could rise to 100 thousand this summer, but ministers say the jab is weakening the link between the virus and serious illness. step—by—step, jab byjab, we are replacing the temporary protection of the restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine. he is releasing controls on transmission at the time yes, let's have freedom, but not a hi-h yes, let's have freedom, but not a high risk_ yes, let's have freedom, but not a high risk free for all. fixed sick pay and — high risk free for all. fixed sick pay and let's unlock in a safe and sustainable way. we'll be looking at the risks involved in opening up in england,

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