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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 6, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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an end to self isolation for anyone in england who's had both doses of a covid vaccine, starting in mid august. the health secretary announces a new approach to dealing with anyone who comes into contact with a positive coronavirus case. step—by—step, jab byjab, we're replacing the temporary protection of the restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine. we wa nt we want people to have their freedoms back, but we want don't want to have a high risk free for all. . ., ., , ., want to have a high risk free for all. . ., . n, , all. infection rates are sadly risin: all. infection rates are sadly rising again _ all. infection rates are sadly rising again steeply, - rising again steeply, hospitalisations are rising again, more _ hospitalisations are rising again, more people will die.
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the health secretary also announced unvaccinated under 185 who come into contact with a positive case will no longer have to self—isolate. also this lunchtime... covid—related absence among school pupils in england is the highest since students returned in march. the government is preparing to announce how to relax the rules. vauxhall announces a £100 million investment in electric vehicles — securing more than 1,000 jobs at ellesmere port. challenging the abortion laws — a woman with down�*s syndrome goes to the high court, saying the rules discriminate against people like her and her husband. the artist damien hirst tells us he's dealt with lockdown anxiety by changing tack — no more studded skulls, instead he's been painting cherry blossom. i always just try to keep reinventing myself. yeah. my mum used to say to me,
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there's enough horror in the world, can't you just paint flowers? so maybe she got to me, eventually. and here at st george's park, england's players for their final training session. and coming up on the bbc news channel, it is women's quarterfinal. it is women's quarter final day at wimbledon, with world number one ashleigh barty in action. can she get the better of ajla tomljanovic later this afternoon? good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. in the last half an hour, the health secretary sajid javid has said that people who've had both doses of a covid vaccine in england will no
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longer have to self—isolate if they come into contact with a positive case of the virus. the change will come into force on 16th august, it will also apply to people under the age of 18, who are currently not eligible for vaccination. it comes despite the health secretary saying that daily cases "could go as high as 100,000" as restrictions ease. 0ur health correspondent jim reed reports. 0ver jim reed reports. 7 million people in england have over 7 million people in england have had a call or a notification like this telling them to self—isolate after being in contact with someone who tests positive for covid. speaking in the commons, the health secretary said that is changing from the middle of next month. ., ' ~ ., ~ , month. from the 16th of august, when even more peeple _ month. from the 16th of august, when even more people will— month. from the 16th of august, when even more people will have _ month. from the 16th of august, when even more people will have the - even more people will have the protection of both doses and when modelling suggests the risks from the virus will be even lower, anyone who is a close contact of a positive case will no longer have to
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self—isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. it’s self-isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. �* , , ., self-isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. �*, , ., ., self-isolate if they have been fully vaccinated-— vaccinated. it's 'ust one of the ma'or vaccinated. it's 'ust one of the major changes _ vaccinated. it'sjust one of the major changes to _ vaccinated. it'sjust one of the major changes to life - vaccinated. it'sjust one of the major changes to life in - vaccinated. it'sjust one of the i major changes to life in england coming in 13 days' time. social distancing rules will be scrapped as well as at the guidance to work from home if possible. masks in shops like this one will become voluntary. i like to see faces. have of it is covered~ — i like to see faces. have of it is covered. not a way to live life. let's _ covered. not a way to live life. let's give _ covered. not a way to live life. let's give it— covered. not a way to live life. let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm bored _ let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm bored with— let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm bored with the _ let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm bored with the lockdown - let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm bored with the lockdown but - let's give it a bit longer. yes i'mi bored with the lockdown but hey, let's give it a bit longer. yes i'm - bored with the lockdown but hey, i'm still here _ bored with the lockdown but hey, i'm still here. the — bored with the lockdown but hey, i'm still here. . , ., ., still here. the decision to lift restrictions _ still here. the decision to lift restrictions comes _ still here. the decision to lift restrictions comes at - still here. the decision to lift restrictions comes at a - still here. the decision to lift restrictions comes at a time | still here. the decision to lift - restrictions comes at a time when cases are rising sharply, driven by the faster spreading are delta variant. the government says that could lead to as many as 100,000 infections a day this summer. the difference now is that we have vaccines that work well. the latest weekly figures show there is jabs driving excess deaths, here shown in red, back to the level we would
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expect in a normal year without covid. and the scientist whose advice led to the first lockdown expects hospitalisations and deaths of two state lower than in previous waves. , , . , , waves. this is a slight experiment at the moment. _ waves. this is a slight experiment at the moment. i'm _ waves. this is a slight experiment at the moment. i'm reasonably. at the moment. i'm reasonably optimistic. the policy will have to remain flexible. if we end up somewhere close to a worst case scenario, which i think is unlikely but can't be ruled out, there may need to be some course correction later. , ., ., ., later. others are worried the legal restrictions _ later. others are worried the legal restrictions are _ later. others are worried the legal restrictions are being _ later. others are worried the legal restrictions are being lifted - later. others are worried the legal restrictions are being lifted too - restrictions are being lifted too quickly. laboursay restrictions are being lifted too quickly. labour say they want to open up the economy but some measures like mask wearing should continue in shops and on public transport. irate continue in shops and on public transport-— continue in shops and on public transort, . ., , ., , ., ., transport. we want people to have their freedoms _ transport. we want people to have their freedoms back _ transport. we want people to have their freedoms back but _ transport. we want people to have their freedoms back but we - transport. we want people to have their freedoms back but we don't l their freedoms back but we don't want _ their freedoms back but we don't want a _ their freedoms back but we don't want a high risk free for all. remember the context we are in. infection — remember the context we are in. infection rates sadly are rising steeply— infection rates sadly are rising steeply again, hospitalisations are
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rising _ steeply again, hospitalisations are rising again, more people will die, sadix _ rising again, more people will die, sadl . , , . ., sadly. the government is expected to confirm the lifting _ sadly. the government is expected to confirm the lifting of— sadly. the government is expected to confirm the lifting of england's - confirm the lifting of england's restrictions next week before going ahead on july restrictions next week before going ahead onjuly 19. restrictions next week before going ahead onjuly19. governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland are also due to review their guidance later this month. jim reed, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent is here. a relatively new health secretary. indeed, a new approach. effectively, he is embarking on a process which gives people who have had two vaccinations greater freedom than ever before stop health isolation, he mentioned, he is also talking about a travel announcement later this week. getting back in from amber countries if you have been double vaccinated without having to self—isolate. but the policy isn't
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without consequences. there is perhaps one good reason why people who are in contact with people who have had covid will be no longer be expected from mid august to self—isolate. that is the sheer number of cases. this hundred thousand figures which sajid javid has been mentioning. that could be nearly three quarters of a million people self isolating in a week because they are ill. if all their contacts had to self—isolate as well, that has a huge effect on everyday life. this is it spelt out in this government document, perhaps not widely read, but let me read out the key section. it says there will be high levels of infection and therefore disruption to lives, the economy and delivery of public services. in other words, some of these bars and restaurants reopening may not have people to staff them, no one to collect your beans. labour is calling it reckless. they want to
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make this politically risky. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here. what is the significance of what sajid javid has been saying? just buildin: sajid javid has been saying? just building on _ sajid javid has been saying? just building on what we've heard from ian. hugely significant for anybody who has_ ian. hugely significant for anybody who has been pinged by the app or contacted — who has been pinged by the app or contacted by contact racers that they will— contacted by contact racers that they will not run august the 16th, if they've — they will not run august the 16th, if they've had two jobs, have to self—isolate for ten days. it has cost _ self—isolate for ten days. it has cost a — self—isolate for ten days. it has cost a lot — self—isolate for ten days. it has cost a lot of inconvenience for people. — cost a lot of inconvenience for people, loss of earnings, there's been _ people, loss of earnings, there's been a _ people, loss of earnings, there's been a lot— people, loss of earnings, there's been a lot of complaint about lack of financial — been a lot of complaint about lack of financial support from people having _ of financial support from people having to — of financial support from people having to self—isolate for ten days. so there's — having to self—isolate for ten days. so there's been an argument that that deters some from actually going ahead _ that deters some from actually going ahead and _ that deters some from actually going ahead and doing it. that will not happen— ahead and doing it. that will not happen in— ahead and doing it. that will not happen in england if you are double vaccinated. — happen in england if you are double vaccinated, and crucially it won't happen — vaccinated, and crucially it won't happen for— vaccinated, and crucially it won't happen for the under 18 is either. from _ happen for the under 18 is either. from august to 16th onwards, it will be the _ from august to 16th onwards, it will be the case — from august to 16th onwards, it will be the case that under 18 is, if they— be the case that under 18 is, if they have _ be the case that under 18 is, if they have been in contact with someone _ they have been in contact with someone who has tested positive, will not _ someone who has tested positive, will not have to self—isolate, which paves _ will not have to self—isolate, which paves the — will not have to self—isolate, which paves the way for the schools and answered — paves the way for the schools and
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answered in england which is due very shortly. but as we've been hearing. — very shortly. but as we've been hearing, the 100,000 cases per day which _ hearing, the 100,000 cases per day which has _ hearing, the 100,000 cases per day which has now been predicted by the health _ which has now been predicted by the health secretary, up from 27,000 now, _ health secretary, up from 27,000 how. we _ health secretary, up from 27,000 now, we got no more detail of what that modelling suggests for hospital admissions. so that is more information that will be required. in information that will be required. in terms— information that will be required. in terms of— information that will be required. in terms of the numbers who may benefit _ in terms of the numbers who may benefit from this new move on itself isolation _ benefit from this new move on itself isolation and not needing to do that with double jabs, numbers painted by the nhs _ with double jabs, numbers painted by the nhs app in early may, it was the end of— the nhs app in early may, it was the end ofjune — the nhs app in early may, it was the end ofjune it was more than 250,000 in a single _ end ofjune it was more than 250,000 in a single week, to say that they need _ in a single week, to say that they need to— in a single week, to say that they need to self—isolate. it will be considerably more people who would have to _ considerably more people who would have to self—isolate as cases rise up have to self—isolate as cases rise up from — have to self—isolate as cases rise up from here. hugh, thank you. we will continue with that. under 18
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is from mid august will not have to self—isolate if they come into contact with a positive case. and let's pick up on any story about england's schools. we expect to hear a little later how the government will deal with that stop 640,000 schoolchildren missing school because of reasons related to covid, that was the figure that was announced just in the last couple of hours. 0ur education correspondent sean dilley reports. by by the number of confirmed cases is unlikely to rise, classrooms like this one are expected to fill up after the summer holidays. the education after the summer holidays. tue: education secretary after the summer holidays. tte: education secretary is after the summer holidays. the: education secretary is expected after the summer holidays. t�*te: education secretary is expected to tell mps this lunchtime that daily testing for english school students will replace the current stock isolation rules that mean groups of
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children who are considered to have beenin children who are considered to have been in close contact with a confirmed case in school are sent home. ~ ., ., , ._ home. we need to find a better way forward, home. we need to find a better way forward. and _ home. we need to find a better way forward, and there _ home. we need to find a better way forward, and there is _ home. we need to find a better way forward, and there is a _ home. we need to find a better way forward, and there is a much - home. we need to find a better way forward, and there is a much better| forward, and there is a much better way forward — forward, and there is a much better way forward. i'm not going to tell you what— way forward. i'm not going to tell you what that is right now, you are going _ you what that is right now, you are going to _ you what that is right now, you are going to have to wait for the education secretary. but the reason we can— education secretary. but the reason we can move forward in a more positive — we can move forward in a more positive way is because of the vaccine — positive way is because of the vaccine. . positive way is because of the vaccine. , ., ., positive way is because of the vaccine. , ., vaccine. this high school in bolton is one of 200 _ vaccine. this high school in bolton is one of 200 across _ vaccine. this high school in bolton is one of 200 across england - vaccine. this high school in bolton is one of 200 across england that| is one of 200 across england that took part in a pilot to replace itself isolation with daily testing. the trail ran from march tojune. tit the trail ran from march tojune. in total, it was something like 17,500 hours _ total, it was something like 17,500 hours of— total, it was something like 17,500 hours of face—to—face teaching that was regained. as a teacher, there are huge — was regained. as a teacher, there are huge benefits there of having the students there with you. this earten the students there with you. this year ten student _ the students there with you. tt 3 year ten student believes her education benefited from the pilot. the teacher can read your facial e>
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on your— you're at home, you are struggling on your own — you're at home, you are struggling on your own it— you're at home, you are struggling on your own-— you're at home, you are struggling on your own. it has won the support of arents on your own. it has won the support of parents like _ on your own. it has won the support of parents like this _ on your own. it has won the support of parents like this one. _ on your own. it has won the support of parents like this one. it's - of parents like this one. it's brilliant- — of parents like this one. it's brilliant. u— of parents like this one. it's brilliant. it saved _ of parents like this one. tt�*s brilliant. it saved a lot of isolation time for my two children, it means they can continue their schooling, stay in school, stay with their friends, schooling, stay in school, stay with theirfriends, orat schooling, stay in school, stay with their friends, or at least they keep some sort of social interaction and education rather than being kept at home because of bubbles.- education rather than being kept at home because of bubbles. across the count , home because of bubbles. across the country, teachers _ home because of bubbles. across the country, teachers are _ home because of bubbles. across the country, teachers are welcoming - home because of bubbles. across the country, teachers are welcoming any| country, teachers are welcoming any measures to help children catch up on lost learning. there is in england are urging ministers to give schools as much notice as possible so they have time to prepare. labour say they are concerned about the pace at which government are lifting restrictions. . . pace at which government are lifting restrictions. ., , ., pace at which government are lifting restrictions. . , ., , , , restrictions. parents and pupils will be relieved _ restrictions. parents and pupils will be relieved that _ restrictions. parents and pupils will be relieved that bubbles i restrictions. parents and pupils| will be relieved that bubbles are coming to an end, but my primary concern is that schools should be supported to put in the necessary mitigation. we need to know if school testing is going to happen, we need to know how the last few days of school are to be managed. the governments of scotland and wales are currently reviewing how and when they may ease covert rules
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in schools, meanwhile ministers in westminster say they are fully aware that infections are likely to rise. they say that it is a part learns to live with the virus and that schooling returns to normal as quickly as possible. a second man has been charged after england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, was accosted last month in a park in london. jonathan chew faces a charge of assault. the owner of vauxhall has announced plans to invest £100 million in its factory in ellesmere port, saving more than 1,000 jobs. the plant will make a new fleet of electric cars and vans, as our business correspondent theo leggett reports.
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for years, dark clouds have been hanging over vauxhall�*s plant at elsmere court. now at last the workforce has a reason to be cheerful. parent company still on it says it intends to invest £100 million to the factory, as well as passenger versions of the same models. brute passenger versions of the same models. ~ ., .,' passenger versions of the same models. ~ ., , ., models. we are offering the plant, vauxhall and _ models. we are offering the plant, vauxhall and the _ models. we are offering the plant, vauxhall and the british _ models. we are offering the plant, | vauxhall and the british automotive industry a new era of all electric vehicle manufacturing and a sustainable future. the vehicle manufacturing and a sustainable future.- sustainable future. the new investment _ sustainable future. the new investment is _ sustainable future. the new investment is badly - sustainable future. the new| investment is badly needed. sustainable future. the new- investment is badly needed. the factory currently makes an old version of the vauxhall astra, but it is outdated and because of the government's plan to outlaw the sale of new petrol and diesel plants by 2030, its replacement will be built elsewhere. so why advance? well, the increase in home deliveries which has only grown during the pandemic means that things like this are
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selling very well at the moment. but on top of that, increasing emissions regulations in towns and cities across europe means the demand for this type of europe is only going to grow, and still unters thinks that is good business. but this new investment does come at a price. still unters buses made clear that production would need support from the uk government, and that support is not to be worth tens of millions of pounds. is not to be worth tens of millions of pounds-— of pounds. every country in the world that _ of pounds. every country in the world that has _ of pounds. every country in the world that has advanced - world that has advanced manufacturing, all their governments are having _ manufacturing, all their governments are having the kinds of conversations we are having. it's a competitive — conversations we are having. it's a competitive situation and we are absolutely prepared to help investment in the uk for british 'obs investment in the uk for british jobs and — investment in the uk for british jobs and for our economy. today's news follows _ jobs and for our economy. today's news follows last _ jobs and for our economy. today's news follows last week's - news follows last week's announcement by innocent of the much larger investment in electric car production in sunderland. but experts say much more is needed if the uk industry is to remain competitive.— the uk industry is to remain competitive. the uk industry is to remain cometitive. ., , ., competitive. the hard fact is that when this is _
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competitive. the hard fact is that when this is a _ competitive. the hard fact is that when this is a really _ competitive. the hard fact is that when this is a really great - competitive. the hard fact is that when this is a really great start, l when this is a really great start, we need — when this is a really great start, we need much _ when this is a really great start, we need much more _ when this is a really great start, we need much more investment when this is a really great start, - we need much more investment like this if— we need much more investment like this if the _ we need much more investment like this if the uk— we need much more investment like this if the uk car— we need much more investment like this if the uk car industry— we need much more investment like this if the uk car industry is- we need much more investment like this if the uk car industry is going i this if the uk car industry is going to survive — this if the uk car industry is going to survive. and _ this if the uk car industry is going to survive. and batteries - this if the uk car industry is going to survive. and batteries and - this if the uk car industry is going . to survive. and batteries and digger factories— to survive. and batteries and digger factories are — to survive. and batteries and digger factories are what _ to survive. and batteries and digger factories are what it _ to survive. and batteries and digger factories are what it is _ to survive. and batteries and digger factories are what it is all— to survive. and batteries and digger factories are what it is all about. - factories are what it is all about. the car— factories are what it is all about. the car industry _ factories are what it is all about. the car industry will _ factories are what it is all about. the car industry will ultimately i the car industry will ultimately move — the car industry will ultimately move to — the car industry will ultimately move to where _ the car industry will ultimately move to where the _ the car industry will ultimately move to where the batteries . the car industry will ultimately. move to where the batteries are made _ move to where the batteries are made. , , . ., , made. nevertheless, with uncertainty over tradina made. nevertheless, with uncertainty over trading conditions _ made. nevertheless, with uncertainty over trading conditions after - made. nevertheless, with uncertainty over trading conditions after brexit i over trading conditions after brexit now out of way, manufacturers are clearly happier to invest in the uk, and the outlook for the industry here seems brighter than it has for several years. theo leggett, bbc news. our business correspondent colletta smith is at the vauxhall plant. good news for a lot of people. it is certainly a — good news for a lot of people. it is certainly a relief _ good news for a lot of people. it is certainly a relief for the 1030 workers _ certainly a relief for the 1030 workers based here at ellesmere port in cheshire _ workers based here at ellesmere port in cheshire. the production line behind — in cheshire. the production line behind me _ in cheshire. the production line behind me isjust turned on again. the staff— behind me isjust turned on again. the staff here are working again on those _ the staff here are working again on those vauxhall astra is, but that is a line _ those vauxhall astra is, but that is a line that — those vauxhall astra is, but that is a line that has been tapering off over the — a line that has been tapering off over the last couple of years. this time _
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over the last couple of years. this time next — over the last couple of years. this time next year, the production of those _ time next year, the production of those vehicles were stopped entirely. this production line we have _ entirely. this production line we have now— entirely. this production line we have now heard will have completely transformed. this time next year, the view— transformed. this time next year, the view will look very different indeed — the view will look very different indeed and instead, what is going to be produced are electric vehicles stops _ be produced are electric vehicles stops are — be produced are electric vehicles stops are what we will be seeing is these _ stops are what we will be seeing is these three vans, view show, citroen produced _ these three vans, view show, citroen produced right here as well as the act. produced right here as well as the act and _ produced right here as well as the act and it's— produced right here as well as the act. and it's notjust normal vans, it is a _ act. and it's notjust normal vans, it is a electric— act. and it's notjust normal vans, it is a electric vans. the crucial element — it is a electric vans. the crucial element here is that the batteries will be _ element here is that the batteries will be made in france and germany and then— will be made in france and germany and then chipped in here so the vans will be _ and then chipped in here so the vans will be made here, they will be turned — will be made here, they will be turned into battery packs and inserted _ turned into battery packs and inserted into the vehicles before they are — inserted into the vehicles before they are rolled off the production line _ they are rolled off the production line it _ they are rolled off the production line it is — they are rolled off the production line it is a — they are rolled off the production line. it is a huge relief for staff. there _ line. it is a huge relief for staff. there certainly is a lot more job security— there certainly is a lot more job security than it was at this time yesterday _ security than it was at this time yesterday. the long—term future, it is still— yesterday. the long—term future, it is still insecure. but this is definitely a line that the company themselves are hoping will grow
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massively as their planned market has to— massively as their planned market has to transfer it to being an electric— has to transfer it to being an electric market as the normal car market— electric market as the normal car market does as well, so the time we -et market does as well, so the time we get to— market does as well, so the time we get to 2020 — market does as well, so the time we get to 2020 or 2030 even, all of the vehicles _ get to 2020 or 2030 even, all of the vehicles we — get to 2020 or 2030 even, all of the vehicles we are driving in the uk will be _ vehicles we are driving in the uk will be electric, and the company here. _ will be electric, and the company here, vauxhall, are hoping that a massive — here, vauxhall, are hoping that a massive part of the uk market and elsewhere — massive part of the uk market and elsewhere will be driving vans rolled — elsewhere will be driving vans rolled out of the factory here. colletta, thank you. our top story this lunchtime. the health secretary announces an end to self isolation to under 18 is and anyone who has had both doses of the vaccine. it will start in august. the vaccine. it will start in au~ust. . .. the vaccine. it will start in august-— the vaccine. it will start in au~ust. _ ., august. vaccine by vaccine, we are relacin: august. vaccine by vaccine, we are replacing the _ august. vaccine by vaccine, we are replacing the restrictions _ august. vaccine by vaccine, we are replacing the restrictions with i august. vaccine by vaccine, we are replacing the restrictions with the i replacing the restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine. and italy and spain go head to head in the first of the euro 2020
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semifinals, with 20,000 fans expected in to watch. campaigners have gathered at the high court to support a woman with down's syndrome, who's trying to get a change to abortion laws. at the moment, a pregnancy can be terminated up to full term in england, scotland and wales — if the foetus has down's syndrome. most other abortions can't take place beyond 24 weeks. heidi crowter says the law discriminates against people who could have gone on to lead full and happy lives, like her and her husband. frankie mccamley reports. surrounded by friends, family and supporters. today, heidi is taking on the government.— supporters. today, heidi is taking on the government. here we are at the hiuh on the government. here we are at the high court — on the government. here we are at the high court to _ on the government. here we are at the high court to challenge - on the government. here we are at the high court to challenge the i the high court to challenge the discrimination... she the high court to challenge the discrimination. . ._ discrimination... she wants to challenge _ discrimination... she wants to challenge the _ discrimination... she wants to challenge the law _ discrimination... she wants to challenge the law that - discrimination... she wants to challenge the law that makes| challenge the law that makes abortion legal up until birth if the
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foetus has a disability, including down syndrome. joining her, parents who have children with disabilities. some say they felt pressured into an abortion. the some say they felt pressured into an abortion. ., ., ., , , abortion. the whole language sets the tone. abortion. the whole language sets the tone- my _ abortion. the whole language sets the tone. my baby _ abortion. the whole language sets the tone. my baby was _ abortion. the whole language sets the tone. my baby was described i abortion. the whole language sets| the tone. my baby was described as abortion. the whole language sets i the tone. my baby was described as a chromosomal abnormality. i am immersed in maternity care now and i'm seeing it day in, day out. women being told, "do you want to take the baby home? " this is 2021 in the uk. and a familiarface. i think it's and a familiar face. i think it's really— and a familiar face. i think it's really important that people with disabilities, women with disabilities, women with disabilities in particular, take this argument forward, because i am pro-choice _ this argument forward, because i am pro—choice but i also believe that everybody — pro—choice but i also believe that everybody should be equal under the law. �* . . ~ everybody should be equal under the law. �* ., . ~' ., everybody should be equal under the law. 2, . ~' ., ., , law. back home in coventry, heidi recently celebrated _ law. back home in coventry, heidi recently celebrated our _ law. back home in coventry, heidi recently celebrated our first i recently celebrated our first anniversary with husband james. she says she lives life to the full. brute says she lives life to the full. we
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want to say _ says she lives life to the full. we want to say to — says she lives life to the full. we want to say to the world that we have _ want to say to the world that we have a _ want to say to the world that we have a good _ want to say to the world that we have a good quality— want to say to the world that we have a good quality of— want to say to the world that we have a good quality of life. i want to say to the world that we have a good quality of life. her. have a good quality of life. her leral have a good quality of life. her legal team _ have a good quality of life. her legal team have _ have a good quality of life. legal team have raised more have a good quality of life.- legal team have raised more than £100,000 to take on the government in this landmark test case. it is a roundabout 90% of women find... but some experts say this isn't a decision that is taken lightly. brute decision that is taken lightly. we are talking about a relatively small number— are talking about a relatively small number of— are talking about a relatively small number of abortions _ are talking about a relatively small number of abortions every - are talking about a relatively small number of abortions every year i are talking about a relatively smalll number of abortions every year that take place _ number of abortions every year that take place after— number of abortions every year that take place after 24 _ number of abortions every year that take place after 24 weeks. - number of abortions every year that take place after 24 weeks. these i number of abortions every year thatl take place after 24 weeks. these are incredibly— take place after 24 weeks. these are incredibly challenging, _ incredibly challenging, heartbreaking - incredibly challenging, i heartbreaking circumstances involving _ heartbreaking circumstances involving often _ heartbreaking circumstances involving often very- heartbreaking circumstances involving often very much i heartbreaking circumstances i involving often very much wanted pregnancies — involving often very much wanted pregnancies where _ involving often very much wanted pregnancies where women - involving often very much wanted pregnancies where women have i involving often very much wantedl pregnancies where women have to involving often very much wanted - pregnancies where women have to make really tough _ pregnancies where women have to make really tough decisions, _ pregnancies where women have to make really tough decisions, and _ pregnancies where women have to make really tough decisions, and i— pregnancies where women have to make really tough decisions, and i think- really tough decisions, and i think to imply— really tough decisions, and i think to imply that— really tough decisions, and i think to imply that somehow— really tough decisions, and i think to imply that somehow those i to imply that somehow those decisions _ to imply that somehow those decisions are _ to imply that somehow those decisions are made _ to imply that somehow those decisions are made flippantly to imply that somehow those i decisions are made flippantly or casually— decisions are made flippantly or casually is— decisions are made flippantly or casually is incredibly _ decisions are made flippantly or casually is incredibly offensive i decisions are made flippantly orl casually is incredibly offensive to the women — casually is incredibly offensive to the women involved. _ casually is incredibly offensive to the women involved. the - casually is incredibly offensive to the women involved.— casually is incredibly offensive to the women involved. the case will be heard at the — the women involved. the case will be heard at the high _ the women involved. the case will be heard at the high court _ the women involved. the case will be heard at the high court today - the women involved. the case will be heard at the high court today and i heard at the high court today and tomorrow. bars and restaurants in england won't require customers to sign
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into venues using the test and trace app afterjuly 19th. in recent weeks, businesses have been complaining that the app sends too many alerts, causing disruption as workers have to be sent home. so what will the future be for the app? rory cellan—jones has been finding out. the app will help us safely live our lives, protecting you and others. it had a difficult birth, but since last september, millions of us have used the nhs test and trace app to scan in when we visit a cafe or pub, and more importantly, to get alerts telling us when we may have been in contact with someone with covid—19. something of the order of half a million to 600,000 cases were averted as a result of using this app. so that has to be worth it. the nhs covid—19 app has been downloaded nearly 26 million times, but we don't know how many people are still using it. more than a million positive test results have been recorded in the app, and they've triggered nearly two and a half million
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contact tracing alerts, sending people into isolation. you can see here how there's been a spike in those alerts, as cases have risen in the last few weeks. the fact that thousands of locations ask you to scan in to register a visit has encouraged use of the app. but what happens when places like this are told they no longer need to get people to check in? it seems possible that many customers will simply decide to turn the app off, especially given the high number of alerts it's sending out right now. with infections on the rise again, some businesses say the app is causing them real problems as staff are sent home. and amongst the public, there are mixed feelings about sticking with it. if i don't need it to get into restaurants and stuff, yeah, i'll get rid of it for sure. as things are getting better, and i had my two jabs, and hopefully everyone else will have the second jab, i might not use it. i think it's important that we can keep track of people _ that may be infected, _ and especially with new variants coming in as well.
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i think it's really important. the team behind the app strongly believes it still has a job to do. but as life gets back to normal, persuading people not to turn it off may prove tricky. rory cellan—jones, bbc news, west london. quarterfinal action is getting under way at wimbledon, after the run of the british teenager emma raducanu came to a sad end last night. she retired for medical reasons, after developing breathing difficulties during her fourth round match on number one court. joe wilson is at wimbledon. the breezes trying to push across the dark clouds. some of the sunshine has gone from wimbledon. emma raducanu radiated all the excitement through her three victories. it was distressing see her last night on court one looking so vulnerable. breathing difficulties, as you say. that is still the official explanation of why she had to withdraw. we are
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hoping to get more information on that later. that kind of thing does happen a lot in sport. the captain of her, interesting to get her reflections on what happened last night when we spoke earlier today. given the occasion and with the roof closed _ given the occasion and with the roof closed and _ given the occasion and with the roof closed and the crowd getting as excited — closed and the crowd getting as excited as they were, it was a huge match~ _ and i think we just have to remind ourselves that emma is still 18 years of age, but inexperienced. she's never played in front of a crowd of that size before. she, in terms of professional tennis, she hasn't even put in a full year on tour yet. so there's loads of room for improvement, and it's back to the drawing board. but i do trust, i know she's 0k, she's still recovering, and i'm sure we'll hear from her at some point today. yes, indeed. in the meantime, we
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have these really interesting quarterfinals to look forward to. some unusual names in those matches stop i will return to you, jane, with a reminder that on the show because today we are at full capacity. the first of the two euro 2020 semi—finals kicks off tonight, with england taking on spain in front of 60,000 fans at wembley. the winner will face either denmark or england in sunday's final. england's players are taking part in their last full day of training at st george's park in staffordshire. 0lly foster is there. they've just wrapped up that final training session in the last few minutes, and they were wrapped up as well. they were wearing woolly hats and gloves, they had all their winter training gear on. but the
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most important thing when we count them on the bus here this afternoon is that all 26 will be heading for london ahead of that semifinal against denmark at wembley. a full squad from gareth southgate to choose from. into the final stretch, that all the players are raring to go. he says that is the trickiest part of the job, telling the players that they won't be involved. but this team is becoming more settled now. what he is doing with those attacking talents, those impact players, he is rotating them. phil foden, jayden sancho, we know that harry kane and raheem sterling, they will surely start tomorrow. that defence that has been so impressive, they have not conceded a goal yet. harry maguire, he will surely start in the heart of that defence. he was also in the team that lost the world cup semifinal three years ago against croatia, but he says this
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group are so much better prepared. they are so much more focused and ready for a match of this magnitude. they will be huge favourites against denmark, but that focus, you just sense that england will perhaps get to that final stop the prize is so close now. to that final stop the prize is so close now— to that final stop the prize is so close now. ., ,, england's cricket team have named an entirely new squad to face pakistan in the forthcoming one—day series after a major covid—19 outbreak hit the camp. three players and four members of backroom staff returned positive results, and the rest of the team were identified as close contacts, meaning they also have to isolate. the new 18—strong group will be captained by ben stokes. the artist damien hirst, famous for his bisected cow, shark in formaldehyde and diamond studded skull, has changed tack. his new exhibition is of oil paintings of cherry blossom. the show in paris has been delayed twice because of covid,
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but finally opens today, showcasing canvases painted during long periods working alone during lockdown. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson was given a preview. as shocking as a dead animal or a diamond studded skull in the eyes of the artist. as much about life and death. damien hirst has been painting cherry trees, dozens upon dozens of them, all the way through the pandemic. much of it alone, without his team of assistants, thanks to covid restrictions. itjust became a really solitary thing, making art, which i've never really got it to that point except when i was very young. so it was quite nice to do that, and then trying to find some positivity in all the negativity and all the anxiety that everybody is feeling. in the beginning, i was really anxious, but it's funny that in that anxiety, i made these paintings that are really positive.
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the canvases got larger in lockdown, he says. leaves appeared and shifts in perspective gave more gravity to the trees. i rememberjohn lennon once said, somebody said to him, why did he cut his hair in the 70s? and he said, "well, what else would you do after you have grown it?" it kind of feels something like that, i always just try to keep reinventing myself. yeah. my mum used to say to me, "there's enough horror in the world, can't you just paint flowers?" maybe she got to me eventually. flowers that are in his words garish, messy, almost tacky. "someone who saw them the other day asked me if i was in love," hirst told me, "but i hope they're more psychotic than that". lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz shafernaker. guess what, we are stuck for the
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showers for the next few days. it is what it is.

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