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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. the taliban say they've continued to capture territory in afghanistan, taking more than ten districts over the past day. a draft law is being introduced to british parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. and one of the biggest events in cinema makes a grand return as the cannes film festival holds its opening ceremony. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world.
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schools in england will find out this afternoon how the government plans to relax the "bubble" rules that mean large numbers of pupils are sent home if a single child has a positive covid test. last week more than 375,000 children in england were off school while isolating for ten days. the education secretary, gavin williamson, is expected to say the changes will come into effect on the 19th ofjuly when most of england's covid regulations are set to be scrapped. social distancing will be scrapped for the first time in 16 months. face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement. limits on socialising will be lifted — bringing an to end to the rule of six indoors. and the advice to work from home will come to an end. meanwhile, new health secretary sajid javid, who we'll hear from at 1230 — in the commons — has said that new cases could go as high
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as 100,000 as restrictions ease, and that the people who are double—vaccinated should be treated differently from those who aren't. here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. will hospitals be able to cope? it's a risk the prime minister is contemplating taking, his desire to remove all covid restrictions across england just as infections are rising fast again. but borisjohnson believes relaxing curbs now in the summer is preferable. waiting could be worse. we run the risk of either opening up at a very difficult time when the virus has an edge, has an advantage, in the colder months, oragain, putting everything off to to next year. so i do think it's going to be a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more social distancing. no limits on how many can visit your home, or how many can pack restaurants, bars and pubs.
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theatres, nightclubs, sports stadiums all open and full. no more empty offices, as the requirement to work from home would end too. but there's a concern a third wave of covid is under way, with an average of more than 25,000 cases a day in the past week, and the number infected is doubling roughly every nine days. his own chief scientific adviser said now is the time to be controlling the virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic at the moment, and therefore we need to behave accordingly in terms of trying to limit transmission spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting the pandemic. the numbers in hospital and dying with covid are relatively low. it's the reason mrjohnson believes he can go ahead. and he wants to remove the legal obligation to wear a mask too. but the scientists are cautious, saying they will continue to wear theirs. there was a really clear consensus
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that under all circumstances, some degree of further social distancing will be maintained, needs to be maintained, even after the the restrictions are lifted in law. and that's been part of the road map all the way through. and that is widely supported by the scientific views. and today, we'll hear more about the plans for schools. the government is hoping to lift restrictions to put an end to bubbles and isolation of whole groups. judging the cost is no longer worth the benefit. damian grammaticas, bbc news. we can speak to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. important hints is not a formal announcement this morning. people won't have to isolate if they have come into contact with someone testing positive for covid—19 if they have been double vaccinated. if this is announced, how significant
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would it be? it this is announced, how significant would it be?— would it be? it is a significant chance would it be? it is a significant change in _ would it be? it is a significant change in the _ would it be? it is a significant change in the government - would it be? it is a significant - change in the government approach to containing the spread of coronavirus and it is in line with what the prime minister set out yesterday which is a political choice, a decision on his part and the government to go ahead with the lifting of all legal restrictions in england onjuly lifting of all legal restrictions in england on july the 19th. lifting of all legal restrictions in england onjuly the 19th. the role of six will go, guidance to work from home will go, social distancing measures including masks as we heard in the report will go. there is a debate whether it is the right time to do that and whether the government has gone too far too fast. labour, trade unions and some scientists say in particular about face coverings, there should be more caution and the government is opposing. we are learning more about how the government expects coronavirus to continue to spread in england and around the uk in the months to come as the prime minister made clear yesterday, it may be
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restrictions are going but covid—19 is not going anywhere and the health secretary said this morning that cases could reach 100,000 per day by later on the summer and the government is able to allow that to happen because the data shows that the link between cases of coronavirus and hospitalisations and deaths has been weakened significantly and so they feel confident to proceed on that basis. more changes to come not least around test, trace and isolate. if you have been contacted by test and trace and told you have to stay out on for ten days, that could change as health secretary hinted this morning if you are fully vaccinated. we will have a more proportionate system _ we will have a more proportionate system of — we will have a more proportionate system of taste, trace and isolate, it is absolutely right that those who have been double vaccinated we can take _ who have been double vaccinated we can take a _ who have been double vaccinated we can take a different approach than
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the one _ can take a different approach than the one we take today. in terms of what _ the one we take today. in terms of what we _ the one we take today. in terms of what we will do exactly, you will have _ what we will do exactly, you will have to — what we will do exactly, you will have to wait for my statement to parliament later today. a different a- roach parliament later today. a different approach which — parliament later today. a different approach which could _ parliament later today. a different approach which could involve - parliament later today. a different l approach which could involve testing cases of people who have come into contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus rather than the blanket rule to isolate. more details later and the system for schools in england which has seen huge numbers of children sent home to isolate if someone has symptoms in their class or their bubble, and also around travel as well, allowing fully vaccinated people to travel to more countries without the need for quarantine on their return. fin more countries without the need for quarantine on their return.— quarantine on their return. on the hrase a quarantine on their return. on the phrase a different _ quarantine on their return. on the phrase a different approach, - quarantine on their return. on the phrase a different approach, the l phrase a different approach, the health minister has been in thejob a matter of days and yet there does seem to be a change of tone from the government in that time. is that down to him? 0r where all these changes planned anyway? he down to him? or where all these changes planned anyway? he has come into the role of— changes planned anyway? he has come
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into the role of health _ changes planned anyway? he has come into the role of health secretary - into the role of health secretary and had a different emphasis on lifting restrictions as soon as possible and making sure that it is an irreversible move, no going back he said in his first full day in the job about lifting restrictions on july the 19th in england. that date has always been on the road map well before he came into the post and matt hancock was the health secretary. there is perhaps a shift in tone and emphasis, particularly around what he has been talking about clearing the backlog of operations and other procedures that the nhs has which has stacked up throughout the pandemic, he has stressed that in interviews this morning so that is something the government is keen to address as it moves into the next stage, the next phase of its response to the pandemic. it does not mean the pressure that coronavirus puts on the nhs will not be something that cited that it is acutely aware of and will have to respond to and
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people have warned about in the months to come. schools in england will find out later today how the government plan to relax the bubble rules. it's expected pupils in england schools may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid. it was revealed last week two hundred and seventy nine thousand children were self—isolating due to a possible contact with a covid 19 case. simon kidwell, is the headteacher of hartford manor primary in cheshire. he's also an executive member of the national association of head teachers union. hejoins me now from cheshire. it is good to have you with us. before we move on to what the government may be proposing i would like to get a sense from you of how much a problem it has been for you in your school of pupils having to sell isolate over the last year? we
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had sell isolate over the last year? - had relatively little disruption in the autumn term, one bubble closed in september 2020, but after half term when the delta variant was prevalent, we have had four bubbles close and a lot of stuff disruption, a maximum of 89 people isolating in the first week back after half term. we have seen more disruption in the last four weeks than in the entire pandemic. sat last four weeks than in the entire andemic. , , ., last four weeks than in the entire pandemic— last four weeks than in the entire andemic. , , ., pandemic. sat disruption as you say, what is the effect _ pandemic. sat disruption as you say, what is the effect on _ pandemic. sat disruption as you say, what is the effect on children - pandemic. sat disruption as you say, what is the effect on children who i what is the effect on children who presumably have to isolate more than once in that period? we presumably have to isolate more than once in that period?— once in that period? we have seen local children _ once in that period? we have seen local children at _ once in that period? we have seen local children at the _ once in that period? we have seen local children at the high _ once in that period? we have seen local children at the high school, l local children at the high school, colleagues, the children who go to 0ldham who are in their seventh period of isolation, we have been fortunate and not had multiple cases of destruction but individual families, we've had one family who missed because of the domino effect of people getting infected within the same family. one? we may be
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saying goodbye to bubbles. do you welcome this news? we want to see a plan for september, we are still speculating, we know the new variant is more transmissible, if there are no more bubbles, what is a safe alternative and what are they proposing as a safe alternative to having bubbles? it is ok, we may have... what about the staff? areas like birmingham, yorkshire, they are struggling to get staff at the moment because they are of isolating because they have covid—19. we have to be careful about what the alternative is and is it safe? do ou have alternative is and is it safe? do you have any sense of a safe alternative?— you have any sense of a safe alternative? ~ ~ ., ., alternative? we know there are trials in some _ alternative? we know there are trials in some schools, - alternative? we know there are trials in some schools, a - alternative? we know there are i trials in some schools, a colleague in bolton last week i talked about a trial where children instead of isolating, they could have daily testing if they had been identified
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as a close contact. my has spoken favourably about the daily testing. how will that be scaled down because we know that the test using the swab in our nurseries is very difficult to get an effective swab. aha, in our nurseries is very difficult to get an effective swab. a final thou~ht, to get an effective swab. a final thought. most _ to get an effective swab. a final thought, most schools - to get an effective swab. a final thought, most schools break i to get an effective swab. a finali thought, most schools break up to get an effective swab. a final- thought, most schools break up and less than a fortnight, have you received any government guidance at all and if you haven't, i mean, how much notice do you need and its expectation that you will be working over the summer to implement new measures? , ., ., over the summer to implement new measures?— measures? yes, we have got eight more days — measures? yes, we have got eight more days of— measures? yes, we have got eight more days of school— measures? yes, we have got eight more days of school left _ measures? yes, we have got eight more days of school left in - measures? yes, we have got eight more days of school left in our- more days of school left in our school, we have not heard anything yet, we are speculating, what the measures could be, a round face coverings, will they be a requirement school and transport? also, we will be working on the
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summer holidays, we've been working every weekend to do track and trace in the school and we will be working in the school and we will be working in the school and we will be working in the holidays to make sure we can implement the plans in september. 1 implement the plans in september. i asked you a lot of questions at the end, thank you for answering them all. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk and four other countries. from tomorrow, british tourists will be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. those who are fully vaccinated also won't have to quarantine. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill has this report. just two weeks ago, angela merkel was trying in vain to persuade other eu leaders to impose tighter restrictions on travellers from the uk. now germany is relaxing its own rules. they were worried by the spread of the delta variant and had banned anyone not a german citizen or resident to enter the country from britain. as of tomorrow, this will no longer apply. people not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine for at least five days.
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the decision will no doubt be seen by some as a victory for boris johnson who discussed the issue with angela merkel last week. others may interpret it as a concession to the demands of other european countries keen to welcome back british tourists, but the relaxation of restrictions which also applies to portugal, russia, india and nepal may represent an acknowledgement on the part of the authorities that the delta variant is fast becoming the dominant strain in germany too. the headlines on bbc news... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in 2 weeks time as the health secretary warns that new cases could go as high as 100,000 a day. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country
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even if they're not residents. the prime minister says he wants to lift almost all of england's restrictions in 2 weeks. it is expected that rules on face coverings and social distancing will be removed and this has faced a mixed reception from the public. i can now speak to honey langcaster—james, a behavioural psychologist. good to have you with us. i suppose some people will continue to be cautious, others will think it is freedom day, so people will come out of this differently. how do you bridge the gap between those who are confident and those who are cautious?— confident and those who are cautious? , ., , ., cautious? the number one thing is to t and cautious? the number one thing is to try and keep — cautious? the number one thing is to try and keep communication - cautious? the number one thing is to try and keep communication open. i try and keep communication open. whether this is mixing with your friends and family are going back
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into the workplace and mixing with your colleagues. there is going to be a period where we are respectful to one another and we open up that dialogue. that can be done very quickly, instead of launching into cattle someone when you haven't seen them for a while, it might be about saying that you would love to but do you feel comfortable with that? negotiating those little interactions that you have. in the workplace there is going to need to be a clear leadership an individual team level from managers saying look, we are coming back into the office, but let's discuss who is comfortable with what. do we all want to come in at the same time? and although the restrictions have lifted, having micro—conversations in the workplace and our teams so that we can negotiate levels of comfort. that is ultimately going to make people feel safer by having the conversation because when someone
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shows an interest in our comfort, and our views on an important subject, that in itself leads us to feel secure and safe art to so that our wishes are respected. communication is key. it our wishes are respected. communication is key. our wishes are respected. communication is ke . , , communication is key. it sounds very sensible, communication is key. it sounds very sensible. the — communication is key. it sounds very sensible, the difficulty _ communication is key. it sounds very sensible, the difficulty is _ communication is key. it sounds very sensible, the difficulty is that - sensible, the difficulty is that people have polarised views on theirs. how do you bridge that gap? 0ne theirs. how do you bridge that gap? one of the things we have to remember is that although we have been through this collective experience, lots of us have done it in different ways. some people have been shielding completely, some people have been going to work and living life normally, some people have been on the front line. we have to respect that is going to have affected us differently and we will have different views. the important thing is that it is ok to have very different views but still respect that that is not necessarily where someone else is. need to make allowances and have understanding
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that there will be polarised views but it does not mean we have to impose our views on someone else. we have to stay within the guidelines. when the restrictions have lifted, the guidelines are going to be about social norms and respect for each other. there will be more personal responsibility but there is also a level of responsibility where we need to assert our boundaries and if we do not feel comfortable with how someone is behaving around us, we need to respectfully say so. you mentioned _ need to respectfully say so. you mentioned social _ need to respectfully say so. you mentioned social norms, i wonder after 16 months, is it in your view actually possible to get back to normal or is the reality that life is going to be different? i is going to be different? i personally think life is going to be a bit different for a while. they will be a new normal. ultimately if you look at how other places around the world have responded to the sars virus, there were cultural shifts. if you travel, in some parts of the
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world, if someone is coughing and they have a cold, they are more likely to put a mask on when they get on a train, going into a public place, and i think we will see a little bit of that. . social norms will be set where people will look at you if you are coughing all over other people and they will consider it to be rude and inconsiderate. 0ne it to be rude and inconsiderate. one of the thing psychologically through the pandemic is that there has been a greater level of awareness and consciousness about our impact on other people. not everybody, not everybody is going to take it on—board but many people are going to say, do you know what? we should be cleaning our hands and we should be cleaning our hands and we should be wiping down our trolleys. we should be wearing a mask if we have a cold because otherwise we are sharing our germs with others. we will see a shift in the norms, but it will take some time before things feel like normal because ultimately
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we are human beings and we normalise our circumstances. whether we will go back to exactly how things were before, i don't think so. that is part of human life. we evolve, we grow, we adapt to what happens in our life and we make adjustments and thenit our life and we make adjustments and then it feels like normal.— then it feels like normal. thank you very much- — then it feels like normal. thank you very much- good — then it feels like normal. thank you very much. good to _ then it feels like normal. thank you very much. good to have _ then it feels like normal. thank you very much. good to have you - then it feels like normal. thank you very much. good to have you with l then it feels like normal. thank you l very much. good to have you with us. a second man has been charged with common assault after england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, was accosted last month in a central london park. jonathan chew was charged with common assault and obstructing police. he will appear at westminster magistrates�* court later today the taliban say they've continued to capture territory in afghanistan, taking more than ten districts over the past day. the militants have been advancing rapidly as nato troops withdraw. they now control about a third of the country. thousands of people have been displaced by fighting —— as mark lobel reports.
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the us military left this air base just north of kabul so fast at night, its new afghan commander was only told after they had gone. afghan security forces must now face the taliban alone in many provinces, including this one, in the country's north—east. translation: the armed taliban tried to break the city's defence line and enter from yesterday until midnight, but they faced strong resistance from our defence and security forces. translation: i am a soldier of the national army and i will defend my homeland as long as a drop of blood remains in my body. butjust over 100 kilometres north of here, neighbouring tajikistan says more than 1000 afghan government soldiers have fled there. a number of afghan forces may well have fled, but the afghan national army, the afghan national police force, that we've worked really hard to build up.
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they've got a fair degree of capability. and we are not moving all our capability. 0ur intelligence support will be there. 0ur drones overhead will be there. it is the afghan people's will to beat the taliban that is really critical. the dark grey parts of this map show the areas the taliban claims it has captured, 150 out of 369 including recapturing what now resembles a ghost town in punjwayi district and their former stronghold of kandahar in southern afghanistan, leaving security forces on edge and families fleeing. translation: they tried to kill me. if they killed me, then who would look after my children? the taliban don't want peace, they want the whole government. foreign forces fought the taliban for years after they offered a safe haven to al-qaeda who attacked america, but could that threat now re—emerge? if the country collapses back to the taliban, the threat can be concentrated again
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in afghanistan and they have strong ties with al-qaeda. if those ties resume, women's rights are set back and fighting in cities intensifies, then many may question what a war that cost 200,000 lives and $1 trillion has achieved. mark lobel, bbc news. the number of people known to have died in the miami apartment block which partially collapsed two weeks ago has risen to 28, after another body was found in the rubble overnight. search teams were able to resume their operations after the rest of the building was demolished on sunday night. 117 people are still missing. meanwhile florida is bracing for the arrival of tropical storm elsa — with strong winds already lashing miami. elsa has already battered parts of cuba and is due to pass near the florida keys early on tuesday —— with the risk of a life—threatening storm surge.
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gunmen in nigeria have kidnapped at least 140 schoolchildren in the north—west of the country. the military says 26 children were rescued. more than a thousand students have been seized for ransom since december. nine have been killed and more than two hundred are still missing. georgia's president has condemned the violence that forced gay rights activists to cancel a march in the capital tbilisi. some 20 foreign embassies have also denounced the homophobic attacks by nationalists who ransacked the office of the march organisers. hong kong's chief executive, carrie lam, has urged parents, teachers and religious leaders to monitor teenagers and report any suspected crimes they commit to authorities.the controversial leader told a weekly news conference that government departments shouldn't allow what she called "illegal ideas" to spread through the education system.
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she also praised the national security law imposed on the territory by beijing last year. the legislation has been used to crush dissent. huge pro—democracy protests that took place in hong kong in 2019 were largely led by young activists. israel's governing coalition has suffered defeat in one of its first big tests in parliament since taking office last month. the prime minister, naftali bennett, failed to win enough support to renew a law which denies citizenship to palestinians from the occupied territories who marry israelis. the legislation, which critics say is clearly discriminatory, has been extended every year since it was introduced nearly two decades ago. here in the uk, draft legislation intended to tackle what ministers describe as a "broken asylum system" is being introduced to parliament. the government says the bill will help prevent people who've passed through a safe country
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claiming asylum in the uk. refugee campaigners warn that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has this report. until the pandemic broke last year, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk had doubled since 2010. if you look back over the last two decades, the number of applicants was still less than half what it was 20 years ago. and the figure, including dependents, is significantly lower than the numbers in germany, france, spain and greece. the pandemic also triggered a change in how people try to get to britain. the number crossing the channel in small boats rose sharply. it was 8500 last year. it is heading for an even greater number this year. the home secretary, priti patel, says she wants to create a fair but firm system that will break the business model of the people smuggling gangs. the nationality and borders bill will allow the uk government to return people to a safe country
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if they pass through it on the way to britain. campaigners say this will result in thousands of valid claims being deemed inadmissible, and call it a shameful dereliction of duty. the bill will also allow asylum claims to be processed outside the uk, potentially paving the way for controversial offshore centres for processing applications. daniel sandford, bbc news. the company that owns car manufacturer vauxhall is expected to announce plans today to build electric vans at its ellesmere port plant in north—west england. the investment, said to be worth hundreds of millions of pounds, would safeguard more than 1,000 factoryjobs. the future of the plant has been in doubt after vauxhall�*s parent company, stellantis, scrapped plans to build its new astra model there. an initiative to encourage more diversity in the police in london will, it's hoped, lead to 40% of new officer recruits next year being from ethnic
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minority backgrounds. currently 15.6% within the metropolitan police service are from these backgrounds. the force's behind the badge programme is trying to foster trust in all communities. the bbc asian network's anisa kadri reports. basically you don't know what is round the corner. 0rahead of you. out and about with london's met police for what is known as a ride along. it's notjust forjournalists, they are also open to the public so people can see what police do. we are just getting called out somewhere now. and we are en route to a possible break in. but when we get there it turns out to be builders setting off an alarm system. ambitious plans to increase diversity in the police, these ride alongs are one way of improving engagement and building trust. we want a police service that reflects the diversity of the city. a lot of people believe
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that it is not as diverse, for example, there's mention of racism, which from doing the job, i have never experienced. figures show 15.6% of police officers are from black and ethnic minority backgrounds, 3.6% black. the metropolitan police has ambitious aspirations going forward. the london metropolitan police force is the biggest in the country and it has been told that 40% of new recruits should be from black and ethnic minority backgrounds. this, it hopes, means it will better serve the communities in the capital. we need to understand that especially in our community as asians, and muslims, we struggle to understand how and where the police come from at times. i have been there myself where i would not necessarily have had the best view because of what we see. we only see one side of police and it is not necessarily always positive. i was lucky, i had
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a very close friend in the police who has been there from the start. he's also british asian like me. he used to tell me this is why they do certain things and those conversations i used to have with him as an outsider before ijoined the police. were there any particular areas of argument? for example, there may be a video where six officers try to restrain one person. 0n the outside, before ijoined the please, oh, my god, this is police brutality. this is that. however, once you get on the inside, you understand that the techniques they are using is to bring the person under control in the safest manner. it is thought policies like stop and search have not helped. the police hope their behind the badge campaign allows people to hear the experiences of ethnic minorities and helps foster trust in the force. the headlines on bbc news... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans
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to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks time as the health secretary warns that new cases could go as high as 100,000 a day. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. the taliban say they've continued to capture territory in afghanistan, taking more than ten districts over the past day. a draft law is being introduced to the british parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. and one of the biggest events in cinema makes a grand return as the cannes film festival holds its opening ceremony let's get more reaction now to our main story — the uk government's plans to lift
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almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks' time as the health secretary warns that the number of new covid cases could go as high as 100,000 a day. i can now speak to karl knights, a journalist with cerebal palsy, who has been shielding for most of the pandemic. good to have you with us and thank you forjoining me. thank you for having me. what do you think of the government decision and the prospect of restrictions ending on the 19th of restrictions ending on the 19th ofjuly? i of restrictions ending on the 19th ofjul ? ~' . , ., , ., ofjuly? i think the decision is a terri in: ofjuly? i think the decision is a terrifying decision _ ofjuly? i think the decision is a terrifying decision and - ofjuly? i think the decision is a terrifying decision and i - ofjuly? i think the decision is a terrifying decision and i think. ofjuly? i think the decision is a l terrifying decision and i think it's so searingly obvious that shield is such as myself even as we have been throughout the entire pandemic seem to have been forgotten and left out again and the prospect of
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restrictions lifting is profoundly terrifying. restrictions lifting is profoundly terri inc. , _ , terrifying. deeply terrifying. fora ive terrifying. deeply terrifying. forgive me. _ terrifying. deeply terrifying. forgive me, i _ terrifying. deeply terrifying. forgive me, i did _ terrifying. deeply terrifying. forgive me, i did not- terrifying. deeply terrifying. forgive me, i did not mean| terrifying. deeply terrifying. l forgive me, i did not mean to interrupt. that word terrifying, could you explain why that is? i think it's twofold in that the first reason for me personally why it's terrifying is that throughout the entire pandemic, the office for national statistics, the 0ns, has said six in ten deaths, six in ten of the uk �*s total covid deaths were disabled people and that is something that i think about, certainly, every day and it's something i know many of my disabled peers often think about and then the other reason why i think it's so
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terrifying is that it comes at a time when there was a glimmer of hope for those shielding in terms of vaccine uptake and taking things slowly and opening up slowly and there was that glimmer of hope that maybe this catastrophic historical event will have some kind of end in sight whereas yesterday �*s announcement shows that for those shielding, like myself, and many other disabled people across the country, we will remain in place, remain shielding and will remain isolated just so we can protect ourselves and the people around us. can you give us a sense of what it's like when you are shielding and
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isolating and you also did mention that glimmer of hope so how things had changed recently. i that glimmer of hope so how things had changed recently.— had changed recently. i think with mostl , had changed recently. i think with mostly, shielding _ had changed recently. i think with mostly, shielding is _ had changed recently. i think with mostly, shielding is mostly - mostly, shielding is mostly incredibly boring in the sense of i've been in these four walls since february 2020 and it's just mostly very profoundly isolating and there is a deep, natural kind of loneliness that you would expect that comes with that and then also, i think what might have changed, with the high uptake of vaccines, with the high uptake of vaccines, with tests of their efficacy, it seemed like cases were going down that vaccines offered it least to some disabled people, recent data
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has shown that the vaccine may not work as well in immunocompromised people which is one worry, certainly, that some disabled people rightly have had at least for some disabled people at least, it seems that it felt as though the vaccine was a gateway to beginning to think about the end of the pandemic, beginning to allow yourself to think about what life might look like afterwards, whereas that hope, it feels like that hope, that cautious hope, has been snatched away, i think. by the very sudden shift to lift all restrictions and to essentially keep those shielding in place. essentially keep those shielding in
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lace. ~ ., , essentially keep those shielding in lace. . ., , ., essentially keep those shielding in lace. ~ ., , ., ., ., place. would it be fair to say and lease place. would it be fair to say and please correct — place. would it be fair to say and please correct me _ place. would it be fair to say and please correct me if— place. would it be fair to say and please correct me if i _ place. would it be fair to say and please correct me if i am - place. would it be fair to say and please correct me if i am wrong, | please correct me if i am wrong, that you don't have an objection per se to some of these restrictions being lifted but that you would have just like the whole process to have been taken more slowly, is that a fair characterisation? i been taken more slowly, is that a fair characterisation?— fair characterisation? i think so. i think certainly _ fair characterisation? i think so. i think certainly what _ fair characterisation? i think so. i think certainly what i _ fair characterisation? i think so. i think certainly what i personally i think certainly what i personally object to is the severity and the speed of restrictions lifting. i think definitely i wouldn't advocate for restrictions being forever in place, in perpetuity, ithink for restrictions being forever in place, in perpetuity, i think for me, at least, place, in perpetuity, ithink for me, at least, certainly place, in perpetuity, i think for me, at least, certainly what a great deal of disabled people want to see is that there is a slow move towards doing things one by one and opening each kind of gateway one by one and going slow but steady, especially to
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float the idea of lifting all restrictions when our cases are rising so dramatically is very terrifying prospect. ithink, in a different context, i might have something else to say! but in our current climate, when the cases are going up, a very sudden shift in public health policy is worrying, i think. we public health policy is worrying, i think. ~ ., ., ., , , think. we are out of time but very aood to think. we are out of time but very good to hear— think. we are out of time but very good to hear your _ think. we are out of time but very good to hear your thoughts - think. we are out of time but very good to hear your thoughts and i think. we are out of time but very - good to hear your thoughts and thank you forjoining us on bbc news. thank you. a woman with down's syndrome is at the high court today to demand a change in abortion law. a pregnancy can currently be terminated up to full term in england, scotland and wales
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if the foetus has down's syndrome while most other abortions can't take place beyond 2a weeks. heidi crowter says the law discriminates against people who could have gone on to lead full and happy lives. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has more. heidi crowter from coventry has down's syndrome. she recently celebrated her first wedding anniversary with husband james. she lives life to the full. i like singing, i like dancing. i like watching disney. she's going to the high court, seeking a change to the 1967 abortion act. this allows abortion up to 2a weeks. but if the foetus has a disability, including down's syndrome, abortion is legal right up to birth. heidi says this is discriminatory. the reason it's important to me and james is we have down syndrome and we want to say to the world we have a good quality of life. her mother liz has encouraged heidi to be as independent as possible. she lives here in coventry.
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heidi's legal team have crowdfunded £102,000 to take on the government in a landmark test case. i'm very proud of heidi, of her campaigning and i'll be supporting her along the way. 3,200 foetuses are aborted each year because the child is likely to be severely disabled. and 90% of women whose foetuses have down's syndrome choose to have an abortion. some say women in this situation need more time to make an informed decision. we're talking about a relatively small number of abortions every year that take place after 2a weeks. these are incredibly challenging, heartbreaking circumstances involving often very, very much wanted pregnancies, where women have to make really tough decisions. and i think to imply that somehow those decisions are made flippantly or casually, is incredibly offensive to the women involved. the case will run for the next two days in london's high court. aruna iyengar, bbc news.
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there are many routes used by migrants to enter europe — but surely none as strange at this. belarus appears to be encouraging migrants who've arrived there from the middle east to cross over into neighbouring lithuania. so far this year, the numbers are ten times what they were in the whole of 2020. the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, says it appears to be politically motivated. sara monetta has more. the white specks on the screen are a group of iraqi men, illegally crossing from belarus into lithuania. in the past few weeks more and more have reached european union in this way. the new migrant route that caught the tiny baltic country completely by surprise. translation: each day, we are detaining around 150 illegal migrants, we have never seen such numbers before. on average, lithuania welcomes around 70 migrants in a year.
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in the past month alone, they have received more than 1200 people. the government says it is no coincidence. translation: today, lithuania is experiencing an unprecedented migratory pressure. we witness how the regime of belarus is using migration as a tool of political manipulation. authorities believe that belarus state airline is flying migrants from baghdad and istanbul to the belarusian capital minsk. from there, people can easily make their way to the lithuanian border. translation: it is not difficult to understand a certain link between the sanctions that the eu has applied in belarus and the actions that lukashenko is taking across the border. the eu imposed the sanctions on belarus after a ryanairflight was forced to land in minsk so that authorities could arrest the dissidentjournalist roman protasevich.
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in retaliation, the long—time belarusian leader alexander lukashenko said his border guards would no longer stop migrants from crossing into the eu. down at the border, it's full emergency, with the lithuanian government asking villages to make room for the new arrivals and announcing the setting up of a second migrant camp. translation: hybrid war is waged against lithuania and we have to be united and focused both on the municipal and national level in addressing these challenges. with belarus behaving more and more unpredictably, people here are bracing for impact. sara monetta, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks time as the health secretary warns that new cases
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germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. the social media platform tik tok is responsible for launching numerous dance crazes and has even helped a sea shanty reach number one in the charts. now it's bringing a whole new audience to busking, allowing street artists to earn hundreds of pounds and legions of fans. 0ur entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, hit the streets with one singer in leeds. she sings. so this is how busking works in 2021. a crowd of around 30 people in the centre of leeds on a weekday morning. but tens of thousands watching all round the world live on tiktok.
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you can see people in the comments. like, hi from germany, hi from the philippines, america. itjust, like, brings everyone together really. liv harland is 23 and from york. this is on my spotify. # what does it look like in heaven.# at the start of the year, she decided to change how she busked. now when she travels to london or manchester to take to the streets, she also goes live online. and it's altered everything, especially how much money she makes. thank you very much. thank you. on average, it's kind of like £100—odd an hour, depending on how long i stay out. the most i've made is £400 in one hour. in cash? that was in cash. and then my live stream, which was through gifts on tiktok,
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igot £1,500. the next song i'm going to sing is lost without you by freya hardings. it's also seriously helping to raise her profile. am i a tiktoker? yeah. liv harland. i'm recording now. see what i mean? yeah. while we're there, shoppers are constantly recognising liv from her online busking. you performed in london the other day, so i was. wondering why you're here. have you seen her before? i have, i've seen you on tiktok. while others have travelled especially. where you from? bradford. did you come through todayjust for this? because you saw it on my story? that's mad. this is actual... this is how it works. yeah. so how did you know about today? on her instagram. right. you posted something yesterday, didn't you? about saying something's happening today in leeds. so i thought, do you know what? let's get up and drive and we'll go support her. so you've come from bradford especially to see her busk. yeah.
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these are different days. literally. it'sjust the power of social media, isn't it? what a life! that's my original song. # i saw you out and you both turned around # you walked away. # so i hope you find the one that you're looking for.# this guy's singing along. # i guess it was all in my mind.# i've got it as my ringtone. it's one of them rare songs that you can associate with, it don't matter who you're with or where you are. it just... it's almost a healing song for me. this is so different to busking of the past, isn't it? yeah. do you know what? it's good. i'm not sure how she's not been picked up before. i absolutely love her to death. liv has now quit herjob in a kindergarten to concentrate on music full time. it's the online busking, which helped to secure a manager and a deal
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to release her own songs on spotify. i want to kind of be an artist, really. and that is very, very possible with the platform i built on social media. so the power of social media is crazy. you don't have to go on x factor these days to get recognised. i'm bursting with pride. ijust can't... i actually can't take it in how well she's doing and how positive and bubbly she is. and i'm so proud. but i was rather getting in the way. so to explain to people watching on tiktok, this is for bbc breakfast, we're doing a piece on liv and how busking has changed. this feels very meta. yeah. explaining to tiktok what's going out on bbc breakfast. yeah. it's crazy that's even happening, to be honest. and the numbers were large. i had 80,000 views within just short of half an hour and 1,500 new followers. wowee! just from like a short little live. yes, online busking is big business. shall we say goodbye? yeah. see you later.
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thank you very much. colin paterson, bbc news, leeds. around a thousand more babies would survive each year in england if maternity services were as safe as those in sweden, according to a group of british mps. the uk parliament's health and social care committee says a lack of staff and a blame culture which prevents lessons from being learned, are significantly hindering maternity services. the chair of the committee isjeremy hunt and hejoins me now from westminster. welcome to you. these are very sobering figures. so many babies could have been saved but also that maternity units are not up to standard. has maternity units are not up to standard-— maternity units are not up to standard. �* , , , , i. maternity units are not up to standard. �* , , , , , , standard. as surprised where you buy what ou standard. as surprised where you buy what you found? _ standard. as surprised where you buy what you found? good _ standard. as surprised where you buy what you found? good morning, - what you found? good morning, rebecca. i think the first thing to say as there are about 700,000 babies born every year on the nhs in england and the vast majority are totally safe and they have been getting safer, we've seen a drop in
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baby deaths of around 30% the last ten years but the report is very sobering, you're right. what we discovered is we still are a long way off the safest and best in europe and this report we tried to understand why that is and part of it is starving but i think the biggest issue is a cultural issue, there is a blame culture when something tragic goes wrong with a birth, we find the lawyers get involved, people are worried about being fired, struck off the register and the most important thing of all, that every doctor and midwife once passionately which is to learn the right lessons so it never happens again, that is the thing which does not happen. flan again, that is the thing which does rrot happen-— again, that is the thing which does not hauen. ., , ., ., not happen. can you explain a little bit more about _ not happen. can you explain a little bit more about how _ not happen. can you explain a little bit more about how our _ not happen. can you explain a little bit more about how our system - bit more about how our system differs from the one in sweden and how therefore we might benefit in the uk? {371 how therefore we might benefit in the uk? . ., , how therefore we might benefit in theuk? , , , , the uk? of course. the simplest way to exlain the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it — the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it is _ the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it is if _ the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it is if you _ the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it is if you have _ the uk? of course. the simplest way
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to explain it is if you have a - the uk? of course. the simplest way to explain it is if you have a baby - to explain it is if you have a baby and you discover that the baby is severely disabled, you are obviously worried about the future and worried about the financial implications for your family. in about the financial implications for yourfamily. in the uk, the only way yourfamily. in the uk, the only way you can't get any compensation from the nhs as if a court agrees there was clinical negligence. —— you can. lawyers can evolve quickly, there is a court case which often lasts about five years, in sweden they will give compensation to families as soon as it's accepted that a mistake was made but you don't have to prove this called clinical negligence which understandably doctor really fight against. and so, the result is that there is a much less adversarial relationship and there is much more learning and that's why they have much lower rates of baby harm, of disability, of baby deaths than we have in england and that's why we think this is a system that we should be looking at because it
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could save really a huge amount of money. ii could save really a huge amount of mone . , ., could save really a huge amount of mone . y ., ., could save really a huge amount of mone. i. .,. ., could save really a huge amount of mone. ., money. if you do change the system, realistically what _ money. if you do change the system, realistically what difference _ money. if you do change the system, realistically what difference can - money. if you do change the system, realistically what difference can it - realistically what difference can it make if as your report suggests, there aren't enough doctors and midwives? , , there aren't enough doctors and midwives?— there aren't enough doctors and midwives? , , . . ., midwives? this is the crucial thing because what _ midwives? this is the crucial thing because what we _ midwives? this is the crucial thing because what we are _ midwives? this is the crucial thing because what we are saying - midwives? this is the crucial thing because what we are saying is - midwives? this is the crucial thing | because what we are saying is that staffing is something that needs to be sorted out, it has improved recently. but we still need at least 2000 more midwives and at least 500 more obstetricians. and the cost of that, it costs something, it's between 200 and £350 million a year but compare that to the £2.3 billion every year we are spending in maternity claims and lawsuits just in maternity, this isn't all the nhs maternity, all the nhs lawsuits, it isjust maternity, all the nhs lawsuits, it is just in maternity so about one tenth of that cost would pay for the staff we need and then we would save that extra money many times over so
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it makes financial sense but most importantly, it will help us avoid the horrific human tragedy is that i'm afraid we have seen all too many of. , , ., ,, , ., i'm afraid we have seen all too many of. , , ~ " , ., , of. jeremy hunt, thank you. very aood of of. jeremy hunt, thank you. very good of you _ of. jeremy hunt, thank you. very good of you to — of. jeremy hunt, thank you. very good of you to join _ of. jeremy hunt, thank you. very good of you to join us. _ football and excitement is already building for the first semi final of the euro 2020 competition later. italy and spain are going head—to—head at london's wembley stadium, with a place in the final against england or denmark up for grabs. it's not likely there'll be many spanish and italian fans from at the match, because of quarantine restrictions. but on the streets of madrid, it's all anyone was talking about. spain is going to win, obviously. 0f spain is going to win, obviously. of course, we are in spain, we have to win. at least that is what i think. italy, i like them. but i am from
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spain. i like spain, i would love spain. i like spain, i would love spain to win. spain. i like spain, iwould love spain to win-— spain. i like spain, iwould love saintowin. ., spain to win. italy is a good team, the have spain to win. italy is a good team, they have players. _ spain to win. italy is a good team, they have players, the _ spain to win. italy is a good team, they have players, the league - spain to win. italy is a good team, they have players, the league in i they have players, the league in italy they have players, the league in italy is— they have players, the league in italy is very important. i think it's a — italy is very important. i think it's a complicated team and a complicated match, especially when it's the _ complicated match, especially when it's the semifinal, everyone wants to go— it's the semifinal, everyone wants to go to _ it's the semifinal, everyone wants to go to the final. the it's the semifinal, everyone wants to go to the final.— to go to the final. the final, to be better for spain, _ to go to the final. the final, to be better for spain, england - to go to the final. the final, to be better for spain, england have . to go to the final. the final, to be better for spain, england have a i better for spain, england have a very good — better for spain, england have a very good team, _ better for spain, england have a very good team, they— better for spain, england have a very good team, they play- better for spain, england have a very good team, they play at - better for spain, england have a - very good team, they play at home. it very good team, they play at home. it could _ very good team, they play at home. it could he _ very good team, they play at home. it could he very— very good team, they play at home. it could be very difficult. _ very good team, they play at home. it could be very difficult. [— very good team, they play at home. it could be very difficult. [will- it could be very difficult. i will not no it could be very difficult. i will rrot go to _ it could be very difficult. i will rrot go to the _ it could be very difficult. i will not go to the final _ it could be very difficult. i will not go to the final because i it could be very difficult. i will not go to the final because of| it could be very difficult.“ not go to the final because of the covid _ not go to the final because of the covid situation, and also because the cases— covid situation, and also because the cases in england are growing, also here — the cases in england are growing, also here. and i think it's not the best— also here. and i think it's not the best idea — also here. and i think it's not the best idea i— also here. and i think it's not the best idea. i prefer to watch it at home — best idea. i prefer to watch it at home if— best idea. i prefer to watch it at home. ,, ,. ., ~ best idea. i prefer to watch it at home. ,, ., ~ home. if spain win, i would like so bad to no home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to _ home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to see _ home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to see a _ home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to see a match - home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to see a match but - home. if spain win, i would like so bad to go to see a match but withl bad to go to see a match but with the covid situation, i don't know. we are being really respective with
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these fans and all of that stuff so maybe it's better to watch it on television with popcorn and a beer and that is all! we television with popcorn and a beer and that is all!— television with popcorn and a beer and that is all! we will say goodbye now to all those _ and that is all! we will say goodbye now to all those viewers _ and that is all! we will say goodbye now to all those viewers who - and that is all! we will say goodbye now to all those viewers who are i now to all those viewers who are watching us around the world. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello. it looks like today will be the most unsettled of the week in terms of weather, things tending to calm down towards the latter part of the week as high—pressure tries to build. we will see some showers and some sunny spells around but it comes off the back of something pretty stormy for the time of year, this low which brings severe gales to north—west france overnight, strong winds through the channel and heavy rain spreading its way through much of england and wales. it's pushing towards the north sea, a hangback of that rain will continue to affect eastern scotland and north—east england,
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western scotland, northern ireland, the rest of england and wales should see sunshine through the afternoon, some showers could be heavy and areas of showers which could merge to give longer spells of rain, quite a mixture of everything. temperatures disappointing in the north—east with the rain, 18 or 19 in the sunshine. for this afternoon and again tomorrow we are likely to see some interruptions from showery bursts of rain across the wimbledon area, temperatures generally in the high teens. this area of low pressure continues to scoot towards norway through the overnight period, leaving a legacy of cloud, drier for eastern scotland, this new feature pushing into the south—west, enhanced shower activity and nowhere will be cold, temperatures 10—14. this feature will enhance the showers across large parts of england and wales through wednesday. we start with quite a bit of cloud around, sunshine breaking through but then we see showers developing, some of them could be quite heavy and even thundery across england and wales, certainly, a bit more slow—moving because the winds
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will be lighter for all. some showers in the north, feeling warmer, 18—22 or 23 degrees. on thursday, pressure tries to build in, still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow showers to develop especially across scotland and northern ireland, cloud and sunshine in the south, looking at highs of 23 celsius. the winds very light. moving into friday and the weekend, weather fronts never too far away but as i mentioned, the pressure continuing to bill so we should see some good spells of sunshine on friday and into the weekend, but there is always that threat of showers and some of them could continue to be heavy.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks' time as the health secretary warns that new cases "could go as high as 100,000" a day. this vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and our restaurants back to normal,
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but let's have the masks on public transport. how do you feel about the restrictions easing in england? will you still be wearing a mask when it's no longer a legal requirement? get in touch with me by tweeting me at annita?mcveigh or by using the hashtag bbcyourquestions. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. a draft law is being introduced to the british parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. hello, good morning. and welcome to bbc news.
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schools in england will find out this afternoon how the government plans to relax the "bubble" rules that mean large numbers of pupils are sent home if a single child has a positive covid test. last week, more than 375,000 children in england were off school while isolating for ten days. the education secretary, gavin williamson, is expected to say the changes will come into effect on the 19th ofjuly — when most of england's covid regulations are set to be scrapped. among those plans, social distancing will be removed for the first time in 16 months. face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement. limits on socialising will be lifted — bringing an to end to the rule of six indoors. and the advice to work from home will also come to an end. meanwhile, new health secretary sajid javid, who we'll hear from at half past twelve in the commons, has said that new cases "could go as high as 100,000" as restrictions ease, and that the people
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who are double—vaccinated should be treated differently from those who aren't. plans for easing lockdowns in scotland, wales and northern ireland will be outlined later this month. here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. will hospitals be able to cope? it's a risk the prime minister is contemplating taking, his desire is to remove all covid restrictions across england just as infections are rising fast again. but borisjohnson believes relaxing curbs now in the summer is preferable. waiting could be worse. we run the risk of either opening up at a very difficult time when the virus has an edge, has an advantage, in the colder months, oragain, putting everything off to next year. so i do think it's going to be a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more social distancing. no limits on how many can visit your home, or how many can pack restaurants, bars and pubs.
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theatres, nightclubs, sports stadiums all open and full. no more empty offices, as the requirement to work from home would end, too. but there's a concern a third wave of covid is under way, with an average of more than 25,000 cases a day in the past week, and the number infected is doubling roughly every nine days. his own chief scientific adviser said now is the time to be controlling the virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic at the moment, and therefore we need to behave accordingly in terms of trying to limit transmission spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting the pandemic. the numbers in hospital and dying with covid are relatively low. it's the reason mrjohnson believes he can go ahead. and he wants to remove the legal obligation to wear a mask, too. but the scientists are cautious, saying they will continue to wear theirs. there was a really clear consensus
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that under all circumstances, some degree of further social distancing will be maintained, needs to be maintained, even after the the restrictions are lifted in law. and that's been part of the road map all the way through. and that is widely supported by the scientific views. and today, we'll hear more about the plans for schools. here, too, the government is hoping to lift restrictions to put an end to bubbles and isolation of whole groups. judging the cost is no longer worth the benefit. damian grammaticas, bbc news. we can speak to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. morning to you. so we've had quite significant push back against what the prime minister was announcing yesterday in some quarters, and we heard his chief medical and scientific advisers alongside him at that briefing yesterday one of the continued significant risk from this virus, so do you think that is going to lead to any tweaks of this idea
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of removing all restrictions on the 19th ofjuly? the of removing all restrictions on the 19th ofjuly?— 19th ofjuly? the short answer to that is no- _ 19th ofjuly? the short answer to that is no. the _ 19th ofjuly? the short answer to that is no. the government - 19th ofjuly? the short answer to that is no. the government has i 19th ofjuly? the short answer to - that is no. the government has been quite clear in taking what is effectively a political decision, really, at this point in its reaction to the pandemic. as we heard, the prime minister emphasised yesterday moving to a phase where people are encouraged to take their own decisions, take responsibility for their own actions. and we have seen ministers asked in pretty much every interview over the last couple of weeks whether they will be wearing a facemask in various situations after the 19th ofjuly went restrictions will be lifted in england, and we have had different responses given. but despite the pressure you suggest from labour, trade unions and some scientists on the government to keep in place some kind of guidance at least on the wearing of facemasks and possible social distancing measures in some
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circumstances, i think it is likely that the government will continue on this course of stepping back and allowing people to make their own decisions. and i think it feels it can do that because, although the infections are expected to rise through what we are seeing is a definite third wave of coronavirus, this summer peaking at perhaps 100,000 cases per day, ministers seem positive that the link between cases and hospitalisations and deaths from covid has been weakened enough for them to proceed on this basis. we are going to see further basis. we are going to see further basis as well, further shifts in the government's approach. people who are fully vaccinated different to others who are not. and around changes to the test, trace and isolate system, which currently means that you have to stay at home and isolate for ten days if you have beenin and isolate for ten days if you have been in contact with the mini was tested positive for covid—19, it seems that is going to be changed to
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an approach based on testing, and the health secretary hinted at what that could be this morning. we will have a more proportionate| system of taste, trace and isolate, and it is absolutely- right that those who have been double jabbed, we can take a different approach _ than the one we take today. in terms of what we will do exactly, you will- have to wait for my statement to parliament later today. - more details to come there. there is of course the debate about whether or not the government is going too far in lifting all restrictions and not issuing any guidance across the board on the wearing of masks. and we are seeing a debate about that now. labour, liberal democrats, others here at westminster are accusing the government of going too far and too fast. the shadow health secretary said at his party's position this morning. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and our restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport,
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let's have the ventilation systems in place and let's pay people sick pay. that is labour�*s position, and the debate will continue. but as things stand, the government is ready to go ahead with its step in the road map out of lockdown in england onjuly 19, and more details to come on the situation in schools in england later today from the education secretary. changing from where one bubble of the student is set him at once to a system based around testing that will see more students keptin testing that will see more students kept in schools. and more details on travel, too. with every further evidence of the government putting a line between those who are fully vaccinated and those who are not, perhaps able to return from member countries without the need to quarantine. countries without the need to quarantine-— countries without the need to uuarantine. ., ,, , ., , . countries without the need to uuarantine. ., ,, , . ., quarantine. thank you very much for that.
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we have some new figures this morning from the office for national statistics on the latest deaths involving covid—19 in the uk. they show that there were 118 deaths involving covid—19 in the week ending june the 25th. that's out of a total of 10,052 deaths recorded — 6% below the five—year average. and that figure for covid—19 deaths is up by two on the previous week. the 0ns also says that the total number of deaths recorded involving covid—19 in the uk is now 153,926. let's speak now to the uk government's former chief scientific adviser professor, sir mark walport. thank you forjoining us today. borisjohnson talking yesterday about the potential of 50,000 cases about the potential of 50,000 cases a date by the 19th ofjuly, the health secretary today talking about possibly 100,000 cases a day later in the summer. despite that, is this the time to start thinking
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differently about covid? irate the time to start thinking differently about covid? we are definitely in _ differently about covid? we are definitely in the _ differently about covid? we are definitely in the grip _ differently about covid? we are definitely in the grip of- differently about covid? we are definitely in the grip of a - differently about covid? we are definitely in the grip of a third i definitely in the grip of a third wave. — definitely in the grip of a third wave, and 50,000...100,000 definitely in the grip of a third wave, and 50,000... 100,000 is two doubling _ wave, and 50,000... 100,000 is two doubling times. there is no doubt at all that— doubling times. there is no doubt at all that the _ doubling times. there is no doubt at all that the number of cases is going — all that the number of cases is going to — all that the number of cases is going to continue to rise. the very good _ going to continue to rise. the very good news — going to continue to rise. the very good news is we have just heard is that the _ good news is we have just heard is that the death rate, mercifully, is not rising — that the death rate, mercifully, is not rising very significantly at the moment, — not rising very significantly at the moment, though hospitalisations are also rising _ moment, though hospitalisations are also rising as well. they're up at about— also rising as well. they're up at about 350 — also rising as well. they're up at about 350 a day to day. that doubles to 700 _ about 350 a day to day. that doubles to 700 to _ about 350 a day to day. that doubles to 700 to 1400. so there will be some _ to 700 to 1400. so there will be some pressure on the nhs. but we are in this— some pressure on the nhs. but we are in this position because the vaccine programme has been so successful. but we _ programme has been so successful. but we still— programme has been so successful. but we still have about 35% of adults — but we still have about 35% of adults that have only had one dose of the _ adults that have only had one dose of the vaccine, and so getting on with the — of the vaccine, and so getting on with the vaccine programme is absolutely critical. is with the vaccine programme is absolutely critical.— with the vaccine programme is absolutely critical. is that a yes, ainhoa or _
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absolutely critical. is that a yes, ainhoa or a _ absolutely critical. is that a yes, ainhoa or a maybe _ absolutely critical. is that a yes, ainhoa or a maybe to _ absolutely critical. is that a yes, ainhoa or a maybe to that - absolutely critical. is that a yes, - ainhoa or a maybe to that question, is it time to think differently about covid? it is it time to think differently about covid?— is it time to think differently about covid? . . , , ., about covid? it clearly is time to start thinking — about covid? it clearly is time to start thinking differently, - about covid? it clearly is time to start thinking differently, and i about covid? it clearly is time to start thinking differently, and it | start thinking differently, and it is a matter ofjudgment as to whether— is a matter ofjudgment as to whether to move all of the restrictions. the social distancing review _ restrictions. the social distancing review came out yesterday as well, and of _ review came out yesterday as well, and of course wearing facemasks as part of— and of course wearing facemasks as part of that — and of course wearing facemasks as part of that. there is a lot of uncertainty and both chris whitty and patrick ballance were rightly in my view _ and patrick ballance were rightly in my view rather cautious. a and patrick ballance were rightly in my view rather cautious.— and patrick ballance were rightly in my view rather cautious. a couple of months back. _ my view rather cautious. a couple of months back, he _ my view rather cautious. a couple of months back, he said _ my view rather cautious. a couple of months back, he said the _ my view rather cautious. a couple of months back, he said the mistake i months back, he said the mistake that has been made repeatedly is relaxing just slightly too early. do you think we are in that situation now, or if the government had said yesterday, "look, we are going to get rid of lots of these restrictions but we want people to keep wearing masks indoors, in crowded public places," i would have been enough? i crowded public places,�* i would have been enough?— crowded public places," i would have been enough? i think the guidance is auoin to been enough? i think the guidance is aoian to be been enough? i think the guidance is going to be really — been enough? i think the guidance is going to be really important, - been enough? i think the guidance is going to be really important, and - going to be really important, and hopefully— going to be really important, and hopefully that will be really, really — hopefully that will be really, really clear. because i think it is still the — really clear. because i think it is still the case that the virus likes
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to transmit most effectively in indore. — to transmit most effectively in indore, crowded, poorly ventilated spaces. _ indore, crowded, poorly ventilated spaces, and those are the spaces where _ spaces, and those are the spaces where it— spaces, and those are the spaces where it makes logical sense to keep wearing _ where it makes logical sense to keep wearing masks and if possible some degree _ wearing masks and if possible some degree of— wearing masks and if possible some degree of social distancing. sol think— degree of social distancing. sol think clear— degree of social distancing. sol think clear guidance is necessary. and the _ think clear guidance is necessary. and the question then is the extent to which— and the question then is the extent to which people take notice of that guidance — to which people take notice of that guidance. all to which people take notice of that auidance. . ., , ., guidance. all about personal responsibility, _ guidance. all about personal responsibility, we _ guidance. all about personal responsibility, we are - guidance. all about personal responsibility, we are told. i responsibility, we are told. personaljudgment. and clearly there is going to be a clash of personal responsibilities and judgment as we move towards the 19th and beyond. so how, as a society, do we deal with that? i how, as a society, do we deal with that? 4' how, as a society, do we deal with that? ~ , how, as a society, do we deal with that? 4' , ., that? i think it is about some dearee that? i think it is about some degree of— that? i think it is about some degree of social _ that? i think it is about some degree of social solidarity, i degree of social solidarity, actually. it's not only yourself you're — actually. it's not only yourself you're protecting but actually you are protecting others. and so how you behave — are protecting others. and so how you behave matter as to how others -et you behave matter as to how others get on _ you behave matter as to how others get on and — you behave matter as to how others get on and whether they catch this virus _ get on and whether they catch this virus or— get on and whether they catch this virus or not — get on and whether they catch this virus or not. and obviously, the more _ virus or not. and obviously, the more people that are vaccinated the superposition we will be in. there is no _ superposition we will be in. there
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is no doubt — superposition we will be in. there is no doubt that the vaccine programme is enormously successful, and it— programme is enormously successful, and it has— programme is enormously successful, and it has very significantly weakened the link between the infection and the most severe effects — infection and the most severe effects. nevertheless, it still enough— effects. nevertheless, it still enough to give people a miserable time even — enough to give people a miserable time even if they don't get the worst— time even if they don't get the worst effects. we time even if they don't get the worst effects.— time even if they don't get the worst effects. ~ . . ., , worst effects. we watch the warnings about the delta _ worst effects. we watch the warnings about the delta variant, _ worst effects. we watch the warnings about the delta variant, and - worst effects. we watch the warnings about the delta variant, and then - worst effects. we watch the warnings about the delta variant, and then as| about the delta variant, and then as we saw it become the dominant strain here in the uk, how concerned are you as england plans to remove all of those remaining restrictions about the room for another variant to emerge, because that is one of the big topics that scientists like yourself are discussing. the virus is based on _ yourself are discussing. the virus is based on the _ yourself are discussing. the virus is based on the laws _ yourself are discussing. the virus is based on the laws of _ yourself are discussing. the virus is based on the laws of nature, i yourself are discussing. the virus l is based on the laws of nature, and will evolve — is based on the laws of nature, and will evolve as darwin discovered in the 19th _ will evolve as darwin discovered in the 19th century. there that give the 19th century. there that give the virus — the 19th century. there that give the virus an advantage will prosper. so, inevitably, it will remain a threat — so, inevitably, it will remain a threat of— so, inevitably, it will remain a threat of new variants. there is nothing — threat of new variants. there is nothing very frightening on the
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medium — nothing very frightening on the medium horizon at the moment. of course _ medium horizon at the moment. of course we _ medium horizon at the moment. of course we remain vulnerable to viruses — course we remain vulnerable to viruses where ever they emerge in the world, — viruses where ever they emerge in the world, and of course the uk is by far— the world, and of course the uk is by far and — the world, and of course the uk is by far and away the global country in terms _ by far and away the global country in terms of— by far and away the global country in terms of sequencing the virus, but that— in terms of sequencing the virus, but that is— in terms of sequencing the virus, but that is a _ in terms of sequencing the virus, but that is a risk for the future and i— but that is a risk for the future and i think— but that is a risk for the future and i think everyone has acknowledged the fact that the virus can work— acknowledged the fact that the virus can work in— acknowledged the fact that the virus can work in ways that could cause further— can work in ways that could cause further restrictions to be introduced in the future. we had heard the bma _ introduced in the future. we had heard the bma are _ introduced in the future. we had heard the bma are urging - introduced in the future. we had heard the bma are urging the i introduced in the future. we had i heard the bma are urging the prime minister to say that people should continue to wear masks. do you think this is a point at which we are seeing a really clear divergence between the political thinking and the scientific medical thinking? i think the political thinking is actually— think the political thinking is actually that what the public now it needs _ actually that what the public now it needs is— actually that what the public now it needs is clear guidance, so i don't think— needs is clear guidance, so i don't think there — needs is clear guidance, so i don't think there is a dispute about the value _ think there is a dispute about the value of— think there is a dispute about the value of masks. 0r indeed any of the other— value of masks. 0r indeed any of the other measures. i think it's a political, _ other measures. i think it's a political, philosophical point about how to _ political, philosophical point about how to encourage citizens in the uk to behave — how to encourage citizens in the uk to behave. by the same token, the
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misery— to behave. by the same token, the misery that— to behave. by the same token, the misery that has been cast over the last year— misery that has been cast over the last year by— misery that has been cast over the last year by the restrictions on people's— last year by the restrictions on people's freedoms, the economy, on mental— people's freedoms, the economy, on mental health are very severe indeed — mental health are very severe indeed if_ mental health are very severe indeed. if someone is to let the brake _ indeed. if someone is to let the brake off, — indeed. if someone is to let the brake off, it is better to do it in the summer because the risks of respiratory— the summer because the risks of respiratory infection in the winter are just _ respiratory infection in the winter are just so — respiratory infection in the winter are just so much worse.— respiratory infection in the winter are just so much worse. thank you so much for your— are just so much worse. thank you so much for your time _ are just so much worse. thank you so much for your time today. _ are just so much worse. thank you so much for your time today. the i are just so much worse. thank you so much for your time today. the uk i much for your time today. the uk government's former chief scientific adviser there. some of your comments. "i often travel to 0kehampton on the bus and will be wearing my mask on crowded places and buses even though i am exempt because of breathing difficulties. 0ne can't be too careful." "i will continue to wear a mask primarily to protect others. this is doing my duty as a member of society. i also want to avoid getting long covid." " we can still enjoy our freedoms in a
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mask, but not wearing them will condemn the most vulnerable to continued lockdown and isolation. why can't people just be decent and think of others?" "the mask is staying firmly on. no confidence whatsoever in the westminster government's ability to manage covid—19." government's ability to manage covid-19." "it government's ability to manage covid—19." "it would seem sensible to advise mask wearing in hospitals, public transport in the future." so far, everybody who has been in touch has said they will wear their mask. maybe you are not going to and want to get in touch with me as well. whatever your thoughts are on this, or the plans to do away with bubbles, find another way to deal with covid in schools, also treating people who are double vaccinated differently, i would love to hear your thoughts on those stories today. do get in touch with me on twitter and use the hashtag, and i will try to read out some more of your comments.
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germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk and four other countries. from tomorrow, british tourists will be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. those who are fully vaccinated also won't have to quarantine. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill has this report. just two weeks ago, angela merkel was trying, in vain, to persuade other eu leaders to impose tighter restrictions on travellers from the uk. now germany is to relax its own rules. the government, worried by the spread of the delta variant, had, in effect, banned anyone who wasn't a german citizen or resident from entering the country from britain but, as of tomorrow, that will no longer apply, although people who aren't fully vaccinated will have to quarantine for at least five days. the decision will no doubt be seen by some as a victory for borisjohnson, who discussed the issue with chancellor merkel during their meeting last week. others may interpret it as a concession to the demands of other european countries keen to welcome back british tourists, but the relaxation of restrictions, which also applies to portugal,
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russia, india and nepal, may simply represent an acknowledgement on the part of the authorities here that the delta variant is now fast becoming the dominant strain in germany, too. a second man has been charged with common assault after england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, was accosted last month in a central london park. jonathan chew was charged with common assault and obstructing police. he'll appear at westminster magistrates�* court later today. the company that owns vauxhall is expected to announce plans today to build electric vans at its ellesmere port plant in cheshire. the investment, said to be worth hundreds of millions of pounds, would safeguard more than 1,000 factoryjobs. the future of the plant has been in doubt after vauxhall�*s parent company, stellantis, scrapped plans to build its new astra model there. more now on the health secretary, sajid javid, saying the number of covid cases
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in the uk could rise as high as 100,000 a day, after legal restrictions are lifted in england. mrjavid said the country was in "uncharted territory" ahead of the expected reopening in less than two weeks' time. let's get some reaction to the easing of restrictions. we can speak to michael kill, chief executive of the night time industries association. everyone knows that the night time industries association, everyone employed in that sector, has been waiting for some progress for a very long time. broadly, what is your reaction? brute long time. broadly, what is your reaction? ~ ., , long time. broadly, what is your reaction? ~ . , ., _ reaction? we are very encouraged by the prime minister's _ reaction? we are very encouraged by the prime minister's announcement. the prime minister's announcement that came out suggesting that in stage four, many of these measures or mitigations will be dropped. but we obviously as you appreciate are still anticipating an announcement on the 12th that he is going to confirm whether the 19th is going to go ahead, so there is a lot of work on our part that we need to do. we
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are waiting for guidance to come out. as you can appreciate, it's very encouraging and there is a lot of emotional response across our members in particular, and the wider industry, at the knowledge that we have somewhat of an addictive date that we can look forward to opening on. �* ., �* , that we can look forward to opening on. �* . �* , , ., that we can look forward to opening on. . �*, ~ ., that we can look forward to opening on. . �* , m, ., on. but, and i'm sure you know what i'm aoain on. but, and i'm sure you know what i'm going to — on. but, and i'm sure you know what i'm going to say. _ on. but, and i'm sure you know what i'm going to say. we _ on. but, and i'm sure you know what i'm going to say, we heard _ on. but, and i'm sure you know whatj i'm going to say, we heard yesterday from the chief medical and scientific advisers, that crowded, indoor spaces are the riskiest environments for transmitting covid, and if a significant number of the people going to nightclubs and so on are in the younger age group, perhaps haven't been vaccinated yet, how worried are you that you are going to be able to give people the sort of experience that they would ideally like to have and be able to keep them safe? it’s ideally like to have and be able to keep them safe?— ideally like to have and be able to keep them safe? it's our “ob now to take u- keep them safe? it's our “ob now to take up that — keep them safe? it's our “ob now to take up that mantle i keep them safe? it's our “ob now to take up that mantle and i keep them safe? it's ourjob now to take up that mantle and work i keep them safe? it's ourjob now to take up that mantle and work hard i keep them safe? it's ourjob now to i take up that mantle and work hard to make sure that we deliver the right guidelines to keep not only our customers, but more importantly our staff safe. and that is maintaining
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sanitation, protecting ourfront sanitation, protecting our front line sanitation, protecting ourfront line staff, making sure that our ventilation systems are up to spec, and really working hard alongside the guidelines to make sure that we deliver a level of confidence in our protocols to people that are coming into our spaces. there are still a lot of work to do it now. we are very encouraged with the fact we are able to open. as you can appreciate, this is the start and we need to maintain that confidence not only on our staff and customers that we are going to deliver safe environments for them as well.— for them as well. would you anticipate. _ for them as well. would you anticipate, for _ for them as well. would you anticipate, for example, i for them as well. would you anticipate, for example, in i for them as well. would you i anticipate, for example, in some venues staff continuing to wear masks if they are coming into close contact with many, many different people? would you anticipate some venues perhaps requiring, even though they don't have to do this, people coming in to show proof of a negative covid test?— negative covid test? that's down to choice. as negative covid test? that's down to choice- as you _ negative covid test? that's down to choice. as you can _ negative covid test? that's down to choice. as you can appreciate, i negative covid test? that's down to choice. as you can appreciate, we i choice. as you can appreciate, we are going to wait for the guidance to come out. individual businesses may feel that that is necessary.
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it's not something that we have driven towards. we are very confident that the vaccination roll—out programme has been quite substantive and we are in a position, as the prime minister mentioned, lodging into the summer is a better period given that the hospitalisation levels and the pressures on the nhs, and we have got a job to do. it is quite clearly that position. if people decide that they want to wear masks, we are going to have to support them in their response to maintaining their safety as well as other people's safety as well as other people's safety within those environments. tell us a little bit more about the efforts going on to make the environment as safe as possible? you talked about continued good sanitation measures, but what about ventilation? is that i was going to be possible? to get better ventilation in place? has be possible? to get better ventilation in place? as you can appreciate. _ ventilation in place? as you can appreciate, that _ ventilation in place? as you can appreciate, that presents i ventilation in place? as you can appreciate, that presents manyj appreciate, that presents many challenges. there are different ways to do it. things like pathogen reduction systems have been looked at. i think we will find that gone
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are the days, 15, 20 years ago, when ventilation systems were poorly adapted. they had been upgraded right across the board, and we're pretty confident that the systems would possibly meet many of the regulations required by public health in particular, and many of these purpose—built spaces are built with that in mind. from our perspective, we have moved on quite a way. nightclubs are not the nightclubs of the past that are just sweaty rooms. they are environments that are very well circulated... as you can appreciate, we are willing to make every effort that they are maintained appropriately, all the right mitigations are put in place to make sure they are as safe as we can make them. to make sure they are as safe as we can make them-— to make sure they are as safe as we can make them. with covid, there is alwa s a can make them. with covid, there is always a risk- _ can make them. with covid, there is always a risk. whatever _ can make them. with covid, there is always a risk. whatever area - can make them. with covid, there is always a risk. whatever area of i always a risk. whatever area of life, the risks can be mitigated in some circumstances more than others. do you think that a lot of the patrons who will come to venues in the night—time industry sector will be saying, "look, we want to get
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back to this, we know there is a risk, but we are trying to balance the risk with living our lives." exactly. we have been extremely encouraged by the amount of people who have reached out and are keen to take us up and get into our venues again. you got to remember that, just taking this point, 850,000 18—year—olds who turned 18 have never been to a festival or event, never been to a festival or event, never experienced freshers at university. it's notjust about coming to a nightclub to drink, it is much to come and experience the culture, the music and all those social engagements. and it's a big part of social well—being. 0ur concern is that we think we can give a huge amount back, but we absolutely can present safe environments, no not dissimilar to the pub, restaurant and bar
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environments that we are already seeing starts to open it now. briefly, will there be any plans to monitor... it may not be the responsibility of the venues, but is there any way of monitoring whether, once nightclubs, etc, are opened, whether that is leading to hotspots of infection? brute whether that is leading to hotspots of infection?— of infection? we will be working closely with _ of infection? we will be working closely with government i of infection? we will be working closely with government as i of infection? we will be working closely with government as we i of infection? we will be working i closely with government as we have done for the last 16 months, and we will make sure we are feeding back any challenges as we have done with the test and trace system. we will be monitoring very heavily, we will be monitoring very heavily, we will be monitoring very heavily, we will be monitoring clear guidelines, more importantly, there is a big communication strategy that needs to be put together, particularly for clubs, to give people confidence but also give them direction if they are having symptoms before attending some of these premises. we have a thick party play in this and we recognise that, and we are going to work very hard to make sure that we
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create those environments that people can once again enjoy. people can once again en'oy. thank ou ve people can once again en'oy. thank you very much. * around 1,000 more babies would survive each year in england, if maternity services were as safe as those in sweden, according to a group of mps. the health and social care committee says a lack of staff, and a blame culture which prevents lessons from being learned, are significantly hindering maternity services. jeremy hunt, who chairs the committee, says bringing in more staff — and adopting a "no—blame" compensation scheme like sweden's — could make a significant difference. staffing is something that needs to be sorted out. we need at least 500 more obstetricians. and the cost of that does cost something, and of course it's between 200 and 350 million pounds a year. but compare that to the £2.3 billion every year we are spending in maternity claims,
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in lawsuits, just in maternity. this is not all of the nhs, just maternity. about a tenth of that cost would pay for the staff we need, and we would save that extra money many times over. so it makes financial sense. most importantly, it will help us avoid the horrific human tragedies that i'm afraid we have seen all too many of. the number of people known to have died in the miami apartment block which partially collapsed two weeks ago has risen to 28, after another body was found in the rubble overnight. search teams were able to resume their operations after the rest of the building was demolished on sunday night. 117 people are still missing. meanwhile, florida is bracing for the arrival of tropical storm elsa — with strong winds already lashing miami. elsa has already battered parts
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of cuba and is due to pass near the florida keys early on tuesday, with the risk of a life—threatening storm surge. the time is 11:28am. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaous. hi, there. the weather is pretty unsettled at the moment. we've had an unusually deep area of low pressure for the time of year sweep up from the south—west during the night and today is going to leave a legacy of cloud, some rain in places, but also sunshine and showers. a mixture of everything. here it is, this deep low, affecting mostly england and wales, pushing across into the north sea as we head through the course of the day, but there will be a hang—back of the rain which has spread northwards across england and wales — it will be affecting eastern scotland, north—east england. elsewhere, western scotland, northern ireland, the rest of england and wales, sunshine, some showers, some of which could be heavy, but also areas of cloud and more persistent rain at times, so it really is a mixture of pretty much everything. temperatures a little bit lower than what we expect
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at this time of year — around 15 to maybe 18 or 19 degrees in the sunnier spots. it stays unsettled as we head through this evening and overnight. there will be further areas of cloud, some showers, too, some of which could be quite heavy, but for most of us temperatures remaining in double figures overnight. hello this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks' time,
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as the health secretary warns that new cases "could go as high as 100,000" a day. this vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and our restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk. from tomorrow, they will be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. a draft law is being introduced to the british parliament to prevent asylum—seekers staying in the uk if they have already passed through a safe country. one of the biggest events in cinema makes a grand return, as the cannes film festival holds its opening ceremony coming up: we'll see how the social media platform tiktok is helping
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buskers earn hundreds of pounds and legions of fans. sport now and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. before we came to you i said to you, will gavin be starting with football or tennis, will gavin be starting with football ortennis, in will gavin be starting with football or tennis, in fact it's cricket, but isn't it great that we have so much sport to talk about? yes, it is a bit of a reversal that isn't it? we have heard this morning that the entire england one—day squad are isolating following a covid—19 outbreak in their bubble. 18 replacement players have been drafted in to play pakistan in the 0d! series, including nine upcapped players, with ben stokes named captain and chris silverwood back as head coach. following routine testing on monday, three players and four members of management tested positive. the rest of the party have been deemed close contacts, so also need to isolate. the first one—day match is set to take place on thursday in cardiff.
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the 10—day isolation period will span all three 0dis against pakistan. there was heartbreak for british teenager emma raducanu at wimbledon last night. after becoming an overnight success at sw19, she was forced to retire from her last—16 match against ajla tomljanovic for medical reasons. the 18—year—old fought a tough first set, which she lost 6—4, and seemed to be having trouble breathing when 3—0 down in the second. raducanu requested a medical time—out and went off court before it was announced that she had been forced to concede the match. sally nugent spoke to former british number one anne keothavong, who knows raducanu well. it is difficult, look, because everyone is going to want a piece of property as good people around her who will do whatever they can to make sure her pigsty on the ground. she is a sensible young girl and she still hasn't played a full year on the tour yet, so for her, she will just want to get back at it, she
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works hard, she has the great work ethic, she wants to be back on the practice court as soon as possible and fly out to her next tournament as soon as she can. so ajla tomyanovic will now face world number one and fellow australian ash barty in the quarterfinals later today. top seed barty overcame french open champion barbora krejcikova with relative ease on monday and will look to reach herfirst wimbledon semifinal. meawhile, in the men's draw, novak djokovic continued his bid for a record—equalling 20th men's grand slam title with a routine win over chile's cristian garin. the world number one sailed through to the quarterfinals in straight sets. he will play marton fucsovics next. anotherfamiliarface is through to the quarterfinals — eight—time wimbledon champion roger federer beat italy's lorenzo sonego in straight sets. not long to go now — just one day until england's semifinal match against denmark and manager gareth southgate says he and the team have the opportunity to bring happiness to millions.
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the squad continued their preparations as they trained at st george's park today ahead of their first semifinal at a european championship in 25 years. it's what it means to the country, really. it's not... i think if you're a coach, it's a bit like being a parent. you gone past the moment where it's about you and it's about what you pass on to others. and when you're the england manager, you have the opportunity to bring happiness to so many millions of people. you have the opportunity to do the opposite as well by the way. but you do have the opportunity to make people create memories, um, and most importantly, for your players to try to create the best version of them as a group and the best of them individually that they can hope to have. before all that, it's italy versus spain in the first semifinal at wembley tonight. both teams trained after arriving in london yesterday. the italians have been one
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of the standout sides so far and are one of the favourites to win the tournament. so who is going to win that one? you'll remember paul the octopus and his predictions. well, we now have the help of a psychic sausage dog called r2d2. will he go for the spanish serrano palma ham or the italian lasagne? he sniffs around the ham, but isn't too fussed, but the lasgane is a hit and he tucks in. so italy to win, then! idid i did predict england would beat ukraine 4—0. i reckon 3—1 with denmark this time. my denmark this time. my dogs would be both of those at the same time! thank you very much. bars and pubs in england will no longer need customers to sign into venues using the test and trace
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app under new guidance due to come into effect from 19th july. so will that mean the end of the app altogether? our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones has been looking into it. the app will help us safely live our lives, protecting you and others. it had a difficult birth, but since last september, millions of us have used the nhs test and trace app to scan in when we visit a cafe or pub, and more importantly, to get alerts telling us when we may have been in contact with someone with covid—19. here's how it works. i've got the app and i'm waiting for a bus, standing reasonably close to a complete stranger who's also got it. 0ur phones are recording that contact. a day or so later, the stranger enters a positive covid test into the app, and that triggers an alert, telling me to go into isolation. the app was delayed after an early version trialled on the isle of wight proved unreliable and raised privacy concerns. one of those who advised the government to change tack says
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the final version has worked. something of the order of half a million to 600,000 cases were averted as a result of using this app. so that has to be worth it. the nhs covid—19 app has been downloaded nearly 26 million times, but we don't know how many people are still using it. more than a million positive test results have been recorded in the app, and they've triggered nearly two and a half million contact tracing alerts, sending people into isolation. you can see here how there's been a spike in those alerts, as cases have risen in the last few weeks. the fact that thousands of locations ask you to scan in to register a visit, has encouraged use of the app. but what happens when places like this are told they no longer need to get people to check in? it seems possible that many customers will simply decide to turn the app off, especially given the high number of alerts it's sending out right now. with infections on the rise again, some businesses say the app
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is causing them real problems as staff are sent home. and amongst the public, there are mixed feelings about sticking with it. if i don't need it to get into restaurants and stuff, yeah, i'll get rid of it for sure. as things are getting better, and i had my two jabs, and hopefully everyone else will have the second jab, i might not use it. i think it's important that we can keep track of people _ that may be infected, _ and especially with new variants coming in as well. i think it's really important. the team behind the app strongly believes it still has a job to do. but as life gets back to normal, persuading people not to turn it off may prove tricky. rory cellan—jones, bbc news, west london. coming up on the news channel later, we'll have full coverage of two covid—19 updates to mps at westminster. at half—past twelve we're expecting the health secretary sajid javid to set out how people who have had two coronavirus jabs can take a different approach
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to the restrictions. and then, at about one—thirty, the education secretary gavin williamson is due to make a statement on easing restrictions in education settings in england. for most of us, grabbing a face—covering as we leave the house has become as natural as picking up our keys, wallet and phone. in less than a fortnight, as we've been hearing, wearing one in england will become a matter of personal choice. graham satchell has been finding out how yesterday's announcement was received. it's the first time in more than a year this group of musicians have met up in person. for george, the prospect of no restrictions, no social distancing, no masks, is massive. well, i'm looking forward to getting back to living my life as it was before. it's going to be good for me in my line of work that i can actually do singing in a bar with a microphone
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without a mask on. it's going to be very useful to actually be able to work again doing that. lorraine is a ukulele teacher, her income decimated by not being able to hold classes in person. nevertheless, she's worried restrictions are being lifted too quickly. i think i might be a bit more cautious. i'd love to be able to be in person again, but not at the risk of my long term health. public opinion is split between those desperate to return to normality and those worried about the virus still spreading. 0n the street, the signs are everywhere, from shopfronts to buses, but wearing a mask in england will no longer be mandatory in just a couple of weeks. i think is quite good because we've been living with these forso long, so, yeah, hopefully everything goes well and we can get rid of the masks. i firmly believe there's still a lot of people that aren't inoculated. and if we pick something up, even though we've been inoculated,
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we can still pass it on. so ijust think for a little bit longer, we should be holding onto the masks. we have to learn to live with it. i totally appreciate that. but equally, i'm not too sure we're at the stage where i the government canjust make it an individual choice, _ there has to be some parameters and there has to be some - accountability there in terms i of where does the government stop and the individual begin, so to speak. i face masks were made compulsory a year ago injuly. they've had a disproportionate impact on some, like those with hearing difficulties. a mask makes lipreading impossible. the isolation, as we've seen mental health—wise across the population has been tough. but for a community that are isolated in a way anyway, it's been incredibly tough with the masks and the not being able to hear. but from a pure lipreading point of view, yes, being able
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to lipread will be a definite advantage. others are really worried about masks becoming voluntary. for hundreds of thousands of people with a suppressed immune system, the vaccine isn't totally effective, and the face covering is a last line of defence. i will continue to wear a mask because of the incidence that we are unsure of the efficacy of the vaccine. i am double vaccinated, but i did get covid in march when i'd had one vaccine. so, yes, iwill still be wearing my mask. there will be winners and losers when restrictions are lifted in england and little consensus about whether it's the right or the wrong thing to do. graham satchell, bbc news. a few tweets on the subject. some
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person sets that facemask wearing has become almost cult—like, it is like we have been told that we don't have immune systems. another person says that we have been abandoned with new guidance. this one from joanne, my husband and i were both double injected a couple of months ago, last week we tested positive. i will continue to wear my mask. thank you very much for those tweets. the owners of vauxhall are holding a press conference about the future of their factory at ellesmere port, let's join it now.
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it is my great pleasure to be here today to have this announcement after so many months of uncertainty. at vauxhall we will celebrate our 60th anniversary next year and with the secretary of state for business, energy and industry, we can give this historic fight and historic signalfor its this historic fight and historic signal for its sustainability. we can confirm our commitment to vauxhall, our iconic british brand. the transformation of the automotive industry is a challenge for all manufacturers and we can say that we are at the forefront of all requirements to reduce c02 are at the forefront of all requirements to reduce co2 emissions and offering to our customers a
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large range of vehicles to help them to switch to electrified solutions of mobility. at a time when the british government has taken strong decisions to end the sale of new internal combustion powered vehicles, and before the european union presented new regulations on 2030 c02 union presented new regulations on 2030 co2 emissions, we have decided to lead the way with the transformation and our ceo will disclose our energy plan tomorrow... sorry, on thursday. i am disclose our energy plan tomorrow... sorry, on thursday. iam proud disclose our energy plan tomorrow... sorry, on thursday. i am proud to confirm that ellesmere port is ready for this transition and will be a strong asset in the footprints in
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the future. indeed, ellesmere port will be the first plant to be fully dedicated to a battery electric vehicles. we are also an industry leader in lcd. we have number one market position in europe. vauxhall, 0pel market position in europe. vauxhall, opel, peugeot, citroen are already offering all electric versions of their van model, and indeed vauxhall is the number one in the uk for electric lcd vehicles. at ellesmere port we produce eight of these cars, starting from 2022. we will produce vauxhall and 0pel cars, we will
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produce partner, the citron bar lingo, and the passenger car derivative. vauxhall and 0pel, the peugeot, and the citron bar lingo. this motor coupled with the 50 kilowatts power battery can power these vehicles. they can be charged 80% in only 30 minutes with a fast charger. this new production will also see a transformation of the planets with a total investment of £1.5 million for a new body shop, for assembly, for compression of the sites. i want to thank the contributors to this great project, the uk government and warrington
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local enterprise partnership and manchester college. i also want to thank you nights, our union and the 1030 employees at the plant. they are the real asset of this plant. they have demonstrated remarkable mindset and flexibility during these last months of uncertainty. keeping focus on improving the performance of the plants and the quality of its products. they are the ones who will be at the heart of the success of this transformation. today, as a tribute to the spirit of performance and collaboration, we are offering ellesmere port vauxhall and the british automotive industry and you hear of all electrical engineering
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manufacturing and a sustainable future. thank you all and i'm very happy to leave the floor to the secretary of state. thank you so much. this is a remarkable day and many of you will know _ remarkable day and many of you will know the _ remarkable day and many of you will know the months of uncertainty, conversations we have had, and the sheer— conversations we have had, and the sheer resilience that i would suggest _ sheer resilience that i would suggest the workforce here have shown — suggest the workforce here have shown i— suggest the workforce here have shown. ijust spoke to mark and he said the _ shown. ijust spoke to mark and he said the one — shown. ijust spoke to mark and he said the one thing was that we never .ave said the one thing was that we never gave up. _ said the one thing was that we never gave up, and i think that phrase really— gave up, and i think that phrase really summarises the spirits, the remarkable spirit that the workforce here showed in what was an uncertain time _ here showed in what was an uncertain time in— here showed in what was an uncertain time inthat— here showed in what was an uncertain time. in that vein i would like to thank— time. in that vein i would like to thank the — time. in that vein i would like to thank the workforce, i would like to thank the workforce, ! would like to thank— thank the workforce, i would like to thank the _ thank the workforce, i would like to
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thank the union, as well, for their role _ thank the union, as well, for their role i_ thank the union, as well, for their role i would _ thank the union, as well, for their role. i would also like to thank the local— role. i would also like to thank the local authorities who have always engaged — local authorities who have always engaged with this, and i have always believed _ engaged with this, and i have always believed in— engaged with this, and i have always believed in the remarkable people and the _ believed in the remarkable people and the talents that really drives this fantastic operation. i'm also very pleased that the uk government, and certainly myself as business secretary, have always been very engaged — secretary, have always been very engaged and concerned to drive progress — engaged and concerned to drive progress here because we implicitly believed, _ progress here because we implicitly believed, not only in the uk as a place _ believed, not only in the uk as a place to— believed, not only in the uk as a place to invest, but also in the great — place to invest, but also in the great talent and commitment of our workforce — great talent and commitment of our workforce i— great talent and commitment of our workforce. i was really pleased just coming _ workforce. i was really pleased just coming in _ workforce. i was really pleased just coming in to see some of the apprentices and also people who graduated from the apprentice programme here in ellesmere port. stellantis. — programme here in ellesmere port. stellantis, as we all know, is deeply— stellantis, as we all know, is deeply committed to the uk and this £100 million investment is a great
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development. i think that this plants, — development. i think that this plants, this all electric vehicle facility, — plants, this all electric vehicle facility, the first that stellantis have _ facility, the first that stellantis have in — facility, the first that stellantis have in the world, will be a beacon of how— have in the world, will be a beacon of how automotive manufacturing can be done _ of how automotive manufacturing can be done in _ of how automotive manufacturing can be done in the uk and it underlines the fact— be done in the uk and it underlines the fact that automotive manufacturing, the automotive industry— manufacturing, the automotive industry is at the centre of our manufacturing as a country. this site will— manufacturing as a country. this site will see thousands of new electric— site will see thousands of new electric vans being built and i was very interested to learn that next year will — very interested to learn that next year will be the 60th year in which automotive manufacturing has taken place at _ automotive manufacturing has taken place at this site. 1962 was the year— place at this site. 1962 was the year of— place at this site. 1962 was the year of the beatles's first hit single. — year of the beatles's first hit single, their first number one, year of the beatles's first hit single, theirfirst number one, so it isa— single, theirfirst number one, so it isa very— single, theirfirst number one, so it is a very long time ago. for all that— it is a very long time ago. for all
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that time, — it is a very long time ago. for all that time, manufacturing has taken place _ that time, manufacturing has taken place here — that time, manufacturing has taken place here at a very high level. i am looking _ place here at a very high level. i am looking forward to many decades to come _ am looking forward to many decades to come in— am looking forward to many decades to come in which this site will be a world _ to come in which this site will be a world beater. the context of this, i will world beater. the context of this, i wiltiust_ world beater. the context of this, i witljust say— world beater. the context of this, i willjust say in summary, is of course — willjust say in summary, is of course transition. i am delighted to see so— course transition. i am delighted to see so many workers here, so many people _ see so many workers here, so many people committed to the fight against — people committed to the fight against climate change, committed to making _ against climate change, committed to making the _ against climate change, committed to making the transition and i think that britain, the uk, is a real that britain, the uk, is areal leader— that britain, the uk, is areal leader in— that britain, the uk, is a real leader in this and it is really gratifying to see an announcement of this kind _ gratifying to see an announcement of this kind in _ gratifying to see an announcement of this kind in the year of copd 26. for the — this kind in the year of copd 26. for the quality of the jobs, for the commitment to net zero, for the historic— commitment to net zero, for the historic commitment and a tradition that we _ historic commitment and a tradition that we represent here, this is a fantastic— that we represent here, this is a fantastic announcement. i would like to fantastic announcement. ! would like
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to thank— fantastic announcement. i would like to thank arno, mark, paul, javier and everyone who has worked tirelessly _ and everyone who has worked tirelessly to make this happen. thank— tirelessly to make this happen. thank you _ tirelessly to make this happen. thank you very much and now i am going _ thank you very much and now i am going to _ thank you very much and now i am going to hand over to the prime minister. — going to hand over to the prime minister, who unfortunately can't come _ minister, who unfortunately can't come here — minister, who unfortunately can't come here in person, but apparently he is _ come here in person, but apparently he is going _ come here in person, but apparently he is going to address a few words to us— he is going to address a few words to us by— he is going to address a few words to us by video. so thank you very much _ to us by video. so thank you very much it— to us by video. so thank you very much it has— to us by video. so thank you very much. it has been a fantastic announcement and good luck for the future _ future. applause. iam i am absolutely thrilled that stellantis is going to open europe is �*s first dedicated electric vehicle factory right here in the united kingdom. it's a huge vote of confidence in our economy, in the people of ellesmere port and post—brexit trading relationships and it is a great example of the kind of high skilled, well—paid jobs
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that we are securing as part of a green industrial revolution, which is why we work closely with stellantis is why we work closely with stella ntis to is why we work closely with stellantis to make sure this investment, this factory, this great opportunity came to this country. here in the uk we are entering the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2030 and with many other countries making similar plans on working towards net zero, delivery companies the world over will soon lead to huge fleets of zero emission vehicles. with tens of thousands of them rolling off the assembly line in cheshire each year, the stellantis plant marks the start of a new age of cheap and efficient mass produced electric vehicles. i could not —— could not be more proud that in just could not —— could not be more proud that injust a could not —— could not be more proud that in just a couple of years from now, your packages will be gliding silently to your door in an electric fan marked made in great britain.
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thank you very much everybody... so the prime minister there is a saying that the announcement by stellantis, the owners of vauxhall about their plans to build electric vans at its stellantis plant in cheshire is a vote of confidence in the economy and the post—brexit trading relationships. we heard the business secretaryjust before that saying that the automotive industry was at the front and centre of the uk's manufacturing offer. before that we heard that this investment in electric vans at ellesmere port in electric vans at ellesmere port in cheshire is a positive signal for the plant was not sustainability any talked about stellantis because my
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commitment to vauxhall, which he described as the iconic british brand. the investment is said to be worth millions of pounds. stellantis says there has been support in that from the uk government and it is understood it will safeguard more than a thousand jobs at the factory. it follows on from the announcement from nissan last week which is building on all electric vehicle in the uk and the giger plant producing electric batteries. today will be the most unsettled day of the week weather—wise, but things will turn to calm down naughty —— at the end of the week. some showers and sunny spells around. it comes off the back of something pretty strong for the time of year, this deep blue which brought severe gales to north—west france overnight,
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strong winds across the channel and a band of heavy rain which is moving across much of england and wales. it is pushing on across the north sea. there will be rain in north—east england and eastern scott for the day. the rest of the country should see sunshine in the afternoon, with a few possibly heavy showers. quite a few possibly heavy showers. quite a mixture of everything. temperature is disappointing, particularly in the north—east we have the rain. 18 or19 the north—east we have the rain. 18 or 19 in the sunshine. for this afternoon and again tomorrow we are likely to see some interruptions from showers at wimbledon. an area of low pressure will scoot off towards norway and leave a legacy of cloud, a bit driver eastern scotland. we have a new feature pushing to the south—west which will bring showers. nowhere will be cold, no lower than 10—40 . this feature
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will enhance the showers across large parts of england and wales for wednesday. we will start up with quite a bit of cloud around then the sunshine will develop. there will be some heavy showers, some of them could be done trhe in england and wales. there will be slow—moving because the winds will be lighter. it will feel a little bit warmer, 18-23 . on it will feel a little bit warmer, 18—23 . on thursday, pressure is trying to build input there is still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow some showers to develop, particularly across scotland and northern ireland. in the south we could be looking at highs of 23. the winds will be like. moving into friday at the weekend, the weather fronts are never too far away, but the pressure wants to continue to build them to we should see some good spells of sunshine on friday, and there is always that threats of showers and some of them could continue to be on the heavy side.
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this is bbc news, the headlines... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. in half an hour, the health secretary will announce plans for people who've received two vaccination jabs — and what it means for self—isolation rules. how do you feel about the restrictions easing in england? what would you like to hear in the health secretary's announcement? and indeed the education secretary's announcement? get in touch with me by tweeting me at annita?mcveigh or by using the hashtag
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bbcyourquestions. vauxhall is to receive a £100 million investment to produce electric vehicles at its plant in ellesemere port. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. a draft law is being introduced to the british parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. and one of the biggest events in cinema makes a grand return as the cannes film festival holds its opening ceremony. hello, and welcome to bbc news. schools in england will find out this afternoon how the government plans to relax the "bubble" rules that mean large numbers of pupils
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are sent home if a single child has a positive covid test. last week, more than 375,000 children in england were off school while isolating for ten days. the education secretary, gavin williamson, is expected to say the changes will come into effect on the 19th ofjuly — when most of england's covid regulations are set to be scrapped. social distancing will be removed for the first time in 16 months. face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement. and limits on socialising will be lifted — bringing an to end to the rule of six indoors. and the advice to work from home will come to an end. meanwhile, new health secretary sajid javid, who we'll hear from at 12:30 in the commons, has said that new cases "could go as high as 100,000" as restrictions ease, and that the people who are double—vaccinated should be treated differently from those who aren't. plans for easing lockdown in
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scotland, wales and northern ireland will be outlined later this month. here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. will hospitals be able to cope? it's a risk the prime minister is contemplating taking, his desire is to remove all covid restrictions across england just as infections are rising fast again. but borisjohnson believes relaxing curbs now in the summer is preferable. waiting could be worse. we run the risk of either opening up at a very difficult time when the virus has an edge, has an advantage, in the colder months, oragain, putting everything off to next year. so i do think it's going to be a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more social distancing. no limits on how many can visit your home, or how many can pack restaurants, bars and pubs. theatres, nightclubs, sports stadiums all open and full. no more empty offices, as the requirement to work from home would end, too.
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but there's a concern a third wave of covid is under way, with an average of more than 25,000 cases a day in the past week, and the number infected is doubling roughly every nine days. his own chief scientific adviser said now is the time to be controlling the virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic at the moment, and therefore we need to behave accordingly in terms of trying to limit transmission spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting the pandemic. the numbers in hospital and dying with covid are relatively low. it's the reason mrjohnson believes he can go ahead. and he wants to remove the legal obligation to wear a mask, too. but the scientists are cautious, saying they will continue to wear theirs. there was a really clear consensus that under all circumstances, some degree of further social distancing will be maintained, needs to be maintained,
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even after the restrictions are lifted in law. and that's been part of the road map all the way through. and that is widely supported by the scientific views. and today, we'll hear more about the plans for schools. here, too, the government is hoping to lift restrictions to put an end to bubbles and isolation of whole groups. judging the cost is no longer worth the benefit. damian grammaticas, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has been following developments in westminster and explained the political pressures on the government right now. the government has been quite clear in taking what is effectively a political decision, really, at this point in its response to the pandemic and stepping back, removing all legal restrictions in england. as we heard the prime minister emphasise yesterday, moving to a phase where people are encouraged to take their own decisions and take responsibility for their own actions. and we've seen ministers asked
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in pretty much every interview over the last couple of weeks whether they would be wearing a facemask in various situations after the 19th ofjuly when restrictions will be lifted in england, and we've had different responses given. but despite the pressure you suggest from labour, trade unions and some scientists and others on the government to keep in place some kind of guidance at least on the wearing of facemasks and possible social distancing measures in some circumstances, i think it's likely that the government will continue on this course of, as i say, stepping back and allowing people to make their own decisions. and i think it feels it can do that because, although the infections are expected to rise through what we are seeing as a definite third wave of coronavirus, this summer, peaking at perhaps as much as 100,000 cases per day, the health secretary has said this morning, ministers seem positive that the link between cases and hospitalisations and deaths
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from covid has been weakened enough for them to proceed on this basis. we're going to see further changes as well, further shifts in the government's approach. people who are fully vaccinated treated different to others who are not. and changes to the test, trace and isolate system, which currently means that you have to stay at home and isolate for ten days if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for covid—19, it seems that is going to be changed to an approach based on testing, and the health secretary hinted at what that could be this morning. in terms of what we will be doing exactly. — in terms of what we will be doing exactly, you will have to wait for my statement in parliament later today _ my statement in parliament later toda . a, my statement in parliament later toda . ., , ., ., today. more details from the health secretary to — today. more details from the health secretary to come _ today. more details from the health secretary to come there. _ today. more details from the health secretary to come there. there i today. more details from the health secretary to come there. there is i secretary to come there. there is however a debate about whether the
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government is going too far in listing restrictions and not issuing any guidance across the board. we are seeing a debate about that now. labour, the liberal democrats, others here at westminster are accusing the government of going too far and too fast. the shadow health secretary said that his party's position this morning.- secretary said that his party's position this morning. let's 'ust be cautious, position this morning. let's 'ust be cautious. tet-s * position this morning. let's 'ust be cautious, let'sjust i position this morning. let's 'ust be cautious, let'sjust be i position this morning. let'sjust be cautious, let'sjust be careful. i cautious, let'sjust be careful. yesa _ cautious, let'sjust be careful. yes. tet's_ cautious, let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and restaurants back to normal, but let's _ restaurants back to normal, but let's have — restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport, _ let's have the masks on public transport, let's have deep ventilation systems in place and let's pay— ventilation systems in place and let's pay people sick pay. that is labour's position _ let's pay people sick pay. that is labour's position and _ let's pay people sick pay. that is labour's position and the - let's pay people sick pay. that is labour's position and the debate | labour's position and the debate will continue. as things stand, the government is prepared to go ahead in the fourth step of the lockdown out of lockdown in england. and more details to come on the situation in schools from the education secretary. changing the systems are
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from one where a whole bubble or your group is sent home at once to a system based around testing that would see more children kept in schools. and more details on travel, where they will be further evidence of the government putting a line between those who are fully vaccinated and those who are not, perhaps able to return from amber list countries without the need to quarantine. irate list countries without the need to quarantine-— list countries without the need to auarantine. ~ , ., ,, ., quarantine. we will be talking more in 'ust a quarantine. we will be talking more in just a second _ quarantine. we will be talking more in just a second about _ quarantine. we will be talking more in just a second about schools. i in just a second about schools. first, let me bring you this piece of news, which is that the government will allow pubs in england to stay open until 11pm on sunday to allow football fans to watch the whole of euro 2021 final if it goes to extra time and penalties. we are trying to find out a view more details about this. but the top line there, the government allowing football fans the opportunity to watch the euro 21
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final, because pubs in england will be allowed to stay open until 11:15pm, covering the possibility of extra time and penalties. schools in england will find out later today how the government plan to relax the bubble rules. it's expected pupils in english schools may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid. it was revealed last week 279,000 children were self—isolating due to a possible contact with a covid—19 case. maisoon vadakkayil is a single parent to five—year—old boy who is currently self—isolating for the third time after a child tested positive at school. thank you so much forjoining us. what a frustrating situation to be in. first of all, how is your little boy and how has he been through these periods of self isolation? it's the fourth period of isolation.
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it's the fourth period of isolation. i beg _ it's the fourth period of isolation. i beg your— it's the fourth period of isolation. i beg your pardon. so this is the fourth period of isolation, goodness me. ., ., ., ~ me. extended for another week because a _ me. extended for another week because a child _ me. extended for another week because a child tested - me. extended for another week because a child tested positive. me. extended for another week i because a child tested positive. so he had _ because a child tested positive. so he had to— because a child tested positive. so he had to extend his isolation period — he had to extend his isolation period for— he had to extend his isolation period for another week. that means he is missing the last week of his reception — he is missing the last week of his reception year. he is missing the last week of his reception year-— he is missing the last week of his reception year. that is so sad. so many children — reception year. that is so sad. so many children are _ reception year. that is so sad. so many children are missing i reception year. that is so sad. so many children are missing such i many children are missing such important experiences. there has beenin important experiences. there has been in the thick of the school term where they are missing their academic work, but around this time of year there are lots of very special experience is that children are missing out on. he is five. does he really understand why he is having to be away from school and his friends? he having to be away from school and his friends?— having to be away from school and his friends? ., , , ., , his friends? he does understand, but every morning _ his friends? he does understand, but every morning we _ his friends? he does understand, but every morning we have _ his friends? he does understand, but every morning we have this _ every morning we have this conversation where he goes, "mum, can i_ conversation where he goes, "mum, can i go— conversation where he goes, "mum, can i go to _ conversation where he goes, "mum, can i go to school today?" i go, "nor _ can i go to school today?" i go, "no. you've _ can i go to school today?" i go, "no, you've had a positive case of coronavirus— "no, you've had a positive case of coronavirus in school." he says, "i want _ coronavirus in school." he says, "i want to _ coronavirus in school." he says, "i want to meet _ coronavirus in school." he says, "i want to meet my friends, i want to
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id want to meet my friends, i want to go back— want to meet my friends, i want to go back to — want to meet my friends, i want to go back to school." because this is the last— go back to school." because this is the last week, he was really excited _ the last week, he was really excited. he gets quite excited about goodbyes _ excited. he gets quite excited about goodbyes. he knows he won't be seeing _ goodbyes. he knows he won't be seeing these teachers again. it's sad _ seeing these teachers again. it's sad i_ seeing these teachers again. it's sad i have — seeing these teachers again. it's sad. i have to have this conversation with him every morning. where _ conversation with him every morning. where i_ conversation with him every morning. where i have — conversation with him every morning. where i have to say, "no, you cannot io where i have to say, "no, you cannot go to— where i have to say, "no, you cannot go to schoot~" — where i have to say, "no, you cannot go to school-"— go to school." what sort of impact is this having _ go to school." what sort of impact is this having on _ go to school." what sort of impact is this having on your— go to school." what sort of impact is this having on your work- go to school." what sort of impact is this having on your work as i go to school." what sort of impact is this having on your work as a i is this having on your work as a doctor? it is this having on your work as a doctor? ., , ., ., . doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a — doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a doctor— doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a doctor and _ doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a doctor and as _ doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a doctor and as a - doctor? it does have a huge impact on me as a doctor and as a parent. | on me as a doctor and as a parent. there _ on me as a doctor and as a parent. there are — on me as a doctor and as a parent. there are a — on me as a doctor and as a parent. there are a lot of things. i cannot io there are a lot of things. i cannot go to— there are a lot of things. i cannot go to work. — there are a lot of things. i cannot go to work, which makes it hard for them _ go to work, which makes it hard for them to— go to work, which makes it hard for them to find — go to work, which makes it hard for them to find someone else to replace me because _ them to find someone else to replace me because obviously it is short notice _ me because obviously it is short notice and — me because obviously it is short notice and you have to inform them and they— notice and you have to inform them and theyjust have to find someone else to _ and theyjust have to find someone else to cover the word where i am working — else to cover the word where i am working. that's one. two, it doesn't come _ working. that's one. two, it doesn't
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come under— working. that's one. two, it doesn't come under sick pay, carer's leave, and i'm _ come under sick pay, carer's leave, and i'm forced to take annual leave. because _ and i'm forced to take annual leave. because this is my fourth self isolation _ because this is my fourth self isolation period, and i am a single parent, _ isolation period, and i am a single parent, there is no other place where — parent, there is no other place where i— parent, there is no other place where i could leave my son. so i'm forced _ where i could leave my son. so i'm forced to— where i could leave my son. so i'm forced to take leave. and i'm forced to take _ forced to take leave. and i'm forced to take my— forced to take leave. and i'm forced to take my annual leave. so i finished — to take my annual leave. so i finished all my annual leave and then— finished all my annual leave and then the — finished all my annual leave and then the only option i'm left with is to take — then the only option i'm left with is to take unpaid leave. so there is no specific— is to take unpaid leave. so there is no specific guidance when it comes to single _ no specific guidance when it comes to single parents and kids having to isolate _ to single parents and kids having to isolate so — to single parents and kids having to isolate. so that is quite hard. it�*s isolate. so that is quite hard. it's an awful isolate. so that is quite hard. it�*s an awful situation to be in, maisoon, and i'm sure a lot of parents will be listening to this and empathising with what you are saying. in terms of what might replace the bubble system, presumably you would welcome a change, given what you have gone and are going through. but replace it with what? i
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are going through. but replace it with what? ., are going through. but replace it with what? ~ ., , , ., with what? i think hospitals should have an option _ with what? i think hospitals should have an option of— with what? i think hospitals should have an option of childcare - with what? i think hospitals should have an option of childcare within i have an option of childcare within the hospital premises. they could have a _ the hospital premises. they could have a childcare option where kids of nhs _ have a childcare option where kids of nhs workers can isolate if they have two — of nhs workers can isolate if they have two. but if the new rule is going _ have two. but if the new rule is going to — have two. but if the new rule is going to be that they don't have to do isolate — going to be that they don't have to do isolate and the bubble doesn't have to _ do isolate and the bubble doesn't have to isolate, then honestly i don't _ have to isolate, then honestly i don't know what that means. will he still be _ don't know what that means. will he still be in _ don't know what that means. will he still be in school? i don't know what _ still be in school? i don't know what the — still be in school? i don't know what the new rule is going to be. a lot of what the new rule is going to be. lot of the focus has been on the secondary schools and on testing. i guess a testing becomes slightly more problematic when you are talking about very young children. would you welcome daily testing or the wearing of masks? which of those options would you prefer to see? i
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would say wearing a mask definitely. because _ would say wearing a mask definitely. because my five—year—old hates being tested _ because my five—year—old hates being tested he _ because my five—year—old hates being tested. he hates the moment i say he has to— tested. he hates the moment i say he has to get— tested. he hates the moment i say he has to get a _ tested. he hates the moment i say he has to get a test done. "i don't want _ has to get a test done. "i don't want things stuck up my nose." it is hard _ want things stuck up my nose." it is hard for— want things stuck up my nose." it is hard for kids — want things stuck up my nose." it is hard for kids to understand how important — hard for kids to understand how important it is. i would say it may be used _ important it is. i would say it may be used masks in schools. that would be used masks in schools. that would be a good _ be used masks in schools. that would be a good option. but daily testing, i be a good option. but daily testing, i don't _ be a good option. but daily testing, i don't know how practical that is going _ i don't know how practical that is going to — i don't know how practical that is going to be. i don't know how practical that is going to be— i don't know how practical that is train to be, . ., ., going to be. was your son wearing a mask u- going to be. was your son wearing a mask up until _ going to be. was your son wearing a mask up until the _ going to be. was your son wearing a mask up until the point... _ going to be. was your son wearing a mask up untilthe point... ? - going to be. was your son wearing a mask up untilthe point... ? they i mask up until the point... ? they were very young, they weren't wearing masks, were they? because of their age. wearing masks, were they? because of theirage. do wearing masks, were they? because of their age. do you think it is a reasonable idea to expect very young children to wear a mask in school? it is, because in school theyjust listen _ it is, because in school theyjust listen to— it is, because in school theyjust listen to what their teacher is saying. — listen to what their teacher is saying, and my son doesn't have a problem _ saying, and my son doesn't have a problem wearing a mask. he is ok with wearing a mask when we go out.
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if with wearing a mask when we go out. if that's _ with wearing a mask when we go out. if that's what the teachers say. thank — if that's what the teachers say. thank you _ if that's what the teachers say. thank you so much for sharing your story with us. we wish you all the best. it is a very difficult situation to be in. doctor maisoon, who is on the fourth period of isolation with her son. she is a single mother and doctor. lots of parents going through that right now. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk and four other countries. from tomorrow, british tourists will be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. those who are fully vaccinated also won't have to quarantine. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill has this report. just two weeks ago, angela merkel was trying, in vain, to persuade other eu leaders to impose tighter restrictions on travellers from the uk. now germany is to relax its own rules. the government, worried by the spread of the delta variant, had, in effect, banned anyone who wasn't a german citizen or resident from entering the country from britain but,
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as of tomorrow, that will no longer apply, although people who aren't fully vaccinated will have to quarantine for at least five days. the decision will no doubt be seen by some as a victory for borisjohnson, who discussed the issue with chancellor merkel during their meeting last week. others may interpret it as a concession to the demands of other european countries keen to welcome back british tourists, but the relaxation of restrictions, which also applies to portugal, russia, india and nepal, may simply represent an acknowledgement on the part of the authorities here that the delta variant is now fast becoming the dominant strain in germany, too. the company that owns vauxhall has announced the firm is to receive a £100 million investment to produce electric vehicles at its plant in ellesemere port. the investment will safeguard more than a thousand factoryjobs. the future of the plant has been in doubt after vauxhall�*s parent company, stellantis, scrapped plans to build
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its new astra model there. here's the stellantis chief officer arnaud deboeuf speaking a little earlier... today, as a tribute to the collaboration, we are offering foxhole, and the british automotive industry, a new era of all electric vehicle manufacturing and a sustainable future. the bbc has published its annual report, which features salaries for its highest on—screen earners, plus details about the licence fee income and iplayer viewing figures. 0ur media editor, amol rajan is with me. let's begin with the salaries, which always tends to grab the headlines. indeed. they spent on the highest earners, which is the thing that has attracted most attention, the overall spend is down by about 10%. that is a combination of pay cuts and other people leaving the
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corporation. zoe ball has taken a villain tiered pay cuts last year. she is down to £980,000, still a big salary but that means it hasn't yet been reflected in this year's figures. top of the list is gary lineker, who we are seeing a lot of during the euro championship. he has taken a 23% pay cut. there are some improvement on gender balance. i need to check this, but i think the top ten is all white, which i think is something the bbc top boss wants to look at. the is something the bbc top boss wants to look at. . . .., to look at. the licence fee income, if we look — to look at. the licence fee income, if we look at _ to look at. the licence fee income, if we look at things _ to look at. the licence fee income, if we look at things like _ to look at. the licence fee income, if we look at things like salaries i if we look at things like salaries versus how much income is coming in through the licence fee, there is always the expectation that the bbc must demonstrate that it is providing value for money. the interesting _ providing value for money. tue: interesting there, the providing value for money. tue interesting there, the annual providing value for money. tue: interesting there, the annual report reflects an exceptional year. many more people have been at home. the bbc has had an extraordinary year in
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terms of digital growth in particular. the question of course is whether you can convert that growth into licence fee payers. when it comes to the iplayer, the bbc has grown by 28% in the last year. the iplayer is now getting 6.1 billion streams. that is quite remarkable given the competition from global giants like disney, amazon and netflix. the other big change at the bbc, part of what the director has said he wants to deliver, is the bbc to become leaner. there is a 6% reduction in the public sector workforce. and the other big thing of course over the last year is that the third element of the bbc�*s mission to inform, educate and entertain, education has sometimes felt like an afterthought, but education has been central to the bbc in the last year. and the
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consumption of its educational output has been absolutely huge. sport now and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. british teenager emma raducanu's brilliant run at wimbledon came to end after she was forced to retire in her last—16 match against ajla tomljanovic for medical reasons. the 18—year—old fought a tough first set, which she lost 6—4, and seemed to be having trouble breathing when 3—0 down in the second. raducanu requested a medical time—out and went off court before it was announced that she had been forced to concede the match. let's take a look at how the women's quarterfinals look. it's tunisian 0ns jabeur, against the second seed, aryna sabalenka, on centre court later this afternoon, followed by tomljanovic against ash barty. karolina pliskova takes on viktorija golubic on court number one. after that, it's karolina muchova against angeligue kerber. the entire england one—day squad are isolating following a covid—19 outbreak in their bubble. 18 replacement players have been drafted in to play
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pakistan in the 0d! series, including nine uncapped players. ben stokes has been named captain and chris silverwood is back as head coach. following routine testing on monday, three players and four members of management tested positive. the rest of the party have been deemed close contacts, so also need to isolate. the first one day match is set to take place on thursday in cardiff. so, how are the nerves? mine are shredded. just one day to go until england's euro 2020 semifinal match against denmark at wembley. the squad continued their preparations as they trained at st george's park today ahead of their first semifinal at a european championship in 25 years. before all that, it's italy versus spain in the first semifinal at wembley tonight. both teams trained after arriving in london yesterday. the italians have been one of the stand out sides so far and are one of the favourites to win the tournament.
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translation: we know. that it won't be that easy. we know that we need to produce a big performance because spain are a top side. we're in the semi—finals of the european championship. and so it's very unlikely to find easy opposition. the australian grand prix has been called off for the second year in a row because of the coronavirus pandemic. the event in melbourne was due to take place in november, but has been abandoned because of tight border controls in australia. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thanks very much. draft legislation intended to tackle what ministers describe as a "broken asylum system" is being introduced to parliament. the home office says the bill will help prevent people who have passed through a safe country claiming asylum in the uk. but refugee campaigners warn that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has this report.
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until the pandemic struck last year, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk had doubled since 2010. if you look back over the last two decades, the number of applicants was still less than half what it was 20 years ago. and the figure, including dependents, is significantly lower than the numbers in germany, france, spain and greece. the pandemic also triggered a change in how people try to get to britain. the number crossing the channel in small boats rose sharply. it was 8,500 last year. it's heading for an even greater number this year. the home secretary, priti patel, says she wants to create a fair but firm system that will break the business model of the people—smuggling gangs. the nationality and borders bill will allow the uk government to return people to a safe country if they've passed through it on the way to britain. campaigners say this will result in thousands of valid claims being deemed inadmissible, and call it a shameful dereliction of duty. the bill will also allow asylum
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claims to be processed outside the uk, potentially paving the way for controversial offshore centres for processing applications. daniel sandford, bbc news. it was cancelled in 2020, but one of the biggest events in cinema is back. the cannes film festival holds its opening ceremony today. tom brook reports. the pandemic means this year's cannes film festival is a little different. the unvaccinated will be tested and mask wearing will be mandatory at key venues. tonight, you have a very particular mission... didier allouch has been hosting red carpet coverage at cannes for french television for more than two decades. the covid—19 crisis will affect the festival, that is for sure. cannes is about 40,000 people coming into town for the festival, that includes talent, journalists, the professionals that come here to participate in the cannes film market. there won't be that many people, from the 40,000. movies, of course, will be
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the big attraction. the festival's opening night film is annette, an operatic musical featuring a celebrity couple and their newborn from french director leos carax. it stars oscar—winning french marion cotillard. and hollywood's adam driver. the story, music and songs come from sparks, the decades—old art rock duo. if the movie is like their other endeavours, it will be a film that pushes the envelope. that's something that's been there from day one that we've carried through you know to the current time, we always want to constantly be challenging in what we are doing. the kids did this. cannes can boast a big line—up, american films like the french dispatch from wes anderson revolving around a literary magazine, and benedetta, a controversial love story between two 17th—century nuns from dutch director paul verhoeven. the festival is hoping to regain its potency as a showcase. look at something like parasite which was debuted at cannes and went through a global box office hit
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to becoming a best picture winner, the first korean film ever to win the best picture 0scar. that is what you want from cannes. the pandemic has definitely shaped movies being seen at cannes. the year of the everlasting storm is an anthology of films from seven esteemed film—makers that were made under lockdown with rigid stipulated rules. the basic rules were something like, you know, you have to shoot from your home. 0nset cast and crew will be limited to those who are with you in quarantine. and i think the theme of rebirth is really embedded throughout the film. covid—19 has changed the landscape of cinema. it is now a world of ubiquitous streaming. film festivals like cannes rooted in celebrating movies destined for cinemas face uncertain times. but if cannes lives up to its expectations it will at least over the next 12 days be showcasing excellent works from some of the greatest film—makers in the world. tom brook, bbc news, cannes.
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allow me to remind you that we will be live in the house of commons very shortly for a statement from the health secretary, sajid javid, where he is expected to announce changes to rules and regulations for people who are double vaccinated. before that, a look at the weather. hi, there. the weather is pretty unsettled at the moment. we've had an unusually deep area of low pressure for the time of year sweep up from the south—west during the night and today is going to leave a legacy of cloud, some rain in places, but also sunshine and showers. a mixture of everything. here it is, this deep low, affecting mostly england and wales, pushing across into the north sea as we head through the course of the day, but there will be a hang—back of the rain which has spread northwards across england and wales — it will be affecting eastern scotland, north—east england. elsewhere, western scotland, northern ireland, the rest of england and wales,
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sunshine, some showers, some of which could be heavy, but also areas of cloud and more persistent rain at times, so it really is a mixture of pretty much everything. temperatures a little bit lower than what we expect at this time of year — around 15 to maybe 18 or 19 degrees in the sunnier spots. it stays unsettled as we head through this evening and overnight. there will be further areas of cloud, some showers, too, some of which could be quite heavy, but for most of us temperatures remaining in double figures overnight. hello this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines:
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hello this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: in an hour's time, the education secretary is expected to confirm that pupils in england will soon no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid. the health secretary is about to announce plans for people who have received two vaccination jabs and what it means
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for self—isolation rules. vauxhall is to receive a £100 million investment to produce electric vehicles at its plant in ellesemere port. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk. from tomorrow they will be able to enter the country even if they are not residents. a draft law is being introduced to the british parliament to prevent asylum—seekers staying in the uk if they have already passed through a safe country. before we cross to the house of commons for the statement from the health secretary over changes in restrictions and rules for those who have got both vaccinations. let's look at some of your comments about your thoughts on the relaxation of
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the rules. 0ne your thoughts on the relaxation of the rules. one person says, this is a quantum leap from masks to no masks. graham says, i think the government has it right. the people who abuse current rules will continue to do so and those of us that followed them are free to exercise common sense. he said i will continue to wear a mask. peter says, keep masks and shops, medical centres, hospitals, schools and public transport. richard says, i will still be wearing my facemask, the government is passing the buck again. and greensmith says, why have ministers failed to grasp that you wear a mask to protect others? how can it be left to personal responsibility when it is clear many people don't care about others. another person says, masks are to
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stop you breathing out aerosol particles, not to stop you breathing in aerosol particles. tim says, the uk government is finally realising the impact of lockdown on businesses and mental health. no options have zero risk. a majority of you getting in touch to say you will continue to wear your masks, but other people say this is the right decision at this point. thank you very much for sending in your thoughts on that. it is a subject we will be returning to many times and looking for your opinions on. around a thousand more babies would survive each year in england, if maternity services were as safe as those in sweden, according to a group of mps. the health and social care committee says a lack of staff, and a blame culture which prevents lessons from being learned, are significantly hindering maternity services. jeremy hunt, who chairs the committee,
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says bringing in more staff and adopting a �*no—blame' compensation scheme like sweden's could make a significant difference. what we are saying is that staffing is something needs to be sorted out, it has improved recently, but we need 2,000 more midwives and 500 more obstetricians. the cost of that is between 200 and £350 million a year. compare that to the £2.3 billion every year we are spending in maternity claims, in lawsuits just in maternity. this isn't all the nhs lawsuits, just in maternity. about a tenth of that cost would pay for the staff we need and then we would save that extra money many times over. it makes financial sense, but most importantly, it will help us avoid the horrific human
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tragedy is that i'm afraid we've seen all too many. a woman with down's syndrome is at the high court today to demand a change in abortion law. a pregnancy can currently be terminated up to full term in england, scotland and wales if the foetus has down's syndrome — while most other abortions can't take place beyond 24 weeks. heidi crowter says the law discriminates against people who could have gone on to lead full and happy lives. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has more. heidi crowter from coventry has down's syndrome. she recently celebrated her first wedding anniversary with husband, james. she lives life to the full. i like singing, i like dancing. i like watching disney. she's going to the high court, seeking a change to the 1967 abortion act. this allows abortion up to 24 weeks. but if the foetus has a disability, including down's syndrome, abortion is legal right up to birth. heidi says this is discriminatory.
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we wa nt we want to say to the world that we have a good quality of life. her mother liz has encouraged heidi to be as independent as possible. she lives here in coventry. heidi's legal team have crowdfunded £102,000 to take on the government in a landmark test case. i'm very proud of heidi, of her campaigning and i'll be supporting her along the way. 3,200 fetuses are aborted each year because the child is likely to be severely disabled. and 90% of women whose foetuses have down's syndrome choose to have an abortion. some say women in this situation need more time to make an informed decision. we're talking about a relatively small number of abortions every year that take place after 24 weeks. these are incredibly challenging, heartbreaking circumstances let's cross to the house of commons,
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where the health secretary, sajid javid, is making a statement. after the arduous 18 months we have all endured, it was so wonderful to describe the world will be no longer have to count the number of people we are meeting, where theatres are bursting with people once again, and where care home residents are able to see their loved ones without restrictions. of course, mr speaker, i understand that some people are cautious about the idea of using restrictions, but we must balance the risks. the risks of a virus that has diminished, but not defeated, against the risks of keeping these restrictions and the health, social and economic hardship we know they bring. this pandemic is farfrom over. we will continue to proceed with caution, but we are
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increasingly confident that our plan is working and that we can soon begin a new chapter based on the foundations of personal responsibility and common sense, rather than the blunt instrument of rules and regulations. today, i would like to provide an update on another area where we will be able to ease restrictions, the rules on self isolation. self isolation has played a critical role in helping us to get this virus under control, by denying the virus to human contact that he needs to spread. i am so grateful to the many, many people right across the uk who have selflessly done their duty, making sacrifices so they can help keep the virus at bay. even though we have done everything in our power to support the people who had to self—isolate, yesterday we announced that we would be extending financial support until september. i am fully
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aware of how difficult it has been, but we can take hope from the fact that science has shown us a solution. just as it has done so many times in ourfight solution. just as it has done so many times in our fight against this virus. that solution is our vaccine. which we know offers huge protection. the latest data from public health england shows that our vaccination programme has saved over 27,000 lives and has prevented over 7 million people from getting covid—19. it shows that both doses of covid—19 vaccine can reduce symptomatic infection by almost 80%. that protective wall, because that is what it is, it means that the odds have shifted in our favour and we can look afresh at many of the measures we have had to pick —— put in place. this is especially
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important when almost two thirds of adults, 64%, have had both doses of vaccine and have the maximum protection that the vaccine can offer. as a result, we will soon be able to take risk based approach that recognises the huge benefits that recognises the huge benefits that the vaccines provide both the people who get the jab and their loved ones. so from the 16th of august, when even more people will have the protection of both doses and when bottling suggest the risks from the virus will be even lower, anyone who is a close contact of a positive case will no longer have to self—isolate if they have been fully vaccinated. if someone gets their second dose just before orjust after the 16th of august, they will need to wait two weeks after which
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their second jab can take effect and give them these new freedoms. this will allow the vaccine time to build up will allow the vaccine time to build up the maximum possible protection, those two weeks. as we make this change, we will be drawn on the huge capacity we have built for testing and sequencing and advising close contacts who are fully vaccinated to take at pcr test as soon as possible so they can get certainty about their condition. of course, anyone that tests positive will have to self—isolate whether they have had the jab or not. this new approach means that we can manage the virus in a way that is proportional to the pandemic, while maintaining the freedoms that are so important to us all. as honourable members will be aware, we are not currently offering vaccines to most people under the age of 18. we thought carefully about how we could make sure that young people get the life
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experiences that are so important to their development while at the same time we are keeping them safe from this deadly virus. in line with the approach for adults, anyone under the age of 18 who is a close contact of a positive case will no longer have to self—isolate. instead, they will be given advice about whether they should get tested, dependent on their age, and will need to self—isolate only if they test positive. these measures will also come into force on the 16th of august ahead of the autumn school term. i know that people will have questions, colleagues will have questions, colleagues will have questions about these changes, and other questions around step four on a road map and how it impacts schools and colleges. the education secretary will be updating the house immediately after my statement. we
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are also looking at the self isolation rooms for international travel, so that we can remove the need for fully vaccinated arrivals to isolate when they returned from an amber list country. the transport secretary will be providing an update to the house later this week. step—by—step, jab byjab, we are replacing the temporary protection of the restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine so we can restore the freedoms which we cherish and the experiences that mean so much to us all. let's all play our part to protect ourselves and to protect others as we enter these crucial few weeks so that in this battle between the vaccine and the virus the vaccine will prevail. i commend the statement to the house. ,, :, :, ,, : :, , :, ,, :, house. shadow secretary of state, jonathan ashworth. _ house. shadow secretary of state, jonathan ashworth. i— house. shadow secretary of state, jonathan ashworth. i thank- house. shadow secretary of state, jonathan ashworth. i thank the i jonathan ashworth. i thank the secretary of state for advanced sight of a statement. this morning
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the secretary of state was warning that he expects infections to hit 100,000 a day, so could he confirm that that will be the peak and when will we hit it in his expectations? with infections running at 100,000 a day, that will translate into around 5,000 people a day developing long—term chronic illness, long covid, so what will that waiting list look like by the end of the summer? hejustifies a lung infection is to climb by pointing to the weakened link between hospitalisations and deaths and that we are building a protective wall, but of course, the wall is only half built and we know from outbreaks in israel, and research that the delta variant can be transmitted through fully vaccinated people, even if they don't get sick. indeed, data in they don't get sick. indeed, data in the last day or so from the ministry of health in israel points to the pfizer vaccine being just 64%
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effective at stopping symptomatic and asymptomatic transmission of the delta variant. sadly, being double jabbed means you are still at risk —— a risk to others, yet he is releasing controls on transmissions at a time when infections are rising and hospitalisations will rise as well, so can he tell us what's are the percentage of intensive care beds in general and acute beds that will need to be occupied before, in his view, wider nhs care is compromised? we have heard him in the last week or so tell us that he wants to unlock because he rightly wants to unlock because he rightly wants to unlock because he rightly wants to focus on the monumental nhs backlog, but the rising hospital admissions that are baked into the plan, into the party has chosen, will mean operations cancelled, treatment is delayed and waiting times increasing. will he now be
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clear with patients at risk of permanent disability that the increase in admissions to hospital will mean that they have to wait longer, and what is his assessment of the waiting list and what will it hit by the end of the summer? i understand the rationale for his announcement today, but i have got to tell him again that the biggest barrier to an effective isolation policy hasn't been the inconvenience, but the lack of financial incentive to stay home. if we are going to live with this virus, the days of people soldiering on when unwell or over. sick pay is vital to infection control. will he please now fix it? getting back to normal, which we all want to do, depends on people feeling safe, so does he appreciate that those who are immunocompromised orfor him that if vaccination is less effective, will have their freedoms
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curtailed by ditching masks on public transport? blood cancer uk warned the people with blood cancer will feel like their freedoms have been taken away when mass wearing lifts. what are his message to those with blood cancer? it is not good enough to say to travel or go to the shops at less busy times. he —— he understands the importance of mass because i have read his pandemic paperfrom harvard, he praises the use of masks in this paper, but also warns in this paper that changing course on policy—making is an essential feature of good policy—making, and he goes on to say that politicians find it hard because of the tendency to become psychologically and emotionally anchored. i agree with him. i hope he still agrees with himself as well, so let's have a u—turn on mask wearing. yes, let's have freedom,
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but not a high risk free for all. keep masks for now, fix sick pay and let's unlock in a safe and sustainable way. let's unlock in a safe and sustainable wa . ,, : :, , :, ,, :, sustainable way. secretary of state. let me turn — sustainable way. secretary of state. let me turn to _ sustainable way. secretary of state. let me turn to the _ sustainable way. secretary of state. let me turn to the right _ sustainable way. secretary of state. let me turn to the right honourable | let me turn to the right honourable gentleman because my questions. first of all he asked about infections. as i said yesterday, we do expect for the time being infections to continue rising for the reasons i set out yesterday. at the reasons i set out yesterday. at the 19th ofjuly, the point when we enter into step four, the advice that we received and the modelling suggest, it could be as high as 50,000, double what it is now on a daily basis. as the right honourable gentleman said, we believe that it will continue rising as the modelling goes further. it is less certain. they could go as high as 100,000. i have been very upfront about that. what i have been clear about, the reason we can make the
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decisions that we have made and set out yesterday, the decision just announced today on self isolation rules for those who are double vaccinated, if they come into contact with someone who is infected, the reason we can do this is because of the vaccine. the vaccine has been our wall of defence, brick by brick we have been building a defence against this virus. the vaccine, whilst no one can say at this point that the link between cases and hospitalisations have been definitively broken, there is not enough evidence for that, what there is evidence for is to show us the link between cases and hospitalisation and deaths has been severely weakened. the honourable gentleman has asked about how many hospitalisations there have been or may be. what i can tell him, which i think will help demonstrate how this link has been severely weakened, is at the moment in the last 24 hours
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we have had approximately 27,000 reported new infections, and the total number of people in hospital in england isjust under 2,000. the last time we had infections at that level we were above 20,000. that is a demonstration of how much the link has been weakened. in making sure that it stays that way, we want to see more and more people getting vaccinated. we have announced a booster programme that will start in september, to make sure that immunity that comes with the vaccine remains. the honourable gentleman also talked about non—covid health problems. a number of honourable members have raised that. i would like to try to understand that the reason we have so many people that wanted to go to the nhs with non—covid health problems such as cancer or heart disease, mental
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health problems, but they were prevented was because of the restrictions that we had in place and how that prevented them, how that impacted them because many of those problems. if he thinks about the mental health problems that have been caused by these restrictions. if we want to start dealing with those non—covid health problems then we have to start easing are moving away from the restrictions because of the protection of the vaccine has provided us. as the shadow health secretary, he should bejust provided us. as the shadow health secretary, he should be just as concerned as i am about non—covid health problems are serious with covid problems. he also asked me about the immunosuppressant. he and other colleagues are right to raise this issue. the vaccines are there to protect everyone, including many of those people that are immunosuppressed account take vaccines, the fact that the rest of us to help protect them and we wouldn't want to see them take the
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same precautions that they would usually take in winter, trying to protect themselves against colds and flu and other viruses. i would encourage people to make sure they are in contact with your gp to see what other measures they might be able to take. lastly, he asked me about masks. he referred to a paper that i authored before i took this position. he should understand, there is a role for masks in dealing with a pandemic, particularly when you have a pandemic with no wall of defence against a pandemic. when you have a vaccine and the vaccine works and you have the best vaccine roll—out programme in the world, you need to start moving away from those restrictions, including masks. jeremy hunt. thank you. one of those other illnesses, apart from covid, that has been very badly affected by the pandemic is cancer. he will know
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that last year 40,000 fewer people started cancer treatment, which will sadly lead to a number of preventable deaths. will he be looking at the required to deal with the cancer backlog? will he also look at the capital requirements of many hospitals, including my own area that is trying to build a cancer institute. can i make him a generous offer to come in front of the select simply —— select committee in september to talk about those plans? he is absolutely rights to raise the issues of cancer. of course it is a huge priority for this government. i mentioned earlier how, sadly, because of the rules in place we
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have had in place for well over a year, many people who would have come forward to the nhs with cancer or suspected cancer and they have not been seen. that is really built up not been seen. that is really built up a terrible problem. it is an absolute priority for me to tackle, with the workforce, with capital. i look forward to sitting in front of a select committee. i'm not sure about seven hours! but i do look forward to it.— forward to it. martin day. thank ou, mr forward to it. martin day. thank you, mr speaker. _ forward to it. martin day. thank you, mr speaker. given - forward to it. martin day. thank you, mr speaker. given that i forward to it. martin day. thank| you, mr speaker. given that this government has repeatedly got things wrong on covid, from the timing of lockdowns, the lack of border control switch allows the delta variant into the uk, the delay of putting india on the red list, now we have the delta variant searching while we still have many people not fully vaccinated, many will be concerned that the uk government is actively trying to snatch defeat
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from the jaws of a vaccine victory. what confidence can we have that abandoning all restrictions is not another reckless gamble in the face of an increase in transmission? in a poll by the new scientist, after a majority of disease expert said that some form of mass where it would be required until 2022, others the stock 2023 or later? can the minister, for the sake of clarity and honesty, confirmed that the uk government has stopped listening to the science on its covid policy? we have 150,000 people dead already and the prime minister has said we must reconcile ourselves to more deaths from covid, so perhaps the secretary can enlighten us to how many more deaths the uk government thinks is acceptable? the
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deaths the uk government thinks is acce-table? :, :, :, , :, acceptable? the honourable gentleman refers to the announcement _ acceptable? the honourable gentleman refers to the announcement we - acceptable? the honourable gentleman refers to the announcement we made i refers to the announcement we made around masks yesterday, about moving away from rules and regulations to guidance and personal responsibility. he is asking how can we make such a decision. the answer is the vaccine. the vaccine is working. we have more people vaccinated than any other large country in the world thanks to the work of the nhs, the volunteers and everyone else involved, including in scotland, too. that has weakened the link between cases, hospitalisation and deaths, and these decisions have been informed by the science, contrary to what the honourable gentleman said, they have been informed by the science and the science is working. the informed by the science and the science is working. the secretary of state said in — science is working. the secretary of state said in a _ science is working. the secretary of state said in a statement _ science is working. the secretary of state said in a statement that i science is working. the secretary of state said in a statement that he i state said in a statement that he was grateful to the many people across the uk who have selflessly done their duty. last week, a friend e—mailed me in
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despair. the doctor contracted covid—19 on christmas eve for doing her duty in hospital and has been able to work as it turned into long covid. now hr have issued her paper to get statutory sick pay at the job centre and she stands to lose her salary entirely. surely this is completely unacceptable and an insult to nhs workers�*s sacrifice. does the secretary of state believe this is fair? if not, will he look into this and similar cases urgently so the heroes of this pandemic, the front line staff, receive the proper financial support they need while they recover? first of all, my own personal thanks to the doctor in her constituency that she is just referred to and to the many other doctors and clinicians for everything they have done for the country and they
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continue to do throughout this pandemic. she has raised the issue of the particular doctor she has repaired too. i am not aware of the details, but if she writes to me i will look into it. ihie details, but if she writes to me i will look into it.— details, but if she writes to me i will look into it. we all recognise that the tremendous _ will look into it. we all recognise that the tremendous success i will look into it. we all recognise that the tremendous success of i will look into it. we all recognise i that the tremendous success of the vaccine programme has changed everything and my right honourable friend has made a point eloquently again this morning. it is also clear from the recent daily figures that take up appears to be falling. can my right honourable friend explained why that is happening, and what he is doing to make sure that as many people get vaccinated fully as fast as possible?— as possible? what i can tell my riaht as possible? what i can tell my right honourable _ as possible? what i can tell my right honourable friend - as possible? what i can tell my right honourable friend is i as possible? what i can tell my right honourable friend is that i as possible? what i can tell my| right honourable friend is that in terms of take—up, compared to any other large country, it is the best in the world. that said, we would like to see even better take—up. four fifths of adults have had at least one jab and three fifths have
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had two jabs. we are seeing many vaccine centres moving to walking vaccine centres moving to walking vaccine centres. you can continue to watch business in the house of commons —— the house of commons on bbc parliament. here we will have the bbc news that one in just a few moments.
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an end to self isolation an end to self isolation for anyone in england for anyone in england who's had both doses of a covid who's had both doses of a covid vaccine, starting in mid august. vaccine, starting in mid august. the health secretary announces the health secretary announces a new approach to dealing a new approach to dealing with anyone who comes into contact with anyone who comes into contact with a positive coronavirus case. with a positive coronavirus case. step—by—step, jab byjab, we're step—by—step, jab byjab, we're replacing the temporary protection replacing the temporary protection of the restrictions with the of the restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine. long—term protection of the vaccine. we wa nt we wa nt we want people to have their we want people to have their freedoms back, but we want don't freedoms back, but we want don't want to have a high risk free for want to have a high risk free for all. : :, :, , :, all. : :, :, , :, want to have a high risk free for want to have a high risk free for all. : :, :, ,:, , all. infection rates are sadly all. : :, :, ,:, , all. infection rates are sadly
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risina all. infection rates are sadly rising again _ all. infection rates are sadly rising again steeply, i risina all. infection rates are sadly rising again _ all. infection rates are sadly rising again steeply, i rising again steeply, hospitalisations are rising again, rising again steeply, hospitalisations are rising again, more _ hospitalisations are rising again, more people will die. more _ hospitalisations are rising again, more people will die. the health secretary also announced unvaccinated under 18s who come into contact with a positive case will no longer

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