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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the government wants to lift almost all of england's restrictions in 2 weeks' time. this vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport. how do you feel about the restrictions easing in england? will you still be wearing a mask when it's no longer a legal requirement? get in touch with me by tweeting me at rebecca jones bbc or by using the hash tag
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bbc your questions. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. a draft law is being introduced to parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. schools in england will find out this afternoon how the government plans to relax the "bubble" rules that mean large numbers of pupils are sent home if a single child has a positive covid test. last week more than 375—thousand children in england were off school while isolating for ten days.
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the education secretary, gavin williamson, is expected to say the changes will come into effect on the 19th ofjuly —— when most of england's covid regulations are set to be scrapped. social distancing will be scrapped for the first time in 16 months. face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement. limits on socialising will be lifted — bringing an to end to the rule of six indoors. and the advice to work from home will come to an end. it's also expected we'll hear more details about international travel and self—isolation in the coming days. here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. will hospitals be able to cope? it's a risk the prime minister is contemplating taking, his desire to remove all covid restrictions across england just as infections are rising fast again. but borisjohnson believes relaxing curbs now in the summer is preferable.
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waiting could be worse. we run the risk of either opening up at a very difficult time when the virus has an edge, has an advantage, in the colder months, oragain, putting everything off to to next year. so i do think it's going to be a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more social distancing. no limits on how many can visit your home, or how many can pack restaurants, bars and pubs. theatres, nightclubs, sports stadiums all open and full. no more empty offices, as the requirement to work from home would end too. but there's a concern a third wave of covid is under way, with an average of more than 25,000 cases a day in the past week, and the number infected is doubling roughly every nine days. his own chief scientific adviser said now is the time to be controlling the virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic at the moment,
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and therefore we need to behave accordingly in terms of trying to limit transmission spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting the pandemic. the numbers in hospital and dying with covid are relatively low. it's the reason mrjohnson believes he can go ahead. and he wants to remove the legal obligation to wear a mask too. but the scientists are cautious, saying they will continue to wear theirs. there was a really clear consensus that under all circumstances, some degree of further social distancing will be maintained, needs to be maintained, even after the the restrictions are lifted in law. and that's been part of the road map all the way through. and that is widely supported by the scientific views. and today, we'll hear more about the plans for schools. the government is hoping to lift restrictions to put an end to bubbles and isolation of whole groups. judging the cost is no longer worth the benefit.
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damian grammaticas, bbc news. we can speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. hints if not necessarily an announcement about isolation, but what did you read into the comments and how significant are they? the government _ and how significant are they? tue: government has and how significant are they? tte: government has been getting in trouble from the speaker of the house of commons for making announcements to the media before mps. ministers are more reticent to preview what they are doing. what we think is at lunchtime we will get a series of statements, one of them from the department of health about changes to the isolation rules for people who are notified to be close contacts of people who test positive for covid—19. at the moment, if you get a call from test and trace you have to isolate for ten days even if you have no symptoms. it looks like that will now change, if you have had both doses of the vaccine you
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will not have to isolate. and here is how the health secretary hinted at it earlier. tia is how the health secretary hinted at it earlier-— at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic— at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic has _ at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic has gone _ at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic has gone it - at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic has gone it is - at it earlier. no one is pretending the pandemic has gone it is still l the pandemic has gone it is still very much— the pandemic has gone it is still very much there. case numbers are hi-h very much there. case numbers are high and _ very much there. case numbers are high and they are going to get highen — high and they are going to get higher. 0ne high and they are going to get higher. one of the things i said yesterday, currently we are seeing this number around 25,000 a day, i expect— this number around 25,000 a day, i expect they— this number around 25,000 a day, i expect they will be as high as 50,000 — expect they will be as high as 50,000 by the time this easing happens — 50,000 by the time this easing happens. but the difference is this vaccine _ happens. but the difference is this vaccine wall of defence, it is working _ vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. and hospitalisation is severely weakened-— and hospitalisation is severely weakened. ., ., , and hospitalisation is severely weakened. ., , ., weakened. that was a different clip from the one _ weakened. that was a different clip from the one i _ weakened. that was a different clip from the one i was _ weakened. that was a different clip from the one i was expecting - weakened. that was a different clip from the one i was expecting but i from the one i was expecting but thatis from the one i was expecting but that is one of the other things he has raised this morning, the level of covid—i9 cases in the near future. yesterday at the press conference the prime minister said on the 19th ofjuly when the restrictions are lifted, they could be 30,000 covid-19 restrictions are lifted, they could be 30,000 covid—i9 cases per day which sounds like an alarming
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number. the case being made by the health secretary is because of the vaccine, fewer people are going into hospital or dying when we had those numbers earlier in the layer are last year. he did another interview on radio four and we sent a few weeks after that we could be kissing 100,000 cases but he made the case again that the vaccine weakens the link between the number of people going into hospital and dying. the government scientific advisers say it is a high—risk strategy, it is in black—and—white and some of the documents published what other reaction has there been? businesses are over the moon that the social distancing measures are going out. the one metre plus rule is going, having to order at your table, that is going, it will help businesses get more customers and they do not need so many staff so their course can go down. trade
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unions are concerned because they think more of their workers will be exposed to more of the virus as things open up further and also that mask wearing becomes advisory rather than mandatory, that shop workers could be exposed to more of the virus. and labour are along the same lines. they think the prime minister is being reckless opening up too far and too fast. they would keep the mask rules. 0n the issue of masks, symbolic of the whole dilemma, you get the sense from the government that if a train company or a business wants to insist their customers or passengers wear a mask, then the government will not stand in their way then the government will not stand in theirway and then the government will not stand in their way and that opens up a whole patchwork of do you wear a mask or do you know where it? let alone personal interactions between all of us have different opinions. thank you very much for that. we can speak to dr muhammad munir, a virologist at lancaster
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university. good to have you with us. the prime minister says now is the right time to end covid—i9 rules. do you agree? just to interrupt you, i think you may have muted yourself. are you able to try again? can may have muted yourself. are you able to try again?— may have muted yourself. are you able to try again? can you hear me now? i was — able to try again? can you hear me now? i was asking _ able to try again? can you hear me now? i was asking you _ able to try again? can you hear me now? i was asking you if _ able to try again? can you hear me now? i was asking you if you - able to try again? can you hear me now? i was asking you if you think| now? i was asking you if you think this is the right _ now? i was asking you if you think this is the right time _ now? i was asking you if you think this is the right time to _ now? i was asking you if you think this is the right time to end - this is the right time to end covid—i9 rules? in this is the right time to end covid-19 rules?— this is the right time to end covid-19 rules? in the scientific community _ covid-19 rules? in the scientific community we _ covid-19 rules? in the scientific community we agree _ covid-19 rules? in the scientific community we agree that - covid-19 rules? in the scientific community we agree that the i covid-19 rules? in the scientific. community we agree that the data covid-19 rules? in the scientific- community we agree that the data at the moment is significantly higher than when we are opening up and if you look at the data and the abrupt release of all of these measures that we put in place, this is not justified. notjust because of the weakening connection between the number of cases and the deaths, but
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also the consideration of long covert i9, also the consideration of long covert19, having also the consideration of long covert 19, having no masks and restrictions and gathering, all those things justify that we are not heading in the right direction. tit heading in the right direction. if not now, when? that _ heading in the right direction. if not now, when? that is - heading in the right direction. if not now, when? that is the - heading in the right direction. if. not now, when? that is the stance the government _ not now, when? that is the stance the government has _ not now, when? that is the stance the government has taken - not now, when? that is the stance the government has taken and - not now, when? that is the stance the government has taken and in l not now, when? that is the stance i the government has taken and in the press conference yesterday the prime minister said that is the question when we talk about infectious diseases, it is almost impossible to define. we need to look into where we are, can be virus the way we are living or in the scientific community we do not think we can live with the virus with a high number of cases. we put all those controls that we have been following at the stage where we can have more control on the number of cases, there are more than in the whole of
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there are more than in the whole of the eu combined which is really significant and the projection is... am i right to infer that you do not agree that it is safer to unlock in the summer than agree that it is safer to unlock in the summerthan in agree that it is safer to unlock in the summer than in the autumn? is that fair? t the summer than in the autumn? is that fair? ~ ., ., ,_ that fair? i think what i am saying is we cannot _ that fair? i think what i am saying is we cannot stay _ that fair? i think what i am saying is we cannot stay in _ that fair? i think what i am saying is we cannot stay in the _ that fair? i think what i am saying is we cannot stay in the situation | is we cannot stay in the situation for ever but a major concern is that the controls put in place to release all of them all at once is not a wise decision moving forward. looking onto the two important measures that have reduced the impact, facemasks and social distancing, if we maintain those and keep them in place, these are not preventing us to open up, they are not stopping us from having the economy and lights back on, we need to do... we are dealing with infectious diseases and no borders. variants are coming and and the
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disease in the rest of the world and the vaccinations are low compared to the vaccinations are low compared to the uk, so all in all, i think we can move on with opening up but to keep their restrictions that are not interfering with social life. to be clear about _ interfering with social life. to be clear about what _ interfering with social life. to be clear about what you _ interfering with social life. to be clear about what you are - interfering with social life. to be clear about what you are saying, interfering with social life. to be. clear about what you are saying, i think you are suggesting we should keep and keep social distancing. are there other measures you would like to see kept in as well?— to see kept in as well? absolutely. safeguarding _ to see kept in as well? absolutely. safeguarding schools, _ to see kept in as well? absolutely. safeguarding schools, ventilation, | safeguarding schools, ventilation, and also better testing and tracing, from this point onward, the children are not vaccinated,— are not vaccinated, thank you very much for your— are not vaccinated, thank you very much for your thoughts. _ and at 9:35 this morning, we'll be putting your questions to a health expert and an employment
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expert on what the proposed changes in england might mean for you. do send in your questions using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. we will be speaking to an owner of 19 pubs across kent to talk about i9 pubs across kent to talk about the relaxing of restrictions on the hospitality industry. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk and four other countries. from tomorrow, british tourists will be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. those who are fully vaccinated also won't have to quarantine. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill has this report. just two weeks ago, anger that merkel was trying in vain to persuade other eu leaders to impose tighter restrictions on travellers
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from the uk. now germany is relaxing its own rules. they were worried by the spread of the delta variant and had banned anyone not a german resident to enter the country from britain. as of tomorrow, this will no longer apply. people not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine for at least five days. the decision will be seen as a victory for boris johnson who discussed the issue with angela merkel last week. 0thers me interpreted as a concession to the demands of other european countries keen to welcome back british tourist, but the relaxation of restrictions which also applies to portugal, russia, india and nepal may represent an acknowledgement on the part of the authorities that the delta variant is the dominant strain in germany too. a second man has been charged with common assault after england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, was accosted last month in a central london park. jonathan chew was charged with common assault and obstructing police. he will appear at westminster
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magistrates' court later today the headlines on bbc news... pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the government wants to lift almost all of england's restrictions in 2 weeks time. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. draft legislation intended to tackle what ministers describe as a "broken asylum system" is being introduced to parliament. the home office says the bill will help prevent people who've passed through a safe country claiming asylum in the uk. refugee campaigners warn that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. our home affairs correspondent
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daniel sandford has this report. until the pandemic broke last year, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk had doubled since 2010. if you look back over the last two decades, the number of applicants was still less than half what it was 20 years ago. and the figure, including dependents, is significantly lower than the numbers in germany, france, spain and greece. the pandemic also triggered a change in how people try to get to britain. the number crossing the channel in small boats rose sharply. it was 8500 last year. it is heading for an even greater number this year. the home secretary, priti patel, says she wants to create a fair but firm system that will break the business model of the people smuggling gangs. the nationality and borders bill will allow the uk government to return people to a safe country if they pass through it on the way to britain. campaigners say this will result in thousands of valid claims being deemed inadmissible, and call it a shameful dereliction of duty.
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the bill will also allow asylum claims to be processed outside the uk, potentially paving the way for controversial offshore centres for processing applications. daniel sandford, bbc news. 0ur correspondent, simonjones is in dover. it looks very windy there. can you give us a sense of the impact of the bill on the number of migrants who may arrive at dover?— may arrive at dover? broken is the word the government _ may arrive at dover? broken is the word the government has - may arrive at dover? broken is the word the government has been - may arrive at dover? broken is the l word the government has been using repeatedly in recent months to describe the asylum system. there will be hoping changes put forward today will reduce the number of migrants particularly crossing the channel by boat. we are unlikely to see arrivals today given the weather, but so far this year more than 6500 people have made the
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journey from france by boat. this month already we've seen 650 people. a bit of context, the number of migrants arriving on the back of lorries has fallen dramatically during the pandemic but the big change the government is hoping as they way they are treating people who arrive illegally. the idea is that if someone gets on a boat over from france, they will have passed through several safe eu countries before arriving in the uk so there will be an assumption that their asylum claim will not be valid and the government will seek to return people arriving by boat or arriving illegally to save eu countries they have passed through. the big problem is that after brexit, there is no agreement in place for this to happen. there used to be the dublin regulation, the government said it was not working but it did allow them to return some migrants. since
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brexit, the government has been negotiated with individual countries trying to draw up bilateral agreements but as far as we are aware, so far, the 6500 who have arrived by boat last year not one person has been returned to aeg country because there is no deal in place do this. tett country because there is no deal in place do thie— place do this. tell us more about the reaction _ place do this. tell us more about the reaction to _ place do this. tell us more about the reaction to this _ place do this. tell us more about the reaction to this legislation. it the reaction to this legislation. tt is proven controversially because the government is proposing a two tier asylum system. the assumption that people who arrive by boat will be turned away about what the government wants is to take people directly from war zones or refugee camps further afield. people will be brought to the uk, they will be granted asylum immediately so they will not be long delays about having their asylum claims assessed. the group supporting refugees see a two tier system is not fair because it is not taking into account the type of persecution or war zone someone
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has been escaping from. for the refugee council have said today that they think this is an anti—refugee bill and they describe it as really not fit for purpose. priti patel says she is determined to tackle the people smugglers who are operating these crossings. she heard at the weekend from border force a family of four who were trying to get to the uk from france. the two parents were separated from their two young daughters by smugglers at gunpoint who force the parents to go on one boat, the smugglers then told the parents of their two young daughters would be on the following boat but they have not seen them since. priti patel said she is determined to stop human tragedies like this but the reality is the asylum system is not going to be quick or easy to change and that is something the government is going to have to contend with.
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thank you very much. a woman with down's syndrome is at the high court today to demand a change in abortion law. a pregnancy can currently be terminated up to full term in england, scotland and wales if the foetus has down's syndrome — while most other abortions can't take place beyond 2a weeks. heidi crowter says the law discriminates against people who could have gone on to lead full and happy lives. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has more. heidi crowter from coventry has down's syndrome. she recently celebrated her first wedding anniversary with husband james. she lives life to the full. i like singing, i like dancing. i like watching disney. she's going to the high court, seeking a change to the 1967 abortion act. this allows abortion up to 2a weeks. but if the foetus has a disability, including down's syndrome, abortion is legal right up to birth. heidi says this is discriminatory.
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we wa nt we want to say to the world that we have a good quality of life. her mother liz has encouraged heidi to be as independent as possible. she lives here in coventry. heidi's legal team have crowdfunded £102,000 to take on the government in a landmark test case. i'm very proud of heidi, of her campaigning and i'll be supporting her along the way. 3,200 fetuses are aborted each year because the child is likely to be severely disabled. and 90% of women whose foetuses have down's syndrome choose to have an abortion. some say women in this situation need more time to make an informed decision. we're talking about a relatively small number of abortions every year that take place after 2a weeks. these are incredibly challenging, heartbreaking circumstances involving often very, very much wanted pregnancies, where women have to make really tough decisions.
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and i think to imply that somehow those decisions are made flippantly or casually, is incredibly offensive to the women involved. the case will run for the next two days in london's high court. aruna iyengar, bbc news. some breaking news, the entire england cricket one—day international team have gone into self isolation. i will give you more details. it is following the pcr tests that were administered yesterday in bristol after a one—day international against sri lanka, three members of the team and four members of the management team of england's one—day international party had tested positive for covid—i9. that means that all the team will now observe a period of self isolation from yesterday
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following the uk government protocol on quarantine. that is because the remaining members of the party have been deemed close contacts with those that had tested positive and will also isolate. england are due to play pakistan at lord's in a one—day international on saturday but we have been told that the team have over night worked identify a whole new squad and that ben stokes will return to england duties as captain so there will be a whole new squad for this game against pakistan on monday because the england one—day cricket team are currently testing positive, have tested positive and gone into self isolation after three england cricket players and four staff members tested positive for
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covid—i9. no doubt we will get more details on that in the sport at 930. around a thousand more babies would survive each year in england, if maternity services were as safe as those in sweden, according to a group of mps. the health and social care committee says a lack of staff, and a blame culture which prevents lessons from being learned, are significantly hindering maternity services. the company that owns vauxhall is expected to announce plans today to build electric vans at its ellesmere port plant in cheshire. the investment, said to be worth hundreds of millions of pounds, would safeguard more than a thousand factoryjobs. the future of the plant has been in doubt after vauxhall�*s parent company, stellantis, scrapped plans to build its new astra model there.
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the imminent lifting of the remaining pandemic restrictions in england. phillip thorley owns and runs 19 pubs across kent. hejoins me now do you think the government has got it right? do you think the government has got it riuht? , ., ~ do you think the government has got it riht? , ., ~ do you think the government has got itriuht? , ., ~ , it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago _ it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago they _ it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago they say _ it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago they say to - it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago they say to us - it right? yes, i do think so. many months ago they say to us followj it right? yes, i do think so. many - months ago they say to us follow the data, not the dates. the data has been ready for us to reopen, we as an industry are ready to reopen and we are looking forward to the 19th ofjuly being that day.— we are looking forward to the 19th ofjuly being that day. when you do reo en, ofjuly being that day. when you do reopen, assuming _ ofjuly being that day. when you do reopen, assuming everything - ofjuly being that day. when you do reopen, assuming everything goes| reopen, assuming everything goes according to the government timetable, well everything be back to normal? will your pubs look exactly the same? will behaviour be exactly the same? will behaviour be exactly the same as february 2020? we look forward to welcoming the public back in a normal way, the phrase we we have been using is near normal. some of our practices that
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we put in during this enforced period, we are going to continue, table service has proved very popular, people like that, t table service has proved very popular, people like that, i don't know if you _ popular, people like that, i don't know if you can _ popular, people like that, i don't know if you can still— popular, people like that, i don't know if you can still hear - popular, people like that, i don't know if you can still hear me, . popular, people like that, i don't| know if you can still hear me, you have frozen. i will give you a couple of seconds but i feel we may have to enter there. good to talk to you. thank you if you can still hear me. an initiative to encourage more diversity in the police is hoping to lead to 40% of new officer recruits next year being from ethnic minority backgrounds. currently 15.6% within the metropolitan police are from these backgrounds. the force's behind the badge programme is trying to foster trust in all communities. the bbc asian network's anisa kadri reports. basically you don't know what is round the corner. 0rahead of you. out and about with london's met police for what is known as a ride along. it's notjust forjournalists,
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they are also open to the public so people can see what police do. we are just getting called out now. and we are en route to a possible break in. but when we get there it turns out to be builders setting off an alarm system. ambitious plans to increase diversity in the police, these ride alongs are one way of improving engagement and building trust. the are one way of improving engagement and building trust.— and building trust. the police service has — and building trust. the police service has to _ and building trust. the police service has to reflect - and building trust. the police service has to reflect the - and building trust. the police - service has to reflect the diversity of this city. a lot of people believe that it is not as diverse, for example, the mention of racism, which from doing the 15.6 police officers are from black and ethnic minority backgrounds. the metropolitan police has ambitious plans. the police force is the biggest in the country and it has been told that 40% of new recruits
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should be from black and ethnic minority backgrounds. this, it hopes, means it will better serve the communities in the capital. taste the communities in the capital. we need to the communities in the capital. - need to understand that especially in our community as asians, and muslims, we struggle to understand how and where the police come from at times. i have been there myself where i would not necessarily have had the best view because of what we see. we only see one side of police and it is not the most positive. i was lucky, i had a very close friend in the police who has been there from the start. he used to tell me why they do certain things and those conversations where as an outsider before ijoined the police. the there may be a video where six officers try to restrain one person. 0n the outside, before ijoined the
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please, oh, my god, this is police brutality. from the inside, you understand that the technique they are using is to bring the person under control safely. tt is are using is to bring the person under control safely. it is thought olicies under control safely. it is thought policies like _ under control safely. it is thought policies like stop _ under control safely. it is thought policies like stop and _ under control safely. it is thought policies like stop and search - under control safely. it is thought policies like stop and search havej policies like stop and search have not helped. the police hope this campaign helps foster trust in the force. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaous good morning. the weather is unsettled at the moment. this area of low pressure sweeping up from the south, a legacy of cloud tonight, rain in places, but sunshine and showers. this deep low affecting mostly england and wales, pushing across into the north sea as we head through the course of the day but there will be a hang back of rain, spreading northwards across england and wales, affecting england and
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scotland and north—east england. elsewhere, sunshine and showers, some of it could be heavy, areas of cloud and more persistent rain, so it's a mixture of pretty much everything. temperatures a little bit lower than what we would expect this time of year, 15 — 18 or 19 degrees in the sunny spots. staying unsettled this evening and overnight, further areas of cloud, some showers as well, some of those could be heavy but for most of us, temperatures in double figures overnight. hello, this is bbc news with rebecca jones. the headlines... with rebecca jones. pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in two weeks time as the health secretary warns that new cases could go as high as 100,000. this vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases
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and hospitalisation is severely weakened. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport. germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able to enter the country even if they're not residents. a draft law is being introduced to parliament to prevent asylum seekers staying in the uk if they've already passed through a safe country. and coming up, we'll see how the social media platform tik tok is helping buskers earn hundreds of pounds and legions of fans. sport and time for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. letsjoin gavin for some lets join gavin for some breaking news in cricket.
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good morning. but news in the last half an hour that ben stokes has been drafted in to captain the england 0di squad after a serious covid 19 outbreak in their team bubble. following routine testing on monday three players and four members of management tested positive. the rest of the party have been deemed close contact, so will also need to isolate. the ecb have confirmed that the 0dis and t20 matches against pakistan will go ahead — with stokes leading a replacement squad that will be named later today. the first one—day match against pakistan is on thursday and we will get more on this story later on in the day. there was a heartbreaking end at wimbledon for the british teenager emma raducanu who was forced to pull out in the middle of her last—16 match for medical reasons last night. the 18—year—old was a set down to australian ajla tomljanovic when she appeared to be suffering from breathing difficulties asjoe wilson reports. emma raducanu's first lesson in wimbledon's second week was how to wait. practice courts in the afternoon, show court finally, at 7:52 pm. what we saw looked like another
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example of remarkable composure. raducanu's opponent top of the screen, australia's ajla tomljanovic is over a decade into her professional career. look who was embracing the occasion! you can see how closely matched these players were, every rally felt tense. imagine being emma's mum. well, a 50—minute first set was settled like this. that's going to be too long. 6—4 to tomljanovic. in the second set, the tennis remained intense — under the roof. it required energy, demanded concentration, everything. raducanu was trying to keep up with the pace but between points she was taking every second she could, frequently going to her towel. at 3—0 down, it became clear she was battling more than the score. medical time out. remember, this is an 18—year—old in her first major tournament, for whatever reason, it was suddenly too much.
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and what could we feel but sympathy? the match was over. ladies and gentlemen, due to medical reason, miss raducanu is not able to continue the match. emma must be really, really hurt if, you know, she came to the decision to retire. i know... i mean to play as a brit at home, it's unbelievable. so i'm really sorry for her because, you know, i wish we could have finished it. but, you know, it's sport. it happens. so i'm really wishing her all the best. well, standing here in the early evening drizzle, this wasn't the way any of us wanted it to finish. but we must remember and we must hope that for all emma raducanu has achieved at the championships, for her, this is just the start. joe wilson, bbc news at wimbledon. so the winner of that one, ajla tomljanovic will now face world number one and fellow australian ash barty in the quarter—finals. the top seed barty overcame french open champion barbora krejcikova with relative ease on monday and will bid to reach herfirst
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wimbledon semi—final. novak djokovic continued his bid for a record—equalling 20th men's grand slam title, with a routine win over chile's cristian garin. the world number one sailed through to the quarter—finals in straight sets — he'll play marton fucsovics next. and another familiar face through to the quarter—finals. eight—time wimbledon champion roger federer beat italy's lorenzo sonego in straight sets. now, just one day to go until england's semi—final match against denmark, and manager gareth southgate says he and the team have the opportunity to bring happiness to millions. the squad looked in great spirits as they trained at st georges park yesterday ahead of their first semi—final at a european championship since 1996. but before all that it's italy versus spain in the first semi—final at wembley tonight. both teams trained after arriving in london yesterday. the italians have been one of the stand out sides so far — and are one of the favourites to win the tournament.
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the australian grand prix has been called off for the second year in a row because of the coronavirus pandemic. the event in melbourne was expected to take place in november but has been abandoned because of tied border controls in australia. that's all the sport for now. next up, your questions answered. after the government announced the latest guidelines on the lifting of coronavirus restrictions in england, we've been asking you to send in your questions. with me is employment lawyer and director of employment and hr, adam pavey. and sally bloomfield — an expert on hygeine and infection control — from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine.
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lovely to have you both with us. we have lots of questions. an anonymous question for sally, but a good one, is there any evidence that hand washing has prevented what is now recognised as an airborne disease? yes, there's lots of evidence, there is good evidence from studies done over many years that hand washing can reduce respiratory infections by “p can reduce respiratory infections by up to 30%, it may be less for covid, i don't know, but certainly hand hygiene, you know, can reduce infections. it's primarily airborne but i would suspect nine in ten infections are airborne, one in ten is via hands and surfaces, 65 million people, that's a lot of infections. there's been criticism because of the images of people fogging subways and fogging streets and so forth and experts, people
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don't touch those services, they forget in our own homes and restaurants and all those sorts of places that we visit that are crowded, we are quite likely to touch a service that has been touched by someone else, that someone else might have been infected so it is a means of transmission of infection but it is about notjust hand washing, doing other things as well. find about notjust hand washing, doing other things as well.— other things as well. and offices as well and adam, _ other things as well. and offices as well and adam, a _ other things as well. and offices as well and adam, a question - other things as well. and offices as well and adam, a question from i other things as well. and offices as i well and adam, a question from phil, slightly different, but he would like to know how quickly will firms get their staff back into the office? ., ~' ., get their staff back into the office? ., ~ ., , , ., get their staff back into the office? ., ~' ., , , ., ., office? you know, employers have got to be aware — office? you know, employers have got to be aware of— office? you know, employers have got to be aware of the _ office? you know, employers have got to be aware of the fact _ office? you know, employers have got to be aware of the fact a _ office? you know, employers have got to be aware of the fact a lot _ office? you know, employers have got to be aware of the fact a lot of- to be aware of the fact a lot of people — to be aware of the fact a lot of people have been working at home for a considerable amount of time now and because of that, lifestyles have changed. _ and because of that, lifestyles have changed, the way they work, the way they do— changed, the way they work, the way they do things have changed, private life, they do things have changed, private life. family— they do things have changed, private life, family life have now really been _ life, family life have now really been built and adapted around these kind of— been built and adapted around these kind of changing working models so i think overnight, to change that and expect— think overnight, to change that and expect that people will immediately
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be able _ expect that people will immediately be able to go back into the office as they— be able to go back into the office as they were before, i think is possibly— as they were before, i think is possibly a _ as they were before, i think is possibly a little bit unrealistic and in — possibly a little bit unrealistic and in many cases, for employers, it may be _ and in many cases, for employers, it may be quite — and in many cases, for employers, it may be quite an unwise thing to do. icy may be quite an unwise thing to do. icy this _ may be quite an unwise thing to do. icy this as— may be quite an unwise thing to do. icy this as being really a kind of process— icy this as being really a kind of process of— icy this as being really a kind of process of consultation with people that are _ process of consultation with people that are currently working at home, and are _ that are currently working at home, and are expected to come back into the office — and are expected to come back into the office. there needs to be a two-way— the office. there needs to be a two—way dialogue there about how that looks — two—way dialogue there about how that looks and really kind of exploring possible alternatives because i think to suddenly do it overnight. — because i think to suddenly do it overnight, i think will cause a lot of people — overnight, i think will cause a lot of people working at home some significant problems, really. sol think— significant problems, really. sol think it's — significant problems, really. sol think it's a — significant problems, really. sol think it's a process and i think it's for— think it's a process and i think it's for employers to be live to these — it's for employers to be live to these issues, some of the areas where _ these issues, some of the areas where there is benefit for people working — where there is benefit for people working from home, to do it overnight— working from home, to do it overnight i think is problematic. but of— overnight i think is problematic. but of course there are going to be employers — but of course there are going to be employers who are just desperate for people _ employers who are just desperate for people to _ employers who are just desperate for people to come back, away from home
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working _ people to come back, away from home working and _ people to come back, away from home working and will probably make it happen— working and will probably make it happen quicker than it possibly needs— happen quicker than it possibly needs to — happen quicker than it possibly needs to but i think in terms of people's— needs to but i think in terms of people's employment rights, it's reatiy— people's employment rights, it's really about employers acting reasonably with this and not immediately overnight saying we expect— immediately overnight saying we expect all of the workforce to come back so— expect all of the workforce to come back so there needs to be a dialogue between _ back so there needs to be a dialogue between the employer and employee about this. ., , , ., ., , between the employer and employee about this. , ., ., , about this. hopefully that goes some wa to about this. hopefully that goes some way to answering _ about this. hopefully that goes some way to answering rebecca _ about this. hopefully that goes some way to answering rebecca 's - about this. hopefully that goes some | way to answering rebecca 's question way to answering rebecca �*s question about whether people will be able to opt to work from home if they have concerns about going an office. sally, tricia would like to know, once we can fly again, should we be concerned about the same air being recycled in aeroplanes and in airports? recycled in aeroplanes and in airorts? , recycled in aeroplanes and in airports?— recycled in aeroplanes and in airorts? , . ., , airports? yes, we should certainly be concerned _ airports? yes, we should certainly be concerned about _ airports? yes, we should certainly be concerned about airborne - be concerned about airborne transmission. in aeroplanes, i don't know the numbers, i think it's every 20 minutes, the air is recirculated and its recirculated through filters so that will remove most of the
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virus but if there is someone on the plane who is infected or infectious, remember even if he had been vaccinated, that could be so, within that time, they will be spreading virus into the air possibly faster than the air filter system is taking it out. so that is why if we are travelling on a plane or in a train or a tight space, then i hope that the airlines will require that we do wear masks so that one person, we don't know who it will be, is shedding the virus, we can reduce the chance of them infecting other people on the plane so it's these things working together, the filtration with the masks which will maximise the safety of the person stop out of interest, would that be your view for theatres as well? absolutely. 0bviously, filters, theatres are extremely crowded places. we are touching things all the time. we are moving around the
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theatre and as i say if someone in there is infected they will be spreading the virus soap masks in theatres is advisable but it's going to be down to personal responsibility for us to make our own decisions. and to act responsibly because in the next two or three months, before the vaccination programme is completed, there are going to be a lot of vulnerable people out there who are not only going to become infected but they are going to pass the infection on and you talked earlier about 100,000 people. we really got to try and keep it down below that and it's down to us and how we behave because we are not being restricted by mandate, it's now down to us to restrict the amount that we spread the virus.— spread the virus. adam, if i could return to you. _ spread the virus. adam, if i could return to you, one _ spread the virus. adam, if i could return to you, one viewer- spread the virus. adam, if i could return to you, one viewer asks i spread the virus. adam, if i could i return to you, one viewer asks what precautions will companies have to take after the restrictions have been eased? is there any onus on companies to do anything at all? it's always been the case employers
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have to _ it's always been the case employers have to comply with health and safety — have to comply with health and safety legislation, what that means is an employer has to provide a safe place _ is an employer has to provide a safe place of— is an employer has to provide a safe place of work and obviously, people that are _ place of work and obviously, people that are concerned about covid, concerned — that are concerned about covid, concerned about covid safety, many of them _ concerned about covid safety, many of them will have legitimate concerns about particular things that happened in the workplace which they say— that happened in the workplace which they say may be health and safety concerns — they say may be health and safety concerns so that is always going to be the _ concerns so that is always going to be the case, you know, there's always— be the case, you know, there's always been issues with infections and that— always been issues with infections and that type of issue for employers to deat— and that type of issue for employers to deal with. so really, it's going back— to deal with. so really, it's going back to _ to deal with. so really, it's going back to that kind of fundamental health— back to that kind of fundamental health and safety which is about providing — health and safety which is about providing a safe place at work and save processes at work as well. so that will _ save processes at work as well. so that will remain the case and that legislation deals with issues like covid _ legislation deals with issues like covid. ., ., .., , covid. that will remain the case. sall , covid. that will remain the case. sally. and _ covid. that will remain the case. sally. and it— covid. that will remain the case. sally, and it wants _ covid. that will remain the case. sally, and it wants to _ covid. that will remain the case. sally, and it wants to know - covid. that will remain the case. sally, and it wants to know howl sally, and it wants to know how likely are we to get a vaccine
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invading mutation are likely to break through because one of the arguments around lifting restrictions and justification is the success of the vaccine programme especially for people who have been double vaccinated. yes. especially for people who have been double vaccinated.— double vaccinated. yes, and i think it's a real concern _ double vaccinated. yes, and i think it's a real concern to _ double vaccinated. yes, and i think it's a real concern to government i double vaccinated. yes, and i think| it's a real concern to government as well as to all of us that you know, well as to all of us that you know, we have managed to work through the road map to undoing lockdown and we are on target to do it but one thing that would completely derail it would be if we had another vaccine variant that was more virulent and which was more resistant to the vaccine and that could completely derail everything and we cannot predict it we do not know if or when it is going to happen, it is a chance event. i have heard people say it is unlikely we would get a variant that is totally resistant to the vaccine but they are obviously already talking about booster vaccines, looking to see which of
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the variance s the barons we need to have vaccines against but it takes three months at minimum to develop a new influenza vaccine once you know what you are up against because they can find out what the vreeland strains in australia, which are likely to come over to us in the winter. so if a new reland comes over which is as as the delta variant, it could take off two huge levels before we are just the vaccine so that is a very real fear. interesting. nicholas would like to know will vulnerable people who have a public facing job for example someone who works in a bar or restaurant, will they be forced to go and work while people don't have to socially distance and wear face coverings any more? you to socially distance and wear face coverings any more?— to socially distance and wear face coverings any more? you know, it's likely people _ coverings any more? you know, it's likely people like _ coverings any more? you know, it's likely people like that _ coverings any more? you know, it's likely people like that would - coverings any more? you know, it's likely people like that would be - likely people like that would be
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considered to be disabled which is a protected _ considered to be disabled which is a protected characteristic so employers in that situation need to carefully— employers in that situation need to carefully think about discrimination and the _ carefully think about discrimination and the fact that it imposes that type of— and the fact that it imposes that type of condition, people had to come _ type of condition, people had to come back and be a public facing roles, _ come back and be a public facing roles, when they have a disability such— roles, when they have a disability such as _ roles, when they have a disability such as that. that could sound in terms _ such as that. that could sound in terms of— such as that. that could sound in terms of discrimination. ultimately, though. _ terms of discrimination. ultimately, though. it's— terms of discrimination. ultimately, though, it's for employers to decide what and _ though, it's for employers to decide what and how they want to operate and to _ what and how they want to operate and to also — what and how they want to operate and to also make decisions as well, where _ and to also make decisions as well, where we _ and to also make decisions as well, where we will see this discussed and actually— where we will see this discussed and actually decided upon is an employment tribunal, we will see those _ employment tribunal, we will see those kind of questions being tested but in _ those kind of questions being tested but in many ways, it's going to be difficult _ but in many ways, it's going to be difficult for — but in many ways, it's going to be difficult for employers faced with particular employees that have particular employees that have particular health issues, particular disabilities and for those employers
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to make _ disabilities and for those employers to make reasonable adjustments for them so _ to make reasonable adjustments for them so there's going to be a very difficult _ them so there's going to be a very difficult period of time when these types _ difficult period of time when these types of— difficult period of time when these types of questions will be considered and obviously, always considered and obviously, always considered on an individual basis. but with— considered on an individual basis. but with that type of scenario, you could _ but with that type of scenario, you could expect that the employer would be consulting with that individual with similar issues and trying to think— with similar issues and trying to think quite laterally about ways of dealing _ think quite laterally about ways of dealing with that, whether other alternative rules could possibly be moved _ alternative rules could possibly be moved to, — alternative rules could possibly be moved to, other types of adjustments but ultimately, there may be situations in which an employer cannot— situations in which an employer cannot make those types of adjustments and unfortunately, cannot— adjustments and unfortunately, cannot keep somebody in that type of role if _ cannot keep somebody in that type of role if they— cannot keep somebody in that type of role if they have a particular health — role if they have a particular health condition so there's going to be lots _ health condition so there's going to be lots of— health condition so there's going to be lots of very kind of difficult decisions _ be lots of very kind of difficult decisions on difficult issues for both— decisions on difficult issues for both employers and employees to grapple _ both employers and employees to grapple with over the next few
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months — grapple with over the next few months. , , months. some very interesting questions- _ months. some very interesting questions. thank _ months. some very interesting questions. thank you - months. some very interesting questions. thank you to - months. some very interesting questions. thank you to our i months. some very interesting - questions. thank you to our viewers for sending the men and thank you adam and sally for answering those. really good to have you both with us. many thanks. some breaking news for the office for national statistics. 0n registered deaths. the number of deaths registered in the uk in the week ending the 25th ofjune 2021 was 10,052. that's 6% below the five year average. 118 involved covid—19, that's two more than the previous week, those figures havejust that's two more than the previous week, those figures have just come into us from the office for national statistics. bars and pubs in england will no longer need customers to sign into venues using the test and trace app under new guidance due
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to come into effect from july 19th. so will that mean the end of the app altogether? our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones has been looking into it. the app will help us safely live our lives, protecting you and others. it had a difficult birth, but since last september, millions of us have used the nhs test and trace app to scan in when we visit a cafe or pub, and more importantly, to get alerts telling us when we may have been in contact with someone with covid—19. here's how it works. i've got the app and i'm waiting for a bus, standing reasonably close to a complete stranger who's also got it. 0ur phones are recording that contact. a day or so later, the stranger enters a positive covid test into the app, and that triggers an alert, telling me to go into isolation. the app was delayed after an early version trialled on the isle of wight proved unreliable and raised privacy concerns. one of those who advised the government to change tack says
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the final version has worked. something of the order of half a million to 600,000 cases were averted as a result of using this app. so that has to be worth it. the nhs covid—19 app has been downloaded nearly 26 million times, but we don't know how many people are still using it. more than a million positive test results have been recorded in the app, and they've triggered nearly two and a half million contact tracing alerts, sending people into isolation. you can see here how there's been a spike in those alerts, as cases have risen in the last few weeks. the fact that thousands of locations ask you to scan in to register a visit, has encouraged use of the app. but what happens when places like this are told they no longer need to get people to check in? it seems possible that many customers will simply decide to turn the app off, especially given the high number of alerts it's sending out right now. with infections on the rise again, some businesses say the app
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is causing them real problems as staff are sent home. and amongst the public, there are mixed feelings about sticking with it. if i don't need it to get into restaurants and stuff, yeah, i'll get rid of it for sure. as things are getting better, and i had my two jabs, and hopefully everyone else will have the second jab, i might not use it. i think it's important that we can keep track of people _ that may be infected, _ and especially with new variants coming in as well. i think it's really important. the team behind the app strongly believes it still has a job to do. but as life gets back to normal, persuading people not to turn it off may prove tricky. rory cellan—jones, bbc news, west london. the social media platform tik tok is responsible for launching numerous dance crazes and has even helped a sea shanty reach number one in the charts. now it's bringing a whole new audience to busking, allowing street artists to earn hundreds of pounds and legions of fans. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson hit the streets
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with one singer in leeds. so this is how busking works in 2021. a crowd of around 30 people in the centre of leeds on a weekday morning. but tens of thousands watching all round the world live on tiktok. you can see people in the comments. like, hi from germany, hi from the philippines, america. itjust, like, brings everyone together really. liv harland is 23 and from york. this is on my spotify. # what does it look like in heaven.# at the start of the year, she decided to change how she busked. now when she travels to london or manchester to take
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to the streets, she also goes live online. and it's altered everything, especially how much money she makes. thank you very much. thank you. on average, it's kind of like £100—odd an hour, depending on how long i stay out. the most i've made is £400 in one hour. in cash? that was in cash. and then my live stream, which was through gifts on tiktok, igot £1,500. the next song i'm going to sing is lost without you by freya hardings. it's also seriously helping to raise her profile. am i a tiktoker? yeah. liv harland. i'm recording now. see what i mean? yeah. while we're there, shoppers are constantly recognising liv from her online busking. you performed in london the other day, so i was wondering why you're here. have you seen her before? i have, i've seen you on tiktok. while others have travelled especially. where you from ? bradford. did you come through
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todayjust for this? because you saw it on my story? that's mad. this is actual... this is how it works. yeah. so how did you know about today? on her instagram. right. you posted something yesterday, didn't you? about saying something's happening today in leeds. so i thought, do you know what? let's get up and drive and we'll go support her. so you've come from bradford especially to see her busk. yeah. these are different days. literally. it'sjust the power of social media, isn't it? what a life! that's my original song. # i saw you out and you both turned around # you walked away. # so i hope you find the one that you're looking for.# this guy's singing along. # i guess it was all in my mind.# i've got it as my ringtone. it's one of them rare songs that you can associate with, it don't matter who you're with or where you are. it just...
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it's almost a healing song for me. this is so different to busking of the past, isn't it? yeah. do you know what? it's good. i'm not sure how she's not been picked up before. i absolutely love her to death. liv has now quit herjob in a kindergarten to concentrate on music full time. it's the online busking, which helped to secure a manager and a deal to release her own songs on spotify. i want to kind of be an artist, really. and that is very, very possible with the platform i built on social media. so the power of social media is crazy. you don't have to go on x factor these days to get recognised. i'm bursting with pride. ijust can't... i actually can't take it in how well she's doing and how positive and bubbly she is. and i'm so proud. but i was rather getting in the way. so to explain to people watching on tiktok, this is for bbc breakfast, we're doing a piece on liv and how busking has changed. this feels very meta. yeah.
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explaining to tiktok what's going out on bbc breakfast. yeah. it's crazy that's even happening, to be honest. and the numbers were large. i had 80,000 views within just short of half an hour and 1,500 new followers. wowee! just from like a short little live. yes, online busking is big business. shall we say goodbye? yeah. see you later. thank you very much. colin paterson, bbc news, leeds. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. it looks like today will be the most unsettled of the week in terms of weather, things tending to calm down towards the latter part of the week as high—pressure tries to build. we will see some showers and some sunny spells around but it comes off the back of something pretty stormy for the time of year, this low which brings severe gales to north—west france overnight, strong winds through the channel and heavy rain spreading its way through much of england and wales. it's
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pushing towards the north sea, a handbag of that rain will continue to affect eastern scotland and north—east england, western scotland, northern ireland, the rest of england and wales should see sunshine through the afternoon, some showers could be heavy and areas of showers could be heavy and areas of showers which could merge to give longer spells of rain, quite a mixture of everything. temperature is disappointing in the north—east with the rain, 18 or 19 in the sunshine. forthis with the rain, 18 or 19 in the sunshine. for this afternoon and again tomorrow we are likely to see some interruptions from showery bursts of rain across the wimbledon area, temperatures generally in the high teens. this area of low pressure continues to scoot towards norway through the overnight period, leaving a legacy of cloud, dryer for eastern scotland, this new feature pushing into the south—west, enhanced shower activity and no work will be cold, temperatures 10—14. this feature will enhance the showers across large parts of england and wales through wednesday. we start with quite a bit of cloud
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around, sunshine breaking through but then we see showers developing, some of them could be quite heavy and even thundery across england and wales, certainly, a bit more slow—moving because the winds will be lighter for all. slow—moving because the winds will be lighterfor all. some slow—moving because the winds will be lighter for all. some showers slow—moving because the winds will be lighterfor all. some showers in the north, feeling warmer, 18—22 or 23 degrees. 0n the north, feeling warmer, 18—22 or 23 degrees. on thursday, pressure dry to build in, still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow showers to develop especially across scotland and northern ireland, were cloud sunshine in the south, looking at highs of 23 celsius. the winds very light. moving into friday and the weekend, weather fronts never too far away but as i mentioned, the pressure continuing to bill so we should see some good spells of sunshine on friday and into the weekend, but there is always that threat of showers and some of them could continue to be heavy.
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work this is bbc news ? i'm rebecca jones. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. pupils in england may no longer have to isolate if a classmate tests positive for covid under new plans to be announced later. the uk government plans to lift almost all of england's restrictions in 2 weeks time as the health secretary warns that new cases could go as high as 100,000 a day. this vaccine wall of defence, it is working and the link between cases and hospitalisation is severely weakened. let'sjust be cautious. let'sjust be careful. yes, let's get our pubs and restaurants back to normal, but let's have the masks on public transport.
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germany is relaxing covid restrictions on travellers from the uk — from tomorrow, they'll be able

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