Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

5:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. overdue, or reckless? the british government plans to end most of england's covid restrictions, despite a sharp rise in cases. russia a sharp rise in cases. evacuate a consulate as the russia evacuate a consulate as the taliban continue to make advances across afghanistan. a $70 million ransom demand as a russian gang launches a global cyber attack against dozens of companies. italy and spain's footballers go head to head
5:01 am
for a place in the euro 2020 final hello and welcome. scientists around the world have been reacting to the england's decision to lift most coronavirus restrictions in two weeks time. prime minister borisjohnson said although cases were rising, it was now or never to make the change, and vaccines were having an impact. if the plan is confirmed, masks will become optional and social distancing will end. but one expert has told the bbc, the plan doesn't allow for the risk posted by the new delta variant. damien grammaticas reports. will hospitals be able to cope? it's a risk the prime minister is contemplating taking. his desire is to remove all covid restrictions across england,
5:02 am
just as infections are rising fast again. but borisjohnson believes relaxing curbs now in the summer is preferable. waiting could be worse. be run the risk of _ waiting could be worse. be run the risk of either _ waiting could be worse. be run the risk of either opening - waiting could be worse. be run the risk of either opening up i the risk of either opening up at a very difficult time in the virus has an edge, an advantage in the colder months, or again putting everything off to next year, so i do think it will be a very balanced decision. what he envisages _ a very balanced decision. what he envisages is _ a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no _ a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more - a very balanced decision. what he envisages is no more social| he envisages is no more social distancing, no limits on how many can visit your home, or how many can pack restaurants, bars and pubs, theatres, nightclubs, sports stadiums all open and full. no more empty offices, as the requirement to work from home would end as well. but there is a concern a third wave of covid is under way, with an average of more than 25,000 cases each day in the past week, and the number infected is doubling roughly every nine days. his own chief
5:03 am
scientific advisor said now is the time to be controlling the virus. ~ ., the time to be controlling the virus. ~ . w the time to be controlling the virus. ~ . ., . virus. we are in the face of an increasing _ virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic _ virus. we are in the face of an increasing epidemic at - increasing epidemic at the moment, and therefore we need to behave accordingly in terms of trying to limit transmission spread. of trying to limit transmission s - read. �* of trying to limit transmission sread. �* ., ., spread. but the vaccination programme _ spread. but the vaccination programme is _ spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting - spread. but the vaccination programme is blunting the | programme is blunting the pandemic. the numbers in hospital and dying with covid are relatively low. is the reason mrjohnson believes he can go ahead, and he wants to remove the legal obligation to wear a mask as well, but the scientists are cautious, saying they will continue to where there's. ., , ., they will continue to where there's. . , ., ., , there's. there was a really clear consensus _ there's. there was a really clear consensus that - there's. there was a really| clear consensus that under there's. there was a really . clear consensus that under all circumstances, some degree of further social distancing will be maintained even after the restrictions are lifted in law, and that has been part of the roadmap all the way through and thatis roadmap all the way through and that is widely supported by the scientific views.— scientific views. today we will hear more — scientific views. today we will hear more about _ scientific views. today we will hear more about the - scientific views. today we will hear more about the plans . scientific views. today we will j hear more about the plans for schools. here too the government is hoping to live restrictions, to put an end to
5:04 am
bubbles and isolation of whole groups, judging the cost is no longer worth the benefit. germany has lifted its ban on travellers from the uk entering the country. from wednesday, people who've had both vaccine doses won't have to quarantine. the changes also apply to those travelling from portugal, russia, india and nepal. people who aren't fully vaccinated will still have to quarantine for at least five days. later in the programme, about 25 minutes, we will be assessing what the economic outlook is for the uk economy if there is a vigilant third wave of coronavirus, what will it mean if restaurants and hospitality fully opens up without social distancing? we will be having that conversation a little later in our business coverage. to afghanistan now, where russia hasjoined iran and turkey in suspending
5:05 am
operations at its consulate in the northern city of mazar—e—sharif as the taliban make sweeping advances across the country. militants claim they've captured 150 out of 369 districts in the past two months. thousands of people have been displaced by fighting, as mark lobel reports. the us military left this air base just north of kabul so fast that night, its new afghan commander was only told after they had gone. afghan security forces must now face the taliban alone. in many provinces, including this one in the country's north—east. translation: the taliban tried to break the city's defence line and enter yesterday until midnight, but they faced a strong resistance from our defence and security forces.
5:06 am
translation: i'm a soldier of the national army and i will defend my homeland, as long as a drop of blood remains in my body. a drop of blood remains in my bod ., , ., a drop of blood remains in my bod .g , ., ':::: a drop of blood remains in my bod. , ., '::::~m, , body. just over 100 kilometres north of here, _ body. just over 100 kilometres north of here, neighbouring i north of here, neighbouring tajikistan says more than 1000 afghan government soldiers have fled their. a, afghan government soldiers have fled their. �* , ., ~ ., fled their. a number of afghan forces may _ fled their. a number of afghan forces may well _ fled their. a number of afghan forces may well have - fled their. a number of afghan forces may well have fled, - fled their. a number of afghan forces may well have fled, but| forces may well have fled, but the afghan national army, the ash stomach afghan national police force that we have worked really hard to build up, they have a fairly good capability, and we are not really leaving with everything, our intelligence and drones will be there, and it is the afghan people's will to defeat the taliban that is really credible.— the taliban that is really credible. ., ., , , credible. the dark grey parts of this map _ credible. the dark grey parts of this map showed - credible. the dark grey parts of this map showed areas . of this map showed areas taliban it has captured. 150 out of 369 districts in the past two months of fighting, including recapturing what now resembles a ghost town in their
5:07 am
former stronghold of khandahar, in southern afghanistan, living security forces on edge and families fleeing. translation: to tried to kill _ families fleeing. translation: to tried to kill me. _ families fleeing. translation: to tried to kill me. if— families fleeing. translation: to tried to kill me. if they - to tried to kill me. if they killed me, who would look after my children? the taliban don't want peace, they want the whole government. want peace, they want the whole government-— government. foreign forces 40 taliban four _ government. foreign forces 40 taliban four years _ government. foreign forces 40 taliban four years after - government. foreign forces 40 taliban four years after they i taliban four years after they offered a safe haven to al-qaeda, who attacked america, but could that threats now re—emerge? if but could that threats now re-emerge?_ re-emerge? if the country collapses _ re-emerge? if the country collapses back _ re-emerge? if the country collapses back to - re-emerge? if the country collapses back to the i re-emerge? if the country i collapses back to the taliban, the threat will be concentrated in afghanistan and they have strong ties with al-qaeda. in afghanistan and they have strong ties with al—qaeda. if strong ties with al-qaeda. if those ties resume, women's rights are set back, and fighting in cities intensifies, and many may question what they wore cost 200,000 lives and $1 trillion is achieved? there are many routes into
5:08 am
europe, but none are strange as this one. belarus appears to be encouraging migrants who've arrived there from the middle east to cross over into neighbouring lithuania. so far this year, the numbers are ten times what they were in the whole of 2020. the president of the european union, ursula von der leyen says it appears to be politically motivated. sara monetta has more. the whiter specs on the screen are a group of iraqi men illegally crossing from belarus into lithuania. in the past few weeks, more and more have reached the european union in this way. the new migrant route that caught the tiny baltic country completely by surprise. translation: each day we are detaining around hundred 50 illegal migrants. we have never seen such numbers before. {lin seen such numbers before. on average. _ seen such numbers before. on average, they welcome about 70 migrants in a year. in the past month alone, they have received more than 1200 people. the
5:09 am
government says it's not a coincidence. ~ ,, ~ ., coincidence. translation: today lithuania is _ coincidence. translation: today lithuania is experiencing - coincidence. translation: today lithuania is experiencing an i lithuania is experiencing an unprecedented migratory pressure. we witnessed how the regime of belarus is using migration as a tool of political manipulation. authorities believe that belarus ' state airline is flying migrants from baghdad and istanbul to the belarus and capital of minsk, and from there, they can easily make their way to the lithuania border. �* ,, �* their way to the lithuania border. �* ,, ~ , ., border. translation: it is not difficult to _ border. translation: it is not difficult to understand - border. translation: it is not difficult to understand the i difficult to understand the certain link between the sanctions that the eu has applied belarus, and the actions that lukashenko is taking across the border now. the eu imposed sanctions on belarus after a ryanair flight belarus after a rya nair flight was belarus after a ryanair flight was forced to land at minsk so authorities could arrest the dissidentjournalist. in retaliation the longtime belarus and leader alexander lukashenko said his bodyguards
5:10 am
were no longer stop migrants from crossing into the eu. down at the border, its full emergency, with lithuanian government asking villages to make room for the new arrivals, and announcing the setting up of a second migrant camp. translation: hybrid war is waged against lithuania and we have to be united in focus, both on the municipal and national level in addressing these challenges.— national level in addressing these challenges. with belarus behavinu these challenges. with belarus behaving more _ these challenges. with belarus behaving more and _ these challenges. with belarus behaving more and more i behaving more and more unpredictably, people here are bracing for impact. a russian—based hacking group known as reevil has compromised the computer systems of at least 1,000 businesses worldwide by targeting an american it provider, that writes and updates their software. one of those affected is sweden's co—op supermarket, which has had to close some 500 outlets — that's more than half its stores — because tills and self—service checkouts had
5:11 am
stopped working. reevil has tailored its ransom demands to the size of each respective company, but on sunday said it would settle the lot for $70 million if someone were prepared to pay it. i'm joined now byjoseph menn, investigative technology reporter for reuters, and an author on technology security. tell us what you think of this most recent cyber attack. it’s most recent cyber attack. it's a very alarming. _ most recent cyber attack. it's a very alarming. it _ most recent cyber attack. it�*s a very alarming. it is the worst by scale ransom where attack motivated by money. there have been more than having pretended to be about money but have been more about destroying things, this one is really about money though, but it may be more destructive in
5:12 am
the end. they have asked for $70 million to shut the whole thing down, the most that has ever been sought in a somewhere case, but i think the most alarming thing is the victims didn't do anything wrong. they using a managed security provider in the managed security provider itself got hacked, so this is what the professionals advise, if you are not in a big enough company to manage your own security, you turn it over to professionals, and in this case it was the professionals that got hacked, so that is an alarming escalation. they are askinu alarming escalation. they are askin: to alarming escalation. they are asking to be _ alarming escalation. they are asking to be paid _ alarming escalation. they are asking to be paid in _ alarming escalation. they are asking to be paid in bitcoin, l asking to be paid in bitcoin, $70 million worth. your thoughts on that? that's a bit confusing- — thoughts on that? that's a bit confusing. they _ thoughts on that? that's a bit confusing. they have - thoughts on that? that's a bit confusing. they have infectedj confusing. they have infected at least several hundred, quite possibly more than 1000 companies, and some of the ransom where demands to individual companies have been very small, a few thousand dollars, and the biggest case that we know is 5 million. they have been in monteiro, so it's
5:13 am
strange they are asking for $70 million to in bitcoin, when bitcoin is more traceable, and in particular there have been two big cases in the us, one against the pipeline, one against the pipeline, one against the pipeline, one against the meatpacker, and in the pipeline case that paid in bitcoin, and the us was able to hack it back in a sense, recover a bunch of. is weird that these guys are asking for bitcoin. i that these guys are asking for bitcoin. ., , ., ., ., ,~' bitcoin. i was going to ask about that. _ bitcoin. i was going to ask about that. given - bitcoin. i was going to ask about that. given that i bitcoin. i was going to ask about that. given that the j bitcoin. i was going to ask- about that. given that the dark side pack on the us pipeline that caused chaos to big swathes of the us for a period of time, they managed to get the money back, the us authorities, we were all saying at the time does this not put off future cyber attacks in terms of what hackers might do next, or how they might move next? ., , , next? so ransom where is very
5:14 am
interesting _ next? so ransom where is very interesting and _ next? so ransom where is very interesting and has _ next? so ransom where is very interesting and has a _ next? so ransom where is very interesting and has a political i interesting and has a political connection. biden brought it up with putin at the recent summit, it because a lot of these gangs are russian based and have some overlap with russian intelligence, in the past at least, and so on the one hand if you are politically motivated, it is good that an entire country gets angry enough, maybe they will pay, because a single company can't come up with the $70 million but the united states government could, but on the other hand you don't want to be so notorious that the us government has you in the sides and brings you up with the government of your country, that may cause you to rebrand, breakup of the debate and try things a different way, so it's a a bit of a risky gambit. we will certainly _ a a bit of a risky gambit. we will certainly see how this one pans out, good to have you on the programme, thank you, and once again a little later in our business coverage we will talk to someone who runs a cyber security firm to get his take on what is going on. do
5:15 am
stay with us here at bbc news. a full sport rounmd up including, the up including, players who have made it through the players who have made it through to the quarter—finals of the women's wimbledon. central london has been rocked by a series of terrorist attacks. police say there have been many casualties, and there is growing speculation that al-qaeda was responsible. germany will be the hosts of the 2006 football world cup. they pipped the favourite, south africa, by a single vote. in south africa, the possibility of losing hadn't even been contemplated. celebration parties were cancelled. a man entered the palace i through a downstairs window and made his way to the queen's private bedroom, then _ he asked her for a cigarette and, on the pretext - for arranging for some to be i bought, summoned a footman on duty who took the man away. cheering and applause. one child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. education is the only solution.
5:16 am
an alarming number of doctors in india have found themselves the targets of attacks by family members of patients who say their loved ones haven't received sufficient medical care. the indian medical association is now calling for a new law to protect healthcare workers. divya arya has more from delhi, and a warning that her report contains disturbing scenes at the very start. they used whatever they could lay their hands on, a metal bedpan, a wooden stick, orjust theirfists.
5:17 am
shocked by the death of their loved one from covid, these relatives took out their anger on dr seuj kumar senapati, on just his second day of work, after graduating from medical school. one month later, the memory of the attack was still fresh. translation: i was very scared. and it felt like i wouldn't survive the attack. they were hitting my head. my nose was constantly bleeding. i begged them to stop, but they didn't. 36 people have now been charged. a shocking case, but not by a long way india's first during the pandemic. chant: we want justice! in some cases, doctors have taken to the streets, complaining about the ongoing attacks that have occurred throughout the pandemic. you are responsible for all
5:18 am
these things so we are not seeing the case properly. they started throwing a plastic chair. nobody was arrested over the attack, which has left the dr reddy suffering flashbacks. at the peak of the second wave of infections, angry relatives damaged property at delhi's apollo hospital. translation: the most| common factor is the lack of infrastructure in hospitals, because of this, hospitals get overcrowded, and as a result, the junior doctors often become the target of violence by relatives. last month, doctors across india held demonstrations, calling for legal protection for health care staff, saying there has been a sharp increase in attacks during the pandemic. many indian states have laws against attacking health workers, but the indian medical association says state legislation is not always
5:19 am
enfored or even publicised. they believe on the a new law passed by the central government can help stop this violence. india has very few doctors for its billion plus people, now it is struggling to keep them safe. divya arya, bbc news, delhi. now let's pause in terms of news for the moment and take in all the latest sports stories. hello, i'm mark edwards and here is your sports news. brazil are into the final of the copa america for the second edition in a row after beating peru 1—0 in rio de janeiro. the 9 time champions seeing off the 2019 runners up courtesy of a solitary goal from lyon midfielder lucas paqueta. peru keeper pedro gallese was in inspired form as he produced a stunning
5:20 am
double save to keep out neymar and then richarlison. but there was nothing he could do about the goal, neymar bamboozling alexander callens with a nutmeg before setting up paqueta in the 24th minute and that proved to be enough for the reigning champions. they'll take on the winner of argentina vs colombia in the final. we really are at the business end of the euro 2020 tournament now with the first semi final taking place later on tuesday, and what a titanic clash that promises to be. it's italy vs spain at wembley. two teams that know each other very well. they've met seven times at the euros previously, the italians who knocked the spanish out of euro 2016, are on a 32—match unbeaten run while spain are the tournament's highest—scoring team with 12 goals in five matches. to wimbledon now and its ladies quarter—finals day in south west london a full capacity crowd on centre court and they'll be treated to the all australian tie between top seed ashleigh barty and ajla tomljanovic. barty came through her match against the french open
5:21 am
champion barbora krejcikova in straight sets and is into the last 8 at the all england club for the first time. ido i do everything in my power to make sure that i was well prepared to come into this tournament, ifeel like prepared to come into this tournament, i feel like we are doing all the right things, we are trying to do everything that we can each and every day to be as many as possible ——to be as ready as possible, that is different to how we prepare for each and every tournament so definitely happy with the way things are going. but the first match on centre court on tuesday sees tunisia's ons jabeur up against 2nd seed aryna sabalenka. jabeur having made history by becoming the first arab woman to reach the quarter finals at wimbledon. she produced a stunning display to defeat seventh seed and 2020 french open winner iga swiatek. jabeur became the first arab woman to win a wta title at the birmingham classic injune and, having become the first arab woman to reach the fourth round at wimbledon, continues to break new ground. south africa's match against georgia on friday is in jeopardy after
5:22 am
the springboks were forced to suspend training and place their squad into isolation because of an outbreak of coronavirus. second row lood de jager returned a positive test and on the grounds of his close contact with a number of players, the whole squad are having to quarantine. it is the second time the springboks have been forced to take such measures during the build—up to the test series against the british and irish lions, which opens in cape town onjuly 24. the tour de france resumes on tuesday with the stage 10 taking the riders out of the alps down to the slopes of the rhone valley into valence. tadej pogaca will start the day in the race leader's yellow jersey after winning stage 8 mark cavendish will be hoping to add to his tally of sprint wins as the race heads closer to paris, while the rest of the field will be hoping that the second week is less eventful than the first. you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me and the rest of the sport team, goodbye. let's talk about what was
5:23 am
cancelled in 2020, the cancelled in 2020, the cancelled festival will be having its opening ceremony. coronavirus played havoc in the film industry but as tom brooke reports, cannes is back. this year's one film festival will be a little different. tonight, you have a very particular niche, if i've got it right. particular niche, if i've got it riuht. , ., particular niche, if i've got itriuht. , . , it right. this man has been hostin: it right. this man has been hosting redcarpet - it right. this man has beenj hosting redcarpet coverage it right. this man has been i hosting redcarpet coverage at cannes for french television for more than two decades. covid-19 will for more than two decades. covid—19 will definitely affect festival, cannes is about 80,000 people coming in to town for the festival, the talent, the journalist, for the festival, the talent, thejournalist, the the journalist, the professionals that thejournalist, the professionals that come here to participate stopping there won't be that many people it would be 40,000.— won't be that many people it would be 40,000. movies of course will — would be 40,000. movies of course will be _ would be 40,000. movies of course will be the _ would be 40,000. movies of course will be the big - course will be the big attraction. opening—night film
5:24 am
is an operatic musical featuring a celebrity couple from a french director, starring oscar—winning french actress and hollywood's adam driver. if the movie is like their other endeavours, it will be a film that pushes the envelope. be a film that pushes the envelope-— be a film that pushes the enveloe. . , ,., envelope. that is something that has been _ envelope. that is something that has been there - envelope. that is something that has been there from i envelope. that is something | that has been there from day one and that we carry through to the current time that we just always want to be challenging what we are doing. cannes can boast a big lineup. american films like the french dispatch from wes anderson and bernadette, a controversial love story between two 17th—century nuns. the festival is hoping to regain its potency as a showcase.— as a showcase. look at something _ as a showcase. look at something like - as a showcase. look at i something like parasite, as a showcase. look at - something like parasite, which was debuted at cannes and went through to becoming a best picture when a first korean film ever to win the best
5:25 am
picture oscar, that is what you want from cannes. the pandemic has definitely _ want from cannes. the pandemic has definitely shaped _ want from cannes. the pandemic has definitely shaped movies i has definitely shaped movies being seen at cannes. the year of the everlasting storm is an anthology of films from seven esteemed filmmakers that were made under lock and with the rigid stipulated rules.- rigid stipulated rules. things like ou rigid stipulated rules. things like you have _ rigid stipulated rules. things like you have to _ rigid stipulated rules. things like you have to shoot i rigid stipulated rules. things like you have to shoot from | like you have to shoot from your home, onset cast and crew will be limited to those who are with you and quarantine, and i think that the theme of rebirth is really embedded throughout the film. covid-19 has changed — throughout the film. covid-19 has changed the _ throughout the film. covid-19 has changed the landscape i throughout the film. covid-19 has changed the landscape of| has changed the landscape of cinema. it is now a world of ubiquitous streaming. film festivals like cannes rooted and celebrating movies destined for cinema face uncertain times, but have cannes lives up to expectations, it will at least, over the next 12 days, be showcasing excellent works from some of the greatest makers in the world. tom
5:26 am
brooke, bbc news, cannes. and as covid restrictions are lifted and eased, what will that mean for events and the hospitality industry? we will be discussing that next. hello there. monday was drierfor a while across england and wales, but we certainly saw the weather going down hill from the south. this rain here is marching its way northwards across the uk up into northern england and scotland, where already in the past few days in edinburgh, we have had a month's worth of rain. now that early rain is moving away, but this area of low pressure is taking a band of rain — heavy at times — northwards up towards scotland and northern england with blustery showers following to the south. for a while, we will have some unseasonably windy weather along the coast of england all the way from dorset across to suffolk, gusts of 50mph in the morning. it won't be as windy in the afternoon, but there will be some heavy showers around, and we have still got this more persistent rain, never really clearing away from northern england,
5:27 am
pushing into eastern scotland. elsewhere, some brightness and maybe some sunshine. the showers are never too far away, and they may well be heavy as well. generally, temperatures a bit lower on tuesday, 18—19 typically, could be chillier than that where it stays wet in northern england and eastern scotland. and as we have seen, there are some showers around, they could well affect wimbledon once again. it's going to be another day where we may well have the covers on and off. those showers will probably tend to ease off though during the evening and into the night. more places become dry, still got some wetter weather towards the north—east of scotland. the breeze tends to ease down a little bit, and we will find temperatures typically again around 12—13 degrees. now, it's low pressure that's brought all the rain over recent days, in the centre of the low pressure, by the time we get to wednesday, it's close to the north—east of scotland. so there's more cloud rolling in here and some patchy rain around, too. elsewhere, there may well be some sunshine, but we are going to find showers breaking out, and those could turn heavy and thundery come the afternoon, particularly across wales, the midlands, across to lincolnshire as well. temperatures may be a notch
5:28 am
higher on friday, still no better than 20—21 celsius. let's end with a glimmer of hope, because the low pressure is trying to move away. this is where high—pressure is, dry weather, and this is trying to nudge up from the south—west across the uk. so during thursday and friday, the winds won't be as strong, and for more places, it will be dry. some sunshine, although still rather cloudy for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures should be a little bit higher.
5:29 am
5:30 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. back to business, as boris johnson announces most restrictions will be eased in england on the 19th ofjuly we assess the impact on the uk economy. stand and cyber—deliver! hackers demand $70 million to release the keys that will unlock victims files — up to 1,500 companies worldwide could be affected. and how to take your holiday in a sustainable and responsible way — we hearfrom one company that aims to convince travellers to prioritise the planet.

47 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on