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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 5, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with christian fraser. england's coronavirus restrictions will be relaxed in a fortnight — an end to all social distancing is likely onjuly 19th, though the final decision will be taken next week. the prime minister wants to get away from government mandated restrictions, british people he says must start taking personal responsibility for the wearing of masks and social distancing. if we cannot reopen our society in the next few weeks, when we will be helped by the arrival of summer and by the school holidays, then we must ask ourselves, when will we be able to return to normal? after 20 years in afghanistan — the withdrawal of nato's troops nears completion —
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just as the taliban begins a major advance. so what does that mean for the western backed government in kabul. and it's manic monday at the all england club. djokovic is through, federer is through, and on court now the british teenage sensation emma radakanu. hello and welcome. borisjohnson says england is on course to end all covid restrictions byjuly the 19th — though a final decision won't be taken until more data is released next week. the prime minister said the pandemic will not be over onjuly 19th, in fact modelling suggests there could be as many 50,000 cases a day by the time all legally enforced restrictions are dropped. the chief medical officer said currenly cases are doubling every 9 days. but you will see from these graphs that
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while hospitalisations and deaths are also starting to rise. the success of the vaccine programme, means they are at a much lower rate — hospitalisations almost 10 times less than they were mid december at the height of the second spike. with deaths also very low. the government expects that every adult will have been offered a firstjab by 19thjuly with 2/3 of adults having had both doses. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young. all around us signs of life interrupted by a pandemic. instructions about where we can go, who we can see even in our own home and how far apart we must stand, but in two weeks things could change. covid has not gone but most restrictions in england are likely to disappear. restaurants and pubs can open normally and theatres and cinemas can fill every seat. the prime minister put the emphasis on personal responsibility instead of government orders.
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i want to stress from the outset that this pandemic is far from over and we must reconcile ourselves sadly to more deaths from covid. there's only one reason why we can contemplate going ahead to step four in circumstances where we would normally be locking down further and that is because of the continuing effectiveness of the vaccine rollout. and in bristol people are starting to contemplate life with fewer rules. personally i think better safe than sorry but just like every normal person i welcome the change. it is the wrong decision - because cases are going up. at least give it a go and then if anything gets worse you can always go back. i think we just have to live with it. you cannot keep living your life being told what to do. people are now afraid even to go out. for some the facemask has become a hated symbol
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of intrusive government. it will still be recommended in hospitals and closed public spaces but the legal requirement to wear a face covering will go. unions say that could put workers at risk. the days of hundreds of pages of rules and regulations to follow will soon be gone and instead the government is asking us to use a common sense and make personal decisions about how we stay safe. it is a shift in approach but comes at a time when cases are rising. the prime minister has been marking the nhs's birthday, and making sure hospitals can cope has been at the heart of his strategy. can you tell us how bad you expect it to get? obviously we have to be cautious and we will continue to look at all the data as we progress. if we do not go ahead now when the summer fire break is coming up and the school holidays and all the advantages that should
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give us in fighting the virus, then the question is when would be go ahead. what the modelling would imply is we will reach that peak before we get to the point where we have the kind of pressures that we saw in january for example this year. labour says some will need more support. to throw off all protections at the same time when the infection rate is still going up is reckless. we need a balanced approach and need to keep key protections in place including masks, ventilation and crucially on something we've asked for during the pandemic, proper payment for those who need to self—isolate. later in the week we will find out about government plans for foreign travel and when we come into a positive case what will happen. in schools entire class bubbles will not be sent home. we have lived under restrictions that we could not have imagined, and today borisjohnson signalled it is time to get back to normal.
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vicki young, bbc news. so what does learning to live with covid mean? well, it is expected that afterjuly 19th we will be able to order a pint at the bar, go to the theatre, return to the workplace. but its the decision to make mask wearing a personal responsibility rather than a mandated one, that is dividing opinion. according to yougov polling of nearly over two and half thousand adults in britain, 71 per cent face masks should continue to be mandatory on public transport, 21 % per cent said they should not. 66% support compulsory face masks in shops and indoor public places, 27% opposed them. professor melinda mills from oxford university is on the uk governments sage behavioural insights advisory group though she is speaking to us in a personal capacity. she led a royal society study on the effect of face coverings last year. well what about the economic case for dropping face maks.
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i think it is quite confusing for people because it is a good move that they clearly described that infections are going up but really, the link between hospitalisations and deaths is becoming weaker. i think people are wondering, why would i have to do this? why would i still have to wear a facemask or do these things? it is interesting what you talked about with the survey. there always this fear that people are fed up with it and won't comply. but actually, people understand how the virus is transmitted and they are even more concerned, so they could be a backlash. when asked themselves, even the prime minister said, we will keep wearing them, so i think they need to tighten up their messaging and do something like japan, their messaging and do something likejapan, not their messaging and do something like japan, not making it mandatory
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but made it very clear. japan had the three seas, in those settings, crowded places and enclosed spaces. if it is given your personal choice, people are not going to have them on in restaurants or public transportation so we really need to make sure those messages are clear. ryanair said today they will keep the mandate in place on masks. i imagine some businesses will follow suit which really begs the question, who has the duty of care? that becomes very _ who has the duty of care? that becomes very important. - who has the duty of care? twat becomes very important. if it shifted, in many ways by the government making this decision, their shifting responsibility to individuals, they are shifting the responsibility to the person in the restaurant, the 19—year—old for example that has only had opportunity to be vaccinated once. the person working in retail behind
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the cash register, and also for businesses, so some of those youths may say, i am not going to get my second job until september so don't you have a duty of care to protect me? at the same time they will have customers saying, this is my personal choice. there is a mixed message about face coverings and also about covid—19 certification. they say they definitely won't bring it in but if businesses want to introduce them, they will be allowed to do that so that will create confusion and can create more polarisation and that is what we don't want right now. $5 polarisation and that is what we don't want right now.— polarisation and that is what we don't want right now. as the prime minister said _ don't want right now. as the prime minister said today, _ don't want right now. as the prime minister said today, if _ don't want right now. as the prime minister said today, if not - don't want right now. as the prime minister said today, if not now, - minister said today, if not now, when? in the summer weeks, well before the flu season, most of us are outdoors. isn't there a case for doing it now and getting people used to the risk again rather than perpetuating this all the way through, it could be all the way through, it could be all the way through to next year? i through, it could be all the way through to next year?— through, it could be all the way through to next year? i think it is very crucial— through to next year? i think it is very crucial to — through to next year? i think it is very crucial to say _ through to next year? i think it is very crucial to say that _ through to next year? i think it is very crucial to say that many -
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very crucial to say that many scientists are not arguing to keep these stringent measures and all of them in place forever or until the winter. it is not the case at all. many of us are suggesting, be logical. six days ago, the united states centre for disease control was clear, it said when you're in outdoor spaces, we know about these large football events, we don't have a lot of cases but it is when you're indoors and it is crowded and non—ventilated. it is notjust about masks although the discussion has become about that. it is about ventilation and working conditions and being in crowds and close spaces so i think we have to shift the conversation and the thinking. it is not either or. people realise that with vaccinations, with the summer, of course we want to ease restrictions, lots of us want to do that, and i am saying, we should do it, but with some clarity. don't just say it is your public choice. make some clarity for them. what does that mean when i get on the
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bus? that is a crowded, enclosed space with not a lot of ventilation. give us something to go by otherwise it will be very unclear for people. on the flip side of that, is there 0n the flip side of that, is there an argument that people are not getting on train carriages or buses because they're having to wear a mask and so, instead, they are getting in the car?— mask and so, instead, they are getting in the car? there is a lot of discussion _ getting in the car? there is a lot of discussion about _ getting in the car? there is a lot of discussion about that, - getting in the car? there is a lot of discussion about that, first i of discussion about that, first there was the discussion that no, people won't socially distance, they won't wash their hands or wear face coverings but as you just reported, people are actually quite altruistic, they want to protect those around them because that is what you do when you are a face covering. that is what you do when you get vaccinated, you are protecting people around you. i would say that the british public has been exceptional in doing that and understanding it. as soon as they understand why, i soon as we know why we are doing it, of course we want to protect others. i think
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having this idea that people are afraid or they will do something or being noncompliant is actually a misnomer and doing the public a disservice. ,., ., ., misnomer and doing the public a disservice-— disservice. good to talk to you, thank yom _ the lockdown has had a devasting impact on the rail companies' revenue. between 2019 and 2020 the revenue from passengers was £1.7 billion. last year that shrank tojust £0.11 billion, their revenues down a massive 77.7% year on year. let's speak to bobby morton from the unite union which represents many rail workers. when you look at those figures, don't you think, we've got to try everything to get people back on trains? my membersjobs depend on it. i trains? my members “obs depend on it. ~' trains? my members “obs depend on it. ~ ., ., ., y it. i think we have to do everything to net it. i think we have to do everything to get peeple _ it. i think we have to do everything to get people back— it. i think we have to do everything to get people back on _ it. i think we have to do everything to get people back on trains - it. i think we have to do everything to get people back on trains but i to get people back on trains but also buses, too, which is the main type of transport within the city.
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however, you have to do it safely. the lady before mentioned a duty of care and i can tell you that since the pandemic started, we have lost over 60 bus drivers, fatalities, and the prime minister tells us now, expect 55,000 more infections per day by the 19th of january, 19th july, sorry. must reconcile ourselves to more deaths from covid—19. that frightens the life out of me. where is the duty of care to the people, to the staff who operate the trains and buses as well? ., , ., ., ., , , well? our hearts go out to the bus drivers and — well? our hearts go out to the bus drivers and their _ well? our hearts go out to the bus drivers and their families - well? our hearts go out to the bus drivers and their families and - well? our hearts go out to the bus drivers and their families and they | drivers and their families and they were particularly affected during the first two waves, but the prime minister also did put out evidence today that for all the cases we are
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seeing in the country, the deaths and hospitalisations are much, much lower than they were at the peak of the second wave and the risk to bus drivers and train drivers is much, much more diminished.— drivers and train drivers is much, much more diminished. well, i don't rive think much more diminished. well, i don't give think he — much more diminished. well, i don't give think he gave _ much more diminished. well, i don't give think he gave any _ much more diminished. well, i don't give think he gave any evidence - much more diminished. well, i don't give think he gave any evidence of. give think he gave any evidence of the risk to the drivers being diminished. i would say it is the opposite. he is talking about today's figures and then he tells us, i mentioned before, 511,000 a day, and there will be more deaths, well, why? day, and there will be more deaths, well, wh ? ~ g day, and there will be more deaths, well, wh ?~ ~ , day, and there will be more deaths, well, why?— well, why? why? why lift the restrictions? _ well, why? why? why lift the restrictions? will— well, why? why? why lift the restrictions? will there - well, why? why? why lift the restrictions? will there be . well, why? why? why lift the i restrictions? will there be more deaths if they bus drivers are double vaccinated? the deaths among those who are vaccinated, we have seen there is good evidence that the vaccine protects people if they have been a double vaccinated, want they been a double vaccinated, want they be saved? i been a double vaccinated, want they be saved? ., ., ., ., , be saved? i favour of double vaccination _ be saved? i favour of double vaccination but _ be saved? i favour of double vaccination but it _ be saved? i favour of double vaccination but it is - be saved? i favour of double vaccination but it is not i be saved? i favour of double i vaccination but it is not happening. the roll—out for vaccination has been absolutely superb. however there are large numbers of people
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left in the country who, some have had one vaccination, some have had none. when you asked before when she this will end, from my perspective, it should all end when everyone has had a double vaccination. it is it should all end when everyone has had a double vaccination.— had a double vaccination. it is too earl for had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? _ had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it _ had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it is, _ had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it is, for _ had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it is, for me, i had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it is, for me, it i had a double vaccination. it is too early for you? it is, for me, it is l early for you? it is, for me, it is for the drivers, _ early for you? it is, for me, it is for the drivers, it _ early for you? it is, for me, it is for the drivers, it is _ early for you? it is, for me, it is for the drivers, it is for - early for you? it is, for me, it is| for the drivers, it is for everyone i represent and the passenger industry. we i represent and the passenger indust . ~ ., ., ., industry. we will have to leave it there, industry. we will have to leave it there. thank— industry. we will have to leave it there, thank you. _ afghanistan is a mess right now. the taliban have taken over 150 districts in the last couple of months. and this weekend warned any foreign soldiers remaining in afghanistan beyond september will be treated as an occupying force. most nato troops have already been withdrawn ahead of that deadline in september but around 1,000 mainly us troops could remain on the ground to protect diplomatic missions and kabul�*s international airport. here's what one taliban spokesperson told the bbc�*s yogita limaye.
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all foreign courses should withdraw from the country, whether they are contract, advisor or trainer, because they were part of a collision that will react and that reaction would be based on the decision of the leadership. this weekend the afghan forces took complete control of bagram airbase, which for so many years of course, was the sprawling nerve centre of the us nato operation. this is how it looks today — two days after the evacuation. quite eery, isn't it. the runways empty, the hangars deserted and locked. the four by fours that were used by the troops all left behind (tx all this while the taliban is taking territory. this map shows the areas of taliban control in dark grey, contested areas in red, areas controlled by the afghan government in light grey. the situation is changing daily — some of the claimed advance difficult to verify. the taliban says they have captured 150 out of 369 districts in the past two months of fighting. afg hanistan's interior
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ministry neither confirm or deny the claim — saying that though the taliban claim the districts, it does not mean all of them have completely fallen . though tajikistan repoted today that more than 1,000 afghan government soldiers had fled across the border after clashes with the insurgents in several districts. afghanistan's former president hamid karzai says despite its troubles, the country is not a failed state. we have millions of afghan and girls educated here. we did all that we could to put afghanistan on the right track and to represent it well on the international scene. the failure of the state that one would describe especially in the western press is exactly where the authority and the responsibility was more with the united states and its allies. that is where things have failed and thatis that is where things have failed and that is where the afghan people are also paying a price, a very heavy
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price. david loyn is a former bbc correspondent and a known authority on afghan history, his latest book is �*the long war ? the inside story of america and afghanistan since 9/11' which will be released later this year. no one knows the country better than you, you have been a corresponding and a guest of the taliban in the past. when you look at the map and see where they are making advances, what do you see? it is see where they are making advances, what do you see?— what do you see? it is certainly a ve fast what do you see? it is certainly a very fast moving _ what do you see? it is certainly a very fast moving situation - what do you see? it is certainly a very fast moving situation as i what do you see? it is certainly a very fast moving situation as you j very fast moving situation as you show on that map. if i could go back to 1996 when the taliban to kabul and i was with him, they came then from the south, they were a southern movement in reaction to the banditry that preceded them. they came up through campbell and they never took the north very successfully. they did take the north and places that they are now pushing on the north—east, but this time their strategy is different and i think they think they can take the south very easily whenever they want to,
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the main places in the south which are their heartlands so this time they are concentrating on the north. their strategy is to take the northern areas and intriguingly, they have now got apparently according to the wall streetjournal today, they have customs posts which are taliban customs post and they are taliban customs post and they are collecting revenues and operating in a sense like a state, trying to show the people in the areas they have taken that they are areas they have taken that they are a force that people can work with, that they are a genuine government for the area. i think it is going to be taken very difficult... we heard from the former president there, millions of afghans now are educated and they do not want to return to those taliban years.— those taliban years. what is alarmin: those taliban years. what is
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alarming about _ those taliban years. what is alarming about some i those taliban years. what is alarming about some of- those taliban years. what is alarming about some of the| those taliban years. what is - alarming about some of the reports, david, here is one, that they took over a base and what they took from that base which was controlled by afghan forces, 30 hamleys, army pick—ups, 70 sniper rifles, 900 guns, satellite phones. i mean, these are some of the most developed weapons, it reads almost like what weapons, it reads almost like what we saw in northern iraq with islamic state, taking over nato trained, western trained sources and their weapons. irate western trained sources and their wea ons. ~ ., western trained sources and their wea ons. ~ . , ,., western trained sources and their wea �*0ns. . ., , ,., , , weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbin: weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbing scenes _ weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbing scenes in _ weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbing scenes in recent _ weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbing scenes in recent days i weapons. we have seen some pretty disturbing scenes in recent days of. disturbing scenes in recent days of whole groups of afghan soldiers effectively surrendering to the taliban and shaking hands with them when they surrender and frankly, because they have been burly fed and poorly looked after by the afghan government, i think it is a relief for some of those people to surrender and to be, in most cases, quite well treated by the taliban. the taliban are taking huge amounts of war material, some of it has gone
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across the frontier to pakistan. they are keeping some of it in storage in pakistan and i think it will be really interesting in the days and weeks to come what role pakistan is going to play and the power brokers in the region, particularly china and other countries like the added states who might be able to put pressure on pakistan to say, do you certainly want to be the country that is the protector of the taliban, seizing all this american war material, or do you want to actually be part of the solution and to bring peace to afghanistan? i think we are seeing a very fast—moving situation but it is not going to be easy for the taliban to take the country. i not going to be easy for the taliban to take the country.— to take the country. i was 'ust auoin to to take the country. i was 'ust going to say. i to take the country. i was 'ust going to say. joe fl to take the country. i was 'ust going to say, joe biden i to take the country. i was 'ust going to say, joe biden is i to take the country. i wasjust going to say, joe biden is stillj going to say, joe biden is still weighing up how he is going to stop afghanistan becoming a safe haven for terrorists and whether they need to change the rules of engagement for the cia and the department of defence. itjust struck me that it feels rushed because those surely are the sort of decisions you should
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be taking before you withdraw from a country? 0h, be taking before you withdraw from a country? oh, i be taking before you withdraw from a country? 0h, ithink be taking before you withdraw from a country? oh, i think we have lost david. have we lost him? i am sorry, we have. stay with us on news, still to come: we're live in wimbledon to find out who's made it through to the quarter finals. it's expected that coronavirus cases will rise when restrictions are lifted in england. but the prime minister's approach has been given the support of the chief medical officer for england, as fergus walsh explains. vaccines haven't completely broken the link between infection and severe illness but they are doing an incredible job. severe illness but they are doing an incrediblejob. chris severe illness but they are doing an incredible job. chris whitty said that if we waited until autumn to open up, you might simply shift the
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number of people going into hospital and dying to a later date but not actually save any extra people from being hospitalised and he supported the argument that opening up now when you have the firebreak of school holidays was better than doing it in the autumn when we all face the new flu season. but he warned that this winter may be very tricky because of a resurgence of flu plus covid—19 and borisjohnson said this isn't the end of the pandemic and he urged people not to get deemed happy. this is not the end of dealing with this ours. a busy day at wimbledon — it's manic monday — all the men's and women's last—16 matches have been taking place. novak djokovic is through, the german angelique kerber beat coco gauff on centre and roger federer is also through to the quarter finals. what about emma raducanu
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in the singles draw — a teenage wildcard playing in her grand slam debut. our sports news correspondent chetan pathak is at wimbledon. she was doing really well but sadly, she was doing really well but sadly, she has had to retire. what has happened? yes, unfortunately, emma raducanu's wimbledon run ends tonight with her having to retire through breathing difficulties. at times she did find herself really playing some of her best tennis in that first set against the world number 75. emma raducanu that first set against the world number75. emma raducanu is that first set against the world number 75. emma raducanu is ranked 338th in the world when we started and she has already gone up 150 places. some fantastic wins for her en route to the fourth round. a lot of people were fancying emma raducanu with the way she has played her game, how confident and assured she has lived and she has taken these championships in her stride,
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never mind it being herfirst grand slam. she has played as though she has this many times before but she did lose that first set 6—4. then the match started to get away from emma raducanu and she was at times, touching her stomach and chest. she was 3—0 down when she went off the court to get treatment but it became clear she wasn't going to be able to continue with those breathing difficulties so ultimately had to retire and looking down below me now, people are making their way out of court number one, most of them are british fans, understandably disappointed the british players in the singles, men's and women's, are now all out of the chimp and ships. a sad end to emma raducanu's in. she has been doing her enables before she took to the court at wimbledon but good news for the fans, roger
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federer is through and no back—up which is three. it is warming up nicely. it was a weekend when we didn't know whether we were coming or going with the weather. today has been a slightly quieter. we might have started off with quite a lot of cloud across northern england but look the beautiful afternoon we had. the cloud did linger in scotland. there have been some nuisance showers today but not as heavy or anywhere near as widespread as we had yesterday. if we take a look at where those showers are not tending to linger across the far north—west, but look at what is heading in our direction, another low pressure moves in and this is going to bring some unseasonably wet and windy weather into the south—west over the next few hours. it will drive steadily northwards, bringing some heavy rain into wales, gradually pushing into the millions as well. the showers will ease in scotland
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and under clearing skies we will see temperatures dipping into single figures. the winds gusting to gale force so it is going to be a blustery start to tuesday morning. the rain will linger across the north of england into the scottish borders. stretching gradually into a north—east scotland as we go through the afternoon and with those strong winds, it will drive further showers into the afternoon. still the risk of gale force gusts of winds on that exposed kent coast. blustery afternoon for england and wales, the wind is not quite as strong through scotland but the rain will linger into eastern scotland the afternoon and in terms of the feet of things, the temperatures are subdued, perhaps peaking at 18 or 19 degrees. that means for wimbledon, there is still the risk of some showers. it has been tricky, the forecast for this championship so far, hasn't it? look at thursday and friday, it looks as if the story will quieten down quite nicely with lots of sunshine coming through. the reason why on wednesday we could see some
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showers is we have the low pressure with us. it is moving off into scandinavia. it blustery afternoon for many and one or two short showers driving in from the west. the showers on wednesday should be for and far between. so those temperatures should be back up into the low 20s. then that ridge of high pressure will build in from the south—west so from thursday onwards, we see a good deal of dry weather in the forecast and hopefully a little more sunshine.
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this is bbc news with christian fraser. england's coronavirus restrictions will be relaxed in a fortnight — an end to all social distancing is likely onjuly19th, though the final decision will be taken next week. the prime minister wants to get away from government—mandated restrictions. british people, he says, must start taking personal responsibility for the wearing of masks and social distancing. if we cannot reopen our society in the next few weeks, when we will be helped by the arrival of summer and by the school holidays, then we must ask ourselves, when will we be able to return to normal? a russian gang behind a huge global cyber attack demands 70 million dollars in ransom. and would you be happy
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with a four—day working week? a pilot in iceland has been a great success. the researchers want to try it here in the uk. we'll discuss. a russian—based hacking group known as revil has compromised the computer systems of at least 1,000 businesses worldwide by targeting an american it provider, that writes and updates their software. one of those affected is sweden's co—op supermarket, which has had to close some 500 outlets, that's more than half its stores, because tills and self—service checkouts have stopped working. revil has tailored its ransom demands to the size of each respective company but last night said it would settle the lot for $70 million if someone was prepared to pay it. joining me now is ciaran martin —
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he is the founder of the uk's national cyber security centre, who is now professor of practice at the blavatnik school of government. good to have you with us. why does this cyber attack worry you are more than the others we have seen more recently? it than the others we have seen more recentl ? , ., , ., ., ., recently? it is a combination of the scale and the _ recently? it is a combination of the scale and the sophistication. i recently? it is a combination of the scale and the sophistication. as i recently? it is a combination of the| scale and the sophistication. as you said in your introduction, by attacking one company, one that is strategically very important in the provision of global it services, they have access to at least 1000 companies worldwide, so that is what people in the industry call eight supply chain attack. but supply chain attacks are normally associated with nation states that want to spy and in such cases the nation state will lurk in these networks undertake data, it is not very pleasant but it is not disrupted. what these guys are doing is combining that a large—scale
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attack with what is called ransomware, so they cripple the it system and they demand payment to let you out that digital prison. whilst have been some combinations of that supply chain with extortion before, it has never really been done on this scale. moreover, every time there is a major cyber incident, you often hear that the victim so this was a very sophisticated attack and most of the time it is basically not true. in this case, it pretty much is true. there was a very sophisticated technical operation using a previously undisclosed vulnerability and that is quite rare and even the timing of it, when most of the american cyber security industry is on holiday for the 11th ofjuly weekend, suggests a very large—scale, highly damaging criminal operation. just large-scale, highly damaging criminal operation. just going back to the co-op _ criminal operation. just going back to the co-op story _ criminal operation. just going back to the co-op story in _ criminal operation. just going back to the co-op story in sweden, i i criminal operation. just going back| to the co-op story in sweden, ijust to the co—op story in sweden, ijust want to underline for people why this is of strategic importance.
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half the stores closed. what were they forced to do as a result of the tills going off—line? they forced to do as a result of the tills going off-line?— tills going off-line? what they had to do, and sweden _ tills going off-line? what they had to do, and sweden is _ tills going off-line? what they had to do, and sweden is a _ tills going off-line? what they had to do, and sweden is a largely i to do, and sweden is a largely cashless society already, about to become fully cashless within the next few years, so they could not sell any proper use —— produce, as a swedish co—op is over the country were giving away perishable food. there were lots of pictures of strawberries being given away, but it was notjust confined to fruit. also the disruption involved was a significant. you mentioned it several hundred stores. as i understand it, cooperative grocery stores are one fifth of a swedish food retail capacity and in many towns, particularly in more remote towns, particularly in more remote towns in a sparsely populated country, co—op is the only shop in town, so it was a very disruptive attack. but it is not confined to sweden, there is talk, credible
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reports of schools in new zealand, the other end of the planet. and i think when america wakes up tomorrow after the long holiday weekend, there will be lots of nervousness in smaller businesses in particular, car dealerships, small accountancy practices, things like that, because it was the smaller businesses that seem to have the most desperate could that seemed to be the most affected. whilst disruption is very great, so far, and fingers crossed, it has not been as bad over the last 48 hours as the initial projections. is the worst case scenarios might have a fear. is the worst case scenarios might have a fear-— have a fear. vladimir putin told president biden _ have a fear. vladimir putin told president biden just _ have a fear. vladimir putin told president biden just a - have a fear. vladimir putin told president biden just a few- have a fear. vladimir putin told i president biden just a few weeks ago that certain infrastructure was off—limits. i do not know, i don't suppose anyone does, how much knowledge the rushing comment has on this, but clearly there is a sheltering problem of these groups within russia and continues to be. that is absolutely critical point. for years we have been worried about
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russian government hacks spying, inferiors in elections and occasionally disruption of services, although they tended to do that in places like ukraine in countries bordering russia rather than against the west, but we have also had a long—standing problem with russian sheltered criminality. it is not directed by the state. in recent similar ransomware hacks, the biden administration has been clear it understands that is consistent with the evidence, but having said that the, there is a real russia problem here. you do not have these operating out of the uk because the national crime agency would find them and keep the door down, you do not have them in the us, anywhere in the european union. russia is to save an operating environment for them, so what we need to try and support president biden is doing is making the sheltering of these criminals a problem for president putin, because until that happens, we are stuck with these people being able to organise very well operation
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based in russia while we cannot touch them because we do not have any law enforcement reach into russia and russia would extradite anybody, we need to make this a problem for the russian government so they do something about it for that we need to make sure we strengthen against these attacks and stop the flow of money to these criminals. ii stop the flow of money to these criminals. ., stop the flow of money to these criminals. . ,._ criminals. if we are paying them, ou can criminals. if we are paying them, you can see _ criminals. if we are paying them, you can see why _ criminals. if we are paying them, you can see why they _ criminals. if we are paying them, you can see why they keep i criminals. if we are paying them, you can see why they keep doing| criminals. if we are paying them, i you can see why they keep doing it. some of the biggest companies in america who have been hacked have paid up. i america who have been hacked have aid u -. ~ , , america who have been hacked have --aidu. ~ , a, paid up. i think this is a real problem- — paid up. i think this is a real problem. we _ paid up. i think this is a real problem. we are _ paid up. i think this is a real problem. we are in - paid up. i think this is a real problem. we are in a - paid up. i think this is a real problem. we are in a sense| paid up. i think this is a real. problem. we are in a sense of privatising a national security risk. the biden administration has correctly categorised ransomware as a national committee problem, but in many respects, certainly in the us, the key decision takers are private sector executives. if you contrast that with the situation in ireland recently were again another group of
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russian ransomware hackers attacked the health system, the government resolutely refused to pay and it did not end up in a worse situation and there were organisations that did pgy- there were organisations that did pay. the revil hacked a major us brazilian meat company, the largest producer of meat in the world, gbs, and they said last month that they paid revil $11 million even though their systems were not particularly badly disrupted and they said they paid them as a precaution. if that sort of thing is happening, and you can sort of understand why the individual companies take this decision is, if that sort of thing is happening again and again, they are going to come back for more, instead of demanding 11 million they will demand 70 and these ransoms will demand 70 and these ransoms will go up like football transfer prices, so we have to do something. we need to look very seriously at our laws to look at both the laws
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covering ransom payments, what insurers are allowed to do and regulating better the crypto currencies which allow these transactions to flourish. we have to do something about the flow of money to these criminals.— to these criminals. serious stuff. let's see what _ to these criminals. serious stuff. let's see what happens - to these criminals. serious stuff. let's see what happens when - to these criminals. serious stuff. j let's see what happens when the americans come back from the bank holiday tomorrow. thank you very much indeed. rescue efforts have resumed in surfside near miami after the overnight demolition of what was left of the collapsed tower. with tropical storm elsa rapidly approaching, the decision was taken to bring down the remaining 12—storey structure, which now allows rescuers to search an expanded area previously off limits. 121 people are still unaccounted for, officially 2a have been killed. here's the mayor of miami dade. since the first responders were able to resume their work on the collapse last night, we have very sadly recovered three additional victims. the total number of confirmed
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deaths is now at 27. the number of those accounted for is 191 and unaccounted for — 118. pleasejoin me in praying for those who lost their lives, the families who mourn and for all of those who are still waiting. the mayor of miami dade that with the updated figures, those figures changing over time. luis fajardo is a journalist for bbc monitoring in miami. hejoins me now. good to see you. i was explaining that there is an expanded area of the rubble they can now get up because they have been kept away from it, this structure was so precarious. what do they hope to get to in the coming hours? the governor ofthe to in the coming hours? the governor of the state — to in the coming hours? the governor of the state of — to in the coming hours? the governor of the state of florida _ to in the coming hours? the governor of the state of florida has _ of the state of florida has suggested that the number of people, victims who are going to be rescued, it will likely increase in the next few hours quite substantially at the rate at which they are able to reach
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the victims of this tragedy. you can tell why they were so anxious to demolish the building because of the impact of a tropical storm elsa pulled up also apparently is not going to cause a direct hit on miami, but it is still making the weather very unsettled there, there have been tornado warnings in different parts of the city. there are strong winds. 50 very conflicted situation the rescue crews there. hopefully now with the building already demolished in a controlled way they will have escaped one of the greatest worries which was another collapse while they were there. so they are trying to hurry up there. so they are trying to hurry up with the work. because no one is saying it will be done soon and again, the authorities have been insisting it is still a search and rescue mission, they are still hoping to find people alive. i5 rescue mission, they are still hoping to find people alive. is it still classed _ hoping to find people alive. is it still classed as _ hoping to find people alive. is it still classed as a _ hoping to find people alive. is it still classed as a search and rescue effort? because i'm just watching that building going down and that must have come down with an awful amount of the force, there is dust
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everywhere, we're well into the second week now, is it likely that they could find anybody alive in this still? , ., ., ., h, this still? they have made a point of sa inc this still? they have made a point of saying it _ this still? they have made a point of saying it is _ this still? they have made a point of saying it is still _ this still? they have made a point of saying it is still as _ this still? they have made a point of saying it is still as search - this still? they have made a point of saying it is still as search and l of saying it is still as search and rescue mission. of course, the likelihood is vanishing, but they do point out in some other similar tragedies in other parts of the world there have been able to discover people alive after several days, or missed a couple of weeks, so they are still holding some degree of hope on this situation. we will keep our fingers crossed, thank you very much indeed. let's get some of the day's other news. rescuers injapan are searching for 80 people still missing following a landslide in the coastal city of atami. soldiers and emergency workers are using poles and diggers in a desperate race to find possible survivors. the mudslide buried cars and toppled homes when it swept down a hillside on saturday after torrential rain. 130 buildings were destroyed. so far, there are three
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confirmed deaths. the suez canal authority and the owners of a huge container ship that blocked the egyptian waterway earlier this year have reached a deal to release the vessel. the two sides say the ever given will be allowed to set sail on wednesday. the japanese—owned ship became the focus of world attention when it ran aground in march, blocking the vital trade route for six days. the former european council president has returned to polish politics after a seven—year absence to lead the country's main opposition party. he told civic forum members in warsaw that he would fight what he called the evil that ruled poland in the shape of the socially conservative at law and justice party. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: jeff bezos, the world's richest mild steps down as boss of amazon. next up is a trip to space. —— the world's richest man.
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captain sir tom moore's ashes have been buried in his family grave alongside his parents and grandparents. the second world war veteran and nhs charity fundraiser�*s close relatives walked through a guard of honour made up of school children and organisations close to his heart to his final resting place in morton cemetery, riddlesden, west yorkshire, on monday. speaking after the ceremony, captain sir tom's daughter hannah said the family had been very moved by the people who'd come to pay their respects to her father. my father lived with my family and me for nearly 1a years. it is a loss for us, it is a genuine loss. we lost a whole fifth of who we are. how important was it for him to come back to yorkshire? not important, it was more than important. it was just everything. he never lost his accent, you might have heard. he was a yorkshireman through and through. he crossed the boundaries between gender, race, social status, nationality and age. who else has done that? he felt genuinely that if,
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when he spoke, just one person was more hopeful, that was enough. and of course he met the queen, which was just the icing on the cake, surely? it was the icing on the cake. however amazing that anyone thinks that is, times it by 1,000. because she asked to see all of us. she recognised it was the family working hard together. captain tom lives on, doesn't he? his legacy lives on and one of the nicest things to see is the way he has inspired a new generation and when you hear really little, small children talking about him and what he means to them, that is something special. children gravitated to him and one of the things, i talk about that internal pride, that he felt realjoy and when he saw the children inspired by him, he couldn't really believe it, i think. we couldn't really believe a lot of it.
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jeff bezos, the ceo of amazon and one of the world's richest men, will hand over the reigns of the company he founded later today. he launched amazon in 1994 as an online book store from his garage in washington state. amazon is now of course an e—commerce juggernaut, employing 1.3 million people. it handles everything from package delivery to cloud computing. and in 15 days' time, newly retired, bezoz will be launched into space by his company blue origin. james clayton reports. when he started his online book store, jeff bezos told his parents it had a 70% chance of failure. amazon, though, succeeded beyond his wildest dreams. bezos describes himself as being obsessed with customer satisfaction, and that drive has helped to turn amazon into a colossus. bezos�* management style is esoteric.
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people who work closely with him say he likes people to challenge him. just listen to this from a former colleague of his. i would bang on a desk. really? if i am passionate about things, i would bang on a desk. would he do that? he would! but it is not i am banging on a desk to yell atjeff, or him at me, but we are trying to figure out the best solution for the problem. critics say he takes that mechanical view into how he structures the workforce. lower down the chain they sometimes feel like a cog in the machine. he will now be charged with making amazon even bigger, expect them to get into other areas like health care.
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you will also have to fend off negative headlines. —— he will. there is always criticism circling around amazon over how much tax they pay, including how much tax bezos pays and how they treat their workers. their anti—trust allegations he will have to fend off. he has always been fascinated in space travel. it is a thing i have wanted to do all my life, it is an adventure, a big deal for me, to see the earth from space, it changes you, your relationship with this planet and humanity. later this month he aims to fly into space in the first flight made by his company, blue origin. he is not sleeping amazon, he will still be executive chair of the board. —— he is not leaving amazon. but this is a huge moment for amazon and for the world's richest man. that is some way to start your
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retirement. this is how mark zuckerberg, the founder of facebook, chose to mark independence day. he posted this video on instagram, another social media platform his company owns, of him riding a hydrofoil surfboard. and yes, that isjohn denver's take me home, country roads you can hear in the background. that is cool that, in my book. and riding a surfboard is also cool, so why does he not look cool? that is the question americans are asking, this has given birth to a million memes already. i think you can afford those boards, may a few more. —— he can afford. now on this programme, given the vagaries of bbc scheduling, we can speak with some authority on the benefits of a four—day working week. and now it seems iceland has followed suit with a trial of a 35—hour week and you might not be surprised to hear that it was an "overwhelming success". more than 1% of iceland's working
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population took part in this pilot programme — the result? happier people, less stress—related illness, and increased productivity. you will be encouraged to hear that researchers think it should be tested in the uk. round of applause for that. let's speak to one of those researchers, will strong, from the autonomy think tank here in london. give me the top line is, why is it so good, a four day week?- give me the top line is, why is it so good, a four day week? yes, so the four-day _ so good, a four day week? yes, so the four-day week _ so good, a four day week? yes, so the four-day week has _ so good, a four day week? yes, so the four-day week has a _ so good, a four day week? yes, so the four-day week has a of- so good, a four day week? yes, so | the four-day week has a of benefits the four—day week has a of benefits that research has demonstrated quite strongly over the last few years at the conversation when he has picked up the conversation when he has picked up over the last couple of years. on the one hand, we have to acknowledge we have a really burnt out over wet economy, so the government's own stats from last year showed that 17.8 million days were lost due to work depression, stress and anxiety, all that work related. to only one hand it helps us is burn—out of society and burn—out is notjust bad for us as everyday people but also about the business, sick days are
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not good for productivity. secondly it is important to recognise the environment or benefits. this is well evidenced now that working less, winding down production to a lower level, is great out that our carbon footprint, reducing that footprint, but also producing about meeting because it means less cars on the road. finally, it is important to recognise what is down the road on the horizon. thinking about automation, technological unemployment, how do we deal with that and more technology in the workplace? should it be used for greater productivity, more stress, more speed up, or should be divided those benefits of more automation, more technology, allow people to work less and to more filling lives? those are the three key arguments. you will have to remove the friday on that wall think behind you and just have four days. i wonder, this is the most read article on the bbc website today and they want it if
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thatis website today and they want it if that is because we are just much more open to a four—day week than we would have been pre—pandemic. yes. would have been pre-pandemic. yes, absolutel . would have been pre-pandemic. yes, absolutely. the _ would have been pre—pandemic. 13:3 absolutely. the conversation around work, how we work, when we work and where we work has been right at the forefront of all of our minds, the world of work has been thrown in the air. it is at these moments, after world war ii we reinvented the weekend, is after that crisis we invented a new way of working at this is a huge crisis of a work. so the conversation absolutely as you say has really developed. i think people, particularly employers, seeing flex penalty, more autonomy at work, these conversations are being opened up and the four day week is up there as one of these vehicles which is why we are seeing it being publicised. == vehicles which is why we are seeing it being publicised.— it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility- — it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility. i _ it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility. i spent _ it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility. i spent a - it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility. i spent a lot - it being publicised. -- seeing flexibility. i spent a lot of- it being publicised. -- seeingl flexibility. i spent a lot of time in france where they have a 3k hour week and it worked pretty well in the public sector. where it did not work so well was in small companies where you could not increase the productivity with a four—day week.
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you would have to employ more people, you would have a more cost and so there were a lot of small companies that were opposed to it. what happened in iceland? yes. companies that were opposed to it. what happened in iceland? yes, the im ortant what happened in iceland? yes, the important difference _ what happened in iceland? yes, the important difference that _ what happened in iceland? yes, the important difference that is - what happened in iceland? yes, the important difference that is that - what happened in iceland? yes, the important difference that is that in l important difference that is that in france there was this blanket imposition of a reduced working week, which on the whole has worked quite well, but there are eight few exceptions as you say, so in iceland, it was all very well placed based, so there is a lot of work put in with working at staff at the shop floor level to make sure that it works for their particular organisation. to a four—day week could be friday off but it could also be shorter working hours across the five days, so that is important to have that flexibility to make it work going forward. as you say, some sectors it will be harder than others, so things like care, teaching and other public services, there will need to be more staff, but ultimately, if we can agree that the aim of the economy is to provide fulfilling lives for everyone, we have to start asking what cost is too much fun economy of healthy and productive work forced? its,
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too much fun economy of healthy and productive work forced?— productive work forced? a quick answer, productive work forced? a quick answer. we _ productive work forced? a quick answer, we only _ productive work forced? a quick answer, we only have _ productive work forced? a quick answer, we only have a - productive work forced? a quick answer, we only have a minute | productive work forced? a quick - answer, we only have a minute left, is automation and the jobs we are losing to robots, is this the answer to that? is it a way of creating employment that might not otherwise be there? ~ ,,., , , ., be there? absolutely, we should redistribute _ be there? absolutely, we should redistribute the _ be there? absolutely, we should redistribute the sheer _ be there? absolutely, we should redistribute the sheer amount i be there? absolutely, we should redistribute the sheer amount ofj redistribute the sheer amount of work we have to do, we have lots of overwork, lots of people are looking for more hours and is automation increases and technology becomes more available to employers, we have to think about this trade—off. will itjust be about productivity and creating more profit for the few or should we think about what kind of society we want to be? that is the question for us. i society we want to be? that is the question for us.— question for us. i like it, do you work a four-day _ question for us. i like it, do you work a four-day week? - question for us. i like it, do you work a four-day week? i do - question for us. i like it, do you - work a four-day week? i do indeed. you and me — work a four-day week? i do indeed. you and me alike, _ work a four-day week? i do indeed. you and me alike, we _ work a four-day week? i do indeed. you and me alike, we share - work a four-day week? i do indeed. you and me alike, we share an - you and me alike, we share an interest in the four—day week. lots of you commenting online about that story. and as i say, a lot of interest online about what iceland has done it so look on the bbc website. we will be back here same
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time tomorrow, we will not be here on a friday because we too work a four—day week. see you later. summer 21 so summer21 so far summer 21 so far seems to be feast 01’ orfamine, because or famine, because when we had the rain we really have had the rain. this was a sunday in edinburgh, you can see almost two inches of rain fell in 21i hours and that brought some disruption with localised flooding. we are still under the influence of low pressure and that is still producing some rain, but it does get as though things were quite and down a little later on this week. it means for tuesday we will see wet weather moving out of northern england into south—east scotland through the day, blustery as well, strong winds, gale forced us up through the channel coast, particularly at the kent coast which
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will rattle through towers at quite a pace, but it means temperatures will feel a little disappointing, 18 or19 will feel a little disappointing, 18 or 19 at the very best. as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, that's low pressure moves into the north sea and the showers were gradually started to fade away. for wednesday, it will be a quieter morning and still likely to be a few showers around, few and far between, but it means with lighter winds on wednesday, if you catch one, some could be slow—moving. dodge the showers and get some sunshine, it will be a degree or so warmer, highs of 21 degrees, 70 fahrenheit. wednesday into thursday there is a ridge of high pressure building and that will quieten down the story for a couple of days at least. a good deal of dry weather in the forecast. there is a risk of a few isolated showers and favoured spots for that on thursday into the north—east of scotland but there will be some lengthy spells of sunshine coming through and those temperatures will be a little warmer, 23 degrees, that is 73 fahrenheit. moving out
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thursday and friday, almost a repeat performance. still under that influence of high pressure, although there is weather front may well spoil things for the start of the weekend. don't worry about that at the moment, friday's weather mostly dry, still the risk of an isolated shower but they should be few and far between and again, 23 degrees at the high. but if you are planning on a spending time with friends and family outside at the weekend, do be prepared for the potential return to some shopper, possibly thundery dampers. moving on from the south—west, the position of these showers are certainly subject to change this far out, but on saturday across england and wales we could see sharp showers. scotland and northern ireland may well stay dry and relatively settled. what on earth is happening? you may ask. the jet stream has been pretty powerful, fast—moving and it is the jet stream that rising areas of low pressure and we have been on the north side of thejet, the and we have been on the north side of the jet, the cooler side, and we have been on the north side of thejet, the cooler side, so and we have been on the north side
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of the jet, the cooler side, so that drives in those low—pressure systems. that bring that wet weather and also the disappointing feel to the story. we have been to seems like this so far injuly, however, as we move into next week, there are indications that the jet stream is going to weaken offjust a touch. it will also move to the north of the uk, so once we are on the south side of thejet, they uk, so once we are on the south side of the jet, they bomb side, that potentially allows an area of high pressure to build in from the south and that means there's the potential for seeing some sunshine not only that someone is returning. —— the warm side. we could see tempted into the low 20s. keep watching the forecast for further details.
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tonight at ten — learning to live with covid — the prime minister says he hopes to lift almost all of england's restrictions onjuly19th. wearing face coverings would become voluntary, social distancing would end, nightclubs would reopen — a final decision will be taken next week. if we can't reopen our society in the next few weeks, when we'll be helped by the arrival of summer and the school holidays, then we must ask ourselves, when will we be able to return to normal? lifting all protections in one go, when the infection rate is going up, is reckless. it's predicted there
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could be 50,000 new cases a day within a fortnight.

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